ROQUE
The Game of the Century
Official Rules and Regulations
THE AMERICAN ROGUE LEAGUE INC.
1958-1959
Executive Officers
Frank Mothersead, 442 Cedar Avenue,
 Long Beach, California President, Emeritus
J. 0. Fisher, 953 North Oakland, Decatur, Ill President
Karl Waterman, 1532 South Main, Elkhart, Ill. Vice-President
Maryalma Yousey, 5439 Vanderbilt Ave.
 Dallas, Texas Secretary & Treasurer

Registered Agent
John Campbell. 432 John Street .Carlinville, Illinois

Rules Committee
B. C. McGowan, 5439 Vanderbilt Avenue Dallas, Texas
Charley Vulgamott, Box 283 Cerro Gordo, Illinois
Irl Fitzgerald, 1110 Coolidge Wichita, Kansas

Directors
Robb Isaacs, 4550 Edgewater Drive Orlando, Florida
Pete Miers, 58 Forest Knolls Decatur, Illinois
J. C. Roberts, 701 Southeast 12th Pryor, Oklahoma
Russel Matthews, Box 75 Conway Springs, Kansas
Robert Chappell, 2309 South 5th Ave. San Diego, Calif.
W. W. Campbell, 2817 22nd Street Lubbock, Texas
0. H. Berg, 1134 Langworthy, Dubuque, Iowa
Floyd Scott, 5710 Kenwood Kansas City, Missouri
W. E. McGhee, 2712 28th Avenue N St. Petersburg, Fla.
Bobby Arnold, 1422 North Avenue 55 Los Angeles, Calif.
Gene Goodwin , Dalton City, Illinois
Clarence Songer, 1255 South Market Wichita, Kansas
Dr. L. L. Huntley Washington, Kansas
D. C. Hill, 2129 North Talbot, Indianapolis, Indiana

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THE AMERICAN ROQUE LEAGUE WELCOMES YOU
TO BECOME A MEMBER

If you enjoy Roque you are invited to become a member
of the American Roque League. Membership offers you a
share in promoting and organizing your favorite sport.
It offers you the fellowship of players and the opportunity
to be the recognized National Champion. The League has
two classifications of membership. Club membership with
all members enjoying individual membership and individual
membership unattached to any club. Membership is
acquired by payment of a five dollar fee for a Club or a one
dollar fee for an individual unattached to any club to The
American Roque League.

This League, at present, conducts an Annual Tournament
during the month of August, and a Semi Annual Tournament
either in California or Florida in February, or specified time
designated by the Executive Committee.

Maryalma Yousey. Secy.
The American Roque League. Inc.
5439 Vanderbilt Avenue
Dallas 6, Texas

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INTRODUCTION

Croquet has had a very undulating course. It was the
popular game of the Royal families of France more than
two centuries ago and a little later it became the game
of the kings and queens of England. Later it was
absolutely lost sight of as a sport except in parts of Ireland
where it was kept alive. About 1850 it recrossed the Irish
Sea and soon became the most popular outdoor sport in
England.

It was little known in America before the year 1870 when
for a decade it was played in almost every section of the
country, but without organization. At a meeting of
representatives from seven clubs, held in New York City on
October 4, 1882, the National Croquet Association was
organized and the first tournament was held. In 1899 Mr.
Samuel Crosby, of New York City, suggested that the letters
"C" and "T" be taken from the word "croquet,' thus forming 
the name "Roque", that the name of the organization
be changed to the National Roque Association, and that
the game be made thoroughly scientific. Space does not
permit the mention of the names of the many men who
figured prominently and gave their time and money in
the interest of the Association. But as a result of their
contributions we have Roque, the most scientific outdoor
sport in existence.

The AMERICAN ROQUE LEAGUE was incorporated in
the State of Illinois on August 20, 1917.

Its constituent members had been organized since 1911
as the Western Roque Association (not inc.), and this, in
turn, was successor to the original Western Roque 
Association founded at Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1902.
On August 20, 1920, the National Association of America,
at its Annual Tournament in Norwich, Conn., by a
unanimous vote, united with the American Roque League, as its
Eastern Division and adopted the Rules of the League
as hereinafter printed. By this action all Roque interests
in America were brought together into one organization.
The object of the American Roque League is to popularize 
the game of Roque in America, and pursuant to that
end the co-operation of all concerned is solicited.

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HONORABLE MENTION

W. A. Rounds. the first President, and later President
Emeritus of this League, who during his life time, by the
liberal expenditure of thought, time and money, contributed
largely in bringing it to its high state of efficiency .
Rev. A. B. Griffith, Bedford, Ohio, who first suggested
"The American Roque League."

Prof. H. E. Slauqht, 5548 Kenwood Ave., Chicago, 111.,
chiefly through whose kindly and intelligent efforts all clubs
were united into The American Roque League."

Andrew Kramer. 516 Third St., N. E., Washington, D. C.,
who for many years has made Roque mallets.

Rev. W. A. and "Ma" Sunday, who caused to be built
five roque courts at Winona Lake, Ind., and developed a
high standard of construction.

Marshall T. Reeves, Columbus, Ind., whose liberality and
sound judgment was a constant aid in promoting Roque.

Dr. D. D. Biqqer, St. Petersburg, Fla., who in creating
"friendly contests" for Medals, Cups, etc., is making Roque
interesting to both the fans and players.

L. F. Bosworth, who by patience and perseverance with
the younger men, engaged for himself a place in this
column.

Albert I. Denny, who by his great work among the
different clubs in California and elsewhere, and his excellent
contribution to and fostering of the "American Roque News."

W. H. Hoagland, who was President of the American
Roque League for many years. While living, he devoted
a great deal of his time to the promotion of Roque.

W. W. Campbell of Lubbock, Texas, who at the 1949
National Meeting proposed to finance the printing of the
1950 Revised Roque Rule Book for the promotion of Roque.

THANKS

To all those who attend the National Tournaments, thus
perpetuating the game of Roque.

The Park Boards of many cities for their generous aid in
providing proper courts and club houses.

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CONTRIBUTORS OF THE AMERICAN ROQUE LEAGUE
RULE BOOK

Roque Clubs
Arvin Roque Club, 745 Third Avenue, Arvin, California

Dallas Roque Club, 5439 Vanderbilt Ave., Dallas, Texas

Eastland Roque Club, City Park-410 N. Walnut, Eastland,
Texas

Long Beach Roque Club, Lincoln Park, Long Beach, Calif.

The Los Angeles ROQUE Club, Exposition Park, Los Angeles,
Calif.

The Sunshine Roque Club, Mirror Lake Park, St. Petersburg,
Florida

Individuals
Arnold, John Robert, 1422 North Avenue 55, LA 42, CA
Bennett, E. L., 508 Palm Drive, Glendale 2, California
Berg, 0. H., 1134 Langworthy, Dubuque, Iowa
Brewer, Verne, 250 East Spruce, Canton, Illinois
Campbell, John, 432 John Street, Carlinville, Illinois
Clark, E. W., 1313 South 9th, Salina, Kansas
Drake, L. W., 333 Linden Avenue, Long Beach, California
Fisher, I. 0., 953 North Oakland, Decatur, Illinois
Fitzgerald, Irl, 1110 Coolidge, Wichita, Kansas
Gilmore, Fred, Attwood, Illinois
Goodwin, Gene, Dalton City, Illinois
Haydn, Hiram, 457 Madison Avenue, New York 22, New York
Huntley, Dr. L. L., Washington, Kansas
Isaacs, Robb E., 4550 Edgewater Drive, Orlando, Florida
Klunk, Joseph, Worden, Illinois
Matthews, Russel, Box 75, Conway Springs, Kansas
Matthews, Mrs. Zeta, 1425 East 2nd Street, Winfield, Kansas
Maynard, Claude, 410 North Walnut, Eastland, Texas
McGowan, B. C., 5439 Vanderbilt Avenue, Dallas 6, Texas
Miers, C. T. "Pete", 58 Forest Knolls, Decatur, Illinois
Mininger, I. C., Lincoln Park, Long Beach, California
Mothersead, Frank, 442 Cedar Avenue, Long Beach, Calif.
Roberts, I. C., 701 Southeast 12th, Pryor, Oklahoma
Seiberling, I. P., 524 North Portage Path, Akron, Ohio
Smith, W. W., Strasburg, Illinois
Waterman, Karl, 1532 South Main, Elkhart, Indiana
Yousey, Maryalma, 5439 Vanderbilt Avenue, Dallas 6, Texas

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OFFICIAL PLAYING RULES
OF
THE AMERICAN ROQUE LEAGUE
1950

Article I

CONTENTS, CONSTRUCTION AND APPLICATION

Rule I. Of What the Rules Consist - The rules of the
game of roque shall consist of the playing rules, as 
herein-after set forth, the Plans, pages 22 and 23, the 
Specifications, page 6, and the Explanatory Diagram, page 21.

Rule 2. Amendment of the Rules-These rules shall not
be changed or amended in any respect during the progress
of a tournament, nor at any other time except on the
recommendation of the Rules Committee of the American Roque
League, Inc., and the approval of the Executive Committee,
or by a majority vote of the members at the annual meeting
of the league.

Rule 3. Construction of the Rules-Any question arising
under the rules should be referred to the Rules Committee
in writing, and its decision shall be final.

Rule 4. Umpire'. Duties-The umpire is a representative
of the league, and as such it is his duty to enforce all
rules, to call all fouls immediately, to announce in doubtful
cases whether a ball was hit, or which ball was hit, and
to decide all points in controversy. He shall replace all
balls on the court when in questionable position, and all
balls requested to be replaced according to these rules,
when a foul has been committed or an advantage or
disadvantage may be gained. He shall be as near as
possible to each play when it is made, giving his undivided
attention to the game.

Rule 5. Appeal From Umpire's Decision - There shall be
no appeal from any decision of the umpire on any play
involving accuracy of judgment, and no decision rendered
by him shall be reversed except that it be in violation of or
contrary to one of these rules. The players have a right
to protest against a decision and seek its reversal by the
Rules Committee when, but only when, it is claimed that it
conflicts with a rule.

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Rule 6. When No Decision of Umpire Possible - In that
event of a dispute between two players concerning a
question of fact, such as the claim of a foul, the hitting or placing
of a ball, the question of moving the object ball fairly on a
roquet, or any other question of fact, the umpire not having
observed the play or the game having no umpire, the
question shall be resolved by the toss of a coin or any
other method of lot acceptable to both sides. However, the
players may mutually agree to call upon anyone who
observed the play to decide the matter, and his decision shall
be final.

Article II

THE COURT AND ITS FIXTURES

Rule 7. Court Specifications - The game of roque shall
be played upon a level sanded court sixty feet long and
thirty feet wide, constructed In strict accordance with
the Plans and Specifications.

Rule 8. Boundary Wall -
The court shall be bounded with a permanent, 
solid wall built according to the Plans
and Specifications, with its face or inside surface divided
geometrically by permanent contrasting markings in
accordance with the Official Court Plans.

Rule 9. Arches - The court shall be furnished with ten
arches constructed of steel wire five-eighths of an inch in
diameter. with the space between the stems three and three 
eighths. plus or minus one-sixty-fourth. inches. the arches set
rigidly In the ground and extending eight inches above the
surface and located in strict accordance with the Official
Court Plans. Courts built previously with 9-16" wire are
approved.

Rule 10. Stakes - The court shall be furnished with two
steel stakes three-fourths inch in diameter, set rigidly in the
ground at the ends of the court in strict accordance with
the Official Court Plans and extending two inches above
the surface.

Article III

PLAYING EQUIPMENT

Rule II. Necessary Equipment - The equipment necessary
for playing the game of roque shall consist of balls,
mallets and markers.

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Rule 12. Balls Required - The balls used in the game
shall be four in number, one red, one white, one blue and
one black, three and one fourth inches in diameter and made
of hard rubber or suitable material.

Rule 13. Kind of Mallets-The mallets used should have
a solid head of sufficient weight to propel the balls by a
fair stroke, with a smooth face on either end for striking
the ball and a handle of any desired size, shape and length
and proper balance. But there shall be no restrictions as to
size, weight or kind of mallet used and a player may
change his mallet at any time during a game, provided he
uses one similar in size and weight.

Rule 14. Breaking Ball-Should a ball be broken in play,
the player shall replace the balls and make the stroke over.

Rule 15. Markers and Their Us - There shall be one
marker of the same color for each ball used in the game,
with face side easily distinguishable, for use in indicating
the progress of the balls in the scoring of points. The 
marker for each ball shall be placed on the top of the arch
next to be made, with face towards the position side. The
marker for a ball that is ready for the stake shall be
placed, either on the wall behind the stake, or on the side
of the arch nearest the stake in such a position as not
to interfere with any ball rolling on the ground. Upon
making a point, the player may remove his marker and
carry it with him until he completes his turn of play.

Rule 16. Failure to Place Markers Properly - Except when
completing the game, a player at the end of his turn of
play and before leaving the court shall properly place all
markers upon the points next in order for each ball,
opponents' and partnerís as well as his own. If he fails to
do so, the markers must be placed properly, but the ball he
has just played cannot advance at its next turn of play.
It may, however, play on all balls as usual, and points
made for the other balls shall count; also, it may take
position, but if in so doing it should enter its arch so as
to touch a straight edge applied against the stems of the
arch on the exit side, the ball or balls must be replaced
at the opponent's option and play ceases.

Rule 17. Failure to Call and Correct Marker Error -
Should the failure to place the markers properly not be
called before the offending ball's next turn of play, no
penalty applies.

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Rule 18. Making Point Erroneously Marked - Should a
player make a point that his marker erroneously indicates
his ball is for, the point shall not count.

Article IV

THE PLAYING LINE

Rule 19. Location and Purpose of Playing Line - A line
shall be drawn around the outer edge of the court, 28
inches from the face or inner surface of the boundary wall.
This is the playing line, within which all balls must be
set before they can be played, contacted or roqueted.

Rule 20. Replacing Out of Bounds Ball - A ball driven
or played over the playing line or the boundary wall or
the court, must be returned at right angle to the playing
line from the point where it stops, except where otherwise
provided herein, and placed just inside the playing line.

Rule 21. When Out of Bounds Ball Replaced - Any ball
stopping over the playing line or boundary wall must be put
on the court within the playing line at once whenever such
replaced ball would interfere with the player's next play,
and he is subject to the penalties of Rule 29 for failure to do
so, but when a ball is over the playing line at some
distance from the player, he may, in order to save time,
continue play without setting the ball in if it would not
interfere.

Rule 22. Two or more Balls Over Line - If two or more
balls which are over the playing line should rest one be-
hind the other at right angles to the line, they must be
placed properly on the court frozen to each other, in the
same relative position in which they were played over the
line, provided they did not go out on a line at right angles
to the playing line.

Rule 23. Two or More Balls crossing Line at Right Angles
- Should two or more balls go over the playing line
on one line at right angles to such playing line and stop
on one right angle line, but not in a comer place, the first
ball over is first brought in at right angles just inside the
playing line, and the other ball or balls are brought in
and frozen to the first on either side of it, one on each
side or both on the same side at player's option, when
three balls are brought in.

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Rule 24. Balls Played Into Corner Place - The first ball
driven over the playing line into a corner place, which is
the space between the wall and two perpendiculars drawn
to it from a corner of the playing line, is placed inside the
corner of the playing line. If a ball rests at least half way
inside the corner place, it is considered wholly within. If
two or more balls are brought in from the corner place, they
are placed against the ball occupying the corner in the
order and relative position in which they crossed the line.

Rule 25. When Place Inside Line Occupied - If the place
to which a ball over the playing line should be returned
is occupied by another ball, in whole or in part, the re-
turned is occupied by another ball, in whole or in part, the
returning ball is placed on the side of the other ball on
which it crossed the line and frozen to the ball, whether
it be at a corner place or elsewhere along the wan.

Rule 26. When Players or Umpire Unable to Decide
Position - Should the players or the umpire be unable to
decide how to bring any ball or balls inside the playing line,
the player should have his option as to their position in
accordance with these rules.

Rule 27. Playing Ball When Outside Line - It is a foul
subjecting the player to the penalties of Rule 29 to play or
take play from a ball that is outside the plainly line,
except when the playing ball has been so placed in contact
with a ball that is wholly inside the line for the purpose
of roquetting it.

Rule 28. Failing to Set Balls inside Line Before Leaving
Court - Except after completing a game, a player shall
properly place all balls inside the playing line before leaving
the court. If he fans to do so, they must be properly
placed, and he cannot advance the ball he has just played
at its next turn of play. However, if the error is not called
before the offending ball's next turn of play, the penalty
does not apply.

Article V

FOUL PLAYS

Rule 29. Penalty for Foul Play - Except where otherwise
herein provided, all balls moved by a play which violates
or results in the violation of a rule, must be replaced or
left where they stop at the option of the opponent, play

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shall cease, and any point or points made for the offending
player or his partner ball by such foul play shall not be
allowed.

Rule 30. Fouls Subject to the Rule - In addition to the foul
plays described in Rules 27, 36, 49, 54, 57, 64, 73 and 90,
it is a foul subjecting the player to the penalties of rule
29 to:
a. Violate any rule of the game for which there is no
other prescribed penalty;
b. Move or carry a ball that rests over the boundary,
except to bring it directly onto the playing line as provided
by these rules;
c. Tap an arch wherein or against which a ball rests;
d. Lean upon or touch an arch wherein or against which
a ball rests;
e. Touch, move, cause to be moved, stop or divert the
movement of any ball, except as allowed in these rules.
For example, a player may put a ball inside the playing
line, place his ball for roquet, tap a ball to remove the
sand, etc., but he must not pick up the wrong ball after
making a hit, move any ball with his mallet, person or
clothing, or stop any ball, except as provided in Rule 48;
f. Tap any ball within the center or his playing ball when
in close position, that is, close enough to an arch that a
slight movement would result in advantage or disadvantage.
 to the player or his opponent.

Rule 31. Removing Sand from or Freezing Balls - A player
may remove sand from any ball or freeze ball by a gentle
tap of the mallet on the top thereof, except when it is in
close position or within the limits of the center (See Rule
95), when the umpire or opponent should be requested
to remove the sand.

Rule 32. Deferred Discovery of Foul - In case of a
deferred discovery of a foul, play shall cease immediately.
If two or more strokes were made after the commission of
the foul, no attempt shall be made to replace the balls,
and any point or points made shall count. The next ball
in correct sequence shall start play from where the balls
were when the foul was called.

Rule 33. Touching Ball by Opponent - Opponent shall not
touch or move any ball during a player's turn of play,

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the penalty being that the player may replace any ball
so moved.

Article VI

STROKING THE PLAYING BALL

Rule 34. What Constitutes a Fair Stroke--The Playing
ball shall be propelled from one location on the court to
another by striking it fairly with either face, or end of the
head, of the mallet. For the stroke to be fair, a distinct
blow must be delivered upon the ball, but it need not be
squarely from behind and may be at any desired angle,
horizontal or vertical, as long as the face of the mallet
is drawn back from the ball before starting the forward
stroke, giving the ball its impetus from the initial impact
of the blow.

Rule 35. When Stroke Is Made - A stroke is made if a
ball moves when a player attempts to strike it.

Rule 36. When Stroke Is Foul -A stroke is foul subjecting
the player to the penalties of Rule 29, when:
a. The ball is struck with anything but the face of the
mallet;
b. The player's mallet makes a second contact with the
playing ball, giving it a second impetus;
c. The player pulls, pushes or shoves the playing ball
with his mallet by placing the face against it and drawing
or pushing the ball by holding the mallet against it on a
forward motion;
d. The player, by a downward stroke, purposely causes
his ball to jump over an intervening object;
e. The player's mallet hits an arch, causing a ball to
move which was close to or in contact with the arch;
f. The player stops or diverts his playing ball except as
provided in Rule 48.

Rule 37. How Fairness of Stroke Decided - The Umpire
shall decide as to the fairness of a stroke after it is made.

Rule 38. Ball Hitting Player's Person or Mallet - If while
making a stroke, any ball hits the player's person, clothing
or mallet, his play ceases and all balls shall be replaced
or remain where they rest, at the option of the opponent

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Rule 39. Outside Interference With Ball - If a ball is
stopped or diverted from its course by any person or object
on the court not relating to the game, the shot shall be
repeated.

Rule 40. Interference of Opponent with Ball - If a ball is
stopped or diverted from its course by an opponent. the
player shall repeat the shot.

Rule 41. Interference of Opponent with Stroke - When a
player is making a stroke, no one should speak to him or
divert his attention, and if the opponent should do so or be
on the bed of the court, the player shall replace all balls
moved and repeat the stroke.

Rule 42. Opponent Staying In Line of Shot - If an
opponent stands or sits in the line of a player's shot after being
asked to move away, the player shall repeat the stroke
one or more times for as long as the opponent remains in
his line of shot.

Rule 43. Moving Ball by Contacting Arch - A stroke
which moves a ball lying against or near an arch by causing
another ball to contact the arch is not a foul. and the
ball so moved shall not be replaced.

Rule 44. Balls In Contact at Start of Turn - If on starting
his turn of play, the player finds his ball in contact with
another ball, he must proceed with his playas though the
balls were separated.

Rule 45. Marking Wall or Court - No player shall mark
the wall or surface of the court to aid him in directing his
stroke.

Article VI
CONTACTING ANOTHER BALL

Rule 46. When Other Ball May Be Contacted - A player
may contact each 'of the other balls by propelling his own
playing ball against it by a fair stroke of his mallet once
only in each turn of play before making a point. But after
each point is made by him, he is again alive on all balls
and may contact them again until, however. a point is
made after thus contacting a ball, he is dead on it until
his next turn of play.

Rule 47. How Contact May Be Made - A playing ball
may contact a live ball within the playing line, either by

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a direct shot where no object intervenes between his
playing ball and the ball contacted, by a carom or bank shot
by his ball off the wall, an arch or the stake, or by a
roquet shot.

Rule 48. When Ball May Be Stopped After Making Contact - 
A player may stop his playing ball after contacting
another ball, if it is clearly apparent that it will not contact
another ball or the same one again.

Rule 49. Contacting a Dead Ball - It is a foul subjecting
the player to the penalties of Rule 29 to contact a dead ball
by either a direct or a carom or bank shot not made from a
roquet.

Rule 50. When Dead Ball Not Contacted - If a dead ball,
in contact with the playing ball, moves on account of the
inequality of the ground while the latter is being played
away from it, it is not a foul.

Rule 51. When Live Ball Not Contacted - If a live ball. in
contact with the playing ball. moves on account of the in-
equality of the ground when the latter is played away from
it, it shall not be held to be contacted.

Rule 52. Contacting Ball After Making Point - If a player
makes a point for his playing ball and afterwards on the
same stroke contacts a ball within the playing line, he must
take the point and use the ball. If the contacted ball is
beyond an arch as determined by Rule 85 and the playing
ball rests through the arch as likewise determined. the arch
is. held to be first made.

Rule 53. Contacting Ball Beyond Arch - If a ball in making
its arch strikes any ball that is beyond the arch as
determined by Rule 85 and the playing ball rests through
the arch, the contacted ball shall not be considered a dead
ball: the point shall be allowed and the ball must be used.

Rule 54. Contacting Ball In Motion or Outside Playing
Line - It is a foul subjecting the player to the penalties of
Rule 29 to contact or cause another ball to hit a ball that
is in motion or outside the playing line, by either a direct,
carom or roquet shot.

Rule 55. Contact by or Upon Rover Ball - A rover ball
has the right to contact and use each of the other balls
once only during each turn of play, and may be contacted
and used as any other ball by the other balls.

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Article VIII
ROQUETTING A BALL

Rule 56. When and How Roquet Made - When the playing
ball contacts another ball fairly. it must be used or play
taken from it by making a roquet. that is. placing the playing
ball against it and striking the playing ball with the
face of the mallet, thereby causing the contacted or object
ball to move, it being sufficient if it just visibly shakes.

Rule 57. Failure to Move Object Ball - Should the object
fail to move': or shake when being roquetted. this is a foul
subjecting the player to the penalties of Rule 29.

Rule 58. Second Impetus on Roquet - When roquettlng a
ball. the player must not strike his Playing ball twice.

Rule 59. Pounding Object Ball Into Ground - No player
shall pound the object ball into the ground. Making a
depression and thus Making it possible to set his playing ball
Against it and roquet away from it so that such object ball
moves on account of the inequality of the ground rather
than because of its contact with the Playing ball.

Rule 60. Moving Ball when Preparing to Roquet It - If a
player moves a ball not in close position while Placing his
ball Against it to roquet it. He shall not attempt to replace it,
but shall follow it up with his Playing ball. However. if
such ball is in close position. it shall be returned to its
former position by the umpire, or the player with his
opponent's consent. before the play can proceed.

Rule 61. Ball Moving when Playing Ball Picked Up - If
the Playing ball in the proper course of play rests Against
another ball. which moves on acco1lnt of the inequality of
the ground when the playing ball is picked up for the
purpose of placing it for a roquet. such ball shall not be
replaced unless in close position.

Rule 62. Contacting Dead Ball on Roquet: Bombarding
Ball - It is not a foul for the Playing ball to contact a dead
ball on a roquet. or to bombard a live or dead ball by driving
the object ball against it by a roquet. if such ball is
within the playing line.

Rule 63. Roquet after Contacting Two or More Balls -
If a player by a direct or carom shot contacts two or more
balls properly on the court. play must be taken from the
first ball contacted, provided it is a live ball. If the balls

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are contacted on a roquet shot, play must be taken from
the first live ball hit. If two live balls are contacted
simultaneously, the player has his choice of roquetting either,
and the other is still a live ball.

Rule 64. Roquetting a Ball Not Contacted - It is a foul
subjecting the player to the penalties of Rule 29 to roquet
a ball that has not been fairly contacted by the playing
ball.

Article  IX
OPENING. OBJECT AND STRATEGY OF GAME

Rule 65. Number of Players - Either two, three or four
players may participate in the game.

Rule 66. NUMBER OF BALLS PER PLAYER - If only two
players start the game, each player shall play two balls
and should endeavor to make as many points with each
ball as he can and to assist each ball with the other. If
four start the game, each shall play one ball. If three
players are in the game, two shall play one ball apiece as
partners, and the other shall play two balls. Partners may
consult with each other, during either one's turn of play,
either on or off the court, concerning the moves and
strategy of the playing partner.

Rule 67. Opening Lag - All games shall be opened by
lagging from an imaginary straight line running directly
across the court through the middle of the center arches,
one player on each side shooting a ball toward the playing
line at the head of the court. The balls should be shot
simultaneously on separate sides of an imaginary line
running from stake to stake. A lag fails if the ball hits
another ball, an arch, the stake or the wall. If both lags
fail, another trial must be made. The player the center
of whose ball rests nearer the playing line shall have the
choice of turn of play and balls.

Rule 68. Placing the Balls - After the opening lag, the
balls shall then be placed on the court at the four boundary
line corners nearest the center, with the partner's
balls (red and blue, white and black) diagonally opposite
each other, the playing ball and the next in sequence
occupying the corners at the head of the court, and the
choice of corners resting with the playing ball. All balls
arf1 then in play and the game is ready to begin.

Rule 69. The Opening Shot - The player using the ball of
his choice at the head-end of the court opens the game

-21-

by attempting to contact another ball by either a direct
or carom shot, or by lagging or shooting to his partner's
ball or  to his first arch, or by making any other shot not
prohibited by the rules, or he may forfeit his shot. If it
has been discovered that the balls have been improperly
placed on the court after the opening shot the balls must
be replaced and the game re-started.

Rule 70. object of Game - The object of the game is for
each player to score as many points at every opportunity as
he can by propelling or roquetting his playing and partner
balls through the arches and against the stakes in accordance
with the rules, the contacting and roquetting of other
balls being merely incidental to this. The winner is the
side that scores the complete quota of thirty-two points first,
or in a time limit game, the one that scores the most points
in the allotted time.

Rule 71. Assisting or Settling Up For Partner - While a
player's main object in contacting and roquetting another
ball should be to move his playing ball to a position where
it will be possible to make his next point, it may be better
strategy for him not to attempt to make a point for his
playing ball during a particular turn of play, and he may
instead assist his partner ball through an arch or set up
for it by contacting and so roquetting the other balls as to
place all balls in a position favorable for it to make points
during its ensuing turn of play, tying up the hot ball, or
opponent's next playing ball, against, within or behind
an arch by a fair roquet, to reduce the probability of
the hot ball contacting a ball in its next turn of play.

Article X
SEQUENCE AND TURN OF PLAY

Rule 72. Order of Play - The balls shall be played in
regular sequence of red, white, blue and black, red and
blue always being paired as partners against the white
and black.

Rule 73. Playing Wrong Ball - It is a foul subjecting the
player to the penalties of Rule 29 for him in his regular
turn of play to shoot the wrong ball in sequence. In such
a case, his next succeeding opponent shall shoot the next
ball in correct sequence to the one that should have been
played by the offending player.

-22-

Rule 74. Duration of Turn of Play - A player may continue
to play so long as his playing ball makes a point
for itself or contacts another ball upon which it is alive.

Rule 75. When Turn of Play Starts and Ends - A player's
turn of play starts when his last prior opponent steps off
the bed of the court with both feet after completing his
play (See Rule 74), and ends when he does the same.

Rule 76. Number of Shots per Turn of Play - A player has
one shot, that is. stroke of his mallet upon his playing ball,
in each turn of play. which he may use to shoot at another
ball or at an arch or stake that is his next point. or to lag
for position for his next point. to his partner ball or to any
other desired location on the court. or which he may forfeit.
If he makes his point with this shot. or contacts a ball
and hereafter roquets it. he is entitled to one more shot,
which he may use to contact a live ball, make his next
point, lag or forfeit. He may continue thus, as provided
in Rule 74 until he contacts and roquets all other balls and
fails to make a point. or until he makes all his points and
then contacts and roquets all other balls, or until he misses
his shot at a ball. arch or stake.

Rule 77. Premature Play - If a player strokes his playing
ball before his opponent has finished his turn of play, all
balls moved by such stroke shall be replaced and the shot
made over when his turn comes.

Rule 78. Replacing or Repairing Balls, Arches. or Surface
- Before or during his turn of play. a player may require
that any damage to any ball. arch, or the surface of the
court shall be rectified or repaired. The court may be
redressed. watered. or both during a game at the request
of the player in possession of the balls.

Article XI
SCORING OF POINTS

Rule 79. Sequence of Point - All points, that is. the four-
teen arches and two stakes, are numbered consecutively
from one through sixteen, starting with the arch nearest the
stake at the head of the court. and must be made in that
order, as shown by the Explanatory Diagram on page 21.

Rule 80. Fair Position Required - Before An arch can be
made by the playing ball, it must be in fair position 
according to the rules, either within or in front of the face or

-23-

entrance to the arch, although it may bank through off the
wall from any fair position on the court.

Rule 81. Playing Back Through Arch for Position- If a
ball is played or driven under an arch from the wrong
direction but rests so that a straight edge laid against the
arch on the Bide from which it came falls to touch it, it is
in position to make the arch.

Rule 82. Roquetting Through an Arch- In order for the
Playing ball to be roquet through an arch, the ball it is
taking play from must rest so as to touch a straight-edge
laid against the arch on the position side of the arch.

Rule 83. Contacting Dead Ball on Roquet for Position -
If the playing ball on a roquet shot contacts a dead ball,
which stops just beyond the arch next in sequence, while
the Playing ball stops within or in front of the arch, the
Playing ball is in position to make the arch, even if it is
frozen to the dead ball.

Rule 84. When Point la Made - A point is made whenever
a ball, as a result of a fair play by a player, his partner
or his opponent, makes an arch or hits a stake in proper
sequence. A ball barred from continuing through an arch
may not be assisted through, unless first assisted or shot
into fair position.

Rule 85. When Ball Through Arch - A ball Making Its
arch in the right direction is through when a straight edge
laid across the arch on the side from which it came does
not touch the ball.

Rule 86. Rolling Back Into or Through Arch - If a ball
making an arch rolls back into or through the arch, not
having hit another ball, a stake or the wall, so that a
straight edge applied as in Rule 85 touches it, the point
is not made, but the ball is in position to make the arch.
However, should the ball hit a stake or the wall and roll
back into or through the arch, the point is made.

Rule 87. Contacting Ball and Making Point - If the playing
ball hits another ball and rolls back into or through the
arch, the point is not made. If the contacted ball was a live
ball, the player roquets it; if a dead ball, play ceases and
all balls may be replaced at opponent's option and the
Playing ball is not in position to make the arch at its next
turn.

-24-

Rule 88. Hitting Ball and Rolling Back Into or Through
Arch - If the playing ball contacts another ball and after-
wards on the same stroke makes a point, the ball must be
roquetted and the point rejected. But U a point is made for
the partner or an opponent's ball in such manner, the Point
counts, unless the ball was not in fair position as provided
by these rules.

Rule 89. Making Two or More Polnts on One Stroke -
If the playing ball makes two or more points for itself on the
same stroke, all points count, but the player has only the
same privilege that he has in scoring one point.

Rule 90. Jam Shot - It is a foul subjecting the player to
the penalties of Rule 29 for him to jam his playing ball
through an arch he is attempting to make, by keeping his
mallet against the ball after the stroke has been delivered
and holding the ball up against the arch stem until it is
forced though, or by contacting the ball a second time with
the mallet on the same stroke and thus propelling it through.

Rule 91. How End Arches Are Made - The two end arches
at the head of the court must be made toward the center
of the court as points I and 2 when starting the game,
and towards the home stake at the head of the court as
points 14 and 15 at the finish. On the other hand, the
two end arches at the lower end of the court are made
as points 6 and 7 towards the lower or turning stake. which
is Point 8. and towards the center as points 9 and 10.

Rule 92. HOW SIDE ARCHES ARE MADE - The side
arches, points 3, 5, 11, and 13, shall be made the same
as all other arches, except the arch must be made or
entered on a roquet shot or a shot following a roquet shot
from the next playing ball or the hot ball, unless the playing
ball starts play by going through or into the arch,
without first contacting a ball, from any position other than
one within the arch acquired from a roquet off the partner
or cold ball.

Rule 93. How Center Arches. Are Made - The center
arches must be made as though only one arch, from the
right as point 4 when the ball is progressing towards the
lower end of the court, and from the opposite side as point
12 when the ball is progressing toward the head of the
court.

-25-

Rule 94. Making Center in Several Turns - The center
arches may be made in several Successive turns of play,
provided the ball is kept within the limits of the center and
has committed no foul and contacted no live ball.

Rule 95. Whe14 Ball Within Limits of Center - A ball is
within the limits of the center when any part of it is within
the lines of a rectangle circumscribed by laying a straight
edge successively against the inside of both stems of each
arch, the inside of the stem of each arch nearest the home
stake, and the inside of the stem of each arch nearest the
turning stake.

Rule 96. Contacting Live Ball in Center - A playing ball
within the limits of the center which contacts a live ball,
is dead to advancement through the center and must make
a roquet from such contacted ball.

Rule 97. Contacting Dead Ball In Center - If the playing
ball contacts a dead ball on a roquet into the center and
rests within the center, it may continue through the arch.
But if the dead ball was hit on a direct shot, the balls
must be replaced or left where they stop at opponent's
option, and in either case the playing ball is dead to
advancement through the arch if then within the limits of the
center.

Article XII

DURATION AND TERMINATION OF GAME

Rule 98. WHEN GAME IS COMPLETED - Each winning
ball can score only sixteen points during the game, and
when one player or side scores a total of thirty-two points
with both balls, the game is completed, the lower being
credited with all points scored by both losing balls up to
that point. A ball may score all its points except the last
one, and if its partner is already rover, all sixteen of its
points, in one turn of play, which constitutes a home run.
Hence, if each partner ball made a home run during its first
turn of play, the game could be completed in one or three
fourths of one  inning, which is one turn of play for each of
the four balls within the inning. Scores shall be kept on
four-lined score boards, cards, or sheets with inning squares
provided for the players, the points scored by each ball
being entered on its line in the proper inning square and
points scored for it by another ball being encircled in its
proper inning square.

-26-

Rule 99. How Game Is Completed - After a ball makes
all points except the home stake, it is a rover. When both
partner balls are rovers, the playing ball must complete the
game by roquetting its partner ball against the home stake,
which is point 16, and hitting the stake itself, either on the
roquet of the partner ball or the next succeeding shot, all
four balls being within the playing line. If only the partner
ball hits the stake on the roquet, it is still in play and must
be placed properly on the court before the playing ball hits

Rule 100. INNING LIMITATION - The game shall continue
until completed as provided in Rule 98 or until ten full
innings are played, but in no event shall continue beyond
ten innings, except in case of a tie, or except in tournament
play, when the players or tournament officials may extend
the game to a maximum of fifteen full innings, subject to
Rule 98. In the event of a tie at the end of the inning
limitation, play shall continue uninterrupted until one side is
ahead in points at the completion of an inning or concludes
the game under Rule 98 within the inning. Scores shall be
kept on four-1!ned score boards, cards, or sheets with inning
squares provided for the players, the points scored by each
ball being entered on its line in the proper inning square
and points scored for it by another ball being encircled in
its proper inning square, as in Rule 98.

Revised and re-edited by the Rule Committee.

B. C. McGOWAN
CHARLEY VULGAMOTT
IRL FITZGERALD

Approved and adopted by the Executive Committee.
I. 0. FISHER, President
KARL WATERMAN, Vice-President
MARYALMA YOUSEY, Secy. & Treas.

-27-

TOURNAMENT RULES
of the
THE AMERICAN ROQUE LEAGUE, INC.

Revised and Edited January 1, 1959

Rule I. Official Playing Rules to Govern - All games at
any annual, semi-annual or divisional tournament of the
American Roque League, Inc., shall be played in strict
accordance with the playing rules of the league.

Rule 2. Divisions and Prizes - In all league tournaments
there may be two divisions. The winner of a division shall
be given an American Roque League trophy, and may
be given a cash prize. The winners of second and third
places In any division may also be given such awards,
at the option of the tournament committee.

Rule 3. Classification of Players - The tournament 
committee shall classify the players and divide them into
divisions.

Rule 4. Entries - All entries are subject to the approval
and call of the tournament committee, and shall be made
not later than noon of the second day of the tournament.

Rule 5. When Tournament Play Starts - Annual or national
tournament games shall start on Monday of the first
week of the tournament and games in other tournaments
on the first day of the tournament, at such hour as the
tournament committee shall deem advisable, but not earlier
than 8 o'clock A. M.

Rule 6. Schedule of Games - The schedule of games and
assignments thereof to players shall be made by the
tournament committee, but no playerís first game Shall be
scheduled later than the third day of the national tournament
or the first day of any other tournament.

Rule 7. Hours of Play - No player shall be required to
play a game scheduled earlier than 8 o'clock A. M. nor
later than 10 o'clock P. M., but such games may be played
if both players desire and may be so scheduled by request
of both.

-33-

Rule 8. Refusal to Play Scheduled Game - A player on
the courts who has not played three games that day and
who refuses to play a properly scheduled game, except
when prevented by physical inability , shall forfeit the game.

Rule 9. Forfeited Games - A forfeited game shall be
credited to the player not at fault by the score of 32 to 0,
unless inning limit games are being played, when the score
shall be 0 for the player at fault and the final point aver-
age per game in all other games played by him for the
player not at fault.

Rule 10. Duration of Games - All games may be full 32
point games, or may be put on an inning limit, in the 
discretion of the tournament committee.

Rule 11. Score Cards - The number of points made by
each contestant in a game shall be entered on a score
card signed by each and the umpire and the card filed with
the official scorekeeper appointed by the tournament
committee.

Rule 12. Withdrawal from Tournament - All players are
expected to remain until the end of the tournament and
play all games assigned to them. in round robin play,
should any player leave or quit before he has played
seventy-five per cent of all his scheduled games, all his
games shall be thrown out; but if he has played such
proportion of his scheduled games, then each of his
remaining games shall be forfeited in accordance with Rule 9.

Rule 13. When Sections Apply - In case there are too
many entries in a division for a single section round robin
tournament, the tournament committee may divide the
division into a number of sections, according to the wishes
of the players as expressed in the regular or special meeting.
The players in the division shall be seeded by the
tournament committee according to their known ability
and playing record, or drawn by lot into as many sections
as deemed advisable of equal number of players, who shall
play each member of their section. The two players in
each section who win the most number of games shall be
advanced to the divisional finals.

Rule 14. In Case of a Tie - In case of a tie in games won,
the tie shall be broken by a playoff game.

-34-

Rule 15. Determination of Winner - The player in any
division or divisional final who wins the most games in
round robin play with all other members shall be the
winner of that division. Unless otherwise directed before the
start of the tournament, in case two or more players are
tied in total games won and lost, the tie shall be broken
as provided in Rule 14.

Rule 16. Umpire - Each game shall have an umpire
approved by the tournament committee. In case of a protest
from either player, the umpire shall stop the game and at
once refer the protest to the rules committee.

Rule 17. When Game Halted - If it is necessary to stop a
game, the umpire shall decide when play shall cease when a
game is stopped, it shall be continued as soon as possible.
A diagram of any game halted shall be made by the
umpire, and shall be signed by both the players and himself.

Rule 18. Sizing and Replacing Ball - All balls should be
sized by the tournament committee prior to the commencement
of the tournament and dally thereafter, so that all
four balls in a game may be of uniform size as nearly as
possible. Balls broken in tournament play shall be replaced
out of the funds of the league.

Rule 19. When Umpire May Forfeit Game - The umpire
may forfeit a game in accordance with Rule 9 when:
a. After the game has begun, a player refuses to
continue play;
b. After play has been suspended by the umpire, a player
fails to resume his playing within one minute after the
umpire has called "play";
c. A player employs tactics palpably designed to delay
the game;
d. Any rule of the game is willfully and persistently
violated by the player after warning by the umpire.

Rule 20. When Tournament committee Disagrees - In case
of protests or other questions of like importance that may
arise during a tournament, where the tournament commit-
tee cannot agree unanimously, the minority may elect to
appeal to the Executive Committee, whose decision is final.

Rule 21. Divisional Tournaments-All divisional tournaments
in which winners are to receive official trophies of
the league shall be governed by the playing and tournament

-35-

rules and the by-laws pertaining to tournaments of
The American Roque League. Inc.

Rule 22. When Official Trophies May Be Awarded -
Official trophies of the league shall be given at semi-annual
or divisional tournaments only if the clubs or divisions
sponsoring the same are in good standing. have paid the
fees required by the league and have vouchers signed by
the Secretary-Treasurer of the league.

Revised and re-edited by the Tournament Committee.

B. C. McGOWAN
CHARLEY VULGAMOTT
IRL FITZGERALD

Approved and adopted by the Executive Committee.
I. 0. FISHER. President
KARL WATERMAN, Vice-President
MARYALMA YOUSEY, Secy. & Treas.

-36-

BY-LAWS
of
THE AMERICAN ROQUE LEAGUE

The following are the revised By-laws adopted by The
American Roque league, as amended in 1950.
Article I-Name

This organization shall be known as THE AMERICAN
ROQUE league.

Article 2 - Object
The object of this league shall be to promote the game
of Roque in America.

Article 3 - Membership
The membership of this league shall be composed of
Divisions, Roque Clubs, and individuals, unattached to any
Club, whose applications (accompanied by the membership
fees) shall be accepted by the Executive Committee; and
also of such individuals as may be elected to honorary
membership.

Article 4 - Membership Fees
The membership fee of this league shall be five dollars
for Clubs, and one dollar for individuals not attached to
any Club.

Article 5 - Dues and Fees
Section I. Annual dues of THE AMERICAN ROQUE
League are as follows:
$1.00 for unattached members.
$5.00 for clubs, not members of a division.

Section 2. The entrance fees at Annual and Semi-Annual
Tournaments where Official Medals are to be given to the
winners shall not be less than three dollars for each entrant.

Article B - Officers

The officers of this league shall be a President, a Vice.
President, a Secretary-Treasurer, who shall be elected at
the annual meeting to serve one year or until their successors
are elected, and they shall assume the duties of office
at the close of the Annual Tournament during which they
were elected.

-39-

Section 1. The duties of the President shall be to preside
at all meetings of the League, call special meetings when
he may deem it necessary, fill by appointment any vacancy
among the officers that may occur, appoint all committees
and a Director for each Division established in accordance
with Article II, and supervise all interest of the League.

Section 2. The duties of the Secretary-Treasurer shall be
to attend all meetings of the League, keep a record of same,,
collect all dues and fees at Annual Tournaments, receive
and care for all funds collected on behalf of the League,
pay all properly certified bills, make a report at the annual
meeting and such other duties as ordinarily pertain to the
office. It shall also be his duty to collect all Annual, Semi-
Annual and Divisional Tournament fees and certify same
to the Medal Committee.

Section 3. Each Divisional Director shall be especially
responsible for the interests of the League in the Division
which he represents.

Article. 7-Committees

The President-elect shall appoint the following named
standing committees for the ensuing year: Annual
Tournament Committee, Publicity Committee and Medal Committee
and such other committees as the Executive Committee may
authorize.

Section I. The elective officers shall constitute the
Executive Committee. The Executive Committee shall provide
ways and means for collecting funds sufficient to conduct
the affairs of the League in an effective and business-like
manner. The Executive Committee shall have full power to
arrange for the Annual Tournament as to time and place of
meeting by entertaining proposals from clubs, divisions and
cities wishing to hold same. The Executive Committee shall
have final authority in all matters pertaining to the League
which may arise between the annual meetings.

Section 2. It shall be the duty of the Tournament 
Committee to classify the players at the Annual Tournament in
accordance with tournament rules, keep a record of all
games played, arrange exhibition contests and promote 
public interest and attendance.

-40-

Section 3. The Divisional Directors shall constitute the
Promotion Committee. It shall be the duty of the committee
to promote Roque in every possible way.

Section 4. It shall be the duty of the Medal Committee
to furnish the Official Medals for all Annual, Semi-Annual
and Divisional Tournaments and no Medals are to be issued
for any tournament unless authorized by order from
Secretary-Treasurer. The Chairman of Medal Committee shall be
custodian of all medals and dues belonging to
THE AMERICAN ROGUE LEAGUE.

Section 5. It shall be the duty of Publicity Committee to
stimulate attendance during Annual Tournament week by
furnishi'1g newspapers with the schedule and results of'
' games, special mention being made of any feature plays
which may occur.

Article 8 - Tournaments

Section 1. The Annual Tournament will be held on such
courts and at such times as will be selected by the 
Executive Committee.

Section 2. The Tournament Committee will have full
charge of the Annual Tournament, subject, however, to the
approval of the Executive Committee in matters that may
effect the general policy of the League.

Section 3. A Semi-annual Tournament may be held in
California or Florida during the month of January or February
subject to requirements of the Executive Committee.
Any division or club that can comply with the requirements,
may bid for the privilege of holding said Semi-
annual Tournament.

Such bids must be in the hands of the President so as to
be acted upon before September 15th of each year, prior
to said tournament.

Article 9 - Eligibility

Individual members and all members of subsidiary
organizations of THE AMERICAN ROGUE LEAGUE, in good standing
are eligible to play in Tournaments at which the winners
are to receive official League Medals excepting as
provided in Tournament Rules.

Protests as to the eligibility of a player must be presented
to the Tournament Committee in writing and their decision
shall be final.

-41-

Article 10 - Medals
Official American Roque Medals shall be given at any
Annual, Semi-annual or Divisional Tournament only with
the approval of Secretary-Treasurer and his authorized
order to the Chairman of Medal Committee.

Article 11 - Divisions
Any groups of three or more Clubs or any Club Having
three or more Roque Courts, members of THE AMERICAN
ROQUE LEAGUE, with the consent of the Executive Committee
may organize a Division and hold Divisional 
Tournaments in accordance with the Tournament Rules.

Article 12 - Meetings
The annual Meeting of THE AMERICAN ROQUE LEAGUE
shall be held during the week of the Annual Tournament
at a time and place designated by the President.

Article 13 - Fiscal Year
The fiscal year of THE AMERICAN ROQUE LEAGUE
shall end at midnight of the last day of the Annual 
Tournament.

Article 14 - Franchise
Individual members and all members of subsidiary
organizations of THE AMERICAN ROQUE LEAGUE present
at the annual meeting, shall be entitled to a voice and vote,
absentees may be represented by proxy in legal form.

Article 15 - Quorum
(a) Twenty-five (25) or more persons entitled to vote,
present at the annual meeting, and fifteen (15) or more
entitled to vote, present at called meeting, shall constitute
a quorum, and all questions and elections except amendment
to these By-Laws, shall be decided by a majority vote.
(b) Three or more members present at any Executive
Committee meeting shall constitute a quorum.

Article 15 - Amendments
These By-laws may be amended at any annual meeting
by a vote of two-thirds of the members of the League
present.

-42-

Article 16-Order of Business
The order of business at the annual meeting shall be as
follows:
1. Reading of minutes of previous meeting.
2. Reports of committees.
3. Report of Secretary.
4. Report of the Treasurer.
5. Unfinished business.
6. New business.
7. Election of officers.
8. Welfare of the League.
9. Adjournment.

-48-

EXPLANATION OF SPECIAL TERMS AND
POINTS OF HOW TO PLAY THE GAME

Article l - Explanation of Special Terms

BALL - Counting upon. A ball "counts upon" another ball
when it comes in contact with it, so as to require the player
to "take play" from it.

HOT OR DANGER - The ball to be played next, being that of
the opponent.

DEAD - A ball which the player has "counted upon" and
"taken play" from since making a point. 11 is then dead
to all direct shots till he makes another point or has an-
other turn of play. A player or a ball is said to be "dead
on a ball."

FAIR POSITION - A ball lying outside an arch, on the position
side, so that a straight edge applied beyond the arch
does not touch the ball (See Rule 80).

HIDDEN - A hidden ball is a ball resting in a position from
which it cannot be driven so as to hit any part of any other
ball, or to the player's next point in sequence over a straight
course, or, without using an unfair or foul shot, or a bank.

COLD BALL - The last played ball of the opponent.

LIVE - A ball which the playing ball has a right to "count
upon." (See Rule 46.) A player or a ball is said to be
"alive on a ball."

OBJECT - The object ball is the ball being played upon,
played at, or played from, not the player's shooting ball.

PLAYING BALL - The player's shooting ball, which is
using for running arches and making points.

ON THE COURT - A ball that rests wholly inside the
playing line.

OFF THE COURT - A ball which rests partly or wholly
outside the playing line.

ROVER - A ball that has no more arches to make (See Rule
99).

-47-

TAKING A PLAY FROM - To place the playing ball against
another which has been counted upon, and to play from
It with any legitimate stroke which shall move both balls.

ARCH-STEM - The stem of an arch is the vertical wire,
or upright leg, of which there are two.

WALL - The curb surrounding the bed of the court.

PLAYING LINE - The playing line is a line extending around
the court, 28 inches inside the border.

CENTER - The two arches in the center of the court that
count as one POINT.

LIMITS - Of a ball Is within the limits of the "center" if a
straight edge or string held against the inside of both arches
touches the ball.

CLOSE POSITION - A ball is in "close position" when a
slight movement of it might result in either advantage or
disadvantage to the player. (See Rule 29)

BED OF COURT - Each surface, surrounded by wall.

CORNER PLACE - The space included between the wall,
and two imaginary perpendiculars drawn to it from a
comer of the playing line. (See diagram, page 21)

LAGGING - Shooting toward the playing line at the opening
of the game in order to determine the choice of play
and balls.

DIRECT SHOT OR STROKE - When the playing ball struck
with the mallet passes to its object either directly or after
making a carom on a stake, an arch, or the wall.

DRIVE - A direct shot made so as to send the object ball
to some desired position.

FOLLOW - When the playing ball in "taking play" from a
ball is made to follow it without changing the direction
of the stroke.

FOUL - A foul stroke is one which violates or results in
the violation of a rule.

PULL - Hitting the ball on top with (1 drawing motion.

-48-

PUSH OR JAM - Keeping the face of the mallet against the
ball after the stroke has been delivered, or giving it a
second impetus. (See Rule 90.)

SCRATCH - A scratch shot is a fair shot which makes a
point, or counts upon a ball, not necessarily aimed at.

SPLIT - Taking play from a ball and causing it to move.
Every shot in the game of Roque which is not a split shot,
is a direct shot.

TURN - A player's turn is the period between the time the
player's opponent properly steps off of the bed of the court
until the player has stepped off of the bed of the court with
both feet, following his play. (See Rue 75.)

Article 2 - Points of How to Play the Game

Section I. PUTTING THE COURT IN ORDER - In the
in case of outdoor courts, after all leaves, sticks and trash
have been swept off, the earth bed is smoothed, sprinkled,
rolled, sanded and swept or brushed with special tools
and brushes, producing a perfect playing surface. The
ground in and near the arches is smoothed with a hand
trowel, or a straight edge or tamp.

Section 2. PAINTING ROQUE BALLS - Lacquer Paints
may be used, as they dry reasonably quick. Another
good method is to use white shellac and dry color, 
vermilion, ultra-marine blue, and powdered white lead. Mix
is needed. This is cheap and dries in ten or fifteen
minutes. Lamp-black is all right if you wish to paint the ball
black, otherwise just wipe it with a damp cloth. Keep the
brushes in separate, tight mason jars, in enough denatured
alcohol to cover the bristle ends of the brushes. It will
then not be necessary to clean the brushes between painting
jobs, if you don't get the brushes in the wrong jar.
When Painting the blue ball, put in a little white; light
blue looks blue at night, whereas dark blue looks rather
black at night.

Section 3. THE MALLET - The Roque mallet is made
with a comparatively short handle and a heavy head,
having one end faced with fiber or ivory , or metal, and
the other mounted with soft rubber. The handles are made

-49-

in various lengths, to suit the player. There is no standard
mallet. Experience only will teach each individual player
what weight of mallet, length of handle, etc., suits him best.

Section 4. HOLDING THE MALLET - Instructors differ as
to ways of holding the mallet, and there is no rule except
that the stroke must be made with the face of either end
of the mallet head.

Section 5. ACTION OF MALLET ON THE BALL - Some
players use the hard end entirely. Others use the soft
end entirely. The hard end causes the ball to split off at
more of a right-angle in roquet shots, whereas the soft
rubber end will allow the playing ball to follow the ball
played upon or from in a roquet shot, or to split off at any
desired angle with the ball from which play is being taken.
The action of the soft rubber end, on the playing ball in
roquet shots. is almost the same as though no other ball
were against the playing ball. The playing ball may be
made to follow the object ball, for about equal speed and
distance by the use of the soft rubber end.

Section 6. CHOICE OF STANCE - The very best players
differ in choice of stance. Some use the pendulum stroke.
swinging the mallet between the feet, with either one or
two hands, while others prefer the side stroke, using one
hand only. The pendulum stroke permits sighting straight
ahead, as in pool or billiards. The mallet swings in a
vertical arc, this shot being favored most by the best players,
Beginners should adopt a comfortable stance and stroke,
and give them a good trial before changing.

Section 7. DELIVERING THE STROKE - In delivering the
stroke, the eyes should LINE up the mallet, and then watch
the playing ball only. The mallet should be swung by
the arm or arms, without any other movement of the balance
of the body prior to the impact of mallet upon ball.
This will avoid hitting the ground, or slicing the ball. Place
the face of the mallet near the ball, without touching it.
then make the swing. Tightening the grip on the mallet
handle will often spoil the aim.
Try to learn to make your long shots and hard drives
with the arm and back muscles relaxed, as tightening of
the muscles will interfere with the power and direction of
the stroke and the result. Use a nice, free swing, and

-50-

you will soon be surprised at the more effective driving
power and good direction which will result. Tightening
the muscles will actually hold back the power.
Section 8. PRELIMINARY PRACTICE-Beginners will do
well to practice a few minutes each day for a few days,
making arches from various distances, from four inches
up to two feet, and also hitting balls at distances ranging
from 4 feet to 20 feet. Do this before entering any game.
It will give the beginner confidence and an idea of just
what the balls will do under certain strokes.

Section 9. RULE OF PLAY FOR THE PLAYING BALL -
While the rules describe many special plays, and situations
pertaining to the playing ball, the general invariable
rule of play for the playing ball is: A hit, a roquet, and
one free shot. The only deviation from this rule is to forfeit
his play at some time during his turn. He may take all
three, or 1ess, on any object ball, but never more on any
one object ball. The object ball is the one being played
upon or from.

The player may play on all three balls once after his
first hit in any turn of play, and between each two points
made. Having played once on all balls, and not having
made a point, the playing ball becomes "dead." However,
the playing ball is always alive on every ball at the be-
ginning of each new turn.

When a player hits another live ball with his playing
ball, whether by a direct shot or a roquet shot, he must
take play from it. After hitting a live ball with his playing
ball, the player may take his roquet and free shot, or either
of them, for the purpose of getting into contact with the
other balls, or, for the purpose of getting position and
running an arch, or for the purpose of helping his partner,
or for any combination of these. He may do this in several
ways; he may make a drive shot, a follow shot, or a roquet
shot, so long as he does not foul. He may adopt any
method of procedure he desires, so long as he does not
break the rules. If the prevailing rules so provide, he has
a right to roquet into an arch which he is trying to run,
and then, with his free shot, complete running the arch.
Or, he may roquet into position in front of the arch and
then try for the arch with his free shot. Having made a

-51-

point, he is entitled to continue, and so on, indefinitely,
except that, upon getting his first Rover ball, he must then
finish his turn and give the opponent a turn.

Section 10. MAKING THE CENTER ARCH - Making the
first arch of the center by any shot other than a roquet 
shot, does not entitle the player to another shot in that
turn of play, for the purpose of completing his play through
the second arch of the center. His turn is ended, but the
ball is still eligible to continue through the remaining
arch of the center at his next turn of play, provided he is
still within the limits of the center, according to the rules.

Section II. STARTING A GAME - Assuming that the
lag for turns and the placing of the balls have proceeded
according to the rules, the first player should begin by
trying to hit a ball, since it would be impossible to make
his first arch from the corner starting position, without first
trying to round up some balls and having them to play
upon, so that he may maneuver to make the first arch on
his first turn to play.

Section 12. MANEUVERING FOR ARCHES - Persons un-
acquainted with the game often ask why the players appear
to be unnecessarily playing upon all three balls between
each two points. The reason for this is, that the arches
are very difficult to make unless the player succeeds in
driving one or the other of the object balls to a point. very
nearly in front of, and quite close to, his desired arch,
and it usually takes considerable maneuvering to do this.

Also, when a player's turn comes and he is successful in
hitting a ball, or making an arch or point, and thus gets
a start, he is anxious to make more points, and he is also
anxious to keep his opponent from getting control of the
balls, so he proceeds to attempt to hide, or tie up the
opponent's next playing ball (known as the hot ball), and then
maneuvers to make his next point.

When starting the game at the head of the court, the
player should send his playing ball in such a manner,
and with sufficient force, so that if he misses the ball aimed
at, his own playing ball will continue around the court to
the vicinity of his partner ball, so that, should the
opponent miss, the partner ball will have a ball near by, from
which to start play. The above is often done by hitting

-52-

the bank first, and bouncing toward the ball aimed at,
across the head of the court, rather than shooting directly
at the ball. A little coaching on this will be well in place.
In these opening shots, there are plenty of bank shots, etc.,
which afford more than one chance of getting a hit.

Now, assuming that play has started, and the balls are on
the various corners, or scattered over the court, and
some player makes a hit, it should be his desire to
retain the balls, and to make several arches in one
turn, rather than to simply try for one arch, regardless
of further play. Any player might make ONE arch and
stop, but the successful player is the one who plans his
plays for a run of several arches. He must plan ahead
if he would become a real Roque player. There is not, how-
ever, the necessity for mental application in Roque that
there would be in a game such as Chess, the planning of
a Roque game being very much a repetition for one point
after another, and the player rarely ever plans farther than
two arches ahead, the variety being in the varying
locations of the balls on the court, from time to time.

Section 13. DISPOSING OF THE HOT BALL - Briefly,
Roque is this: A player, having gotten possession of the
balls for a turn of play, that is, having contacted a ball at
the beginning of his turn, he should try and send a ball
to the arch next in sequence beyond the point he is for,
before trying to make the point he is for. Some time during
the turn, he should also send the hot ball away, unless he
is willing to take a chance on losing possession of the balls.

Sometimes players are able to continually keep the hot
ball in such bad places on the court, that the opponent
using the same is prevented from making any hit at all,
during a whole game, and consequently not likely to make
very many, if any, points. The rules provide that certain
arches cannot be made by a play from any ball except the
hot ball, in which case it becomes quite a different matter
to keep the hot ball away until it is needed. Thus, this
reduces the likelihood of one player monopolizing the pos-
session of the balls. In other words, as a player becomes
more adept, if desirous of winning games, he tries more
and more to prevent the opponent from advancing, or getting
control of the balls, while at the same time trying to keep
his own or his partner ball in favorable position for making
points.

-53-

Section 14. KEEPING ONE BALL AHEAD - In maneuvering
for the arches, it is a vital feature of handling the plays
to always send a ball to the next arch, before trying to
make the arch desired. Thus having made an arch, or
other paint, the player finds a ball ready for his use at
the next arch in order. This is particularly necessary in
maneuvering for the center or basket, where a playing ball
cannot hope to get through unless it has previously sent
a ball very near the front of the basket, from which the
playing ball can roquet through, or partly through the center.

In other words, before making the first arch, try and
send a ball into a position in front of, or near the second
arch; before making the second arch, try and send the hot
or next playing ball into position in front of or near the
comer arch No.3; and before making the comer arch, try
and send a ball to a position in front of, and near the center
or basket, No.4, and so on. Finally, before negotiating
the last arch of the game, with the last ball to finish, try
and send the partner ball near the finishing stake, so that
you wil1 be able to complete the game easily, once the
last arch is made. The more careful a player is with his
drives and position shots, the better player he wil1 soon
get to be.

Section 15. ANGULAR ARCH SHOTS - When shooting
for an arch from an angular position, avoid hitting FIRST
the wire nearest the playing ball.

Section 16. ROQUETTING INTO ARCHES - When roquetting
into arches from distances of 2 or 3 inches to 8 or 10
inches, the soft rubber roquet will be found very useful,
shooting directly into the arch, or entirely through it, and
sending the ball played from to the side of, or beyond the
arch. The player will soon learn that even the soft rubber
end of the mallet will cause somewhat of a kick-off from
the direct line of aim, in these roquet shots, and this kick-off
must be allowed for. Have some experienced player explain
this to you.

Section 17. GENERAL POLICY AND LOGIC - The soft
rubber end of the mallet may be used when it is desired
to have the playing ball pass by the ball played from.
This is done by placing the balls side by side, or partly
so, and a little practice wil1 enable the player to judge just
how much to engage the ball played from, in order to send

-54-

the two balls as desired. Some players claim that the
rubber end of the mallet has a tendency to make the playing
ball spin through an arch. Others claim that the hard end
shot is more positive and easier to control. There are good
players favoring both plans.

In making the lag shots, and delicate hits and drives,
the soft rubber may be found more effective with some,
because it permits of a free stroke, without so much driving
force. For instance, a player may shoot for a ball which
he wishes to drive (possibly only a short drive), and by
using the rubber end of the mallet, he can deliver the
stroke with more freedom, without so much danger of driving 
the object ball too far. The impact of the mallet on the
playing ball will be normal, while the driving force will
be lighter; if there is sand on the playing ball, the sand
will sink into the rubber end, and thus the danger of sand
interfering with the shot will be lessened by using the
rubber end.

In playing for an arch, which the partner ball is next to
make, or ready to run, do not try to help the partner ball
through the arch unless it Is in very favorable position.
This is a difficult play, and, should the partner ball lodge
in the arch, or even closely beyond it, the playing ball is
likely stopped from making the arch, and from any further
progress which it might otherwise have made on that turn
of play.

When lagging or roquetting for position in front of
arches, preparatory to running the arch, especially from
long distances, beginners will do well to try and lag their
ball to a point 1 1/2 or 2 1/2 feet distant in front of the arch,
rather than nearer, because too often the angle at a closer
distance decreases the likelihood of making the arch,
whereas the same amount of variation from the center line
through the arch, and at a greater distance from the arch,
will make the arch an easy one to negotiate.

When a player doesn't see much chance to make the arch
he desires, he should help his partner ball in any way 
possible. When the balls are all at long distances from each
other, shoot to the partner ball, thus giving it a sure hit and
a start the next play, taking a chance, of course, that the
opponent may not hit in the meantime.

When maneuvering through the basket, try and leave the
partner ball in such a position that, should the playing ball

-55-

get part way through, and remain still within the basket, the
partner ball can send it on through on the next play.

Always remember, however, that the arch which the playing
ball desires is the main thought, everything else being
secondary, or usually so, with beginners; and when one
becomes a finished player, then one may pay more particular
attention to tying up the hot ball, running through
arches with both partners at once, etc., but not so as a
beginner.

When setting up to help the partner ball, maneuver to
place the partner ball and the opponent's cold ball in
convenient locality, near each other, then drive the hot ball
away and tie it up, if possible, after which shoot to the
partner's desired arch or point. it is a nice feature of this
play if one can so place the balls that when it comes time
for the partner to play, he can readily tie up the ball he
is near, which, of course, is then the hot ball. This is what
might be called a double tie-up, and is used continuously in
the games between experienced players.

It is bad policy for beginners to send a playing ball part
way into an arch, from where it will have difficulty in 
hitting a ball. Especially is this true of the basket. Better be
out of the basket than poorly into it. If a lag for an arch
is made and poor position got, go to the partner, unless he
already has a ball near him, in which case go to the arch
he desires, unless he is already well set up to make it,
in which case go near the partner's next arch in order.

Never lag your own ball into position for your arch on
your last shot, unless your partner happens to be for the
same arch. You can always find a place to send your ball
on your last shot of your turn which will do your partner
some good. A lag in front of your arch on your last shot
of your turn does no one any good, unless your partner
might choose to put your ball through for you; and again,
the chances are very great that your opponent will get
the balls before you have an opportunity to take advantage
of the lag you have made.

Beginners are not likely to be able to negotiate arches
from distances of 4 feet or more with much degree of
certainty, especially if at an angle, and when confronted by
such a condition, instead of trying for the arch and failing,
it is the best policy to help the partner ball.

-56-

I always look at the playing ball when finally delivering
a stroke. Some players find themselves looking at the object
I ball. others looking at the ground. and. worse yet, closing
the eyes entirely when delivering the stroke. Especially is
this true of shots requiring unusual force of stroke.
If a beginner will learn the rules by reading them a few
times. and try to use his own judgment in making his plays.
he will be more likely to make quick headway than he
will by following the directions of a coach. especially if he
expects, to make real progress at the game. and especially
if he does not readily see the logic of the plays suggested
by the coach. A coach for a while is desirable if he can
be had. but there comes a time when one must go on his
own resources if he expects to win games.

Section 18. BANK SHOTS - Short distance bank shots
and bank shots at a very acute angle will work out at the
natural angle, the same as on a billiard table. The long
distance banks and ones of more obtuse angle, unless
sent with tremendous force. will be found to spread or
lose part of the natural direction, and for this allowance
must be made, depending a great deal upon the condition
of the ground, and of the wall.

Section 19. PUSH SHOTS - Push shots are allowed in
making split roquets. or drives. This is done by keeping
the playing ball in contact with the ball played from for
an instant. causing it to travel in a split direction, or in
the same direction as the playing ball. to some point
desired. This is usually made with the hard end of the mallet.
holding the handle close to the mallet head. These
shots should be taught by a coach. as it is very easy
to foul in making a push shot. (See foul rules.)

Section 20. ETIQUETTE OF ROQUE - A beginner may
as well learn right at the start to keep off the court when
not playing or using his turn, to keep away from the line of
an opponent's shot. to follow the printed rules and to play
fair. If there is a controversy and no umpire. settle it at
once by leaving it to the nearest player looking on. and
in case there is none such. then by flipping a coin, or some
definite settlement. rather than to continue arguing the
matter. Once a matter has been settled. let that end it. and
center your interests on new efforts.

-57-

Do not jam, push, or pull a ball through an arch, or for
a hit. Be near your ball when your turn comes, so that
you can at once step onto the court and make your play,
thus saving time for the balance of the players.
Don't talk to an opponent when he is shooting. Wear
soft shoes if the surface of the court is soft, and take care
of the courts.

Don't take a questionable advantage.

If the rules say that the player must move the object ball
when taking play from it, do so, and don't take the chance
of having your opponent believe that you claimed to have
moved the ball, when he couldn't see any movement.

If you make a foul, admit it, and leave the court. There
ARE players who believe the foul rules apply to all players
except themselves.

The proper attitude in all these matters will bring more
pleasure to you, and will continue the wholesome good
fellowship which exists between Roque fans generally over
the country.

Lastly, as you learn to play, and run into situations which
you cannot answer, send your questions to the Rules
Committee of the American Roque League. They are the
Supreme Court of Roque.

-58-

INDEX

Executive Officers 3
The American Roque League's Welcome 4
Introduction 6
Honorable Mention 6
Contributions 7

OFFICIAL PLAYING RULES 9
Content, Construction, and Application - Article I
I Of What the Rules Consist 11
2 Amendment of the Rules 11
3 Construction of the Rules 11
4 Umpire's Duties 11
5 Appeal from Umpire's Decision 11
6 When No Decision of Umpire Possible 12

The Court and Its Fixtures - Article II
7 Court Specifications  12
8 Boundary Wall 12
9 Arches 12
10 Stakes 12

Playing Equipment - Article III
11 Necessary Equipment 12
12 Balls Required 13
13 Kind of Mallets 13
14 Breaking Ball 13
15 Markers and Their Use 13
16 Failure to Place Markers Properly 13
17 Failure to Call and Correct Marker Error 13
18 Making Point Erroneously Marked 14

The Playing Line - Article IV
19 Location and Purpose of Playing Line 14
20 Replacing Out of B-Bounds Balls 14
21 When Out of Bounds Ball Replaced 14
22 Two or More Balls Over Line 14
23 Two or More Balls Crossing Line 14
24 Balls Played Into Corner Place 15
25 When Place Inside Line Occupied 15
26 When Players or Umpire Disagree 15
27 Playing Ball When Outside Line 15
28 Failing to Set Balls Inside 16

Foul Play - Article V
29 Penalty For Foul Play 15
30 Fouls Subject to the Rule 16
31 Removing Sand From or Freezing Ball 16
32 Deterred Discovery of Foul I~
33 Touching Ball by Opponent 18

Stroking the Playing Ball - Article VI
34 What Constitutes a Fair Stroke 17
35 When Stroke is Made 17
36 When Stroke is Foul 17
37 How Fairness of Stroke Decided 17 :
38 Ball Hitting Player or Mallet 17  
39 Outside Interference with Ball 18

-61-

40 Interference of Opponent with Ball 18
41 Interference of Opponent with Stroke 18
42 Opponent Staying in Line of Shot 18
43 Moving Ball by Contacting Arch 18
44 Ball in Contact at Start of Turn 18
45 Marking Wall or Court 18

Contacting Another Ball - Article VII
46 When Other Ball. May Be Contacted 18
47 How Contact May Be Made 18
48 When Ball May Be Stopped After Contact 19
49 Contacting a Dead Ball 19
50 When Dead Ball Not Contacted 19
51 When Live Ball Not Contacted 19
52 Contacting Ball After Making Point 19
53 Contacting Dead Ball Beyond Arch 19
54 Contacting Ball in Motion or Outside 19
55 Contact by or Upon Rover Ball 19

Roquetting a Ball - Article VIII
56 When and How Roquet Made 19
57 Failure to Move Object Ball 58 Second Impetus on Roquet 20
59 Pounding Object Ball Into Ground 20
60 Moving Ball While Preparing to Roquet 20
61 Ball Moving When Playing Ball Picked Up 20
62 Contacting Dead Ball on Roquet 20
63 Roquet After Contacting Two or More Ball 20
64 Roquetting a Ball Not Contacted 21

Opening. Object and Strategy of Game - Article IX
65 Number of Players 21
66 Number of Ball per Player 21
67 Opening Lag 21
68 Placing the Ball 21
69 The Opening Shots 21
70 Object of Game 22
71 Assisting or Setting Up for Partner 22

Sequence and Turn of Play - Article X
72 Order of Play ~ 22
73 Playing Wrong Ball 22
74 Duration of Turn of Play 23
75 When Turn of Play Starts and Ends 23
76 Number of Shots per Turn of Play 23
77 Premature Play 23
78 Replacing or Repairing Balls, Arches, or Surface 23

Scoring of Point - Article XI
79 Sequence of Points 23
80 Fair Position Required 23
81 Playing Back Through Arch for Position 24
82 Roquetting Through an Arch 24
83 Contacting Dead Ball on Roquet for Position 24
84 When Point is Made 24
85 When Ball Through Arch 24

-62-

86 Rolling Back Into or Through Arch 24
87 Contacting Ball and Making Point 24
88 Hitting Ball and Rolling in an Arch 25
89 Making Two or More Points on One Stroke 25
90 Jam Shots 25
91 How End Arches Are Made 25
92 How Side Arches Are Made 25
93 How Center Arches Are Made 25
94 Making Center in Several Turns 26
95 When Ball Within Limits of Center 26
96 Contacting Live Ball in Center 26
97 Contacting Dead Ball in Center 26

Duration and Termination of Game Article XII
98 When Game is Completed 26
99 How Game is Completed 27
100 Inning Games 27

Specification of a Roque Court
Explanatory Diagram 28
Official Court Plan 29
Court Details 30

TOURNAMENT RULES 31
1 Official Playing Rules to Govern 83
2 Divisions and Prizes 83
3 Classification of Players 83
4 Entries 33
5 When Tournament Play Starts 83
6 Schedule of Games 88
7 Hours of Play 88
8 Refusal to Play Scheduled Game 34
9 Forfeited Games 34
10 Duration of Games 34
11 Score Cards 34
12 Withdrawal from Tournament 34
18 When Sections Apply 34
14 In Case of a Tie 34
15 Determination of Winner 35
16 Umpires 35
17 When Game Halted 35
18 Sizing and Replacing Balls 35
19 When Umpire May Forfeit Game 35
20 When Tournament Committee Disagrees 35
21 Divisional Tournaments 35
22 When Official Trophies May Be Awarded 36

BY-LAWS 37
Article 1 Name 39
Article 2 Object 39
Article 3 Membership 39
Article 4 Membership Fees 39
Article 5 Dues and Fees 39
 Section 1 Annual Dues 39
 Section 2 Tournament Fees 39
Article 6 Officers 39
 Section 1 Duties of the President 40

-63-

 Section 2 Duties of the Secretary-Treasurer 40
 Section 8 Divisional Director 40
Article 7 Committees 40
 Section 1 Executive Committee 40
 Section 2 Tournament Committee 0
 Section 3 Divisional Directors 41
 Section 4 Medal Committee 41
 Section 5 Publicity Committee 41
Article 8 Tournaments 41
 Section 1 Annual Tournament 41
 Section 2 Tournament Committee 41
 Section 8 Semi-Annual Tournament 41
Article 9 Eligibility 41
Article 10 Medals 42
Article 11 Divisions 42
Article 12 Meetings 42
Article 18 Fiscal Year 42
Article 14 Franchise 42
Article 15 Amendments 42
Article 16 Order of Business 43

EXPLANATION OF SPECIAL TERMS AND POINTS
OF HOW TO PLAY 45
Article I Explanation of Special Terms 47
Article 2 Points of How to Play the Game 49
 Section 1 Putting the Court in Order ~9
 Section 2 Painting Roque Balls 49
 Section 8 The Mallet 49
 Section 4 Holding the Mallet 50
 Section 5 Action of Mallet on the Ball 50
 Section 6 Choice of Stance 50
 Section 7 Delivering the Stroke 50
 Section 8 Preliminary Practice 51
 Section 9 Rule of Play for the Playing Ball 51
 Section 10 Making the Center Arch 52
 Section 11 Starting a Game 52
 Section 12 Maneuvering for Arches 62
 Section 13 Disposing of the Hot Ball 53
 Section 14 Keeping One Ball Ahead 54
 Section 15 Angular Arch Shots 54
 Section 16 Roquetting Into Arches 54
 Section 17 General Policy and Logic 54
 Section 18 Bank Shots 57
 Section 19 Push Shots 57
 Section 20 Etiquette of Roque 57

Advertisement-Where to Obtain Roque Supplies
McGowan's "Texas Sure Shot" Roque Mallets and
 Hard Rubber Roque Balls 59
Stowe-Woodward Inc. Inc. "The Ball Supreme for Roque"
 -The Paralite Hard Rubber Roque Ball 60

-64-
 
 
 

RULES AND
REGULATIONS
OF THE

TWO BALL 

AND

ROYAL ROQUE

1956 - 1957
B. C. McGOWAN
Balls, Mallets, Roque and
Croquet Supplies
NEW ADDRESS
4205 Briar Creek Lane
Dallas, Texas 75214
 
This book printed under the direction of
The American Roque League, Inc.

PRESIDENT 				VICE-PRESIDENT
BOB CHAPPELL 				PAT FISHER
P. 0. Box 953 				North Oakland
St. Petersburg, Florida 		Decatur, Illinois

SECRETARY & TREASURER
MARYALMA YOUSEY
5439 Vanderbilt Avenue
Dallas 6, Texas

PRESIDENT. EMERITUS 			REGISTERED AGENT
FRANK MOTHERSHEAD 			JOHN CAMPBELL
P. 0 Box 866 				432 John Street
St. Petersburg, Florida 		Carinville, Illinois
		
			BOARD OF DIRECTORS		

ROB8 ISAACS 				PETE MIERS
4550 Edgewater Drive 			Forest Knolls
Orlando, Florida 			Decatur, Illinois

J. C. ROBERTS 				RUSSEL MATTHEWS
1201 Collie De Sol 			Northeast Box 75
Albuquerque, New Mexico 		Conway Springs, Kansas

W. W. CAMPBELL 				0. H. BERG
232 Lubbock Bank Bldg. 			1134 Longworthy
Lubbock, Texas 				Dubuque, Iowa

KARL WATERMAN 				FLOYD SCOTT
1532 South Main 			5710 Kenwood
Elkhart, Indiana 			Kansas City, Missouri

BOBBY ARNOLD 				ALBERT ROGERS
3074 West Avenue 35 200J. 		7th Street South
Los Angeles, California 		St Petersburg, Florida

ARAM KAPIGIAN
Adult Recreation Club 			GENE GOODWIN
201 E. Colorado 			Dolton City, Illinois
Glendale 5, Calif.

RULES COMMITTEE
A. C. McGOWAN 				IRL FITZGERALD
5439 Vanderbilt Avenue 			1110 Coolidge
Dallas, Texas 				Wichita, Kansas

WILLIAM GLYNN
Casey, Illinois

ARTICLE IV

General Rules for Two Ball and Royal Roque

Section I. Interference With Game. When a player
is making a stroke, no one should seek to speak to
him or attract his attention. Should an opponent do
so, or stay on the bed of the court, the player may
replace the balls moved and repeat the stroke.

Sec. 2. Premature Stroke. If a player strikes his
playing ball before his opponent has finished his turn
of play, all balls moved by such a stroke shall be re-
placed and the shot made over. A player has not
finished his turn until he has left the court. If he steps
off the court with both feet, he shall be considered to
have left the court.

Sec. 3. Balls-Counting Upon. A playing ball
"counts upon" a live ball on the court when it comes
in contact with it by a fair stroke from the face of the
player's mallet, either by a direct shot or by a split
shot or carom from the border of an arch or the stake.

Sec. 4. Ball Stopped After Counting on Another
Ball. (a) A player may stop his playing ball after it
counts upon a ball. if it is clearly apparent that it will
not again come in contact with another ball, and it is
not a foul if under those circumstances it should strike
his foot, person, mallet, or clothing.
(b) If a player is attempting to make a point. or
a shot. and the playing ball, or the ball he is playing
upon or from, hits his foot, person, mallet or clothing,
play ceases and the balls moved shall be replaced or
remain where they rest at the option of the opponent.

Sec. 5. Ball - Taking Play From When Counted
Upon. (a) When the playing ball counts upon another
ball, play must be taken from it causing the object
ball to move fairly.
(b) When taking play from a ball, the player must
not strike his ball twice, nor give it a second impetus.
This would be a foul.
( c) Should a player move a ball not in "close
position" when placing his ball against it to take play
from it, he shall not attempt to replace it, but shall
follow it up with his ball. But if said ball is moved
when in "close position" it shall be returned to it3
former place before the play can proceed. (A ball is
in close position when a slight movement of it might
result in either an advantage or disadvantage to the
player.
(d) If in making a split shot the playing ball hits a
dead ball or if an object ball hits a live or dead ball,
not lying out of bounds, it is not a foul; therefore play
continues as though the said ball had not been hit.
(e) If in making a shot any ball, lying in contact,
or nearly in contact with an arch, should be moved
by any ball hitting said arch, it is not a foul, and said
ball shall not be replaced.
(f) No player shall pound the object ball into the
ground, thus making a depression, and thus making it
possible to set his playing ball against the object ball
in such a manner that when played away from, the
object ball moves on account of inequality of the
ground, instead of on account of its contact with the
playing ball.

Sec. 6. Ball-Removing Sand from or Freezing. A
player may remove sand from any ball or balls by a
gentle tap of the mallet on top of the ball, except
when the balls are in close position. A player also
may tap the balls on top gently, if necessary, in order
to freeze them.

Sec. 7. Point Making After Counting on a Ball. If
a ball counts upon another ball, and afterwards at the
same stroke, makes a point, for the playing ball, the
player must take play from the ball and reject the
point. If the point were for an opponent's ball, it shall
count, unless said ball was out of position.

Sec. 8. Ball Shot Over the Boundary. A ball over
the boundary or border of the court must be returned
at a right angle to the boundary line from the point
where it stops or left the court.
If two or more balls which are over the boundary
line should rest one behind the other at a right angle
to the line, they must be properly placed on the court
frozen to each other, in the same relative position in
which they were played over the line, provided they
did not go out on the line at a right angle to the
border. If the balls went over the boundary on one
line at right angle to the border and stop on one right
angle line, the first ball over is first brought in at a
right angle, and the other ball is brought inside the
border line and frozen to the first, on either side at the
option of the player.

Sec. 9. Points Making Two or More at Same Stroke.
If a playing ball makes two or more points for itself
at the same stroke, the points all count, except in two
ball, but the player has only the same privilege as if
he made but one.

Sec. 10. First Ball Shot Into a Comer Place. The
first ball driven over the boundary line into a comer-
place is put on the court at the corner of the boundary
line. Should a ball lie half way, or more than half
way inside the corner-place, it shall be considered in
the "comer-place". If two or more balls are to be
brought in from the corner-place, they are placed
against the ball occupying the corner in the order
and relative position in which they left the court.

Sec. 11. Ball Making Position from Wrong Direction.
If a ball is played or driven under an arch from the
wrong direction in which it is advancing, and rests so
that a straight edge laid against the arch on the side
from which it came, fails to touch it, it is in position to
run that arch in the right direction.

Sec. 12. Ball-Taking Play Under the Arch. If any
part of a ball has been placed under portion of an
arch, in order to take play from another ball, it is not
in position to run that arch, unless after taking play, it
rests in position to run that arch in the right direction,
as per Rule II.

Sec. 13. Ball-When Through an Arch, A ball running
its arch in the right direction, is through when a
straight edge laid across the arch on the side from
whence the ball came does not touch the ball.

Sec. 14. Ball-Rolling Back Through or Under an
Arch. (a) If a ball, in making an arch, does not hit a
ball, the stake or the border, and rolls back through
or under the arch, so that a straight edge applied as
in Rule 13 touches it, the point is not made, but the
ball is in position to run the arch.
(b). Should the ball hit the stake or border and roll
back through or under the arch. the point is made and
the player continues his play.
(c) Should a ball hit a ball and roll back through
or under the arch, the point is not made. If the ball
hit was a live ball. he takes play from it; if a dead
ball, his play ceases and all balls may be replaced
at the option of the opponent. The playing ball is not
in position to make the arch at its next turn of play if
a straight edge touches the ball when applied to the
back side of the arch.

Sec. 15. Ball-Stopped By Opponent. If a ball is
stopped or diverted from its course by an opponent the
player may repeat the shot. If stopped by a partner
player. it shall constitute a foul on the player who
made the shot.

Sec. 16. Ball-Stopped By An Object on the Court.
If a ball is stopped or diverted from its course by any
person or object on the court not pertaining to the
game. the shot may be repeated.

Sec. 17. Penalty for a Foul Stroke. (a) All balls
moved by a stroke which violates. or results in the
violation of a rule, must be replaced. or left where
they stop at the option of the opponent. the play shall
cease, and any point or points made for the offending
player or his partner, by such foul stroke. shall not
be allowed.
(b) In case of a deferred discovery of a foul, play
shall cease. If two or more strokes were made after
said foul occurred. no attempt shall be made to replace
the balls, and any point or points made shall stand as
made, but the turn of play ceases.

LIST OF FOUL PLAYS

Section 18. The following are foul plays subject
to Rule 17:
(a) Hitting a dead ball by direct stroke.
(b) Taking play from a ball that has not been
counted upon.
(c) Hitting or causing a ball to hit any ball that
was in motion or off the court when the stroke was
made, by either a direct shot or split shot.
(d) Playing or taking play from a ball when off
the court, except when the playing ball has been
placed in contact with a ball on the court for the
purpose of taking play there from.
(e) Taking play from a ball and failing to move it.
(f) When, in delivering a stroke, the player's mallet
makes a second contact with the playing ball, or gives
it a second impetus.
(g) When in delivering a stroke, the player pulls,
pushes or jams the playing ball with the mallet.
(h) When, by a downward stroke, the player
purposely causes his ball to jump over an intervening
object.
(i) When, in delivering a stroke, the player's mallet
hits an arch and thus causes a ball to move which
was close to, or in contact with the arch.
(j) Playing a ball in the wrong sequence.
(k) When a player touches, moves, causes to be
moved, stops or diverts the movement of any ball,
except as provided in these rules. For example, a
player may put a ball on the court, may place his
ball for taking a split shot, may tap a ball to remove
the sand. etc., but he must not pick up the wrong ball
after making a hit; he must not move any ball with
his mallet, person or clothing; he must not stop any
ball, except as provided in Rule 4.
(I) Violation of a rule constitutes a foul.
(m) Moving or carrying a ball that rests over the
boundary, except to bring it directly on the court, as
provided in these rules.
(n) No player shall tap an arch wherein, or near
which a ball rests.
(o) Should a player stand or sit in line of an 
opponent's shot, after being asked to move away, the
playing ball may repeat the shot, once or more so
long as the opponent continues to stand or sit in line.
(p) Hitting a ball with anything but the face of the
mallet. (Either end of the mallet.)
(q) Pushing a ball with end of mallet.
(r) A player shall not touch or move any ball during -
in opponent's turn of play. The penalty shall be that
the opponent may replace any ball so touched or
moved.
(s) If a player gives instructions to his partner who
is taking his turn of play or talks to an opponent
while the later is playing, it is a foul. If the foul is
called immediately by the opponent the penalty shall
be loss of that turn of play and any balls moved shall
be replaced and points made canceled at the option
of the opponent.

SPECIAL ROYAL ROQUE RULES
(Three Ball)

ARTICLE V
The game of Royal Roque is played with three balls
- red, white and blue or black-with the roque balls
on the Roque Courts.

Section I. To start a game, the Queen Ball, or
white ball, is placed in the center of the "basket.'.
Then the two parties score for choice of play and balls
the same as in two ball games. The winner in scoring
places his ball on the nearest corner to the center of
the head of the court and shoots at the white ball.
and hitting the white ball entitles him to two more
plays to try to make the first arch (a roquet and one
other shot). If successful he continues play. If not.
the other party places his ball on the opposite corner
and in the same manner as his opponent, shoots to
hit the white ball wherever it may rest on the court.

Sec. 2. (a) After a player has hit the white ball
he must take the first arch before he is allowed to
play on the white ball again. A player's ball cannot
block his opponent's arch if the opponent has position
to advance through his arch. If blocked, the player's
ball, at the election of the opponent, may be placed
back to a clearance of not more than 61/2 inches on
the line on which it came to rest if requested by the;
opponent.
(b) If both players are for the same arch (except
arch No. 1) and player's ball {as a result of a foul)
comes to rest in front of his opponent's ball so that his
opponent {when in position) cannot run his arch at
his next turn of play, the fouled ball, at the election
of the opponent, may be placed 61/2 inches directly
toward the right-hand border from the place where it
came to rest.

Sec. 3 After one makes the first arch, he is then
alive on the white ball--and every turn thereafter
except as stated in Rule No.7.

Sec. 4. A player shall not bombard his opponent's
ball, in any manner until each of them has
made the first arch. Thereafter he may bombard for
his own arch in the direction he is advancing at any
time, but must make a point every time he bombards
any other position, except when both balls are for the
same arch, either party may bombard from any direction
at will. By bombardment is meant {whether intentional
or accidental) the driving of an opponent's ball
from its position before an arch or any other position
through the act of roquetting only.
{b) When opponent's balls are for the same wicket
in opposite directions they are not for the same arch.
(c) A player, when stroking his own ball, shall not
move the opponent's ball in any manner with his
mallet. This would be a foul. When a foul has been
committed, all balls may be either replaced or left
where they came to rest at the option of the opponent
If a ball has made the first arch and moves the other
ball, before it has made the first arch, it is a foul, but
if the ball not having made the first arch should move
the opponent's ball by first hitting the white ball, it
is not a foul.
(d) Except when both players are for the same arch,
one player can not block his opponent's arch if the
opponent at his next turn of play has position to
advance through his arch. In such an event, at the
election of the opponent, the blocking ball, if resting
in front of the opponent's arch so that a straight edge
will not touch said ball when applied to the rear side
of the arch. may be placed back 10 a clearance of not
more than 61/2 inches directly in front of said arch or
on the line on which it came to rest if it were moving
in the direction the blocked ball is advancing. If said
blocking ball is resting close to and in the rear of
opponent's arch, it may be placed back not more than
61/2 inches on a line on which it came to rest
Sec. 5. A player shall play on the white ball only
-except when his opponent's ball has made all arches
and both stakes- It is then a king ball, and one may
play on a king ball until he makes the circuit.
Sec. 6. After a player has made all the arches, his
ball is then a Rover, and he can play on the white
ball only once before hitting the home stake. Hitting
your opponent's ball by direct shot before you have
made the circuit, is a foul. Make only first arch of the
basket in the direction you are advancing.

7. A rover or king ball on its next turn of play is
eligible to win the game, by contacting the opponent's
ball, if and when the opponent has made the first
arch. If a player hits the white ball with a king ball
it is a foul and player loses his turn of play. No
player shall speak to an opponent while he is playing
If a player in preparing to stroke his own ball, should
touch his own ball with his mallet in any manner
whatsoever, it counts as a stroke by the playing ball
and his turn of play ceases.

SPECIAL TWO BALL RULES

ARTICLE VI

Section I. All games shall be opened by scoring
from an imaginary line running directly across the
court through the middle of the center arches, each
player shooting a ball toward the boundary line at
the head of the court. A score fails if the ball hits
another ball, an arch, the stake or border. If two
scores fail another trial must be made. The player,
the center of whose ball rests nearest the boundary
line, shall have the choice of play and balls.

Sec. 2. The balls shall be placed at the head of
the court on the boundary line comers nearest the
center.

Sec. 3. The player winning the lag shall shoot
first. He must contact his partner's ball at least once
before making his first arch. After making the first
arch, he again must contact his opponent's ball before
making the next arch. At each turn of play he thus
must continue until all aches have been made and
the stake at the lower end of the court has been 
contacted.

Sec. 4. The second player continues in like manner
at his turn of play until all arches have been made
and the stake at the lower end of the court has been
contacted.

Sec. 5 Each player after contacting opponent's
ball roquets the ball as in roque, and if he fails to
make a point, his turn of play ceases and his opponent
takes the turn. All turns of play cease whenever there
is a failure to make a point.

Sec. 6. Whenever a player by his own shot makes
point No. 15, his turn of play ceases. His ball is then
said to be a poison ball. At his next turn of play,
he shoots to contact the opponent's ball, and if and
when successful, he wins the game. If both balls
should become poison balls, each player at his turn
of play tries to contact the opponent's ball; Whichever
player is first successful wins the game.

Sec. 7. All arches must be made in the same order
as in roque.

Sec. 8 Before starting play , by an adopted pat-
tern, a 75 degree segment of a circle with a radius
of 10 inches from the arch, is made in front of each
arch at the basket. When a player is for the basket,
after contacting his opponent's ball, he may drive his
ball entirely within the arc in front of the arch toward
which he is advancing. As long as his ball remains
entirely within the arc or in the space between the
two arches of the basket or under the second arch
of the basket. the opponent must shoot and strike the
border of the court before contacting the ball trying
for the basket. except on the first shot after the roquet
by the opponent. or his making a point, he has the
privilege of one direct shot, if open. A ball in the
space between the two arches of the basket is said
to be in position to advance as long as a straight edge
placed on the inside of the two arches continues to
touch the ball.

Sec. 9. When the opponents are for the basket in
opposite directions, the one whose ball is first played
into the arch in the direction he is advancing, so that
a straight edge placed on the far side of the arch
touches the ball, has the right of way. Thus his 
opponent cannot block his progress by placing his ball
in the line of advance, except when the arch is
blocked by opponent's ball on a bank shot from the
rail said ball shall not be removed.

Sec. 10. Contacting opponent's ball after making
arch No.7 is optional before hitting the lower stake.
After striking the stake the opponent's ball must be
contacted before making arch No.8

Sec. 11. Each player at his turn of play has the
option of shooting at the opponent's ball, trying for a
point if eligible, or shooting to any position on the
court he may choose.

Sec. 12. When the fifteenth point has been made
the playing ball must layover one turn, it can not
finish game at that turn of play.

Sec. 13. Team play proceeds in the same manner
except that members of a team alternate in their turn
of play.

Sec. 14. When a player has made all 15 points
and laid over one turn of play, he is then eligible to
contact his opponent's ball at each turn of play, and
thus win the game. If both sides complete all points
and layover one turn, then the side that makes a
contact with the opponent's ball first wins the game.

AMENDMENTS TO ALL RULES

ARTICLE VII

On and after January I, 1951, Miscellaneous,
Ground, General and Special Rules may be changed
at any regular meeting by a two-thirds vote, or if
notice be given at the next previous regular meeting
or by posting for three days, by a majority vote.