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Topic 50 of 99: Et Cetera

Wed, Jul 18, 2001 (14:35) | Marcia (MarciaH)
This is for anything you would like to comment on or post which seems to fit no where else. Liam was its inspiration and he provided the first post.
1049 responses total.

 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 18, 2001 (14:41) * 25 lines 
 
An Irishman's Diary
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OPINION/Kevin Myers

One of the key elements to any religion is that whereas there might be much which is difficult to defend logically, it nonetheless fits into a broader theological picture which provides a greater truth; and what holds that picture together, in the face of all the in-built illogic, is faith.

Faith creates a coherence out of the incoherent and contradictory. And when religion expects us to intellectually sustain what our reasons and senses tell us is simply unsustainable, it waves a wand and calls it dogma , thereby excusing us of thought on the matter.

When we say we respect another's religion, what we actually mean is we're not going to publicly ridicule the funny bits, even though in the privacy of our own minds, we chuckle away. Papal infallibility, consubstantiation, Defender of the Faith, Wailing Wall, Mecca, prayer scrolls, circumcision: we tolerate (though perhaps with quiet amusement) those we don't accept, but ardently defend those we do.

We tolerate other's dogmas so long as other religions don't try to impose them on us. Even Saudi Arabia turns a blind eye to the fornication and serial copulation of the ex-pats there. But there are two exceptions: Taliban is one. Feminism is the other.

Feminism is very like a religion in that it is dependent on huge leaps of faith, which cannot be explained by logic or evidence or rational argument. Feminism can only be defended by waving the magic wand and pronouncing equality between the sexes a dogma beyond discussion.

Yet unlike almost all other religions, feminism wishes to impose its theology on all societies everywhere, regardless of the intellectual contradictions at its heart, and the evidence before our eyes every second of our lives.

Examine the news of last week. Did anyone see a single girl or woman rioter in Ardoyne or Drumcree? The only woman who was clearly evident in all the news footage of that appalling violence was a woman constable. And what was she doing in the middle of this nearly murderous mayhem? Simply behaving like Florence Nightingale, minding a wounded colleague.

Can anyone who believes in the "equality of the sexes" explain how it is that Washington is awash with female staffers whose ambition seems to be to bed important male congressmen? Clinton discovered this with many, many young women; so it seems has Congressman Gary Condit, who was not so much two-timing his wife, but eight-timing her.

Congressman Condit is not a pretty boy. He's not young. He plain and he's 54 and he had eight mistresses - though apparently the figure is now down to seven, and probably falling.

But consider: new feminism is nearly 40 years old, yet here we have a career woman, poor Chandra Levy, aged 24, doting on this complete and utter creep, even colour-coding his shirts during the hours he'd sit waiting in his flat before he would finally oblige her with his pelvic attentions.

more... http://www.ireland.com/newspaper/opinion/2001/0717/opt4.htm#top


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 2 of 1049: horrible horace  (horrible) * Wed, Jul 18, 2001 (15:34) * 1 lines 
 
If all the Interns were laid end to end.........what do you mean"IF" heheheh


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 3 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 18, 2001 (15:40) * 3 lines 
 
*grin* Precisely so!

They took a poll of parents and asked if they wanted their daughters to be interns in Washington DC. Oddly enough only 67% said no. I'd have thought it much higher, but perhaps they see it as a career step.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 4 of 1049: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Tue, Jul 24, 2001 (16:45) * 3 lines 
 
Marcia, I'm definitely an etcetera so I thought I'd post here .....

Things are so bad at the moment I'm bowing out of everything ...have put PhD on hold for a bit to sort things out ...


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 5 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 24, 2001 (21:30) * 1 lines 
 
Maggie!!! Will try to be online when you are up in the morning. Oh my dear! Say it isn't so!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 6 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Jul 30, 2001 (18:26) * 1 lines 
 
Maggie, I hope that you can sort things out and that circumstances improve.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 7 of 1049: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Tue, Jul 31, 2001 (12:52) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks Cheryl ...sorry I've been quiet lately .. just trying to keep my head above water emotionally...still nowhere to live come Sept! Packing in anticipation .....


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 8 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Aug 29, 2001 (16:25) * 28 lines 
 
From Liam... Come back... We miss you!

An Irishman's Diary
By Kevin Myers
ireland.com - The Irish Times - OPINION

Astute readers of newspapers at this time of year will have noticed an increasing preponderance of stories beginning, "Scientists in Alabama believe..." or, "Evolutionary experts in Geneva are working on the theory that...." No doubt those readers read on, in the belief that what the words before them are in some way related to reality. And they certainly are - if, that is, you believe that I have consented to be Mariah Carey's toy-boy, but only on condition that I continue to share my prodigious favours with Whitney Houston. Sorry, Britney; not tonight. Perhaps Saturday; and I don't take credit cards...
The only basis for these "scientists believe" stories is to be found in a small chamber, the Creativity Room, in a remote part of The Irish Times labyrinth, the entrance to which is guarded by Gurkhas whose tongues have been surgically removed.

Head-hunters
Most newspapers have such rooms, though they are not always guarded by soldierly Nepalese. Kerrymen are favoured as security by some, and there was a time when New Guinea head-hunters found favour, but they went out of vogue when they developed an appetite for sub-editors.
Now no one begrudges a lonely exile from Port Moresby the odd snack or two, and if they had confined their nutritional adventures to the occasional individual from the books page or sports, no one would really have minded - a sub, after all, is only a sub. But when the Guardian night editor turned up to find that all that remained of his night staff was a single femur being agreebly gnawed by security, with the chief sub's head glumly sitting on the spike, something had to give. The New Guinea lads had to go, and in their place came some West Side Boys from Sierre Leone.
There is a purpose to getting these rough-house lads in; for they have to mind the intellectual heart of the newspaper, the Creativity Room wherein some of the most brilliant minds in journalism are chained to the oars of a galley which roams the world of their fevered imaginations. You only see the fruits of their endeavours once August arrives, but just as the grapes of October are the product of a year's endeavour, so are the vintage stories appearing in August the product of 12 months of toil by these unsung heroes.
"Scientists believe that life on earth began in outer space" is a story which surfaced in newspapers this week, using quotes from the Indian Space Agency. We are rather proud of that story in this newspaper. It was dreamt up by our Debbie last December - she was given a road-kill pigeon as a special reward for Christmas dinner. We sold the story on right round the world in the Frankfurt Silly Season Story Fair last Easter, and Debbie's royalties enabled her to buy a mousetrap to increase her protein consumption. All she needs now is another corker of a story, and she'll be able to buy some cheese for it.

Hallucination
It's not that this newspaper is mean: it's just that we've found than an imagination works best when aided by a touch of famine-induced hallucination. Well-fed minds are dullard minds, is our motto; and so we have a policy that seems a little stern but in reality is simply is a recognition of market forces.
Occasionally we ease up on our stern regime, just so as the inmates of the Creativity Room can see our human face; and there's no way of describing the pleasure we got from seeing our Debbie tearing into her Xmas feral pigeon, then picking her teeth with its tiny talons, finally crunching them as well.

Made us feel like Santa, I can tell you.
Anyway, the product of this policy is a fund of stories to sustain newspapers through the long lean weeks ahead, such as one of ours the other day: "An artichoke that grows in salty water could help create a revolution in world agriculture, according to research." That appeared in the Siberian Gazette, but only because it wasn't good enough for us. Debbie thought it up. It was so poor we fined her one mousetrap.
The Times had another one of ours recently: "A coffin and a mausoleum have been unearthed which may have contained leaders of the ancient Jewish monastic community that produced the Dead Sea Scrolls." Don't you just love the "may"? Our Debbie is a wizard with the "may". She knows just how to pitch it. She could have said "may" have been the place where the Virgin conceived, or "may" have been the place where Judas hanged himself.

Terrible day
The problem is that with really important "mays" experts start enquiring about the origins of the stories. There was that terrible day when The Irish Catholic - of all people - had to send in Little Sisters of the Poor commandos to garotte its entire CR workforce in order to conceal the origins of its "scoop" that a feather from the wing of the Archangel Gabriel had been found in a public toilet in Termonfeckin. A stupid, stupid story, for everyone knows there is no public toilet in Termonfeckin.

And you believe that stuff about Code Red virus? Debbie again. It was so good she got her mousetrap back. Now I'm off to France, and for the next couple of weeks of the silly season, Debbie will be writing the Diary, under different pen-names. If she's very, very good, I've promised her a piece of cheese. If she's not, I get my mousetrap back.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 9 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Nov  6, 2001 (16:50) * 1 lines 
 
Liam still hasn't been back. Maybe one day...


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 10 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov  6, 2001 (19:31) * 1 lines 
 
I miss Liam. I hope he returns. I think he knows he would be welcome! I will email him to see how he is doing and to tell him he is missed! Thanks for reminding me!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 11 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov  6, 2001 (19:32) * 53 lines 
 
I have no idea what this entails, but it sounds interesting. Rob??? They are waiting for you!

********************************************************
Post-Doctoral Fellowships - Laser ablation geochemistry
********************************************************
From: Ian Nicholls

POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN GEOCHEMISTRY USING LASER ABLATION
ICP-MS TECHNIQUES


SCHOOL OF GEOSCIENCES, MONASH UNIVERSITY (MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA).
Expressions of interest are sought for postdoctoral research fellowships in
geochemistry in the School of Geosciences at Monash University, working
within the Trace Element, Isotope & Environmental Geochemistry Research
Group (Drs. Ian Nicholls, Ian Cartwright and Steve Beresford; Professor
Reid Keays; plus a new academic staff member expected to be appointed in
the field of isotope geochemistry/geochronology in early 2002).
Monash Geosciences currently operates a Finnigan-MAT "Element"
high-resolution ICP-MS instrument for ppb-ppm level trace element analysis
using solution and laser ablation modes (the latter with a Merchantek
Nd-YAG laser), and has supporting "clean laboratory" sample preparation
facilities. Monash is a member of the Victorian Institute of Earth &
Planetary Sciences (VIEPS) consortium (Schools of Earth Sciences at
LaTrobe, Monash and Melbourne Universities) and has access to a joint VIEPS
"Nu Plasma" multicollector ICP-MS instrument, soon to be fitted with a
state-of-art ablation chamber and excimer laser system. The "Element" and
"Nu Plasma" will provide powerful complementary facilities for in situ
trace element/isotopic analysis of single minerals, and their mineral, melt
and fluid inclusions, with emphasis on studies in igneous, metamorphic and
ore petrology/geochemistry/geochronology. Such research is often joint with
the minerals industry.
The Geochemistry group is seeking to attract post-doctoral candidates with
experience in techniques and applications of laser ablation ICP-MS
analysis, with continued development of these within VIEPS in mind. The
Australian Research Council annually offers several categories of
postdoctoral and more senior research fellowships, applications for the
next round of which are due in February 2002, for 2003 awards. Since
outlines for excellent research projects are required as part of
applications for these awards, interested researchers are invited to begin
discussions on suitable projects now. Those interested should contact Dr.
Ian Nicholls at: inicholl@mail.earth.monash.edu.au.
Information on The School of Geosciences at Monash University, with a link
to VIEPS, is available at www.earth.monash.edu.au. Information on ARC
Post-Doctoral and Research Fellowships is available at:
www.monash.edu.au/resgrant/grantinfo/ARC/arcdispr.html and
www.arc.gov.au/ncgp/discovery/projects/default.htm

Dr. Ian Nicholls
Deputy Head, School of Geosciences
PO Box 28E
Monash University
Victoria 3800
Australia


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 12 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov 13, 2001 (23:17) * 2 lines 
 
Oddly enough, when Wolfie finds this catch-all topic we can discuss the how wonderful it is to breathe air you can chew, and why iti s called "Orange County" I discovered that the only thing about the county is the color of the smog there. I don't trust air I can see quite that well.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 13 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Nov 14, 2001 (05:50) * 1 lines 
 
LA is in Orange County?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 14 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov 14, 2001 (14:19) * 1 lines 
 
Nope, Los Angeles is its own county. I'm not all that sure anyone else wants it! I'd need to look at a current county map to see where the bakc air of LA stops and the toxic orange stuff of Orange County begina. Alas, all of the trees are now gone which were once the namesake of Orange County.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 15 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov 21, 2001 (13:53) * 3 lines 
 
No Comment on the new title page of Geo? More changes to come as soon as I get Terry to enable me to change my own buttons, wallpaper and horizontal bars. As it stands now, stroud and yapp icons are now in charge of them.

*UNHAPPY*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 16 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov 27, 2001 (17:28) * 1 lines 
 
Deja Vu time on http://www.archives.org when you look up www.spring.com. Were we ever that young? Seems only yesterday! I love seeing it again! Never mind reading my early posts, please!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 17 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec  2, 2001 (15:43) * 18 lines 
 
Thunder and lightning kept me from posting this yesterday on December 2nd.

HAUOLI NA HANAU, LOPAKA AND KELE

Tuberose / Lantern

Ilima

White tuberose mixed with

orange ilima blossoms.

Very fragrant.







 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 18 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec  2, 2001 (15:46) * 3 lines 
 
Rob is officially responsible for himself (meaning he is fair game?!) and Terry is too (has been for a while, he says.) I really like that lei. It is spectacular and what I wanted to wear to my son's wedding in October.

Many Happy Birthdays to come. Your Buggatis are on the way.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 19 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec  2, 2001 (15:53) * 1 lines 
 
Tuberoses smell gently like gardenias for those of you who have not had the pleasure of their company around your neck. Of course, I have to kiss you when I put it on you. It is tradition! Hugs, too.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 20 of 1049: Anon  (curious) * Mon, Dec  3, 2001 (12:23) * 3 lines 
 
In re post 15 above, specifically "No Comment on the new title page of Geo?"

I like much better than what was up when I first joined.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 21 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec  3, 2001 (14:56) * 1 lines 
 
I'm still working on it. Actually, what I hope to have when I can create the right font and find the correct globe is jus to have large letters GEO with the O being the globe. Thanks for your comments!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 22 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec  5, 2001 (17:54) * 1 lines 
 
I have found the ultimate globe. It is posted. Post holiday title will make it formal, diginified and aesthetic. I hope!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 23 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec  5, 2001 (17:59) * 1 lines 
 
I also need to put the yellow letters back on the buttons. White is the wrong color. May I use a magic marker on your monitor? It'll only take me several lifetimes to do it... *sigh*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 24 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Dec  5, 2001 (21:30) * 1 lines 
 
did you save the old buttons, marcia? if so, you can use lview to resize them and still have the yellow letters.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 25 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec  5, 2001 (21:31) * 1 lines 
 
Yes, I did save the original buttons and I will resize them just as I did the "kill" button. I just need to do it.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 26 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Dec  5, 2001 (21:35) * 3 lines 
 
*giggle* i know the feeling!

curious, how long have you been a member of spring?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 27 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec  5, 2001 (22:06) * 3 lines 
 
1997 was my first post - October I think. You have been here longer?

Thank you, John, for slowing down my world. I was spinning too fast!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 28 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Dec  6, 2001 (18:38) * 1 lines 
 
oh sweetie, i was asking curious anon how long they've been visiting us! i think you've been here longer than me!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 29 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec  6, 2001 (18:52) * 2 lines 
 
I am curious, also! - about how long people have been lurking before posting. I found Spring, then I read posts to see how people were interacting, then plunged in - all in the space of one week. Nan was kind enough to welcome me and make me feel at home. I've been here ever since. I did not, however, wander out of the close-knit confines of Drool for at least a year. I thought you "down" here were all so different from me.
Surprise!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 30 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Dec  7, 2001 (19:14) * 6 lines 
 
I am hiding this post in case I am so terribly wrong that it is hopeless and I have lost a dear friend and wise man's respect. Is this the arrangement you meant? It is not as I remember our earlier conversation. What puzzles me is why I am in the middle and the sensors are each side of me. Must each be attched to me directly as in this lampstand? Independently connected so as not to interfere with each other's signals? Please be patient with me. I am just a learner as most of the rest of my readers are.







 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 31 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Dec 11, 2001 (14:33) * 30 lines 
 
For those who celebrate: Enjoy your Holiday of Eid.

Significance Of Eid

'Eid means recurring happiness or festivity. The 'Eid prayer is very important for all Muslims. It has the
merits of the dory prayers, the effect of the weekly convention (Jumu'ah) and the characteristics of annual
reunions between Muslims. There are two such 'Eids.

The first is called 'Eid-ul-Fitr (the Festival of Fast Breaking). It falls on the first day of Shawwaal, the tenth
month of the Muslim year, following the month of Ramadhaan in which the Qur’aan was revealed and
which is the month of fasting.

The second is called 'Eid-ul-Adh'haa (the Festival of sacrifice). It falls on the tenth day of Zil-Hijjah, the
last month of the Muslim year.

The Islaamic 'Eids are unique in every way. To them there can be nothing similar in any other religion or
any other socio-political system. Besides their highly spiritual and moral characteristics, they have matchless
qualities:

Each 'Eid is a wholesome celebration of a remarkable achievement of the individual Muslim in the service of
Allah.

The first 'Eid comes after an entire month of "absolute" fasting during the days of the month.

The second 'Eid marks the completion of Hajj to Makkah, a course in which the Muslim handsomely
demonstrates his renouncement of the mundane concerns and hearkens only to the Eternal voice of Allah.

more (follow links)... http://www.islaam.org/Eid/Eid-1.htm




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 32 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 12, 2001 (16:09) * 25 lines 
 
'Tis the Season. I'll be posting traditions here. Have you any special ones you celebrate in your family?


HOW MANY U.S. FAMILIES WHO PUT UP A CHRISTMAS
TREE OPT FOR AN ARTIFICIAL TREE?
22% of U.S. families choose an artificial tree.

WHERE DID THE TRADITION OF DECORATING A CHRISTMAS TREE BEGIN?
The first recorded documentation of decorating a Christmas
tree was in 1604 in Strasburg, Germany. Decorating Christmas
trees appeared as a tradition in the U.S in the mid-1800's
and has evolved over the subsequent 150 year period to the
production and distribution system we know today.

WHY WAS THE NATIONAL CHRISTMAS TREE NOT LIT IN 1979?
The National Christmas tree was not lit except for the top
ornament in 1979 in honor of the American hostages in Iran.
In 1963, the National Christmas tree was not lit until
December 22nd because of a national 30-day period of mourn-
ing following the assassination of President Kennedy.

WHAT WAS CONSIDERED THE TALLEST CHRISTMAS TREE?
The tallest living Christmas tree is believed to be the 122-
foot, 91-year-old Douglas fir in the town of Woodinville,
Washington.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 33 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 12, 2001 (16:15) * 85 lines 
 
CHRISTMAS TREE


The Christmas tree is a symbol of immortality, resiliency, longevity, and rebirth. Taoists once believed that if a pine's resin was
allowed to flow down its trunk and onto the earth, a fu-lin or mushroom of immortality would grow from it in 1000 years. Eating
the fu-lin would give a person eternal youth.

Growing tall as it weathers the hardships of wind, snow, and rain, the pine tree in the forest symbolizes long-suffering, steadfast
friendships, and enduring fame. The pine's strength in the face of adversity makes it symbolic of those who have become strong
through suffering, or who have kept to their beliefs and promises in spite of opposition. In Scandinavia, a myth of enduring love
surrounds a certain pine. It is said that this tree grew from the blood of two lovers who had been wrongfully executed in the forest.
During the Christmas season, strange lights can be seen shining in its branches as a testimony of their innocence and love.

One Christmas Eve in 8th century Germany, the missionary, St. Boniface, gathered newly baptized Christians together to renounce
paganism by cutting down the sacred oak they once sacrificed under. As it fell, the oak split into four pieces revealing a young pine
growing in its center. Boniface suggested that the people take this pine as a symbol of their new-found Christian faith because it's
shape points toward Heaven, and it's evergreen foliage reminds us of eternal life.

In Rome, the immortal pine was used to celebrate the spring festival of Arbor intrat. Each year on March 22, members of the cult
of Cybele cut down a pine tree and carried it to the Palatine temple. There, it was bandaged, wreathed with violets, and mourned
as if it were the body of Attis, son of Cybele, who, disturbed by his mother's attentions, had castrated himself and died beneath a
pine tree. His soul was believed to have found refuge in the pine and his blood caused violets to spring up around it. Three days
later, he was miraculously restored to life. Egyptians, on the other hand, used the palm tree as an image of resurrection and
decorated their homes with its branches during the winter solstice.

The vertical symbolism of the pine tree was emphasized by Christians. This tree, which forever pointed heavenward, was a
reminder to seek out heavenly rather than earthly treasures. It was a symbol of the saints, their self-denial, and their patience. A
meet Christmas symbol, the tree was also a symbol of communication and mediation between heaven and earth because it's roots
reached into the earth and its branches soared into the heavens.

Today, one can still see the Jesse-tree. Most popular during the 13th century, this nativity tree was decorated to look like the
family tree of the Christ Child. Adam and Eve are displayed at the foot of the tree and Jesus rests at its top. The wicked serpent is
entwined around its trunk. This tradition may have come from the Messianic prophecy: "There shall come forth a Rod from the
stem of Jesse, and a Branch shall grow out of his roots." [Is 11:1]

The Tree of Life and the Tree of Knowledge from the Garden of Eden were blended together in many customs and legends about
the fir tree. Adam and Eve Day was celebrated on December 24th. During the Middle Ages it was customary to perform Paradise
Plays on the Church grounds on this holiday. A single fir tree strung with apples was used to symbolize both of the garden's trees.

Legend states that the fir is the Tree of Life. When it was created, it had flowers, leaves, and fruit like other trees. But when Eve
ate of the forbidden fruit, these shrunk into the needles and cones we see it bear today. The fir did, however blossom briefly on the
night of Christ's birth. It also bears the name "Tree of Life" because it is believed to have been the tree upon which Christ died.

French and German legend calls the Christmas tree the "Tree of Humanity." One Christmas Eve, Bonchevalier found a pine tree lit
up with candles and having a star at its top. Some of the candles stood upright, while others hung upside down. His mother told
Bonchevalier that this was the "Tree of Humanity." The upright candles represented good people, while the inverted candles stood
for evil people. The star at the top was the Christ Child watching over the entire world. Such a tree reminds us to be like our
Father in Heaven who sends the sun and rain to nourish both the righteous and the unrighteous. [Mt 5:45-46]

Jacob Riis records that Christ sent Faith, Hope, and Love to choose the first Viking Christmas tree. They chose the Balsam fir for
this honor because it was as wide as God's love, as high as the Christian's hope, and it bore the shape of the cross on every
branch. The pine is one of the trees God planted in the desert to give shade to the thirsty; to prove His power over the elements;
and to show His care for the needy. [Is 41:17-20]

When the Holy Family was running from Herod's soldiers, a hollow old pine tree hid the exhausted family in its trunk for a night. In
the morning, the Christ Child blessed the pine with His little hands. Because of this, it is said that by cutting a pine cone lengthwise,
we can see the prints of the Infant's hands to this day.

During the New Year holiday, the Japanese place a pine tree on each side of the entrance to their homes as shelters for the kami
which they believe will bestow blessings upon their household. Perhaps these blessings include fertility, and the marital love and
fidelity symbolized by pine trees in many cultures.

According to Virgil, early Romans decorated pine trees with little masks of Bacchus (a fertility god). As the wind blew these
trinkets around, Bacchus was believed to grant fertility to every part of the tree the masks faced. During their midwinter festivals,
Romans also decorated with evergreens to shelter woodland fairies and gave small trees to their friends as New Year's gifts. Their
Mithraic "Tree of Life" was a pine in which birds and creatures symbolic of the souls of the dead or unborn lived.

Other ancient tree trimming customs include the Chinese sacred trees which were draped with red banners bearing prayers of
thanksgiving and praise. European Druids decorated oaks and pines with apples, candles, and cakes in the form of various animals
and birds as a thank offering to their gods of fertility, agriculture, and light. Greeks and Romans decorated the trees sacred to their
gods and goddesses with garlands of flowers and cloth. In Finland, Lapps filled little boats with bits of food and placed them in a
pine tree marked with sacred symbols. Then they killed a reindeer and placed its internal organs in another tree which they
smeared with the animal's blood.

Christian legend states that on the night of Christ's birth, in spite of snow and ice, all the trees of the earth blossomed for joy, and
bore fruit. In addition, all earth's rivers ran happily with wine. In honor of this legend, Austrians brought boughs of cherry,
hawthorn, and pear trees into their homes at the beginning of December and placed them in jars of water so they might blossom in
time for Christmas.

Another popular story claims that one stormy Christmas Eve, a forester and his family heard a knock at the door of their cottage.
Opening the door, they discovered a little child whom they fed and bedded down in spite of their poverty. In the morning the
sound of an angelic choir awakened them. Their visitor was the Christ Child! As a reward for their hospitality, He tore a branch
from a nearby fir and planted it in the ground. Immediately, it grew and was covered with fruit, nuts, gold, and lights. The Christ
Child promised this tree would forever provide for the forester's family in winter.

With thanks: http://ww2.netnitco.net/users/legend01/xmastree.htm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 34 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 12, 2001 (16:21) * 83 lines 
 
~*~The Date of Christmas~*~
The idea to celebrate Christmas on December 25 originated in the 4th
century. The Catholic Church wanted to eclipse the festivities of a rival
pagan religion that threatened Christianity's existence. The Romans
celebrated the birthday of their sun god, Mithras during this time of year.
Although it was not popular, or even proper, to celebrate people's
birthdays in those times, church leaders decided that in order to compete
with the pagan celebration they would themselves order a festival in
celebration of the birth of Jesus Christ. Although the actual season of
Jesus' birth is thought to be in the spring, the date of December 25 was
chosen as the official birthday celebration as Christ's Mass so that it
would compete head on with the rival pagan celebration. Christmas was
slow to catch on in America. The early colonists considered it a pagan ritual. The celebration of
Christmas was even banned by law in Massachusetts in colonial days.

~*~ Mistletoe and Holly~*~
Two hundred years before the birth of Christ, the Druids used mistletoe to
celebrate the coming of winter. They would gather this evergreen plant that is
parasitic upon other trees and used it to decorate their homes. They believed
the plant had special healing powers for everything from female infertility to
poison ingestion. Scandinavians also thought of mistletoe as a plant of
peace and harmony. They associated mistletoe with their goddess of love,
Frigga. The custom of kissing under the mistletoe probably derived from this
belief. The early church banned the use of mistletoe in Christmas
celebrations because of its pagan origins. Instead, church fathers suggested
the use of holly as an appropriate substitute for Christmas greenery.

~*~ Poinsettias~*~
Poinsettias are native to Mexico. They were named after America's first
ambassador to Mexico, Joel Poinsett. He brought the plants to America in
1828. The Mexicans in the eighteenth century thought the plants were symbolic
of the Star of Bethlehem. Thus the Poinsettia became associated with the
Christmas season. The actual flower of the poinsettia is small and yellow. But
surrounding the flower are large, bright red leaves, often mistaken for petals.

~*~ The Christmas Tree~*~
The Christmas Tree originated in Germany in the 16th century. It was
common for the Germanic people to decorate fir trees, both inside and out,
with roses, apples, and colored paper. It is believed that Martin Luther, the
Protestant reformer, was the first to light a Christmas tree with candles. While
coming home one dark winter's night near Christmas, he was struck with the
beauty of the starlight shining through the branches of a small fir tree outside
his home. He duplicated the starlight by using candles attached to the
branches of his indoor Christmas tree. The Christmas tree was not widely
used in Britain until the 19th century. It was brought to America by the
Pennsylvania Germans in the 1820's.

~*~ Xmas~*~
This abbreviation for Christmas is of Greek origin. The word for Christ in
Greek is Xristos. During the 16th century, Europeans began using the first initial of Christ's name, "X"
in place of the word Christ in Christmas as a shorthand form of the word. Although the early Christians
understood that X stood for Christ's name, later Christians who did not understand the Greek language
mistook "Xmas" as a sign of disrespect.

~*~ The Candy Cane~*~
In the late 1800's a candy maker in Indiana wanted to express the meaning of
Christmas through a symbol made of candy. He came up with the idea of bending one
of his white candy sticks into the shape of a Candy Cane. He incorporated several
symbols of Christ's love and sacrifice through the Candy Cane. First, he used a plain
white peppermint stick. The color white symbolizes the purity and sinless nature of
Jesus. Next, he added three small stripes to symbolize the pain inflicted upon Jesus before His death
on the cross. There are three of them to represent the Holy Trinity. He added a bold stripe to represent
the blood Jesus shed for mankind. When looked at with the crook on top, it looks like a shepherd's
staff because Jesus is the shepherd of man. If you turn it upside down, it becomes the letter J
symbolizing the first letter in Jesus' name. The candy maker made these candy canes for Christmas,
so everyone would remember what Christmas is all about.

~*~ Santa Claus~*~
The original Santa Claus, St. Nicholas, was born in Turkey in the 4th century. He was
very pious from an early age, devoting his life to Christianity. He became widely known
for his generosity for the poor. But the Romans held him in contempt. He was
imprisoned and tortured. But when Constantine became emperor of Rome, he allowed
Nicholas to go free. Constantine became a Christian and convened the Council of
Nicaea in 325. Nicholas was a delegate to the council. He is especially noted for his love of children
and for his generosity. He is the patron saint of sailors, Sicily, Greece, and Russia. He is also, of
course, the patron saint of children. The Dutch kept the legend of St. Nicholas alive. In 16th century
Holland, Dutch children would place their wooden shoes by the hearth in hopes that they would be filled
with a treat. The Dutch spelled St. Nicholas as Sint Nikolaas, which became corrupted to Sinterklaas,
and finally, in Anglican, to Santa Claus. In 1822, Clement C. Moore composed his famous poem, "A
Visit from St. Nick," which was later published as "The Night Before Christmas." Moore is credited with
creating the modern image of Santa Claus as a jolly fat man in a red suit.

http://wilstar.com/xmas/xmassymb.htm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 35 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 12, 2001 (16:28) * 58 lines 
 
~*~*~ Greek Christmas Traditions ~*~*~

By Emma Nicolozakes

~*~ The Holiday Season~*~

The Holiday Season in Greece begins on December 6th, which is the Feast of
St. Nicholas, and ends on January 6th, the Feast of the Epiphany. Christmas
ranks as the second most important holiday of the year, superceded only by
Easter. Approximately 95% of all Greeks are members of the Greek Orthodox
Church, and as in the United States, Christmas is celebrated on December 25th.
Christmas is a religious, solemn holiday in Greece, and not as prone to
commercialism as it is in the States. A number of gifts are exchanged between
family members; but in lieu of large expensive gifts, many donations are made to
local orphanages and charities.

~*~ Decoration~*~

Christmas trees are not usually used in Greece. The traditional Christmas season
decoration is a small wooden bowl with a piece of wire suspended over the rim.
A sprig of basil wrapped around a wooden cross is attached to this wire, and a
small amount of water in the bowl keeps the basil fresh. Once a day, the cross is
dipped in Holy Water which is sprinkled around the house to ward off the
mischievous spirits, or Killantzaroi, who are said to play evil pranks on family
members throughout the twelve days of Christmas.

~*~ Santa Claus~*~

St. Basil is the Santa Claus of the Greeks. St. Basil's Day is celebrated on our
New Year's Day, and this is when the presents are exchanged between family
members. Although in the United States we often call Santa Claus "St. Nick", St.
Nicholas in Greece is the patron saint of sailors.

~*~ Carols~*~

During the Holiday season, children go from house to house singing kalanda,
the Greek equivalent of Christmas carols. The children are traditionally rewarded
with treats, such as dried figs, almonds, walnuts, and coins, and the kalanda
they sing are said to bless the house. In fact, the word "carol" itself comes from
the Greek choraulein, which is a Greek dance accompanied by flute music.

~*~ Food~*~

Food is an important part of any Greek holiday, and the Christmas season is no
exception. Traditionally pigs, lambs, and goats were served; today it is common
to have turkey. Christopsomo, the traditional Christmas bread, is shaped into a
round loaf and decorated with a cross. Around this cross are decorations
indicating the trade of the family. For example, if the main livelihood of the
family is fishing, the bread will be decorated with small fish designs. There is a
wide array of desserts served during the Christmas season. Some of the most
popular include melomakarona; cookies dipped in honey, diples, which are fried
dough cookies dipped in honey, and kourabiethes, small cookies dusted with
powdered sugar. Try my recipe for kourabiethes.

Kala Christouyenna!
(Merry Christmas!)


http://www.bellaonline.com/food_and_wine/food/greek/articles/art977072212685.htm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 36 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 12, 2001 (16:34) * 9 lines 
 
I'm hoping someone who knows (Ginny? John?) lets us know how correct the above Greek traditions are.

Wolfie and my daughter-in-law are my German tradition sources.

Maggie, will you add the English traditions I am most familiar with, please?

Any and all comments and traditions are welcome. Rob? What do the Kiwis do? The Maoris?

I'll supply Hawaiian traditions as best I can. We combine many nations' celebrations here. With snow falling on our mountains and cold air coming in my window, I feel very much in the spirit of the holidays. I especially like the Greek tradition of donating to charity for the holiday. That is also MY idea of the best Christmas gift of all that I can give.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 37 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Dec 12, 2001 (19:58) * 5 lines 
 
some of my german traditions got fangled up with anxious waiting children and what to do about them. for example, i was told that we celebrated christmas on christmas eve (the gifts). so i grew up thinking this was why we did it that way, even through my teenage/young adult years. i learned, upon a visit by my new husband (who opens gifts christmas morning) the true origination of the christmas eve exchange was revealed--me and my brother. we would get so excited we'd make ourselves sick! so every christmas eve, the family would pack up the car to go to services and my parents always had to run back in the house. upon our return, santa magically came to our house.

one thing we did celebrate with regularity was st nick's day--Dec 6. this was where we'd set a pair of shoes outside the door. in the morning, we'd find goodies in our shoes. i don't remember the origin of this tradition but have heard it called other things.

in my house, we spent christmas eve driving through ritsy neighborhoods to see how stingy they were with their lights (some weren't at all and they were marvelous displays) until the kids were sleepy. then we played santa.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 38 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Dec 12, 2001 (20:00) * 1 lines 
 
i meant to say, we spend christmas eve looking at lights. and we do the gifts on christmas morning followed by a big meal.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 39 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 12, 2001 (22:10) * 3 lines 
 
St. Nicholas, also called Nicholas of Bari, Nicholas of Myra, and Santa Claus, flourished in the 4th century in Asia Minor near the modern Turkish city of Finike. One of the most popular minor saints commemorated in the Eastern and Western churches, his feast day is December 6th. He is now traditionally associated with the festival of Christmas.

I will share my memories of Christmas tomorrow. Thanks Wolfie!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 40 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 12, 2001 (22:12) * 2 lines 
 
More about St Nicholas
http://www.umkc.edu/imc/stnick.htm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 41 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Dec 13, 2001 (20:02) * 1 lines 
 
in my christmas memoirs above, i see that i forgot to mention that my parents told me it was german tradition to exchange gifts christmas eve (sorry if that was confusing)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 42 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Dec 13, 2001 (20:03) * 1 lines 
 
oh, and here's something i suggest you NOT do....do not set up your video camera to capture santa because your children will need therapy when they get older *laugh* my husband did this one year and my son is convinced. but, i say let him believe as long as he can. heck, i still believe in the spirit of santa and the magic associated with him.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 43 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec 13, 2001 (20:23) * 8 lines 
 
Oh Wolfie, how funny. It reminds me of a story about my father catching Santa. I'll post that as soon as I toast my favorite composer's birthday




Thank you for providing the means by which my soul takes flight and my heart is stirred. Beethoven comforts my mind when all else has abandoned me. *Hugs*
(I think the real Beethoven would have cast scorn at me and sent me packing by now if I had dared to hug him!)



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 44 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Dec 14, 2001 (17:56) * 1 lines 
 
well, you know how geniuses can be! (i love B too)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 45 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Dec 14, 2001 (19:24) * 3 lines 
 
You're my twin - of course you love Beethoven, too. *grin*

Once upon a time, when my father was very young... (I promise to post it!)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 46 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Dec 19, 2001 (10:02) * 9 lines 
 
Hi all

Another cool topic on Geo - anyway, just wandering around and found
this topic which is why I like Geo above all topics - even radio

happy pre solstice
73 de Mike
AA9IL



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 47 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Dec 19, 2001 (21:18) * 1 lines 
 
and to you cosmo!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 48 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec 20, 2001 (17:06) * 5 lines 
 
Way Cool Cosmo has joined the wandering minds that inhabit Geo. We're eclectic, of nothing else!

What do you do to celebrate the holidays? Link your boat anchor radios in parallel or series and fire them all up at the same time? I did that once! Back before there was much music available on radio, I could at least count of a rousing rendition of "God Save The Queen" from the provinces of Canada as they sidned off. On night I managed to tune two radios (tube with huge output speakers) and my head just between them. It wasn't stereo but it sure sounded like STEREO !!! I got the blast of my lifetime listeting and I think I can still hear it rumbling around in my head soemwhere. Sounded glorious to my hungry ears. Did anyone else do anything quite that foolish?

When are you getting an xfm or xam lashup for those long road trips?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 49 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Dec 20, 2001 (19:18) * 21 lines 
 
Hi yall

Well, Christmas will be up here in the cold climes - got the first
major snow shower to lend the look. Usually, I just fire up one
boatanchror rig to warm the room - either the R390A or SP600 - the
Collins has been getting most of the attention as of late. Anyway
the holidays are reserved for the usual family stuff prior to new
years lunacy plus I need to keep hacking on these transverter
projects to get them completed - the first contest of the year
is January but the big one is in June. For those long trips,
I do take my 2m/440 FM rig with me although I do remember working
mobile HF which is alwasy lots o' fun. Need to get a mobile
rig back in the truck - quite different from when I ran my
Yaesu FT101E in my El Camino back during my college years - it
drew so many amps that the alternator belt snapped - had to
limp home on the 12v battery alone.

Happy Solstice!
73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 50 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Dec 20, 2001 (19:21) * 13 lines 
 
doh!

By xfm you mean the satellite service? I looked at the radios
- kind of neat but I really want shortwave in my truck so I can
listen to Radio Canada, BBC, Radio Nederland, etc while driving.
For music, I have my formidable CD collection - maybe someday
get the satellite service tho....

Fine biz on the eclectic minds - I at least like to think Im
eclectic sometimes....

73 de Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 51 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec 20, 2001 (20:23) * 5 lines 
 
I agree with you, Mike. Those new little satellite AM and FM receivers leave much to be desired unless you want to loop Art Bell for 24/7 and become VERY strange. Get a good transceiver for you car and a whip antenna with some pulling power. You don't want to get ripped off so make it invisble. My son put the button panel in the dash and put the works under his seat. It works great and he can flip the button panel over so it is totally unappealing. In his house, I never know how to turn things on. Often the goodies are three rooms away and he can station select and tune from the kitchen.

Hawaii has snow, Sunny Greece is under more than a foot of the stuff and you guys are still waiting for your share? Sant Claus comes to Hawaii on a surfboard and we leave a door open for him.

With John's permission I will post an impressive amount of snow covering his car. (There is also an amazing depressed-looking palm tree with its crown flattened by the weight of the snow. It looks so forlorn... At least when it snows in Hawaii, it keeps it up on the mountains and now down where people live. I am looking at it in a little soft cotton shirt. No shovelling.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 52 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec 20, 2001 (20:43) * 5 lines 
 

HAPPY WINTER SOLSTICE








 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 53 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec 20, 2001 (20:46) * 6 lines 
 
I can't wait till 31 December ! Look at what my ancestors were doing for fun while some of us will be getting hung over. I'm not sure who gets the worst headache!

Allandale Tar Barrel Burning, Northumberland
A version of burning out the old year, locals walk
down the street with blazing tar barrels on their heads.
Some of these are then thrown to light a bonfire.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 54 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Dec 20, 2001 (21:07) * 3 lines 
 
what day is the solstice? is it tomorrow?? (i had heard that tomorrow will be the shortest day of the year)

great pic of stonehenge!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 55 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec 20, 2001 (21:33) * 1 lines 
 
Solsitice is when the sun appears to stand still and our ancestors didnot know if it would reappear and summer would follow, or if they would die a cold and miserable death of starvation in darkness. The lit bonfires and all sorts of other things to get the sun to come back. I'll find some to post. I suspect knocking on wood is not all that different from what they did.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 56 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Dec 20, 2001 (21:36) * 14 lines 
 
Howdy Howdy

Yep, tomorrow is the Solstice! Very cool picture indeed.
Today while walking to the train station in Chicago, there was
a perfect picture of the quarter moon visible between the
office buildings - I thought to my self: "Moon in the canyon"
The twilight was crisp and clear and the lights in the buildings
and trees did twinkle. This was one of those 'nice winter walks'
and no snow!

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 57 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Dec 20, 2001 (22:11) * 1 lines 
 
too bad you didn't have a camera!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 58 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Dec 20, 2001 (22:12) * 1 lines 
 
(thanks for the info on the solstice)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 59 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Dec 21, 2001 (18:00) * 1 lines 
 
Mike, you need to find Santa immediately and tell him you NEED a camera. You might be the Ansel Adams of the 21st century!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 60 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Dec 21, 2001 (18:04) * 17 lines 
 
I neglected to tell WHEN the Winter Solstice is.

In the northern hemisphere, the Winter solstice is day of the year (near December 22) when the Sun
is farthest south. However, in the southern hemisphere, winter and summer solstices are exchanged
so that the winter solstice is the day on which the Sun is farthest north. The winter solstice marks the
first day of the season of winter. The declination of the Sun on the (northern) winter solstice is known
as the tropic of capricorn (-23° 27').


The winter solstice is the shortest day of the year, respectively, in the sense that the length of time
elapsed between sunrise and sunset on this day is a minimum for the year. Of course, daylight saving
time means that the first Sunday in April has 23 hours and the last Sunday in October has 25 hours,
but these human meddlings with the calendar and do not correspond to the actual number of daylight
hours. In Chicago, there are 9:20 hours of daylight on the winter solstice of December 22, 1999.

lots more... http://www.treasure-troves.com/astro/WinterSolstice.html



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 61 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Dec 21, 2001 (19:15) * 1 lines 
 
so it's tomorrow then? 22 Dec and not 21 Dec....but today is the first day of winter!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 62 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Dec 21, 2001 (19:58) * 2 lines 
 
It depends on your time and locality when the sun reaches its southernmost point
For Hawaii it is definitely the 21st. For Greece it is the 22nd as it is for New Zealand and points east. There is a chart on that page url I posted, I think...


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 63 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Dec 22, 2001 (16:20) * 1 lines 
 
ok, gotta go back and find that url!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 64 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec 22, 2001 (17:19) * 3 lines 
 
For an easy-to-understand explanation for seasons and why Rob in New Zealand is having summer while North America is having winter:

http://explorezone.com/earth/seasons.htm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 65 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Dec 22, 2001 (21:41) * 1 lines 
 
bookmarked that one, thanks sweetie!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 66 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec 23, 2001 (21:36) * 1 lines 
 
I think she is too big for the title page. I need a more dignified angel there, I think. But she is so sweet; I love her innocence and tenderness.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 67 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec 23, 2001 (21:37) * 1 lines 
 
Not YOU, Wolfie! You'd fit perfectly on the title page. I meant the angel I have installed. I will change her back to the star and look for a more stately Herald Angel that Mendelssohn wrote about.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 68 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Dec 24, 2001 (10:42) * 1 lines 
 
i've not even seen the angel yet *sniff*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 69 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 24, 2001 (13:46) * 7 lines 
 

Mele Kalikimaka




Look at Crafts title page. The little angel was there last night when I closed out. Did she fly away? *Hugs* No sniffling on Christmas for my Wolfie-Twin. Only happy smiles allowed (yes, I know!) Please feel free to go use any of my seasonal files. I will email you with the url...





 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 70 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 24, 2001 (14:00) * 1 lines 
 
JOHN!!! I really DO know how to do this. I just can't make them work and I did not have any separations between my graphics, my commands for the font or the words therein. This is tiresome, so I will not try it again until Next year!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 71 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Dec 24, 2001 (17:13) * 1 lines 
 
well, i don't care about the alignment, it was done with feeling and i love it! (i didn't venture into crafts last night but i did this afternoon and she's really sweet)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 72 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 24, 2001 (18:22) * 1 lines 
 
*HUGS* Wolfie and Merry Christmas!! She really is sweet. We can thank John for slowing her down. When I found her she was positively frantic. Hugs to him, too for all his help with Craft and Geo-decorating


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 73 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 24, 2001 (18:29) * 4 lines 
 


Geo's Little Angel



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 74 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 24, 2001 (20:23) * 37 lines 
 
I'm not pretending about the snow on Mauna Kea:

http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanoes/maunakea/


Mauna Kea Hawai`i's Tallest Volcano

Tall cinder cones atop the summit of Mauna Kea (4,205m) and lava flows that
underlie its steep upper flanks have built the volcano a scant 35 m higher than nearby
Mauna Loa (4,170 m). Mauna Kea, like Hawai`i's other older volcanoes, Hualalai
and Kohala, has evolved beyond the shield-building stage, as indicated by (1) the
very low eruption rates compared to Mauna Loa and Kilauea; (2) the absence of a
summit caldera and elongated fissure vents that radiate its summit; (3) steeper and
more irregular topography (for example, the upper flanks of Mauna Kea are twice
as steep as those of Mauna Loa); and (4) different chemical compositions of the
lava.
These changes in part reflect a low rate magma supply that causes the continuously
active summit reservoir and rift zones of the shield stage to give way to small isolated
batches of magma that rise episodically into the volcano, erupt briefly, and soon
solidify. They also reflect greater viscosity and volatile content of the lava, which
result in thick flows that steepen the edifice and explosive eruptions that build large
cinder cones.
Glaciers on Mauna Kea?
Most people don't think about snow or glaciers in Hawai`i, but geologists have long
recognizd deposits formed by glaciers on Mauna Kea during recent ice ages. The
latest work indicates that deposits of three glacial episodes since 150,000 to
200,000 years ago are preserved on the volcano. Glacial moraines on the volcano
formed about 70,000 years ago and from approximately 40,000 to 13,000 years
ago. If glacial deposits were formed on Mauna Loa, they have long since been
buried by younger lava flows.
Even today, snow falls on both Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa. Both volcanoes are so
high that snow falls during winter months, perhaps accumulating to a few meters
depth. The seasonal snow cover on the steep slopes of Mauna Kea is easier to see
from coastal areas than on the gentle, rounded slopes of Mauna Loa, whose summit
cannot be seen from sea level.

more...http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanoes/maunakea/


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 75 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Dec 24, 2001 (21:59) * 1 lines 
 
i still can't believe it (though i know you didn't make it up) just doesn't go together--hawaii and snow (even in the mountains)......we could see the snow really good on top of a mountain range here (dunno the name of the mountain). didn't have my camera either or i could've shown you the effects of cooler air and a mountain range on smog. it hung eerily in the air with the mountains rising above it. too bad they don't make giant vacuum cleaners or hepa filters!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 76 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Dec 25, 2001 (20:26) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 77 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Dec 25, 2001 (20:28) * 1 lines 
 
(You didn't expect me to get it right, did you? How I hate disappointing you!)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 78 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Dec 25, 2001 (20:41) * 10 lines 
 

Mele Kalikimaka



My Christmas is slowly ending as the rest of the world is on another day. My dinner with friends included a very typical Hawaiian eclectic mix of food and people. It has been a very nice day. I hope yours was, as well. For dinner we had rice, sushi, poke (raw fish Hawaiian style), seaweed in various delicious ways, fresh fruit of all sorts, raw vegetables in and out of salads, cheeses, tofu barbecued and other ways, traditional mochi (for good luck)rice cakes, olives, "pot stickers", egg rolls, ham, teriyaki beef, chicken, crab salad Hawaiian style, and so many more I cannot remember...

The people were not the students, this year. Instead, we had a wonderful mix of professors from the local University and
researchers from both the University and from Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory. I caught such mentions of 45°F at the summit of Kilauea last night and carried on conversations with people I would happily spend many future hours. Discussions varied from hydroponic gardening to the ever-present Volcano, and Ah, yes, we also discussed the eating of dog in the Philippines and other curious food habits of the non-western world.

Many exchanged email addresses. I have, also. Perhaps Mitchell will look here. We discussed programming and websites and digital cameras among other things. Aloha, Mitchell, if you venture here. I enjoyed meeting you - also a transplant from New York.

The food was delicious; the company fascinating. I have had a wonderful Christmas. I hope yours was as pleasant. The only negative is heavy fumes in Hilo due to lack of air movement. It would not take much exercise to make my lungs hurt. Instead I will email a few people and smile in contentment. Thank you all for making my holiday so special. My special thanks to Miu and Bernie for being such good hosts and assembling so delightful a mix of people.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 79 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Dec 25, 2001 (20:58) * 1 lines 
 
*SIGH*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 80 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Dec 25, 2001 (21:04) * 17 lines 
 
Happy Holidays and Happy Solstice to All!

Hope everyone had a nice day - neat goodies on this end
but the most noteworthy for the list was the complete
Sci American Amateur Scientist CD rom with plenty of
projects and inpho. First great lightbulb realization
was an article on building seismic detectors using
accelerometer integrated circuits - very different from
my idea of a balanced pendulum with a 50000 turn coil
between the poles of a strong magnet but hey, it should
work! Lots of neat things to build with a danger scale
reading from no hazard to loss of life possible - of course,
I have to try building the proton accelerator (very dangerous).

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 81 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Dec 25, 2001 (22:01) * 3 lines 
 
Share your projects, Mike, Please! Seismo stuff? Oooh! Any of them buildable by normal people who solder their fingers together and burn holes in bedspreads? (My son, not I!)

Delighted you had such a wonderful day! I send you best wishes and gratitude for making yourself comfortable here. You're a very special guy. I'd love to see your parts department. My Dad had his all stored in amazing large metal cans and various little parts boxes. I kept my hands behind my back when I entered his sanctum sanctorum! But, I can still smell the fragrance of rosin melting on his soldering iron...


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 82 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Dec 25, 2001 (22:04) * 1 lines 
 
I am a map reader of the first order. I got atlases and bound road map books this year. Plus a lovely 4 inch diameter globe made of semi-precius stone and mounted on a golden pedestal. It resides on my mantle piece now! I shall photograph it if it is possible to do so!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 83 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Dec 26, 2001 (16:08) * 5 lines 
 
oh marcia, i know the globe you're speaking of (although the ones i've seen were floor models) how wonderful!!!!

sounds like you guys had a lot to eat! i made a roast again and it was delicious. tried out my mom's bread dumplings but, practice makes perfect and they all fell apart during the cooking! *laugh*

hope everyone had a good holiday! *HUGS*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 84 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 26, 2001 (17:46) * 5 lines 
 
Falling-apart home cooking can sometimes be the best. It HAS to be better than solid concrete biscuits my sister served me one year! Sounds wonderful.

I'm busy trying to identify country and gemstone. This had to have been very difficult to make. I wonder how many people went blind making it. Australia is solid abalone shell. Beautiful !

I'm thinking of changing the dividers again. You'd think I'd leave well enough alone....


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 85 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 26, 2001 (22:04) * 20 lines 
 
Space Station Christmas

December 25 -- Astronaut Cathy Clarke opened her
eyes and yawned. Mission Control was playing Jingle
Bells over the intercom for about the two hundredth
time. "OK," she barked into the microphone. "I'm
awake and I know it's Christmas!"

Cathy, one of the crew of the International Space
Station (ISS), was feeling homesick.

Back on Earth, she knew, her family was gathered
around the Christmas tree, sipping eggnog and opening
presents. Later they would radio from Houston, but
she yearned to be with them now -- not stuck in an
orbiting laboratory, 350 km above Earth, with no
Christmas spirit.

This is a wonderful story. Read it to your children! The rest of it is
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2001/ast21dec_1.htm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 86 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Dec 26, 2001 (22:12) * 1 lines 
 
the new bars are neat! and i noticed the wreaths as well!! concrete biscuits? *yikes*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 87 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 26, 2001 (22:38) * 1 lines 
 
I am trying to prepare for the New Year and get back to undecking the halls. Ther is much good science going on. Saw 5 satellites and the ISS plus an iridium flare a few moments ago! The Hubble in an hour. Hi Mike! *HUGS*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 88 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Dec 26, 2001 (22:43) * 3 lines 
 
ok, how do you know what you're looking at? i can tell satellites from falling stars but that's it.

undeck the halls? you mean we have to take everything down? already!? but wait, we've got mardi gras season starting Jan 6th!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 89 of 1049: Mike O'Quinn  (Poubelle1) * Wed, Dec 26, 2001 (22:51) * 1 lines 
 
Perhaps you would be so kind to help with a delima our marcie i was say calling her the mistress of the east ! ? or would she be considered the Mistres of the west!? she her self while joking about this says she is in the middle ! Pa Shaw! no one can be in the middle , so to her i suggested perhaps i could place a post here and all could vote if she is a mistress of the east or west ! we thank you for your time in responding to this delima in helping to be politicaly correct!! Poubelle1


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 90 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 26, 2001 (23:25) * 5 lines 
 
Mike! Congratulations on your maiden post! I am more than a little amazed and delighted to see you here! I'll keep a tally of the votes if there are any. Thanks for making the effort to login and all that! You've joined the HTLM programming cognescenti! Welcome. Feel free to wander around.

Perhaps assistant to the Mistress of the Volcano?

Wolfie, We have to bring in the new year..... and Epiphany... The decorations will stay up for 12 days of Christmas... with New Year celebrations also.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 91 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 26, 2001 (23:31) * 1 lines 
 
When one lives in the semi-middle of an ocean near the international date line, I can't imagine what to call me! How about the lady with far too much curiosity ? I think it fits!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 92 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 26, 2001 (23:37) * 1 lines 
 
Mardi Gras is definitly on the schedule. I expect Mike to help celebrate. He's an expert, I understand...


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 93 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Dec 27, 2001 (10:49) * 1 lines 
 
i say we call marcia the world mistress! *HUGS*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 94 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec 27, 2001 (15:10) * 3 lines 
 
*HUGS* Wolfie. Dobn't let Mike fool you. He is a story-teller of great expertise. Editing what he writes is both a pleasure and a challenge. Pou, did you expect some sort of concensus? I think no one will bother to vote except for my twin sister, Wolfie =) In any case, the true founding genius behind Geo who convinced me I could do it (he lied!) designated me "world builder" instead of host. I am still struggling to learn HTML programming and to make this conference worthy of your time.

I do rather like these bars!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 95 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec 29, 2001 (20:28) * 29 lines 
 
It is comforting to know Greece has a few traditions predating Christianity, just as the rest of us do.

From Christmas in Greece
http://www.gogreece.com/learn/christmas.htm

In Greek homes, Christmas trees are not commonly used, but
recently have become more popular. In almost every house though-
the main symbol of the season is a shallow wooden bowl with a
piece of wire is suspended across the rim; from that hangs a sprig of
basil wrapped around a wooden cross. A small amount of water is
kept in the bowl to keep the basil alive and fresh. Once a day, a
family member, usually the mother, dips the cross and basil into
some holy water and uses it to sprinkle water in each room of the
house. This ritual is believed to keep the 'Killantzaroi' (bad spirits)
away. There are a number of beliefs connected with these spirits,
which are supposed to be a species of goblins who appear only
during the 12-day period from Christmas to the Epiphany (January
6). These creatures are believed to come from the center of the earth
and to slip into people's house through the chimney. More
mischievous than actually evil, the Killantzaroi do things like
extinguish fires, ride astride people's backs, braid horses' tails, and
sour the milk. To further repel the undesirable sprites, the hearth is
kept burning day and night throughout the twelve days. Gifts are
finally exchanged on St. Basil's Day (January 1). On this day the
"renewal of waters" also takes place, a ritual in which all water jugs
in the house are emptied and refilled with new "St. Basil's Water."
The ceremony is often accompanied by offerings to the 'naiads',
spirits of springs and fountains. All in all, Christmas is an enjoyable
part of Greece today and one that should be experienced by all.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 96 of 1049: Kilauea83  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jan  5, 2002 (13:50) * 53 lines 
 
WHAT TO DO IF YOU LOSE YOUR WALLET OR PURSE

A corporate attorney sent this out to the employees in his company.
I pass it along, for your information.

WHAT TO DO IF YOU LOSE YOUR PURSE OR WALLET

We've all heard horror stories about fraud that's committed in your
name, address, SS#, credit, etc. Unfortunately I (the author of this piece
who happens to be an attorney) have firsthand knowledge, because my wallet
was stolen last month and within a week the thieve(s) ordered an expensive
monthly cell phone package, applied for a VISA credit card, had a credit
line approved to buy a Gateway computer, received a PIN number from DMV to
change my driving record information online, and more.

But here's some critical information to limit the damage in case this
happens to you or someone you know. As everyone always advises:
1. Cancel your credit cards immediately, but the key is having the toll
free number and your card numbers handy so you know whom to call. Keep those
where you can find them easily.
2. File a police report immediately in the jurisdiction where it was
stolen, this proves to credit providers you were diligent, and is a first step
toward an investigation (if there ever is one).

3. But here's what is perhaps most important: (I never ever thought to
do this)
Call the three national credit reporting organizations immediately to
place a fraud alert on your name and SS#. I had never heard of doing that until
advised by a bank that called to tell me an application for credit was
made over the Internet in my name. The alert means any company that checks
your credit knows your information was stolen and they have to contact you by
phone to authorize new credit. By the time I was advised to do this,
almost 2 weeks after the theft, all the damage had been done.

There are records of all the credit checks initiated by the thieves'
purchases, none of which I knew about before placing the alert.

Since then, no additional damage has been done, and the thieves threw my
wallet away this weekend (someone turned it in). It seems to have
stopped them in their tracks.
The numbers are:
-Equifax: 800-525-6285
-Experian (formerly TRW): 888-397-3742
-Trans Union: 800-680-7289
-Social Security Administration (fraud line): 800-269-0271

We pass along jokes; we pass along just about everything. Do think
about passing this information along. It could really help someone.
AND... why not print it up and keep it in a handy place -- not in your purse
or wallet, of course!





 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 97 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jan  7, 2002 (14:49) * 30 lines 
 
Stress Makes People Fat, Swedish Study Shows
Reuters
Jan 7 2002 9:15AM

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Long-term stress could make people fat,
according to a study of some 50 overweight middle-aged Swedish men
published Monday.
Disruptions in the human nervous system, or stress, can concentrate fat
around the abdomen, raising the risk of diabetes as well as heart
problems, a study by the university hospital in the Swedish city of
Gothenburg found.
One fifth of Westerners are estimated to suffer from diabetes or
cardiovascular diseases.
"The stress system has developed to deal with periods of brief stress for
stone-age man preparing for battle or flight. But in today's civilized world,
stress is different. One does not beat up the boss or run away from the
mortgage institute," said physician Thomas Ljung, who led the study.
A body under stress creates a surplus of a hormone which stimulates a
fat-gathering enzyme. This enzyme is more easily taken up by the
abdomen than other parts of the body, the survey found.
After a long period of stress, the hormone surplus decreases but the fat
remains, particularly around the bellies of modern men who need less
physical exercise to survive than their forefathers.
"Positive stress, a quick rush of adrenaline, is only good for the body. It is
the long-term negative stress than can lead to serious health problems,"
Ljung told Reuters by telephone.
Even though pot-bellies are often associated with middle-aged men, a
surprisingly large number of women also have a disproportionate
amount of fat around their waists, he said.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 98 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jan  7, 2002 (14:50) * 1 lines 
 
Now, I am stressed about getting fat. It is another case of the tail chasing the dog!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 99 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jan  7, 2002 (18:37) * 1 lines 
 
well that explains my troubles then (that and chocolate, what i eat when i'm stressed)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 100 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jan  7, 2002 (19:34) * 3 lines 
 
*sigh* We're doomed.

It is a Good Thing I have long legs and do not have fat genes.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 101 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jan  7, 2002 (22:04) * 3 lines 
 
i'm as fat as i'm gonna get according to my genes (from what i've seen from 3 generations) so that's good. and to think i never broke 100 pounds until i was in the 10th grade!

ah well, german engineering, that's what i call it!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 102 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jan  7, 2002 (22:06) * 1 lines 
 
did you just now do the snowflakes?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 103 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jan  7, 2002 (22:32) * 1 lines 
 
Yup just changed them to very small and changed the bars to black. The angel is the only part remaining until John is safely out of the storm. This is the dark of winter, even in Hawaii...


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 104 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jan  7, 2002 (22:34) * 1 lines 
 
Oh, I did not weigh over 95 pounds until my son was in high school...


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 105 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jan  8, 2002 (18:43) * 3 lines 
 
*jaw dropping*

i just noticed the black bars (very sophisticated)....the snowflakes still look big to me though.....neat design in the middle, kinda artichoke looking (sp?)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 106 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan  8, 2002 (19:27) * 3 lines 
 
I agree about the snowflakes. I'll downsize them a bit more. I would return the hummingbird since I know John is safe and healing (but hate that he has broken his leg!) But, I'll wait.

I found these bars with the red ones I previously used and also a long dark green one just like these - but I have lost the location of the green ones. It does look good with this background, and all is so adaptable. I assume you are assembling your gifs for Mardi Gras? The first floats have made their appearance in New Orleans!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 107 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jan  8, 2002 (19:52) * 1 lines 
 
i'll bet the green ones are nice too. yeah, mardis gras officially started today - 12th night ceremonies and all. i have the gifs for mardi gras just no where to put them (email terry about it though). i've got to get a catalog with beads and stuff to order!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 108 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan  8, 2002 (20:12) * 3 lines 
 
Ooouuuuuuu!!! You will out-dazzle the Hollywood glamourati! Looks like I 'd better check holidays and get searching for MardiGras gifs, too. I know there're out there.

Are the snowflakes still too big?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 109 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jan  8, 2002 (20:18) * 1 lines 
 
no no, i think they're just right now!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 110 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan  8, 2002 (20:22) * 1 lines 
 
=) black snow - just like in West Virginia !


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 111 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jan  8, 2002 (20:24) * 1 lines 
 
*haha*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 112 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan  9, 2002 (15:44) * 1 lines 
 
Is the Greek Key divider bar better or worse? I like it! It looks embossed and quite classic. Now, to do something about that black snow...


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 113 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan  9, 2002 (16:31) * 1 lines 
 
Fresh white snow is not as obvious, but a lot prettier!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 114 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Jan  9, 2002 (18:49) * 1 lines 
 
i like them both! and the greek keys evoke a feel for egyptian archaeology.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 115 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan  9, 2002 (19:01) * 3 lines 
 
How about Grecian antiquities? I think the Egyptians were too busy carving cartouches and painting 2-dimensional people in 3-D to make elaborate moldings, plinths, and such. Take a look at the pyramids, then look at the Parthenon in Athens, Greece. *SIGH*

I like them, too.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 116 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Jan  9, 2002 (19:50) * 3 lines 
 
true true, but they both have wonderful architecture for their times.

on second thought, unless it's my screen, the white snowflakes look like they're missing to me (not see through), just like a cut out or something.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 117 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan  9, 2002 (21:35) * 1 lines 
 
Hmmm... let me try to see them on internet explorer. I see them as vaguely white with sketchy edges. I need better graphics there. I'm working on it!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 118 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan  9, 2002 (21:39) * 1 lines 
 
yup, they look like they are rougfhly punched out on IE. I will find the thing I want and post it ASAP *smile*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 119 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan  9, 2002 (22:00) * 1 lines 
 
Oooh Sweetie, and Omega would be perfect for our alter-images. Let me know how it goes. I can always send you that next year... Sorry for the loss of word I caused you but I simply HAD to do it =)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 120 of 1049: Cathy M  (KitCat) * Wed, Jan  9, 2002 (22:09) * 1 lines 
 
Help! I'm neew here. I'm looking for the DDL board... obviously, I'm lost :(


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 121 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan  9, 2002 (22:36) * 3 lines 
 
DDL??? Darcy Drool Ladies? See http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/browse/drool/all/new

I started there. Enjoy!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 122 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan  9, 2002 (22:48) * 1 lines 
 
Specifically, http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/read/drool/112/new is Darcy Drool. Happy reading. You will see me there a lot in the past!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 123 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan  9, 2002 (22:50) * 1 lines 
 
No, these are not the right torches, either. Back to searching and restoring the snowflakes.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 124 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Jan 10, 2002 (18:34) * 1 lines 
 
i thought they were aztec motifs!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 125 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jan 10, 2002 (18:51) * 1 lines 
 
Oh Dear! No, alas, they are the Salt Lake City 2002 Official Olympic Winter Games Logo. I was going to put Athens 2004 laurel wreath up, but I could not find one good enough to copy. I had a torch there, but it was static and not very good. I'll keep looking...*sigh*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 126 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jan 10, 2002 (18:57) * 1 lines 
 
I think they're supposed to be snowflakes... I'm going back to the white snowflakes for now.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 127 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Jan 10, 2002 (20:27) * 1 lines 
 
i'm having no luck finding olympic motifs such as the rings for you to use. torches are easy enough-in fact, i think i have one in my files. will check for you!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 128 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jan 10, 2002 (23:50) * 3 lines 
 
Thanks! I even tried borrowing one from an active website with not much success. I only managed to find a HUGS Olympic flag which was too large to use here. How hard can it be to make five interlocking circles? I'd like to use the Salt Lake City Logo if I could make it ANY other colors!!! I even tried white but the lines around it are not solid enough to look good. I will hunt further, also. *Hugs*, Wolfie!

We have to be interesting to entertain John while he mends. I'll try to find interesting things for him to contemplate.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 129 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (18:58) * 28 lines 
 
It is Treaty of Waitangi day in New Zealand and a day of significance for their nation.

THE TREATY OF WAITANGI 1840
[English text of the Treaty]

Her Majesty Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and
Ireland regarding with Her Royal Favour the Native Chiefs and Tribes of
New Zealand and anxious to protect their just Rights and Property and
to secure to them the enjoyment of Peace and Good Order has deemed
it necessary in consequence of the great number of Her Majesty's
Subjects who have already settled in New Zealand and the rapid
extension of Emigration both from Europe and Australia which is still in
progress to constitute and appoint a functionary properly authorized to
treat with the Aborigines of New Zealand for the recognition of Her
Majesty's Sovereign authority over the whole or any part of those
islands.

Her Majesty therefore being desirous to establish a settled form of Civil
Government with a view to avert the evil consequences which must
result from the absence of the necessary Laws and Institutions alike to
the native population and to Her subjects has been graciously pleased
to empower and to authorize "me William Hobson a Captain" in Her
Majesty's Royal Navy Consul and Lieutenant Governor of such parts of
New Zealand as may be or hereafter shall be ceded to Her Majesty to
invite the confederated and independent Chiefs of New Zealand to
concur in the following Articles and Conditions.

more... http://www.govt.nz/aboutnz/treaty.php3


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 130 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (18:59) * 1 lines 
 
OOps. not till February 6th. I'll try to find a flag to post tomorrow. Which flag is Politically Correct on this occasion? Rob, Help!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 131 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (19:04) * 1 lines 
 
but will we have ftp tomorrow?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 132 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (19:33) * 1 lines 
 
No, probably not ftp, and I thought I had it on my old files at Spring. I have everyone but NZ. I'll borrow one from somewhere on the net =) I'll also save it until such time as I can ftp.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 133 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (19:34) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 134 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (19:35) * 1 lines 
 
Hmmm Is it big enough?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 135 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (21:15) * 3 lines 
 
nah, a couple more inches and it'll cover the entire screen *laugh*

did you post it in rob's topic?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 136 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb  6, 2002 (14:57) * 2 lines 
 
Not posted yet in Rob's topic. My reason is because there is a lot of politics and racial overtones to this day just as there are certain Hawaiian celebrations. Post the wrong flag as we are all in for accusations of being politically incorrect. This national flag of NZ has the flag of the Union ("Union Jack") of the UK on it. I suspect to the Maori, it is less than welcome.
Black with silver ferns? I am waiting to hear from Rob.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 137 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb  6, 2002 (19:14) * 26 lines 
 



THE IDEA, ITS RELEVANCE FOR TODAY, THE SYMBOL








OLYMPIC TRUCE - THE IDEA

The tradition of the “Truce” or “Ekecheiria” was
established in ancient Greece in the 9th
century BC by the signature of a treaty
between three kings. During the Truce period,
the athletes, artists and their families, as well
as ordinary pilgrims, could travel in total
safety to participate in or attend the Olympic
Games and return afterwards to their
respective countries. As the opening of the Games approached, the sacred
truce was proclaimed and announced by citizens of Elis who travelled
throughout Greece to pass on the message.
http://www.olympic.org/uk/organisation/missions/truce/truce_uk.asp


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 138 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb  6, 2002 (19:17) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 139 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb  6, 2002 (19:17) * 1 lines 
 
aha - I need to make the background transparent. =)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 140 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb  6, 2002 (19:22) * 2 lines 
 
Now I need to be able to ftp them to Spring. *sigh*



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 141 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Feb  6, 2002 (19:23) * 3 lines 
 
the olympic rings are great!!

(i know nothing about the correct flag for NZ)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 142 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb  6, 2002 (22:08) * 1 lines 
 
It is the one I posted, though they are discussing alternatives now that they are distinct from the old Empire. Check this super source for flags of many sorts New Zealand: http://www.fotw.stm.it/flags/nz-mao.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 143 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb  6, 2002 (22:10) * 1 lines 
 
I have the olympic rings ready to ftp to Spring. I can get there but it won't accept anything I try to send.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 144 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Feb  7, 2002 (12:51) * 1 lines 
 
that's the probs i've been having with it....


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 145 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Feb  7, 2002 (18:15) * 1 lines 
 
I can finally ftp to my sites but none of them show up on the net. Have they disappeared into Topic 65? *sigh*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 146 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb  8, 2002 (20:16) * 7 lines 
 
The Olympic cauldron has been lit. The games are officially open. Geo has installed the logo and waits the rings created by John. I think it totally appripriate that he does this for us. After all, we are celebrating his heritage throughout the world. I just wish the Olympic truce existed for all time on the entire planet.

Higher * Faster * Stronger

Let the games begin

May the best person win



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 147 of 1049: Lucie  (alyeska) * Fri, Feb  8, 2002 (21:21) * 1 lines 
 
Amen to that.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 148 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb  8, 2002 (21:29) * 3 lines 
 
I am just now seeing the opening ceremonies. They, like everything else in Hawaii, are tape delayed. I am sharing this with everyone with tears of lost innocence in my eyes. The world is not united even by sport. I would live forever in the embrace of the Olympic Ideals.

*Hugs* to you all !


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 149 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 10, 2002 (23:40) * 27 lines 
 
Olympic Hymn

The Olympic Hymn, played when
the Olympic flag is raised, was
adopted by the International
Olympic Committee in 1957. The
music was composed by Spirou
Samara and the lyrics were written
by Costis Palamas (spelling of their
names varies in different sources). It
was first incorporated at the Rome
Olympics in 1960.

In addition to the official anthem,
each host city where the Olympics
are held can also create its own
anthem. "Bugler's Dream" by Leo
Arnaud was introduced during the
1968 Olympic Games in Grenoble.
Subsequently, John Williams
composed the "Olympic Fanfare
and Theme" for the 1984 Olympic
Games in Los Angeles.

http://www.santacruzpl.org/readyref/files/m-p/olympichymn.shtml

This is the most glorious music and the commentators talke all the way through it. I was NOT happy!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 150 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 10, 2002 (23:42) * 1 lines 
 
Now, if only someone recorded it and I can get hold of a copy. I will search for this, also!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 151 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 11, 2002 (10:58) * 5 lines 
 
If ever there was a reason for appreciating just what satellites can do---with the help of some high altitude aerial imagery, dedication, hard work, and a lot of expensive equipment---this is it!

Here is a must see!!!! http://olympics.gsfc.nasa.gov/

Click on the animation and zoom away!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 152 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 11, 2002 (12:18) * 35 lines 
 
OLYMPIC GAMES - Not an Ordinary Competition

The Olympic Games are about more than sports. The Games have
always been about peace. The first known Olympic Games occurred over
2,500 years ago, in Olympia, Greece. A Greek king called for a truce, or
pause from all fighting, so that the best athletes could compete against each
other in peace. The truce declared: "May the world be delivered from crime
and killing and freed from the clash of arms."
The Games were held every
four years until the year 394 CE.

Over a thousand years later, Pierre de Coubertin suggested the world once
again hold Olympic Games. He thought the Games would promote world
peace and friendship. He designed the Olympic symbol of five interlocking
rings to show the union of the different parts of the world. The ring colors
are blue, yellow, black, green, and red. These colors were chosen because
every flag in the world has at least one of these colors.


Flags are an important part of the Olympic Games. When athletes win a
gold, silver, or bronze medal, their country's flag flies proudly during the
medal ceremony. In addition, the national anthem of the gold medal winner's
country is played for all to hear.

The Olympic Torch Lights the Way
Since ancient times, the Olympic Games were opened by the lighting of an
Olympic flame.
For the past 60 years, the flame has been carried by torch
from Olympia, Greece (where it is lit by the sun's rays) to whatever city in
the world is hosting the Games. This year's torch traveled 13,500 miles. It
went by car, plane, train, boat, dogsled, and snowmobile. But mostly,
runners carried the torch. It passed through 46 of the 50 United States to
reach Salt Lake City. There it is burning in a specially-designed cauldron
until the closing ceremony on February 24. It is then put out with the promise
that it will burn again for the summer Olympic Games in Athens, Greece, in
2004.

http://www.eduplace.com/ss/current/story.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 153 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 11, 2002 (15:47) * 19 lines 
 
Olympic Hymn

Adopted by the IOC in 1957

Cantata by Costis Palamas

Set to music by Spirou Samara in 1896

Immortal spirit of antiquity,
Father of the true, beautiful and good,
Descend, appear, shed over us thy light,
Upon this ground and under this sky
Which had first witnessed thy unperishable fame.
Give life and animation to those noble games!
Throw wreaths of fadeless flowers to the victors
In the race and in the strife!
Create in our breasts, hearts of steel!

http://www.athletics.org.nz/canterbury/olympics_hymn.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 154 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 11, 2002 (15:57) * 21 lines 
 
OLYMPIC HYMN

Ancient immortal spirit, unsullied father of
that which is beautiful, great and true,
Descend, make thyself known and shine hero
on this earth and below these skies
witness of Thy Glory.

Illuminate the endevour of the noble contests
in the running race, the wrestling and the throwing.
Place a wreath of evergreen branch,
creating the body as of iron and worthy.

Vales, mountains and oceans shine with Thee
Like unto a great temple of white and porphyry.
To which all peoples hasten to this temple
to worship Thee, Oh ancient immortal Spirit.

sheet music for piano... http://www.forthnet.gr/olympics/athens1896/pictures/docs/hymn.html

I really want this - done right!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 155 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (13:17) * 12 lines 
 
(John in topic 65):"Perhaps between the spectators of the Olympic Athletic Contests exist more capable athletes but the glory is for those they battle in stadium."

Ancient Greece said much about the human condition to help us know ourselves better. John's quote is pertinent considering how many single-participant "teams" were in attendance at the Olympics soon to conclude in Salt Lake City.
We have learned to sit in chairs and criticize those who dare to compete and to put their best efforts before all mankind. How much better they are for the experience. The journey was heroic. The results are not nearly as important. I hope someday we will realize this once again.

I've become a great fan of the art of chess on ice called Curling I was delighted when a team of Scotswomen representing Great Britain won the gold yesterday. They invented the sport.

I will be watching the 4-man bobsleigh and cheering for the team from Greece. They als participated in the 2-man races and, like we did in some sports, did ot win medals but they did very respectably. Cheers to them for participating.

I am sorrowful for the ending of the games so soon. I am also tired of the big-money high profile figure skating. It is no longer a sport. It has become a political and monitary game which is unworthy of the Olympics. When they eliminated the requried skill elements, they changed everything. I would be happy to be rid of them. I have also seen enough hockey with smashing and gouging to last a lifetime. They can get rid of that, soo. Million-dollar-salaried NHL players against small countries without as much money or aggression? I am offended just as I will be by the NBA players in Basketball in Athens in two years.

Greece really cannot afford the Olympics in 2004. I have absolutely no doubt that they belong in Athens. I also think the host country, in this case, should not be funding the entire enterprise. I think, in gratitude, the entire world's teams should contribute richy to the efforts and save Greece from a huge debt they cannot afford to incur.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 156 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (18:10) * 1 lines 
 
Greece continues to participate and despite the monumental obstacles put in their team's way, the flag bearer at the opening ceremonies, Lefteris Fafalis, did well for himself and for Hellas in Cross Country, and in Combine Pursuit(skiing). Their bobsleigh team also had a good showing. Four-man tonight to watch. unhappily, though teh NBC anchor was presented with a hat, they did not see fit to show any of their runs. That saddens me.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 157 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (18:18) * 9 lines 
 
It's only a bit more than 900 days until the Athens Summer Olympics in 2004. I will be absolutely glued to any transmissions available anwhere. I might even consider obtaining a satellite dish just for that eventuality.

Throughout the Olympic Games, three flags continually fly: the Olympic flag, the hosting country's flag and Greece's flag. How perfectly beautiful it is to see the American flag and the Greek flag either side of the Olympic flag in Salt Lake city. In Athens, will there be two Greek flags? Will the Greek team enter first or just their flag and, as the host country team, enter last?

I am still hunting for the Greek Olympic Team webpage. I can find the Nagano website and the 2004 website.

The Baltimore Orioles, along with Major League Baseball, have stepped forward in an effort to help the Greek government field a competitive baseball team for the 2004 Olympic Games to be held in Athens.
http://www.geocities.com/baseballgreece/olympic.html



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 158 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (18:22) * 23 lines 
 
Greek-American Olympic hopeful Michael Voudaris, an Emergency Medical Technician, helped save lives at Ground Zero. Now competing in the skeleton event, he had planned to memorialize 30 Greek nationals, as well as fellow EMTs and alumni from his high school, who died during the Sept. 11th attacks. (He was not allowed to do this. IOC forbade it.)

SAE, the organization for Greeks abroad, has
announced that the official Volunteers Application
form for the Olympic and Paralympic Games
ATHENS 2004 is now available electronically at
the Organising Committee's website
www.athens.olympic.org in Greek and English,
under Volunteers.

Volunteers should carefully read the guidelines,
before completing the Volunteers Application.
Applications must be completed only in the
language of the application (only Greek or only
English).

The electronic form of the Application must be
received electronically. Photocopies or faxes of the
application are not acceptable. If you submit the
Application electronically you do not need to
submit it in print form.

http://www.helleniccomserve.com/headlinenews.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 159 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (18:23) * 4 lines 
 


Official website of the 2004 Athens Olympics
http://www.athens.olympic.org/Page/default.asp?la=2


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 160 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (18:25) * 1 lines 
 
I always thought they used a laurel wreath. I was corrected by John who told me it was Olive. As you can see by their logo, there are little spheres between the leaves - ergo Olive it is!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 161 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (18:28) * 1 lines 
 
This is my favorite summer Olympic event because I've participated in racing 470's. http://www.athens.olympic.org/Page/default.asp?la=2


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 162 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (18:30) * 1 lines 
 
http://www.ahepa20.org/events/greek_bobsleigh_team.htm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 163 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (18:33) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 164 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (18:39) * 2 lines 
 
If I had only known, I could have been part of their Olympic Bobsleigh team's sled. *sigh* I will look for further opportunities to do this. It is amazing. I recall their showing the sled with the beautiful blue on which were laminated all of the supporting photographs.
http://www.olympicdream.net/Events_schedule.htm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 165 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (20:45) * 41 lines 
 
WHO DESIGNED THE WORLD'S LARGEST UNFOLDING STRUCTURE, THE ARCHED CURTAIN FOR THE OLYMPIC MEDALS PLAZA?
Chuck Hoberman, world renowned inventor and toy designer,
and trained as both a sculptor and engineer, was commis-
sioned to design the Hoberman Arch, a semi-circular, web-
like structure of aluminum backed with translucent panels
that can be illuminated. It geometrically retracts in shape
and size, its 96 panels, each with three-pinned joints,
spiralling outward and upward in a radial motion to form a
6-foot-thick semi-circular ring. Hoberman is said to be
fascinated with nature's moving parts, like the iris of the
eye, and sees how small elements work to develop a bigger whole.

WHAT ARE SOME TECHNICAL DETAILS ABOUT THE HOBERMAN ARCH?
The Hoberman Arch spans 72 feet in diameter and stands 36
feet tall. There are more than 4,000 individually machined
pieces in the Arch. It is held together by 13,000 rivets,
and is powered by two 30-horsepower motors controlling
eight separate cables. The moveable elements weight 15,000
pounds.

HOW SMALL IS THE WORLD'S SMALLEST GUITAR?
The world's smallest guitar is 10 micrometers long--about the
size of a single cell--with six strings each about 50 nano-
meters, or 100 atoms, wide. It was made by Cornell University
researchers from crystalline silicon, and demonstrates a new
technology for a new generation of electromechanical devices.

WHY DID THE FIRST FEMALE AMERICAN TO WIN AN OLYMPIC GOLD MEDAL NOT REALIZE SHE HAD WON?
The 1900 Olympics in Paris were so poorly organized that many
contestants did not realize they were participating in Olympic
games. Part of the problem was because other sporting events
were held in connection with the Olympics, and the 1900 games
extended over a period of six months, unlike other Olympics
where the games occurred over a shorter period. This caused
much confusion. American art student Margaret Abbott entered
a nine-hole "International Ladies' Golf Tournament" on a lark
and won, though nothing she saw identified the tournament as
an Olympic event. It wasn't until two decades after she died
that historians identified her as the first female American
"gold" medalist.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 166 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 24, 2002 (13:52) * 10 lines 
 
Olympic Hopeful? From my Alma Mater:

MINNEAPOLIS -- Penn State pole vaulter Kevin Dare died Saturday after landing on his head during the Big Ten indoor championships.


Dare was a sophomore from State College, Pa., with several years' experience in the often-dangerous sport. Another vaulter was killed in a similar accident in the 1993 Sioux City, Iowa, relays.

"It's always in the back of your mind that you can get hurt pole vaulting," said Michigan State's Paul Terek, the No. 6 vaulter in the nation. "But you bury it deep in the back of your mind, even though 100 out of 100 pole vaulters have had some kind of accident in their careers. You just bury it, but it's been unearthed now, though."

more... http://www.espn.go.com/ncaa/news/2002/0223/1339701.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 167 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 24, 2002 (21:03) * 6 lines 
 
SALT LAKE CITY WINTER OLYMPICS-VERY INTENSE GREEK PRESENCE.
(Cultural, Scientific & General News Category)
February 2002: The 2002 Winter Olympics started on February 8th in Salt Lake City, USA. During his stay in Utah's capital the Greek Minister for the Culture inaugurated the Greek stand which is situated in Salt Lake City downtown and in which is displayed audiovisual material presenting the 2004 Athens Summer Games preparation and inform the audience about the targets of the Cultural Olympics. The Minister had also proceeded in the unveiling of a Prometheus statue during a symbolic ceremony organized by Greek-Americans. The Minister for the Culture together with the Greek Minister of Foreign Affairs attended a Greek oriented exhibit where they were presented the works of the Greek painter Mina Valyrakis who was voted as the 'Sport Artist of the Year' by the American Sports Federation and of the Greek-American Euripides Kastaris, an artist connecting the Olympic ideal with the 2002 and 2004 Games. On the other hand, the Greek Minister for the Culture had an appointment with t!
he president of the Peking 2008 Organizing Committee and discussed the future cooperation between Greece and China concerning the cultural dimension of the Olympics. The Chinese part was very interested about the philosophy of the 2001-2004 Cultural Olympics. In this direction, the president of the Peking 2008 Organizing Committee indicated Greece's knowledge and experience on Cultural Olympics and expressed the willingness of China to be helped by Greece in the organization of cultural exhibits. During the meeting was decided the sign of a protocol of cooperation concerning the Cultural Olympics.
*********************************************************************



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 168 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 25, 2002 (11:39) * 2 lines 
 
The Athens Summer Olympics coverage is now at the Sports Conference Topic 58
http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/read/sports/58/new


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 169 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Feb 25, 2002 (18:34) * 8 lines 
 
Marcia, I agree with many of your observations about the recently concluded Salt Lake City Winter Olympic Games. Concerning figure skating, you are absolutely right, it is no longer a sport. In fact, by removing the required skill elements; i.e., school figures, it is no longer even figure skating. Perhaps they should change the name now that true figure skating no longer exists. What they, especially the women, do now are some cheesy Las Vegas review numbers in gauche and gaudy costumes. As for the judging the rules are positively arcane. No one understands them. They have some bizarre thing involving ordinals. An example would be if Kwan had only lost the free skate to Hughes she would have still taken the gold medal, despite her fall in her free skate. However, since she placed after Slutskaya as well as Hughes, she, instead, took the bronze medal. I don't understand that, at all. Using ladies figure skaking as an illustration again. The last year that school figures were in the Winter Games was at Calga
y in 1988. The winner of the ladies figure skating gold medal in that Olympic Games was Katerina Witt. What is interesting is that Witt only placed first in compulsory (school) figures. She finished second in both the short free-style program and the long free-style program. She was the gold medalist because she had the highest number of points at the end of the competion. It was a fairer system, more in keeping with athletics. Like you, I would be happy to be rid of them.

While I'm venting on figure skating, let me expound on those annoying Canadian whiners who were, and in my mind, still are the silver medalists. They skated a technically easier and less "artistic" program than the Russians. This was also compounded by the fact that they had nowhere near the Russians' unison. Still, since the Russian pair had one of it's members land with slight mis-step, they Canadians were whining like babies that they skated a "perfect" program. Well, they had no mistakes in their boring, safe, and not particularly difficult program. They set they example of aim at the middle, be safe, and if you don't get what you want whine until you do. They disgust me.

Lastly, the American network NBC's coverage was god-awful. It was so chauvinistic as to make me embarassed. They were only interested in competions in which Americans had a chance at medaling. They gave very little note to athletes who were not, at least, North American. It was shameless boosterism coupled with amaturish commentary. NBC needs to understand that the Olympics are an international sporting festival. Much of the joy of them is derived from seeing and learning about the great international stars. I'll stop grumbling now.




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 170 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 25, 2002 (19:54) * 8 lines 
 
Yes Yes Yes, Cheryl. No school figures, no examining edges has turned it into entertainment but not a sport. Get rid of it.

People who winge made me very biased against them. If I did not care about the medals to start with, they surely got my bias against them by their attitude (hers, mostly.) I agree totally that the Russian team won the gold medals hands down with skill level and technical difficulty. It is very sad.

NBC was so appalling at the Sydney Olympics I listened to short wave and avoided the televised programming totally. I even wrote to Australia Broadcasting to thank them for their excellent coverage - and they read my letter on the air!
This time AGAIN, NBC talked OVER the Olympic Anthem! That did it for me. It was down hill all the rest of the way. Worst of all, they will be the only way I will have to see Athens. *sigh* Perhaps rental of a satellite dish might be worthwhile for that !

*joining you on your soapbox*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 171 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (00:31) * 7 lines 
 
Hi,
Olympic games are really an international sporting festival in our days, but not only. An entire economic circuit functions simultaneously with aim the profit. They does not exist chaste ideals for distribution now.

Ancient Olympic games were also an international sporting festival. But they existed ideals and messages for athletes and for Spectators (like ÅÕ ÁÃÙÍÉÆÅÓÈÅ = VERACIOUSLY CONTEST). The more important fact was that the wars they stopped at the duration of the Olympic games. They participated also there, athletes from belligerent countries and were absolutely respectable. The ancient Olympic games were a message of peace and modesty.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 172 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (13:59) * 1 lines 
 
i work with someone who plans to petition NBC to never do the Olympics coverage again! but they had to do something to make lots of money or else they couldn't pay the $1M/show salary for each of the members of Friends!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 173 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (14:00) * 1 lines 
 
i agree with the whining. although a guy i work with was there with his wife. they both thought there was something screwy about the judging and that the canadians did a better program. i don't know because i didn't see it.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 174 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (14:03) * 3 lines 
 
*Sigh* That is why I posted the Olympic Truce twice here. I though it important enough to remind people exactly what the Olympics represented. It is enough that you have made the team and can participate in the events. All who attend are already winners. I am an idealist enough to wish they would return to this ideal. Like the man from Camaroon - the sole competitor from his country. He came in last in his event, but he was every bit as delighted to have participated as the gold medal winner. THAT was what it is all about.

Participation, blending all cultures and ethnicities into one human population striving to do their best, rejoicing in the pacticipation rather than the outcome. Doing one's best for the glory of sport and fellowship. When money enters the equation it spoils everything. This year each medal came with a monitary award. I am far too idealistic for this world as it is now. Still, I cling to the Olympic ideal and pray each time that the goodness in mankind will rise to the challenge.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 175 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (14:07) * 1 lines 
 
There is definitley something terribly wrong with the subjective judging. Publicity and pressure from both inside the IOC and from the public at large made them rethink their methods and to make changes. NBC is horrid. ABC with Jim McKay was always respectful and unintrusive. How sad they have the games until 2008. I think it is a fact of life that they paid billions do get them and they will not be moved by any outcries or protests.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 176 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (14:20) * 1 lines 
 
With our current weather, perhaps Hilo should place a bid for a future Winter Olympics. We have more snow that Lake Placid or Toronto!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 177 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (18:20) * 2 lines 
 
Wolfie, your point is well taken concerning your co-worker. Therein also lies much of the problem concerning the current sorry state of figure skating at the Olympics. Without school figures it very often comes down to a matter of personal taste at best, political one-upsmanship at worst. I think that seeing the two respective performances on television allowed me to be more objective than actually being there and being influenced by the crowd. My family used to produce rabid figure skating fans. They could really delve into the fine points of the sport. Unfortunately, nobody could really skate worth beans in my family, but I digress. The Canadians may have been more crowd pleasing; but it was largely a North American crowd. Thus, more likely to be disposed toward them. Their program was more "show biz" than that of the Russians. That does not make it a better program in terms of competition. The Russian pair skated a program of high technical difficulty in contrast to the Candadian pair's level of mediocre
difficulty. The Russians skated with more speed and unison, as well. In terms of what makes a great team of pairs skaters in the sport of figure skating the Russians were the far better example. It is a shame that the Russian pair had to have their victory and ability cast into doubt by a shoddy judging system. Marcia is right the whole thing is a mess and they should drop figure skating from the Olympics as it can no longer be taken seriously as a sport. As for my family who used to adore figure skating. Essentially most of us couldn't possibly care less about the joke it's become.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 178 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (18:25) * 7 lines 
 
John, you made wonderfully astute and valid points about the Olympic Games both past and present. Perhaps someday they will attain their full potential.

Marcia, I grew up watching the Olympics on ABC with Jim McKay. I loved them and miss the respect and, yes, warmth that they brought to their coverage.

Oh and congratulations Marcia on having your letter to Australian broadcasters of the Sydney Games read on the air.




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 179 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (18:27) * 1 lines 
 
PRAISE BE! I am not banned from Drool. Spring's happy family continues to be just that. I am still having problems with FTP despite terry's phone call. All's cool on the homefront, Terry!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 180 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (18:31) * 3 lines 
 
Terry. FTP WORKS!!!

Many thanks!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 181 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (18:53) * 7 lines 
 
i love figure skating because of the difficulty of their maneuvers as well as integrating the "show biz" portion into it. i thought a well-performed routine combined them both. because it came on so late on the West Coast, i missed the whole program.

i agree that if you set a rule, those rules should be followed to a 'T' and subjectivity should be kept to a minimum.

i'm so glad you have ftp again marcia! (i haven't emailed the details yet)

cheryl, thanks for voicing your opinions--i am in agreement and believe the games should be Good Will and not some kind of contest as they were originally developed!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 182 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (21:22) * 3 lines 
 
Wolfie, thanks for bringing up the Good Will games (possibly unconsciously) because of the way they have developed (I promise not to mention Ms Fonda-Turner is you do, also.) I consider them preparation for the Athens Olympics. Ok Now I will post the logos from my space on the hard drive.




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 183 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (21:23) * 1 lines 
 
well, I managed to remove the background. Now I need to remove the left upright margin of the original. FTP is a GOOD thing!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 184 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (21:24) * 4 lines 
 
so is having the rings without background





 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 185 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (21:25) * 1 lines 
 
*Test*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 186 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Feb 27, 2002 (06:56) * 10 lines 
 
Can I speak with this image?




Also, put on the sound of your computer and


Special construction for all of you in Spring. It is dedicated to all Geo visitors too.


John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 187 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 27, 2002 (12:07) * 9 lines 
 
John, Your little floor element of gymnastics gifs are wonderful. Here we call that mounting the floow and first (element) run - usually a set of flips and summersaults from one corner to the opposite diagonal corner.

Your dove is lovely, and belongs at all venues to remind the participants and their judges of what it is really all about.

A music button that pushed itself?? How wonderful of it to play Zorba for us.

*Hugs* for making our days so much better for your having been here. Onward to creating our best not as a competition, but as an offering to our readers.

Kudos, John.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 188 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Feb 27, 2002 (17:14) * 3 lines 
 
i don't want to talk about Ms F-T so i promise not to as well!

and john, your graphics spoke volumes (as well as zorba).


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 189 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 27, 2002 (17:34) * 42 lines 
 
Does this little excursion in the painful humor of teaching in the US appertain to the rest of the world?



A History of Teaching Math

Teaching Math in 1950:
A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100.
His cost of production is 4/5 of the price.
What is his profit?

Teaching Math in 1960:
A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100.
His cost of production is 4/5 of the price, or $80.
What is his profit?

Teaching Math in 1970:
A logger exchanges a set "L" of lumber for a set "M" of money.
The cardinality of set "M" is 100. Each element is worth one
dollar. Make 100 dots representing the elements of the set "M."
The set "C", the cost of production contains 20 fewer points than
set "M." Represent the set "C" as a subset of set "M" and answer the
following question:
What is the cardinality of the set "P" of profits?

Teaching Math in 1980:
A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100.
His cost of production is $80 and his profit is $20.
Your assignment: Underline the number 20.

Teaching Math in 1990:
By cutting down beautiful forest trees, the logger makes $20.
What do you think of this way of making a living?
Topic for class participation after answering the question:
How did the forest birds and squirrels feel as the logger cut down
the trees?
There are no wrong answers.

Teaching Match in 2000:
A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100.
His cost of production is $120.
How does Arthur Andersen determine that his profit margin is $60?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 190 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 27, 2002 (17:35) * 1 lines 
 
I want to see John doing his handsprings. I know how happy being able to FTP again made him. Me too!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 191 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Feb 28, 2002 (16:01) * 1 lines 
 
John, thank you so much for the beautiful Olympic graphic complete with music.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 192 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Feb 28, 2002 (16:40) * 1 lines 
 
I am so excited to see Greek gymnastics with a great coach worthy of their heritage. Perhaps NBC will finally televise a Greek athlete or two *sigh*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 193 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Mar  3, 2002 (04:42) * 4 lines 
 
Hi Wolfie, Cheryl, and Marcia,
I try to give you something different than simple words here. We can use different ways to express what we have to say. We can find beauty everywhere. We need a simple eyebeam and desire only.

John


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 194 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar  3, 2002 (13:45) * 1 lines 
 
*Hugs* John. My delight is in sharing all things with you. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, as we say. YOU are beautiful and Geo is honored to have your wisdom and perspective. *strewing rosepetals in your path*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 195 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar  5, 2002 (22:16) * 8 lines 
 
From a Geonian who wants to remain anonymous, this truism"

THE TRUTH IN 13 WORDS...
Inside every
older person
is a younger person -
wondering what the heck happened....



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 196 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sat, Mar  9, 2002 (14:15) * 4 lines 
 
I would say, "We are a live library, which is travelling in the time. Our memories are a special window via of which we can see back in time and space. The most of the times it is not agreeable because we easily remember bad situations rather than agreeable moments"

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 197 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar  9, 2002 (14:25) * 3 lines 
 
You are brilliant in your philosophy and observation of human nature, John. I am as guilty of this as is anyone, especially in the unfortunate manner is which I find my life. That is why I find more agreeable minds here than in my real life. We make choices and they are not always the best ones in retrospect.

I choose to look to what is possible from now on to make my life better, to excite my curiousity, and to give me things to make me happy to wake up in the morning. Thank you for being part of that joy and anticipation.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 198 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar  9, 2002 (17:55) * 43 lines 
 
Since the Orthodox Church uses a different calendar from the one we use in the West, they are just now having their pre-Lenten festivities:

Carnival Time in Greece
Guide picks



Patras, Xanthi, and other cities in Greece go all out
for the pre-Lent festival known elsewhere as Mardi
Gras. Join in the fun!

Carnival in Corfu
Ancient and unique customs survive in the Corfiot
carnival.

Patras - General Info
A look at this lovely city, plus a bit on the Carnival.

Ragoutsaria
This early celebration (January 6-8th) has many
elements of Carnival, but also unique traditions
dating back to the ancient Dionysian festivals of
winter.

Xanthi - Burning of the Tzaros
Closing ceremony for the Carnival.

Xanthi Carnival - 1999 Program
Listing of cultural events held in conjuntion with carnival season. Check
back for 2000 info.

Xanthi Carnival - History
Founded in 1966, the Carnival was a success from the start. Quick look, a
few vintage photos.

Xanthi Carnival - Mayor's Message
Closing speech of the carnival, plus some photos.

Xanthi Carnival
Greek-only info on this untouristy Carnival.

all links are hot at the website below
http://gogreece.about.com/cs/carnivaltime/


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 199 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar  9, 2002 (18:06) * 13 lines 
 
For John, who cannot attend this year, a big hug of sympathy and many more years of Carnival in Patras for you!
http://gogreece.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.proskopos.com%2Fpatra_en.html

(I think it is like New Orleans is for Mardi Gras for the US.)

Finally, the Carnival of Patras is an internationally famous event as well as a milestone in the
city's life. It is carried out every year at the end of February or beginning of March (movable
feast). Tenths of thousands of Patras' people -and not only- join each year the carnival groups
(consisting of 150-300 persons) and with their own costumes participate in the various contests
of the Treasure Hunt as well as in the parades. Groups and all kinds of Organizations and
Associations organize their traditional "Costume Dances" in various night clubs and private
halls. Highlights include the Night "On-Foot" Parade on the last Saturday and the Grand Parade
on Carnival's last Sunday, when the whole city surrenders to a frantic continuous dance.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 200 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar  9, 2002 (18:07) * 5 lines 
 
The Municipality of Patras, official sponsor of Patras' Carnival, keeps a discrete eye on the
events and, along with the Carnival Committee, looks after the participants' safety at the same
time it grades the quality of appearance of the groups. The Municipality as well takes part in the
celebrations as it organizes the famous "Mbourmboulia", adult dances, at the Municipal Theater
"Apollon".



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 201 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar  9, 2002 (18:16) * 1 lines 
 
Back to hunting for Birhday decorations. John's celebration is on Shrove Tuesday this year - according to the Orthodox Calendar. =)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 202 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Mar 10, 2002 (01:51) * 7 lines 
 
I have a correction. We have the Shrove Monday just after last carnival Sunday. So this Tuesday is not Shrove Tuesday. It is the next.
(Shrove Tuesday it means clean Tuesday or fasting Tuesday for us in Greece)

The fact that you remember my birthday is the best decoration. But, is someone, which can be glad because he becomes older? It is better to celebrate the fact that we are alive until this day and between good friends too.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 203 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 10, 2002 (15:27) * 3 lines 
 
That is what it supposedly is in the western church but it is the day we eat everything we cannot eat for the next 40 days of Lent.

We celebrate the fact that you were conceived and born into the world so we might come to know and to love you, john! Aging is not something I think about. Rather, I consider a birthday the celebration of your life during which I also give flowers dedicated to your mother. Rejoice and join us in celebrating John who is amongst us and has enriched our lives with his presence. I am busy gathering flowers for you and in your mother's memory.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 204 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 10, 2002 (19:48) * 6 lines 
 
For those who can get the Arts and Entertainment channel on TV, look for the hour each day when they broadcast the Paralympics from Salt Lake City. Congratulations to New Zeland for winning the women's downhill (skiing) and to the US who won their Sledge hockey game against Canada. Too day they are not more publicised or better covered. This is even more wonderful than the others were. Each person paricipating has some horrific tale of survival to tell, and their overcoming the obstacles life has given them is truly inspiring. Give it a look! http://www.paralympics2002.com/







 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 205 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 11, 2002 (13:33) * 9 lines 
 

HAUOLI NA HANAU, KEONI





Mauna Loa Lei

Handcrafted from 250 Vanda Orchid
centers



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 206 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Mar 11, 2002 (17:08) * 1 lines 
 
that is very pretty!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 207 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 11, 2002 (18:46) * 5 lines 
 
In Hawaii, even the men wear flowers - even in their hair or behind their ears. No one dares call Polynesian men sissies. They are strong and built solidly and massively. Flowers actually look very good on men.

More to come... =)




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 208 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 11, 2002 (19:08) * 4 lines 
 
FOR JOHN FROM GEO





 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 209 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Mar 11, 2002 (20:55) * 3 lines 
 
it's tomorrow greece time isn't it?

marcia, i've seen two samoan men here in my tiny adventures, and they were giants--it was like david looking at goliath.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 210 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 11, 2002 (22:10) * 3 lines 
 
Samoans fear nothing on earth except for other Samoans! You're right. They are giants. We have a large percentage of Samoans at UHH and when their students graduate, they all come and sing and dance for the entire audience. It is spine-tingling in the nicest meaning of the word. They also do it for student athletes after they play their last collegiate game. That is totally magical. Everyone is totally transfixed.

IT IS THE 12TH OF MARCH IN GREECE.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 211 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (09:49) * 1 lines 
 
HAPPY BIRTHDAY JOHN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 212 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (09:49) * 3 lines 
 
that was really supposed to be a whole lot bigger.....like this:

HAPPY BIRTHDAY JOHN!!!!!!!!!!



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 213 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (13:13) * 7 lines 
 









 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 214 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (14:54) * 4 lines 
 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, JOHN, from Wolfie







 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 215 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (17:51) * 2 lines 
 

thanks marcia for posting it for me!!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 216 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (17:51) * 1 lines 
 
oh no, now the bold is taking over


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 217 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (18:29) * 1 lines 
 

eeek!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 218 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (18:30) * 1 lines 
 
*whew* I must have missed a closing tag when I did yours - John will be amused!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 219 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (22:55) * 8 lines 
 
This is Great honour for a simple sensitive man. This is the first time where one day it had 36 hours!!!! My international birthday! It started normally in Greece and ends in Hawaii 12 hours after my midnight.

Thank you Marcia
Thank you Wolfie
THANK YOU GEO Deeply of my heart.


John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 220 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (23:20) * 2 lines 
 
Wow! I never thought about 36 hour birthdays! You are right.... how wonderful.
Now, if only you had managed to come around the world backward you could have repeated the entire 36 hour day as you crossed the international dateline.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 221 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Mar 13, 2002 (16:56) * 1 lines 
 
wow, 36 hours of celebrating!! how lucky you are!!!!!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 222 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar 14, 2002 (14:45) * 1 lines 
 
...and how luck we are for being able to be the celebrants!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 223 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Mar 14, 2002 (18:23) * 1 lines 
 
John, I missed your birthday and posted your birthday wishes at the wrong conference. So, I'll try again. Sorry for being late. Happy Birthday, John!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 224 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar 14, 2002 (19:20) * 1 lines 
 
John figured it was already a 36 hour celebration - so I extended the event for the rest of the month. Watch him turn Irish on Monday!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 225 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 15, 2002 (17:00) * 1 lines 
 
*laugh*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 226 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sat, Mar 16, 2002 (16:57) * 4 lines 
 
It’s all right Cheryl. Thank for your wishes. Thanks to Geo and the two opposite sides of Earth, a celebration day can hold out 36 hours. It is normal if you have good friends at the both sides. I feel great honor that I am member in Geo between very god friends from USA, New Zealand and around the world. Especially, I must thanks Marcia that is the great in waiting hostess, Wolfie, Rob and all Geo members. It is great honor for me.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 227 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sat, Mar 16, 2002 (17:01) * 13 lines 
 
I have some news about our earthquake prediction research.

In the ALPHA TV (Greek channel) exists a 3-hours airing every Thursday night. This airing presents everything that is or sounds strange in Greek political and social life. Its name is JUNGLE.

The airing of last Thursday was dedicated to our earthquake prediction research. Dr. Thanassoulas described thoroughly our method. At the discussion that followed were heard only positive scientific opinions and no one negative. Seismologists, they had nothing to say. My participation was by telephone. We gave the lie to rumors for an oncoming big EQ at the Northwest Greece during this airing. Tele-view of this airing was very much high.

Afterwards this airing, I had two TV reporters of different TV channels in my house on Friday morning. I gave also three live talk shows for radio stations. Also, I was sitting in an airing of one hour talk show in ASTRA TV and in the Evening News of TRT TV that are channels of central Greece.

Finally, I have to say two things.
One: It is much difficult if you become the day person suddenly.
Two: I hope that Greek government or someone else can help us to install and operate at least two additional stations in Greece.

John


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 228 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Mar 17, 2002 (11:01) * 1 lines 
 
*woohoo* they're standing up and taking notice, john!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 229 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 17, 2002 (12:23) * 1 lines 
 
John is famous in Greece! He did not tell you his website had many hits after the program. It is better than the Neilson Ratings we have! He will soon outgrow Geo's humble surroundings, I fear. My Congratulations for this long overdue publicity and all honors. No one has said anything negative !!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 230 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 17, 2002 (12:51) * 4 lines 
 

Happy St Patrick's Day







 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 231 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Mar 17, 2002 (19:22) * 1 lines 
 
erin go braugh!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 232 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 17, 2002 (21:19) * 5 lines 
 
Forecver - yes, if they stop finding ways and reasons for killing each other. I think they are gonna make it, after all!


Dhia duit!





 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 233 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 17, 2002 (21:22) * 8 lines 
 
May there always be work for your hands to do;
May your purse always hold a coin or two;
May the sun always shine on your windowpane;
May a rainbow be certain to follow each rain;
May the hand of a friend always be near you;
May God fill your heart with gladness to cheer you.


Thanks, Meredith! *HUGS*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 234 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 17, 2002 (21:25) * 13 lines 
 
Visitors flood Patras for annual carnival

16/03/2002 20:14:21

Thousands of visitors poured into Patras in summer-like weather on
Saturday for the start of the western port city's annual carnival, the
largest in Greece.

The carnival peaks on Sunday with a major parade through the city
centre, this year featuring Poseidon, the sea god of ancient Greek
mythology.

Hoteliers reported that hotels were filled to capacity.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 235 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 17, 2002 (21:32) * 4 lines 
 
I understand that the childish depravity of New Orleans Mardi Gras and the Rio Carbivale has not yet gotten to Greece. Too much of the wrong stuff to drink, I would suppose, but not the naked debauchery for which I am at a loss to explain.


Where ARE their parents?!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 236 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 18, 2002 (18:20) * 4 lines 
 
For John who is the only one on Geo who can actually pronounce this wishes:

'Kala Koulouma':Clean Monday and 'Kali Sarakosti', the fourty day period
before Greek Orthodox Easter



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 237 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 18, 2002 (23:54) * 3 lines 
 
It is still Monday in Hawaii so I can post this but cannot see well enough in the dark to participate in the festivites.

Clean Monday or Katheri Deftera 40 days before Easter, marks the first day of lent and it is customary to go out in the country and fly paper kites.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 238 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar 19, 2002 (00:01) * 40 lines 
 
Greeks celebrate end of carnival, start of Lent

18/03/2002 18:18:02

Thousands of Athenians on Monday climbed Philopappou Hill near the
Acropolis to celebrate the start of Lent with traditional delicacies
and music.

Leading the annual municipally-arranged event was Mayor Dimitris
Avramopoulos.

Children around Greece flew kites, another tradition that marks the end
of the annual carnival season and the beginning of Lent, leading to
Greek Orthodox Easter, which falls early in May this year.

In the capital for celebrations were the leader of the Coalition of the
Left and Progress, Nikos Constantopoulos; and the head of the Communist
Party of Greece, Aleka Papariga.

President of the Republic Costis Stephanopoulos spent the holiday in
Rio, Achaia; Prime Minister Costas Simitis in Aghii Theodori, Attica;
and the leader of the main opposition New Democracy party, Kostas
Karamanlis, on the island of Evia.

On Saturday, thousands of visitors had poured into Patras in
summer-like weather for the start of the western port city's annual
carnival, the largest in Greece.

The carnival peaked on Sunday with a five kilometre long parade through
the city centre, this year featuring Poseidon, the sea god of ancient
Greek mythology, as the carnival's traditional King of Laughter, whose
effigy is burnt at the end of the event. The theme of the parade was
the Mediterranean.

The carnival also includes a treasure hunt, enjoyed this year by about
35,000 children wearing masks and costumes.

Hoteliers reported that hotels in Patras were filled to capacity.

http://www.hri.org/news/greek/apeen/2002/02-03-18.apeen.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 239 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Mar 20, 2002 (09:33) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 240 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Mar 22, 2002 (12:46) * 8 lines 
 
This is for Marcia


This is for Rob


John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 241 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 22, 2002 (13:10) * 4 lines 
 
Thank you, John. This one is for you. (We have missed you!) I wonder if we might be able to put smaller icons like these on the Front Page of Geo...





 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 242 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 22, 2002 (13:13) * 4 lines 
 
For John and for the metrically challenged, I think seeing your weather in bothe metric and "American" might be more meaningful:





 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 243 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Mar 22, 2002 (14:31) * 3 lines 
 
With the mention of the vernal equinox this week, it seems we have been very Northern Hemisphere-centric. We forgot about Rob in New Zealand, where it was the autumnal equinox.

Happy Belated Autumnal Equinox, Rob!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 244 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 22, 2002 (16:14) * 1 lines 
 
You're right! He says Autumn becan two weeks ago for them - the first winter storm. That is how I known when seasons change in Hawaii. The onset of summer is more difficult to discern!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 245 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 22, 2002 (16:42) * 12 lines 
 
HOW IS THE DATE FOR EASTER DETERMINED EACH YEAR?

There are two different formulas for Easter, since there are
two Easters, in most years. The basic formula is: the first
Sunday after the first full moon after the vernal equinox
(March 20, the first day of spring). This year, the holiday
falls on March 31. (It can occur any time between March 22
and April 25.) But there is another formula. In the Eastern
Orthodox religion, the formula is: the first Sunday after
the first full moon after the vernal equinox after Jewish
Passover. That is why the two Easters rarely coincide.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 246 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 22, 2002 (17:09) * 1 lines 
 
hey, where's mine? *laugh* (where can i get one?--dunno if i can ftp yet either)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 247 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 22, 2002 (17:10) * 1 lines 
 
(and i'm glad i'm not keeping track of two easters! just knowing when lent starts and ends is enough for me)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 248 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 22, 2002 (17:36) * 3 lines 
 
I'm Looking Sweetie!

That last calendar explanation was the easiest for me to understand. 18 days after ours. I wonder if that goes for all things or if Greece keeps two calendars. John, we need you!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 249 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 22, 2002 (17:42) * 4 lines 
 
Wolfie, check here http://www.wunderground.com/weatherstation/WXDailyHistory.asp?ID=KCASANPE1





 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 250 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 22, 2002 (17:44) * 1 lines 
 
I wish there was one for Volos somewhere. I'm still hunting!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 251 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 22, 2002 (17:55) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 252 of 1049: TheMaharaja  (TheMaharaja) * Fri, Mar 22, 2002 (18:58) * 2 lines 
 
I think I have found a dinasour tooth? I don't know anything about Archaeology
Can anyone help.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 253 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 22, 2002 (21:14) * 7 lines 
 
Maharaja, I know several personal contacts I can ask for you, or you may join this group and ask them. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/geofossils/

That Geo'fossils is both friendly and full of knowledgable people who would be happy to help you. I suggest you submit a picture - can you arrange to have a digital photo taken of it? If you email it to me, I can post it both here (Geo 7 which is my paleontology topic) and in Geo'fossils.

Good luck!

Most importantly Aloha and welcome to Geo!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 254 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 22, 2002 (23:24) * 4 lines 
 
Larissa is closer than is Athens - for John





 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 255 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 23, 2002 (18:49) * 58 lines 
 


~*~ Independence Day In Greece - March 25th ~*~

Traveling in Greece this
week? You're fortunate -
Independence Day on
Saturday, March 25th, will
fill the streets with parades
and celebrations, both
secular and sacred. In
Athens, military parades will
vie with church
celebrations, keeping the streets both busy and
sometimes blocked.

In 1821, Greeks vigorously rose up against the
oppressive Ottoman Empire which had occupied
Greece for nearly four hundred years, embarking on
the ultimately successful war of independence.
Bishop Germanos of Patras boldly raised the Greek
flag at the monastery of Agia Lavras, inciting the
Peloponnese to rise against the oppressors.

On this day in the Orthodox calendar, the archangel
Gabriel appeared to the maiden Mary and announced
the news: she was pregnant with the divine child.
Bishop Germanos chose this day to deliver a different
but not unrelated message: a new spirit was about
to be born in Greece. The churches celebrate the
Festival of the Annunciation with pomp, ceremony,
and joy. The spectacle is especially vivid on the
islands of Tinos and Idra (Hydra). Hydra, a maritime
merchant power with a swift, well-maintained fleet,
was a determined and effective supporter of the War
for Independence, doubling the celebration there.
You can also expect colorful religious ceremonies
wherever the local monastery or church is named
"Evangelisimos" or "Evangelistria", such as Panagia
Evangelistria on Tinos.

Travelers who don't throw themselves into the spirit
of the day may be frustrated with delays,
unexpected closures, and a general lack of
attentiveness by the Greeks, who are busy with the
dual holiday.

Greek Independence Day is also celebrated by many
of the Greeks of the diaspora, and large parades are
becoming more common in United States cities where
Greeks have made their homes, including Boston and
New York City. Each year, the U.S. President marks
the occasion with a proclamation reminding citizens
of the contributions of Greece to democracy, and of
the ongoing contributions of expatriate Greeks in
their new communities throughout the world.

http://gogreece.about.com/library/weekly/aa032400a.htm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 256 of 1049: TheMaharaja  (TheMaharaja) * Sat, Mar 23, 2002 (19:55) * 6 lines 
 
Thanks for your advice to contact geofossils. I will do that. I will try to
send a digital picture of it to you too. Actually I had seen a program on the
Discovery channel and they showed a dinosaur's tooth, it resembled the one I had found that's why I became 90% sure that it was a dinosaur's
tooth.
Best Regards.
TheMaharaja


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 257 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 23, 2002 (20:02) * 3 lines 
 
The source of the above information and a lot more about Greek Independence:

http://www3.sympatico.ca/bourdeka/25March.htm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 258 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 23, 2002 (20:05) * 1 lines 
 
Maharaja, Fatastic news. I'll also do some hunting for you and post it on Geo 7 which is my Paleo topic. Both are essentially picking the same worthy brains for information. I'm delighted you have fossils to find. My island is so new all we find is yesterday's buried lava flow and a new black sand beach.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 259 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 23, 2002 (21:26) * 1 lines 
 
Since the Mailto links no longer work here on the topics, Use the one on Geo/all to find my email address is marci@aloha.net. Sorry for not making that clear, Maharajah, sir!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 260 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 23, 2002 (21:26) * 1 lines 
 
NOW they work!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 261 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Mar 24, 2002 (09:13) * 4 lines 
 
Welcome Maharaja. Warm regards from Greece

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 262 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sun, Mar 24, 2002 (13:43) * 5 lines 
 
Greetings to the Maharaja!

Marcia, I did know that Orthodox Easter had to fall after the Jewish Passover. I didn't really know that the Vernal Equinox or full moons had much to do with Orthodox Easter. I thought that was for "Western" Easter.

Easter still retains some of its pagan origins. The name has been suggested to be a variant of that of the Babylonian goddess, Istar. She was Inanna to the Summerians and in the "Epic of Gilgamesh" was remarked as having sexual liasions with "gods, men, and animals". There are also supposed to have been the influences of European fertility goddesses in the celebration of Easter. Things like rabbits and eggs. As far a fertility goes, rabbits breed like, well, rabbits. As for eggs, their link to fertility is pretty evident. Marcia, do you know if there was there ever an ancient European fertility goddess with the name of Estore, or something similar. I think I read somewhere that the name "Easter" came from her name or festival.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 263 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 24, 2002 (22:11) * 25 lines 
 
Cypriots mull giant offshore Aphrodite

The government of Cyprus is seriously considering a proposal to build a colossal statue of Aphrodite
balancing on a scallop shell off the island’s southwestern coast, in an attempt to attract more tourists,
reports said yesterday

The 50-million-dollar project is the brainchild of one Xanthos Menelaou, a London-based Cypriot
architect, who was inspired by Sandro Botticelli’s 15th-century painting of the ancient goddess of love
being wafted ashore by the winds. According to Greek myth, Aphrodite was born in the sea and first set
foot on land at Paphos, on western Cyprus.

Cypriot Tourism Minister Nikos Rolandis was impressed.

“Egypt has the Pyramids, London has the Tower, New York has the Statue of Liberty,” he said. “I believe
Cyprus needs an identity, and that should be Aphrodite... It will be a very imposing thing.”

Menelaou said Cyprus needs to be “upgraded as a product.”

“Romantic things like sea and sand don’t work any more.” The Cypriot Cabinet will discuss the idea on
April 3.

http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_357385_23/03/2002_14707





 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 264 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 24, 2002 (22:19) * 1 lines 
 
OEstre the fertility goddess of the Celts also took the form of a rabbit on occasion (their fertility is legendary) thus we have the OEstre bunny. How Ishtar got in on it is a recent development. I did my research in the early 80's and it was already well known in books written at the beginning of the 20th century. I suspect that the mother goddess has many permutations and you will find her everywhere in similar names. When the Romans conquered all Gaul and Britain thereafter they got many holidays and Godesses which they transformed into Christian belilef structures. (That bit of knoweldge sent me on another year's chase looking for evidence of that fact.)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 265 of 1049: TheMaharaja  (TheMaharaja) * Mon, Mar 25, 2002 (05:33) * 9 lines 
 
Thanks to John and Cheryl for welcoming me The Maharaja.
I am enjoying reading some very intellectual discussions going on on this
site.
Marcia I will send you an email on your given email address and tell you more
about my finds. Yes, there is more.
My nick "The Maharaja" also has a story. It was given to me by my students.
I am an English Language teacher.
Best regards to all.
The Maharaja


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 266 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 25, 2002 (13:51) * 3 lines 
 
You will have had an email from me by now. I think your students have judged you well, and we welcome your input to Geo's topics. Even English majors can
inject science in to what they are teaching, and you just might influence some of your students to expand their horizons. Share you find and let them know there are good people on the internet looking for answers for you and for them.
I know - my major was English albeit, with a technical slant. Welcome and Aloha again, Maharaja.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 267 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Mar 25, 2002 (15:43) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks Marcia for the information on OEstre and OEstre as a rabbit. The Easter Bunny is female!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 268 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 25, 2002 (18:06) * 1 lines 
 
Take a dose of Estrogen for Easter. Seems lots of things were named for her!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 269 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Mar 25, 2002 (18:08) * 3 lines 
 
Eat those soybean products, I suppose. They're full of plant estrogens.

Happy Easter!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 270 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 25, 2002 (18:13) * 1 lines 
 
The Easter Bunny is not only female, but another symbol of Oestre is the egg - ususlly pink or red - so our Lady Bunny lays eggs. I wonder how they knew?!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 271 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 25, 2002 (18:17) * 1 lines 
 
Being in estrus. Laying eggs. How remarkable! Especially colored as they were. I wonder where the turquoise eggs came from? Male bunnies?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 272 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Mar 25, 2002 (18:28) * 1 lines 
 
Maybe Lady Bunny was feeling very in touch with her masculine side when she laid those turquoise eggs?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 273 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 25, 2002 (18:33) * 1 lines 
 
*Laugh* But, of course!!! I never thought of that! I won't ask about the green ones! Dr Seuss had just amde a house call?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 274 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar 26, 2002 (00:43) * 25 lines 
 
Greece observes 1821 War of Liberation anniversary
25/03/2002 16:37:59

Nationwide celebrations marking the 181st anniversary of Greece’s War of
Independence culminated on Monday with the annual military parade through
downtown Athens before tens of thousands of people and the country’s top
leadership.
 As in previous years, President of the Republic Kostis Stephanopoulos and
the rest of Greece’s political and armed forces leadership viewed the parade from
grandstand in front of the country’s Parliament.
 Stephanopoulos declined to make statements after the parade.
Prime Minister Costas Simitis cited, among others, Athens’ goal of leading – amid an
area plagued by crises over the past decade -- regional efforts for peace,
cooperation and development, all aimed at achieving the prosperity of both the
Greek people and other neighbouring peoples.
 In his comments honoring Greek Independence Day -- March 25 --
Parliament President Apostolos Kaklamanis called on all forces in the country to
make every possible effort towards safeguarding unity and national consensus.
 National Defence Minister Yiannos Papantoniou, meanwhile, offered his
assurances that Greece’s armed forces remain strong, reliable and effective, ready at
a moment’s notice to defend the country’s national sovereignty and territorial
integrity.
 March 25, 1821 is officially celebrated as the beginning of the Greek nation's War of Liberation against dour Ottoman rule.

http://www.ana.gr/


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 275 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Mar 27, 2002 (00:05) * 3 lines 
 
I feel difficult with a teacher of English here. I am sure that you have bad degree for my posts The Macharaja. I am sorry for my not correct English (I know that they are Greeklish), sir. I hope that you can understand what I want to say each time.

John


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 276 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar 27, 2002 (16:06) * 2 lines 
 
If anyone complains, My Dear John, revert to posting in Ancient Greek and we are all going to be in great difficulty. I think TheMaharaja is much kinder than that. For someone whose English is self-taught, John, you are doing splendidly.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 277 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Mar 27, 2002 (17:15) * 1 lines 
 
john, i have no trouble with understanding what you're saying. thank you for your eloquence and modesty *HUGS*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 278 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Mar 29, 2002 (02:18) * 10 lines 
 
Can you imagine how they were clothed women and how they were adorned their face, 3800 years before, at the ancient Thera?


Wall-painting of Ladies and Papyri
Akrotiri, House of the Ladies. Mature Late Cycladic I period (17th century B.C.).


This is from: http://culture.gr/2/21/211/21121m/e21m18c.html

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 279 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Mar 29, 2002 (03:31) * 21 lines 
 

Women in Minoan Culture

Images of women occur more frequently than men in the Minoan archaeological record, both on Crete and in the more recent excavations on the island of Thera. At both sites women are seen depicted in frescoes either alone or in groups.


Minoan Snake Goddess from Knossos, Crete (1600 BC)
(Archeological Museum, Herakleion)


One of the most revealing images of the status of women in Minoan society is the so-called Toreador fresco in which young women, shown with the conventional white skin, and darker-skinned men, engage in the dangerous sport that appears to involve somersaulting over the back of a charging bull.


Toreador Fresco from the East Wing of the Court of the Stone Spout, Knossos (1400 B.C.)
Fresco (restored). (Archaeological Museum, Herakleion)


Although it is difficult to decipher exactly what these figures are doing, the context and their proximity to the raging bull clearly denotes a game or ritual which involves bravery, agility, and skill, qualities which in any other contemporary eastern Mediterranean culture would be thought of as residing exclusively within the domain of men. That they are being demonstrated also by young women in the Minoan fresco strongly suggests that on ancient Crete women occupied a significant place in society.

http://witcombe.sbc.edu/snakegoddess/minoanwomen.html tml

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 280 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Mar 29, 2002 (14:44) * 1 lines 
 
It would seem that Minoan women held a status equal to, or perhaps superior to that of men. We don't really know much about their culture except that it was one of, if not, the most highly advanced of its time. Part of the problem is that no one can read Linear A; it has yet to be decyphered.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 281 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 29, 2002 (14:58) * 1 lines 
 
how interesting! several ancient cultures depicted women as goddesses, and the more voluptuous, the better!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 282 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 29, 2002 (14:59) * 1 lines 
 
Linear A--how does one go about learning to decypher a cryptic language? will have to look this one up!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 283 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 29, 2002 (22:02) * 1 lines 
 
Liner A has not been decyphered - or am I remembering Linear B? I recall that from college archaeology courses and my reading since then. As for Minoan ladies - rather lower neckline than I am used to wearing. I suspected you might post these pictures. I wish they had been in archaeology, but I am happy to see them in any case. Thank you, John!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 284 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 29, 2002 (22:03) * 1 lines 
 
Wolfie, you are not learning cryptography from your boss? There is a whole school of cryptographers currently employed (and in the past, too) by all governments, I think!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 285 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 29, 2002 (22:40) * 1 lines 
 
oh, indeed not! have never heard of Linear A or B (since i've never taken an archaeology course). are there pictures of it somewhere? will have to do some more research on the minoan culture....my son finished up some studies on the maya (7th grade humanities) and he was very interested in that stuff--they're on to the vikings now.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 286 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 29, 2002 (23:43) * 4 lines 
 
A rather well-padded lady once confided to me that she had been born in the wrong century when I showed her the Willendorf "Venus"
http://witcombe.sbc.edu/willendorf/willendorfdiscovery.html

Happily or unhappily I seem to match the current version of beauty. This ancient "Venus" is over-endowed.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 287 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 29, 2002 (23:46) * 1 lines 
 
Wolfie, see Geo 17 for discussion of Linear A & B and the Phaistos Disc


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 288 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Mar 30, 2002 (11:34) * 3 lines 
 
did that, thanks sweetie...

oh, and a note about venus--famous designers are now creating styles for the real women of today--styles that are scaled correctly -- a size 0 and a size 14 are the same except for the size -- instead of making tents for those of us in the plus sizes... the average american woman wears a size 14 (and a 14 is not a plus size) and i have one thing to say, ree-head, the real women of this world are getting noticed!! (marcia, no slight on you, my dear twin, you are a real woman!)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 289 of 1049: TheMaharaja  (TheMaharaja) * Mon, Apr  1, 2002 (23:14) * 10 lines 
 
John:
Marcia is absolutely right. Language is a means of communicating our
thoughts and if we understand the message then we are using the appropriate
language. Furthermore, I teach English to people who do not know anything
about it. So, you could call me "one-eyed teacher is TheMaharaja among the
blind".
I am increasing my knowledge just by reading your exchanges. Now, I know a
little about Aphrodite too, thanks to Marcia's explanation. I will now dig
into my encyclopedia and learn more about it.
The Maharaja


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 290 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Apr  2, 2002 (11:46) * 8 lines 
 
You are very kind The Macharaja. I do justice to it. Hearing that you say for “one eye teacher”, I understand that you descend to my level, as must do it a Real Teacher.

You are very kind The Macharaja. I do justice to it. Hearing that you say for “one eye teacher”, I understand that you descend to my level, as must do it a Real Teacher. Ancient Greeks were adorers of beauty. They also were saying: “I am aging always learning.” It is absolutely true independently of the time I think. I really have some difficulties with my English but I am happy and I feel lucky that Geo family can understand what I try to say. In any case, I must thank you again.

My best regards

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 291 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Apr  2, 2002 (11:52) * 3 lines 
 
just want to break in here and say hi to the maharaja. please tell us more about yourself.

john, i am an admirer of beauty and i get absolutely covered in goosebumps in the presence of it (be it nature, man-made, music, what-have-you).


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 292 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr  2, 2002 (14:40) * 6 lines 
 
Wolfie, of course you do. You are my "twin" after all.

Please inform me as to the comments of the Blind man. Both of you seem highly intelligent and literate. English has so many permutations that it is difficult to keep up with the current jargon. Some vernacular speech means the opposite from how it appears. "Cool" means Hot in the sense of popularity and up-to-date. I try to stay away from using such comments lest they be interpreted incorrectly.

In the land of the Blind the One-eyed Man is King!
We need all the one-eyed teachers we can get if this is the case and your students are the blind!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 293 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Apr  2, 2002 (15:27) * 1 lines 
 
MARCIA!!!!! have you received any of my messages???


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 294 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr  2, 2002 (16:08) * 1 lines 
 
Yes, I'll respond as soon as you sign off IM with me =)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 295 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Apr  2, 2002 (16:09) * 1 lines 
 
is that a hint or what? *LAUGH*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 296 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr  2, 2002 (16:23) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 297 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr  2, 2002 (16:25) * 1 lines 
 
Now is it is time to welcome TheMaharaja to the Geo family with big warm *HUG* full of aloha and delight. You are now, part of this little family which will wecome and come to your rescue if needed. I am delighted you have found a home here! *HUGS*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 298 of 1049: The Maharaja  (TheMaharaja) * Wed, Apr  3, 2002 (17:13) * 12 lines 
 
Thanks Marcia, John, Curious Wolfie for having me as a family member.

Curious Wolfie, I am a 54-year-young man. I was born and grew up in Karachi
Pakistan. Apart from Karachi I have lived in Saudi Arabia and England for
10 years and 18 years respectively. I have always been knowledge thirsty and
I like sharing it. I am married and have two daughters 24 & 20. What about
you all. May I know a little more about my family members.

Yes Marcia, you have given the correct proverb, I adapted it to suit my
profession.

The Maharaja


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 299 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Apr  3, 2002 (17:57) * 1 lines 
 
You're currently living in England, Maharaja?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 300 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr  3, 2002 (22:13) * 6 lines 
 
Welcome to Geo, officially, TheMaharaja Sikander. We are delighted you have joined us. As the son of The Indus Valley, you represent the oldest known civilization. After we "pick your brains" (that is a compliment) about the rocks and fossils of Pakistan, I'd like you to mention anything archaeological in your vicinity. Dare I ask... do you know Sanscrit? As far as I know, the current ancient language person is John with Ancient Greek.

Your age is perfect. I was afraid I would become the mother figure if I admitted to being older than forty. You are in good company, and I consider you achieving the mature state of grace as does fine wine or brandy. Your students are fortunate, indeed. Do you get to take them on field trips?

We talk and respond in real time posts only when Hawaii (-10 UTC)evening matches up with the other side of the world's morning. We are a far-flung bunch, so you will find someone awake around the clock.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 301 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr  3, 2002 (22:19) * 9 lines 
 
For those interested and in the far-flung corners of the British Empire (even though it be faintly as in the US members) - give you the following websites for the life and funeral of Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother.

The House of Windsor's website:
http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/page1032.asp

The Times of London:
http://www.thetimes.co.uk/section/0,,1582,00.html

My sincerest condolences to those who will miss her gracious presence and sense of humanity and humor. She was living history!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 302 of 1049: The Maharaja  (TheMaharaja) * Thu, Apr  4, 2002 (16:37) * 18 lines 
 
No Terry I live in Karachi now. I guess I used the wrong tense,I should
have used the simple past.

You see John, here goes the reputation of the Maharaja's English.

No Marcia, I don't know any Sanskrit. I'm sure there are lots of places in
Pakistan that may be of interest to archaeologists. A find was made right
here in Karachi where digging was done for a commercial building. Some
intellectuals tried to get the construction stopped but their efforts were
no match to the money of the constructors.

I will once again be taking a trip to the Khir Thar mountains on 24th of this
month. I have a week off. I will try to take some photographs and send it
to you all.

Meanwhile, Aloha.

The Maharaja


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 303 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Apr  4, 2002 (17:51) * 1 lines 
 
I'd love to see those pictures. Are you going mountain climbing? What's the altitude there?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 304 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Apr  4, 2002 (18:15) * 1 lines 
 
are you safe in pakistan?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 305 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr  5, 2002 (15:41) * 5 lines 
 
Be Safe and take many pictures. My pockets would be full of specimens when I returned.

Antiquities and cities seem to go hand in hand, unhappily. The only time they find anything near London is when they are digging new foundations for yet another ugly high-rise building. And, without fail, the antiquities are hastily removed to a sterile site and the "progress" on the building continues. My sympathies.

I have only know one person who could actually read Sanscrit. I am happy you are well-versed in English (yes, you are!) It seems to be Geo's common tongue.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 306 of 1049: The Maharaja  (TheMaharaja) * Fri, Apr  5, 2002 (18:00) * 16 lines 
 

Marcia, I didn't mention last time that I do take my students out on field
trips but they have to be away-day. Parents don't allow their daughters
to go on overnight trips, nor away from Karachi and quite rightly so, because
they know that many of their sons are outright perverts; they see girls as
only sex-object. I still haven't had any problems with my students during the
day-trips.
Yes, there is an archaeologist site some 350 miles north of Karachi. It is
called Mohanjo durro {pronounciation: Mo (as in no) han (as in shun) and durro
(as in borrough)}. That's where they have found clues to the Indus Valley
civilization. There is another smaller site some three-quarters of an hour's
drive east of Karachi. There is another site in the outskirts of Karachi
which most has very ancient graves.
I will definitely send you pictures of my trip. Hopefully, today I will go
and get the dinosaur's tooth scanned, it's my day-off.
The Maharaja


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 307 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr  5, 2002 (20:57) * 3 lines 
 
The 39th annual Merrie Monarch Hula Festival is happening as I write this. Tonight is Hula Kahiko - ancient hula. Tomorrow night is Hula Awana - modern hula. Each night it starts at 6pm Hawaii standard time(-10 GMT)

http://www.thehawaiichannel.com/sponsors/hulafest/


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 308 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr  5, 2002 (21:06) * 6 lines 
 
TheMaharaja, I am sorry that the current generation of students have no manners or no upbringing. This is true all over the world. Perhaps it is best that you do not have over-night field trips. I felt overly-protected when I was in college, but it was safe to walk in the darkess of night on campus without worrying about being assaulted. I truly am sorry, and I should have known this would be the case. I am delighted that you do get to take them on day trips. I can imagine it must be fascinating - or would be so for me!

Mohenjo-Daro is known world wide as one of the earliest cities ever discovered. I will post more about it in Geo 17 wherein lies things archaeological.
However, until you get there, try looking at this link.

http://emuseum.mnsu.edu/archaeology/sites/middle_east/mohenjo_daro.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 309 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr  5, 2002 (23:24) * 3 lines 
 
Live video casting of the Merrie Monarch Hula Festival http://mfile.akamai.com/95/live/reflector:24015.ram

Tonight lasts until midnight Hawaii time. Tomorrow night's broadcast should be the best. Watch and see what it is like about 5 miles from me.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 310 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sat, Apr  6, 2002 (10:15) * 1 lines 
 
Are you going to be attending? Should we look for you in the audience?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 311 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Apr  6, 2002 (10:16) * 1 lines 
 
hey, i was gonna ask that!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 312 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sat, Apr  6, 2002 (11:13) * 1 lines 
 
But I asked first? Maybe you could ask her to elaborate?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 313 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr  6, 2002 (13:25) * 3 lines 
 
Merrie Monarch competition is held in our tennis stadium and the seats are both backless and HARD. No one local goes there if they can hslp it. Especially if it is extrememly crowded (as this is) and of great duration (6 hours tonight - at the very least.) So, from the comfort of my living room (and far more accessible bathroom facilities) I will be watching. However, I did think of being there for you to look for me as in "Where's Waldo." Tonight is the beautiful costumes, the familiar Hawaiian music, and exquisite flowers freshly picked from our forests. Each dancer picks her own while chanting special thanks to the gods and godesses from whose territory they are taking them.

You will also discover your computer video player will go blank from about 8-8:30 pm Hawaiian time. This is because they send the transmission back to Honolulu studios for the news. Usually it occurs at 10 pm but all times are contingent to what is happening at the Festival this weekend. A hui ho !


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 314 of 1049: The Maharaja  (TheMaharaja) * Sat, Apr  6, 2002 (16:16) * 9 lines 
 
Sorry Terry & Wolf for not answering your querry. Yes, it can be very
safe in Pakistan and highly insecure at times and places. The mountains
I visit have very hospitable people living there and I have felt safe.
However, people do keep warning me.

Marcia, I have seen the hula dancing in some of the movies. I think it's
a beautiful sight. I will visit Geo17 as soon as I have posted this.

The Maharaja


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 315 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr  6, 2002 (18:07) * 4 lines 
 
At 0400 GMT you will be able to watch live from Hilo - this is the most beautiful form of Hula to the rest of the world, but it is the least authentic.
That being said, please watch and enjoy. http://mfile.akamai.com/95/live/reflector:24015.ram

I send you my fervent best wished and prayers for your continuing health and safety - and for that of your family. In my personal experience, Pakistan has only the kindest and most thoughtful people.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 316 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr  8, 2002 (15:29) * 5 lines 
 
For those who wish to watch the funeral of Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother, on the internet you can watch on C-SPAN's website
http://inside.c-spanarchives.org:8080/cspan/fullschedule.csp

Or on C-SPN on your local cable April 9th beginning at 2 PM local time in England which is 0000 GMT, midnight Hawaii time tonight (I'm taping it) and 6 AM
tomorrow morning on the East Coast of the US.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 317 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Mon, Apr  8, 2002 (16:47) * 1 lines 
 
Marcia, what time is that on the West coast?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 318 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr  8, 2002 (16:59) * 1 lines 
 
3 AM California time. Better tape it, Esbee!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 319 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr 21, 2002 (16:17) * 4 lines 
 

Happy Earth Day - April 22







 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 320 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (01:08) * 5 lines 
 
Foucault's Pendulum

In honor of the Earth I post the following so you can see that we really do rotate. If you ever get the opportunity to see a Foucault Pendulum, do so by all means and spend enough time watching it until you feel the earth turning with you attached. It is really quite remarkable.

http://www.calacademy.org/products/pendulum/index.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 321 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (09:57) * 9 lines 
 
Hi Marci

I had a chance to see a Foucault pendulum while in London (I think it was
at the science museum near Kensington) - neat stuff. Anyway, still alive
just busy with domestic putterings (i.e. building cabinets) and occasional
soldering.

73 de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 322 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (12:56) * 3 lines 
 
Yup, it is in the set of science and tech nology museums on Brompton Road in Kensington. Near the V&A (Victoria and Albert Museum). They even have Toricelli's original Barometer, and a bunch of other original equipment. Best of all was their radio room which was full of the same old vacuum tube radios my dad used. That was fun! They also had a seismic detector map which lit little lights on a map when earthquakes were detected world wide. I asked the guard if Hawaii had lit up recently. He looked at me in astonishment and asked me if I lived "where it explodes." I said I did, but Hawaii does not explode. It turned out that he was from Martinique. No wonder he thought I was crazy!

I'd love to have a Foucault Pendulum, but my "rotunda" is not nearly big enough.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 323 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (13:20) * 26 lines 
 
Hi There

Ok, I didnt know the exact road but that sounds like the place. A neat place
still the same. I had a chance to see quite a bit of 'ye olde technology'
which always seems way cool as only old technolgy can be (i.e. nice wooden
cabinets, large meters, polished brass terminal strips) - it was as much
art as it was science.

I wish I could remember the tube stop near by the science museum - the one
that I would always take was Glouster (sp?) which was a short hike from where
I was staying. What a neat old neighborhood - it would have been so tres cool
to live there during my college years.

Regarding seismic stuff, I saw on the Gateway electronics web page, they
had a small motion sensor transducer - probably not what I would need for
seismic monitoring but neat just the same - of course, the seismic detectors
I have seen were basically 5 gallon plastic buckets with a large pickup coil
and a magnet suspended by a spring hangning from the lid.

I think that would be a major home renovation project to get the physical
infrastructure to support such a pendulum. Plus, you would have to find
a cannon ball for a pendulum bob.

73 de Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 324 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (16:58) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 325 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (17:02) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 326 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (17:05) * 3 lines 
 


http://www.metropla.net/eu/lon/london.htm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 327 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (17:07) * 2 lines 
 
We used Gloucester Road station almost exclusively because it was right around the corner from where we were staying. Occcasionally we would get off at Kensington High Street, too. Lovely map!!!



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 328 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (17:09) * 1 lines 
 
i saw something like that at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in D.C. it was waaaay cool!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 329 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (17:22) * 5 lines 
 
*sigh* i wanna go to London.

i know this lovely little hotel near Lancaster Gate -just across from the park.




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 330 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (17:44) * 1 lines 
 
We stayed in a lovely converted regency row house that waw made into a hotel. We had a first floor (not ground floor) suite with a balcony and bathroom en suite. The Stanhope Court was its name but that was seemingly centuries ago. Our first trip we stayed in the Penta which was new at the time. Lovely. The second time it was pretty bad so we opted for a smaller hotel. Much nicer! EsBee, you NEED to go! Look at all of the research you could so. Especially if they are shooting a film with certain actor in it where you could watch!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 331 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (18:01) * 5 lines 
 
EsBee, you NEED to go!
LOL this is what i tell myself (practically on a daily bases)
unfortunately those pesky people at the bank keep taking all my $ in the form of a mortgage payment every month.... :-(
Still - it could be worse (at least i have a place to live) and i have a map of London posted just above my desk at work....
It's been two years since i've been to London -i think i'm in serious withdrawl...


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 332 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (18:03) * 4 lines 
 
Look at all of the research you could so. Especially if they are shooting a film with certain actor in it where you could watch!
Ack! so tempting! so very tempting! *sigh*




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 333 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (18:24) * 1 lines 
 
It has been your lifetime or longer since I was last in London. The Lovely thing about Europe is that they take such good care of our historic legacy. It will be waiting for you in beautiful condition when next you get to go. I wonder if I ever will again...*sigh*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 334 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (18:34) * 5 lines 
 
Course you will!

*singing* "She's got High Hopes! She's got High Hopes!"

hmm.... wondering if perhaps office mate has slipped vodka into my diet coke -*sniffing suspciously*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 335 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (18:36) * 3 lines 
 
In preparation for the upcoming ANZAC Day please read http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/read/screwed/163.880

It is Rob's eloquent comments on New Zealand patriotism. I will transport it here if he does not mind. It surely deserves a wider reading than Screwed Conference will give it, though a far different audience than Geo will afford.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 336 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (18:48) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Earth Day!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 337 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr 22, 2002 (19:07) * 1 lines 
 
Somewhere a ways back I posted a big rotating earth and a large green Happy earth Day. In Hawaii, we are celebrating with a gentle rain. My Dendrobium virginalis orchids will appreciate it.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 338 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Apr 23, 2002 (10:50) * 13 lines 
 
Hi Marci, Geoites and Happy Earth Day to All

I have only visited London twice but those were most wonderful visits.
No trips this year tho (sigh...) although I do get to go to Dayton, OH
for THE HAMVENTION which is the Mecca of Radio Geeks and Nerds
It was cold yesterday and today - in the 30's but it will be warming
up again - the trees are in bloom so Spring is slowly coming around.
Looks like some new folks are visiting Geo so Welcome!

73 de Mike
AA9IL
radio cosmo international



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 339 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 23, 2002 (13:47) * 5 lines 
 
We have a great new eager bunch of literate people in Geo now, so that means I have to shape up and stop drifting off-topic all the time.

For anyone who has not seen Geo's new portal page and checked the links (including your local weather, Mike) http://www.spring.net/geo/

Hamfests are the greatest places for swapping both gear and war stories. Enjoy!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 340 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Apr 23, 2002 (17:34) * 1 lines 
 
Nah, they're gonna love us for being ourselves!! *HUGS*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 341 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Tue, Apr 23, 2002 (18:09) * 1 lines 
 
besides - this is Et Cetera ...isnt that where we should go off topic, if we are going to go off topic? :-D


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 342 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Apr 23, 2002 (18:59) * 1 lines 
 
who, us? we NEVAH go OFF-TOPIC! *giggle*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 343 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 23, 2002 (20:00) * 5 lines 
 
Let's hear it for those who drift off-topic. I learn more that way than any other! EsBee, I'm so glad you have joined the continental drift - and the topic drift as well! *BIG HUGS*

I guess they will have to like me the way I am. I am pretty good at being me and a total failure as anyone else *;)

Don't know if I like that gold globe on the title page. The red one was TOO much red and the natural one was a little small. The gold would be perrfect if it did not have the shadow. I'm working on it...


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 344 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Apr 23, 2002 (20:22) * 17 lines 
 
Hi Marci and Geoites

Marci, no problem with drifting off topic - I like the variety.
This is way off topic but this evening, I took the 10ghz transverter
out to Lake Michigan and copied a 10ghz beacon from across the lake
in Grand Haven, MI. (W2UHI). Signals were S9 (very strong). This
is due to the superior over water propgation characteristics as well
as temperature inversions. Distance is a little under 100 miles.
Antenna was a microwave horn - looks like a four sided pyramid about
4 inches by 4 inches at the opening and 4 inches to the antenna feed
back from the opening. The actual antenna feed is a waveguide probe
about .8 cm in length.

Woo hoo!
73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 345 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 23, 2002 (20:30) * 4 lines 
 
Woo Hoo, Indeed, Cosmo! Far out and fantastic, too. Those horns work really well and are easy to make - relatively - and fit in your car better than a 5 element beam might *;)

Drift and enjoy your warming weather. Just keep gear grounded and not via You!
How very perfect it must be to have sky like we currently have, Heavens Abiove to let you know what satellites you are seeing (if it matters) and all sorts of celestial bodies to admire. Speaking of which, are there any good looking lady hams in your area? One who is a good minnight snack provider? That would be perfect! Meanwhile, we will keep you company!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 346 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Apr 24, 2002 (11:51) * 9 lines 
 
YL hams are few and far between in these parts but I have the midnight snack
covered no problem.
I was just amazed at the signal quality with the tiny antenna - usually I
would bring out the big iron - i.e. a two foot dish. Anyway, now working
on setting up some skeds with the other local microwave nuts.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 347 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Wed, Apr 24, 2002 (12:28) * 6 lines 
 
(Marcia)EsBee, I'm so glad you have joined the continental drift - and the topic drift as well! *BIG HUGS*
*BIG HUG* right back. :-)
You'll find i'm only going to post here at etc though.... am unfortunately V. ignorant re most things Geo. i read with interest, but only comprehend a bit of what is posted.
Now, if you were hosting a History Topic... (any one up for a rousing discusion of Harold BlueTooth?) ;-)




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 348 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 24, 2002 (17:03) * 4 lines 
 
Harold works. I shove history in the archaeology of anthropology topic. I considered being a history major but opted for earth sciences instead. I klove the names of the old Frankish kings. Whomever the Fat... the Bald, the Sluggard.
Wonder what they might have called Clinton... *;)

Go for it, Mike. Next I'll be hearing them schedule EME with another guy. That really fascinates me.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 349 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 24, 2002 (17:07) * 13 lines 
 

ANZAC DAY 2002



ANZAC was the name given to the Australian and New Zealand
Army Corps soldiers who landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula in
the East Mediterranean early on the morning of 25 April 1915
during the First World War (1914-1918).

As a result, one day in the year has involved the whole of
Australia in solemn ceremonies of remembrance, gratitude and
national pride for all our men and women who have fought and
died in all wars. That day is ANZAC Day - 25 April.

http://www.anzacday.org.au/


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 350 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 24, 2002 (17:10) * 22 lines 
 
NEW ZEALAND Broadcasters join for Anzac Day tribute

25.04.2002 10.05 am

All radio and television stations in New Zealand broadcast
an identical 2-minute Anzac Day tribute at 10am today.

The organiser of the synchronised tribute, broadcaster Sue
Scott, told National Radio she hoped the broadcast would
help young New Zealanders observe Anzac Day.

"The younger people really need to have something to
continue to remember their forebears by and, because this
is incorporating youth stations as well … it is something
they can participate in."

The broadcast included 6 seconds of silence and the
playing of the Last Post.



© 2002 New Zealand Herald


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 351 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 24, 2002 (17:17) * 150 lines 
 



ANZAC DAY

is held on 25 April each year to commemorate New Zealanders killed in
war and to honour returned servicemen and women. The ceremony itself has been continually
adapted to the times, but has also steadily acquired extra layers of symbolism and meaning.

The Dawn Service

A typical commemoration begins with a march by returned service personnel before dawn to
the local war memorial. Military personnel and returned service-men and -women form up about
the memorial, joined by other members of the community, with pride of place going to the war
veterans. A short service follows with a prayer, hymns (including Kipling's 'Recessional' or 'Lest
We Forget'), and a dedication which concludes with the last verse of Laurence Binyon's 'For the
Fallen':

They shall not grow old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

The Last Post is then played, followed by a minute's silence and Reveille. A brief address
follows, after which the hymn 'Recessional' is sung. The service concludes with a closing prayer
and the singing of the National Anthem.

The Anzac Parade

Another ceremony takes place later that morning, with returned service personnel wearing their
medals, and marching behind banners and standards. The veterans are joined by other
community groups, including members of the armed forces, the Red Cross, cadets, and
veterans of other countries' forces. The march proceeds to the local war memorial, where
another service takes place, including the laying of wreaths by various organisations and
members of the public. This service is a less intimate and emotional
ceremony than the dawn service, but serves as a more public
commemoration. The speech, usually by an important dignitary,
serviceman, or returned serviceman or woman, tends to be of a
conservative nature, with much stress on nationhood and remembrance.
After these services, many of the veterans retire to the local RSA club or
hotel, where they enjoy coffee and rum (in the case of the dawn service)
and 'unwind' after an emotionally and, for elderly veterans, physically exhausting event. At the
end of the day, the ceremony of the 'Retreat' is performed.

1915: GALLIPOLI REMEMBERED

The first public recognition of the landings at Gallipoli took place on 30 April 1915, after news of
the dramatic event had reached New Zealand. A half-day holiday was promptly declared for
government offices, flags were flown, and patriotic meetings were held around the country.
Descriptions of the landings (and casualty lists) were eagerly read, while newspapers gushed
about the heroism of the New Zealand soldiers. From the
outset, public perceptions of the landings at Anzac Cove
were imbued with strong feelings of national pride. The
eventual failure of the Gallipoli operation enhanced its
sanctity in the public mind; the courage and sacrifice of the
New Zealand soldiers in adversity was highlighted.

1916: A Half-Day Holiday

Demands for some form of remembrance on the anniversary of the landing on the peninsula,
both as a public expression of grief and as a means of rallying support for the war effort, were
soon being heard. A half-day public holiday was gazetted on 5 April 1916, and church services
and recruiting meetings were proposed. Among the growing body of returned servicemen,
however, such an approach was an anathema — 'the boys don't want to be split up among
twenty or thirty different churches on Anzac Day, and it is certain they don't want to go to a
meeting to hear people who haven't been there [to war] spout and pass resolutions'. Instead,
returned soldiers preferred a public service conducted by an army chaplain.

THE CEREMONY: PROCESSIONS & SPEECHES

From the beginning, returned servicemen claimed 'ownership' of the commemoration. In the
event, commemorations were marked by processions of returned and serving service
personnel, followed by church services and public meetings at town halls. Speeches extolled
national unity, imperial loyalty, remembrance of the dead, and the need for young men to
volunteer (conscription was imminent). Large crowds attended the commemorations, 2000 at
the Anzac Day service in Rotorua, for example. In London the landing day was marked by a
procession of 2000 Australian and New Zealand troops and a service at Westminster Abbey.
New Zealand soldiers in Egypt commemorated the day with a service and the playing of the
Last Post, followed by a holiday, including sports. In August 1916, after lobbying by returned
soldiers, the use of the word 'Anzac' was prohibited for trade or business purposes, further
enshrining the Anzac myth and the sacredness of the commemoration.

World War One: A Patriotic Ceremony

A similar pattern of 25 April processions of servicemen, church services, and public meetings
continued for the rest of the war. These were generally organized by the New Zealand Returned
Soldiers' (later Services') Association in cooperation with local
authorities. The ceremony was an opportunity to stimulate
patriotism, in which the righteousness of the war and New
Zealand's place as part of the British Empire were stressed.
However, after the war the service quickly lost its patriotic
function, becoming more explicitly a remembrance of the war
dead. Gradually standardized after the war, the ceremony was
essentially a re-enactment of a military funeral. It would be
conducted around a bier of wreathes and a serviceman's hat,
with a firing party with heads bowed and a chaplain to read the
words from the military burial service. Three volleys would be
fired by the guard, and the Last Post played, followed by a
prayer, hymn, and benediction. Nevertheless, there was continual adaptation of the service. The
funeral bier in halls was replaced by public war memorials as these were erected throughout
the 1920s.

A Move to Memorials

The move to Anzac Day commemorations at public war memorials rather than in town halls or
churches signified an increasing secularization of the ceremony. Despite occasional protests
from churches, it was RSA leaders, servicemen, and local politicians who increasingly made
the speeches, rather than clergymen. The laying of wreaths became more central to the
ceremony, while fewer speeches were made and hymns sung. On the other hand, the presence
of the uniformed members of the armed forces in many places became accepted as part of the
march and service. Gradually throughout the 1920s the Anzac Day service became less and
less akin to a mournful funeral.

25 APRIL 1921: A PUBLIC HOLIDAY

The day itself was not marked as a public holiday until 1921. Peace was celebrated from 19 to
21 July 1919, but no official day of commemoration for the war was at first instituted. The
government was prepared to move St George's Day to 25 April and declare that day to be a
government holiday. However, the public was not greatly excited by government holidays, which
in the main were religious observances or patriotic occasions, while Dominion Day, the
self-styled 'National Day', possessed no emotional appeal. While not an official holiday, Anzac
Day had already acquired a strong appeal among the public. Not until 1920 did the government
respond to RSA lobbying for 25 April to be declared a holiday. Although legislation was passed
which made Anzac Day a public holiday, with hotels and banks closed and race meetings
prohibited, this did not meet RSA demands for the day to be 'Sundayised'. In 1922 the
government backed down and 25 April became a full public holiday as if it were a Sunday.

Themes of Nationhood & Peace

Throughout the 1920s and 1930s, Anzac Day was marked with varying degrees of public
enthusiasm. Common themes in the speeches were New Zealand nationhood, national unity,
imperial loyalty, sacrifice, and a desire for peace. While some of a left-wing bent and members
of anti-war movements criticised the commemoration as militarist, most New Zealanders
regarded the day as sacred — an expression of sorrow rather than an opportunity to glorify war.
During the Depression Anzac Day provided a forum to extol the ideals of unity and
selflessness.

The 1930s: Lest We Forget

As the international situation deteriorated in the 1930s, Anzac Day speeches increasingly
focused on the need for defence preparations and the importance of not forgetting past
lessons. The numbers of marchers increased, too, during the late 1930s, perhaps because
returned servicemen, as they aged, became more interested in commemorating their war
experiences through public ritual. Anzac Day began to take on the characteristic of an annual
reunion for many returned servicemen. This was exemplified by the 1300-strong contingent of
New Zealand returned servicemen which participated in the Anzac Day ceremony in Sydney in
1938. It was from Australia that the dawn parade, commemorating both the
time of the initial landings at Gallipoli and the routine dawn 'stand-to' in the
trenches, was introduced to New Zealand for Anzac Day in 1939. The cold
and darkness breaking into sunrise added to the symbolism of the occasion.

more... and images... http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/Gallery/Anzac/Anzacday.htm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 352 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 24, 2002 (17:26) * 1 lines 
 
Rob attended the Dawn Service in Christchurch. Perhaps he might comment on the day. The weather was ideal, I understand.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 353 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Apr 24, 2002 (18:42) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Anzac Day!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 354 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 24, 2002 (20:11) * 1 lines 
 
*Hugs* Wolfie!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 355 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Apr 25, 2002 (08:07) * 10 lines 
 
Hi all and Happy ANZAC day!
No eme yet but plenty of interest in regular tropo microwave contacts.
If the weather stays good then I can go out to the lake without fear
of lake effect snow. Shortwave propagation is very good however - the
BBC was coming in last night quite well (Asia service since the North American
service was discontinued sigh....)

73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 356 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Apr 25, 2002 (15:39) * 4 lines 
 
I grab the pacific service now that the North American service of the BBC has been discontinued. I miss it, too. Not nearly as much cricket as in the old days. I miss that, too.

When you talk about snow, you are not talking interference in your signals. You're talking white stuff you have to shovel!!! Happily, in Hawaii, they make it stay way up on the mountains where we only have to look at it.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 357 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 26, 2002 (22:43) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 358 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr 27, 2002 (03:11) * 43 lines 
 
A very dear freind lives a few blocks from this event's location. Don, you need to come in and say hello to the good folks.

The Kentucky Derby Festival's Opening Ceremonies, "Thunder
Over Louisville", will feature a patriotic theme this year--
"A Stars and Stripes Thunder". Thunder offers an explosive
kick off to two weeks of celebration in Louisville. The 13th
annual event will be held on April 20th, beginning with the
air show that features military and civilian aircraft, sky-
divers, stunt teams, and a fly-by of the world's largest
American flag. Some members of the skydiving team have been
performing for 24 years and have made over 3,500 parachute
jumps.

In just 13 years, what started as a better than average fire-
works display has become the pinnacle of pyrotechnics. The
secret has been to pack as much firepower into 28 minutes as
possible. Music will be broadcast over the world's largest
sound system to the Thunder event venue. More than 2,000
people are involved in making Thunder a safe and enjoyable
show.

Thunder Over Louisville is the nation's largest annual fire-
works event. It is also one of the top five air shows in the
country. After the 1990 event, the producers realized that
the sound particularly rolled across the landscape like
thunder. Thus, the show demanded a title that adequately re-
flected its intensity, and this is how the event got its name.

In 2001, Thunder generated more than $31 million for the local
economy. The total economic impact for the entire 70 events of
the Derby Festival is estimated at $93 million.

Here are some great sites suggested by Rebecca:

Derby Festival History:
http://www.kdf.org/content/aboutus-history.asp

Thunder History:
http://www.thunderoverlouisville.org/thehistory/

Kentucky Derby (Rebecca's favorite part is "Experience"):
http://www.kentuckyderby.com/



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 359 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr 27, 2002 (03:15) * 35 lines 
 
HOW MANY FIREWORK SHELLS ARE USED IN THE "THUNDER OVER LOUISVILLE" EVENT?
More than 51,333 shells will be used in the 2002 show. That
compares to 7,200 used at the first Thunder over Louisville
along the Ohio River.

***
Electrical impulses travel from the skin toward the
spinal cord at a rate of up to 425 feet per second.
***

WHAT IS THE ESTIMATED ATTENDANCE FOR THE 2002 "THUNDER OVER LOUISVILLE" EVENT?
Estimated average attendance of half a million people is
expected, making it the largest event in its region.

HOW MANY STORMS OCCUR OVER THE EARTH?
At any given time, there are 1,800 thunderstorms in progress
over the Earth's atmosphere. Lightning strikes the Earth 100
times every second.

***
Fireworks have a wide range of burn times but on average
the items within a pack will last about 30 seconds unless
otherwise indicated. Thus a 20 item pack may be expected
to provide a display lasting about 10 minutes.
***

HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE INJURED BY FIREWORKS ANNUALLY IN THE U.S.?
About 40 percent of the almost 13,000 people who are injured
during the year from fireworks (over half of whom are children)
are simply bystanders. Bottle rockets, firecrackers and spark-
lers top the list of fireworks causing the most injuries requir-
ing hospitalization. Sparklers burn at about 1800 degrees
Fahrenheit.




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 360 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 30, 2002 (18:47) * 7 lines 
 
It is Holy Week (called GREAT WEEK) in the Orthodox Church.

HAPPY EASTER


KALO PASKA





 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 361 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Apr 30, 2002 (19:08) * 1 lines 
 
yes indeed--Happy Easter to all our Greek friends!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 362 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Wed, May  1, 2002 (16:50) * 2 lines 
 
This is totally and completely off topic, but.... Marcia, would Lizzy know what steel was?
As in "his arms encircled her like bans of steel"


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 363 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, May  1, 2002 (20:52) * 1 lines 
 
Make those arms like iron bands (as in "the village smithy") and you are home free. The Celts had iron long ago.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 364 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, May  1, 2002 (20:56) * 1 lines 
 
To be more specific, if you get into what makes iron into "steel" you get into a technology nightmare that includes meteoritic steel swords and Damascus steel and workings of very indefinite age. The moors had a quenching technique but Henry Bessamer has the pride of place for making the first industrial steel - in Britain - in the mid 1800's.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 365 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Thu, May  2, 2002 (09:42) * 4 lines 
 
Thanks! *big grin*
i knew you'd know! somehow history of metal never sunk in very deep.

You still interested in editing???


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 366 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May  2, 2002 (14:34) * 1 lines 
 
For you, Absolutely!!! As I recall we got on famously. We can even discuss it via IM if you wish.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 367 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Thu, May  2, 2002 (15:02) * 3 lines 
 
*wispering*
am at work, so cant really im
will email you :-)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 368 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May  2, 2002 (16:34) * 1 lines 
 
Oops Ok!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 369 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Thu, May  2, 2002 (17:20) * 6 lines 
 
is actually ok, as boss just called from Antigua, where she's sunbathing on a private yacht, and getting drunk on margaritas. (you think i'm making this up)
i just dont have IM on my work PC, and our IT guy is so busy, i feel bad recuriting him to help me with non-work related stuff.

*pouting*
why am i not the boss? is not fair!



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 370 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May  2, 2002 (23:11) * 1 lines 
 
Sounds like she could at least share with you!!! How unkind of her!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 371 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, May  4, 2002 (00:00) * 48 lines 
 
Greek Orthodox Easter

Greek Easter, the country's most important religious festival, arrives accompanied
by the smells of spring, the rebirth of nature and the flower-carpeted ground.

Many of the traditions that bond the generations together occur during the Easter
feast. Easter is the most sacred and celebrated of all of the Greek holidays. It
begins with a 40-day fast, of the 40 days, one week is chosen for the complete
fast, during that time only natural foods are eaten. No meats, dairy, fish, poultry
or dishes that are prepared with these foods can be eaten. Shellfish can be eaten,
however three days a week are meatless days during the remaining weeks of the
fast. During Holy Week complete fasting is to take place. Palm Sunday, which is the first day of the Holy
Week, is a day when only fish and fish courses are served.

On Saturday before Easter, the food that will be served on Easter Sunday is taken to the church and
blessed by the priest.

The red eggs for just after the Resurrection and the traditional Resurrection soup, "mageritsa," will be the
wife's first concern, and her preparations will begin early in the Holy Week.

That preparation means the cleaning and decoration of the house, the baking of the Easter biscuits and
bread and the dyeing of the eggs.

During Holy Week the churches are full each evening as the people follow, once more the Passion of Our
Lord. Then at midnight on the Saturday the bells ring out joyfully: the faithful, candles lit, can celebrate the
Resurrection.

The meal afterwards consists of the "mageritsa," the red eggs are knocked and the traditional phrase
"Christ is risen" will be heard all around the table.

On Easter Sunday, spit-roast lamb is the centerpiece of the table. In the early morning the spits will be
turning in the courtyards and under the shady trees as the lamb "kokoretsi" is slowly cooked, and the
aroma of the roasting lamb wafts from one end of Greece to the other.

I have brought together for you some of the most delicious recipes of Greek Easter. Serve the dishes with
plenty of green salads particularly lettuce, which in Greece is in season at Eater, lots of good red wine or
retsina.

If you get a chance to celebrate Easter in Greece, do not pass it up; it will mean song, dance and "Kefl"
around the fire pit as the spit slowly revolves cooking the lamb.

http://www.globalgourmet.com/destinations/greece/greekeaster.html

Happy Easter, John from GEO






 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 372 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sat, May  4, 2002 (11:45) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Easter, John!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 373 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, May  4, 2002 (11:52) * 1 lines 
 
John is very busy. He is roasting two whole lambs for the great family feast. He will be scarce until after the holiday. I miss him already.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 374 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, May  6, 2002 (18:43) * 1 lines 
 
I hope that John and his family enjoy their holiday and their family feast immensely. I'm certain that everything will be delicious. Two whole lambs. That should be a rather large family feast.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 375 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Thu, May  9, 2002 (13:04) * 11 lines 
 
Hi All
Easter is the greater feast in the east orthodox church. It changes life rhythms in Greece. This consuetude is very strong. It is a good chance to centralize whole family even its members are living to far.

It is a feast of love for all. It is a good chance for common festive, carousal, and amusement. Is welcome everyone person though it is foreign and unknown. My family is increased this year by the marriage of my daughter. I have here friends from Athens and from Crete too. You can see about the same picture in every Greek house.



This is some flavor of the Easter celebration in my house. This is a photo of my family feast. See the roasting of the two lambs and the part of the lunch table.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 376 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Thu, May  9, 2002 (14:59) * 2 lines 
 
V. Cool pics John!
Thanks for sharing!! :-)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 377 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, May  9, 2002 (16:47) * 1 lines 
 
It looks to have been a wonderful feast and family get together, John. Thanks for posting the photos.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 378 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May  9, 2002 (20:10) * 1 lines 
 
*licking my virtual fingers* and wishing I had been one of your dogs! Did they get the bones as part of their Easter feast? Thank you for submitting these photos. They are wonderful. Beautiful weather and good company. I cannot think of anything you lacked!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 379 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, May  9, 2002 (20:40) * 1 lines 
 
looks like you guys had a great time, john *HUGS*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 380 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, May 10, 2002 (01:43) * 8 lines 
 
May is also the month of spring in Greece.



This is for all of you with my great thanks for your wishes.


John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 381 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, May 10, 2002 (01:43) * 5 lines 
 
Hi B.J,
Your place is already included in Geo portal. You can see your time/temperature, Weather (recent & forecasts) and your Sky upwards of your head in real time. Try it and good sky exploration.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 382 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, May 10, 2002 (16:55) * 1 lines 
 
the flowers are lovely john!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 383 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 10, 2002 (23:26) * 1 lines 
 
As always, the great poetic soul of our Greek oracle's high priest graces Geo with beautiful flowers. Mahalo, John and *Hugs* to Geo's co-host.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 384 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, May 11, 2002 (00:11) * 7 lines 
 

Happy Birthday, AnneH



White fragrant 3-Strand Pikake flower leis twined together with a
traditional Ti-leaf lei.

Beautiful and fragrant.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 385 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, May 11, 2002 (10:24) * 1 lines 
 
happy birthday AnneH!! (what a contemporary looking lei--at first glance, i thought those were pearl onions!)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 386 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sat, May 11, 2002 (11:46) * 5 lines 
 
Happy birthday AnneH!! My best wishes for happiness life.
A bouquet of fragrant roses to you.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 387 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, May 11, 2002 (23:23) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 388 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, May 11, 2002 (23:25) * 4 lines 
 

Happy Mother's Day







 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 389 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, May 12, 2002 (05:33) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 390 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 12, 2002 (11:54) * 2 lines 
 
John, that is so beautiful. Thank you for being so thoughtful.
Warmest *HUGS*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 391 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sun, May 12, 2002 (12:54) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Birthday to AnneH.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 392 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sun, May 12, 2002 (12:56) * 3 lines 
 
Happy Mothers Day to all the moms at Geo.

Happy Mothers Day, as well, to Gaia, the Earth, who is the mother of us all.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 393 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 13, 2002 (00:58) * 2 lines 
 
I have been acquainting Lance with the new denizens of Geo since he was last here. I fear John is being victimized by his electric supplier again. Lancwe asked Is he on GECKO? Greek Electric Company Keeping Offline? How lovely to have a reason to find humor in missing someone. John, I hope all is well with you.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 394 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 13, 2002 (01:00) * 1 lines 
 
I guess my erroneous typing that is not being caught by my eyes is telling me to shut down and go to bed. G'night all. Good Morning, John!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 395 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 13, 2002 (21:48) * 4 lines 
 

IKI







 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 396 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Tue, May 14, 2002 (10:01) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Birthday Iki!! :-)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 397 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, May 14, 2002 (17:24) * 1 lines 
 
A very Happy Birthday, Iki!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 398 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, May 14, 2002 (18:49) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Birthday Iki!!!!!!!!!!!! *HUGS*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 399 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May 14, 2002 (21:01) * 1 lines 
 
He will be delighted.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 400 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May 16, 2002 (00:05) * 16 lines 
 
This idea is brilliant. I am definitly living in the wrong contry

Olympic Education in ‘2004 and beyond’

An ambitious program of Olympic Education projects that focuses on developing a volunteer spirit
among schoolchildren was announced yesterday by Deputy Education Minister Eleni Kourkoula.

Over 29 million euros from the Culture Ministry’s Olympic Games General Secretariat are to go toward
funding the projects.

The Education Ministry has invited schools, municipalities and non-governmental organizations to
propose activities promoting culture, sport, the Olympic truce and the abolition of social exclusion.

Kourkoula said that schoolchildren had already shown a great interest in the program, whose slogan is
“2004 and beyond,” reflecting the ministry’s goal of taking the volunteer spirit beyond the needs of the
2004 Olympic Games.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 401 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, May 17, 2002 (08:34) * 3 lines 
 
Birthdays are refreshing mothers memories rather than children’s celebrations. In any case my best wishes to IKI for success and long life and the best to his mother that is usually the invisible hero.

John


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 402 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Fri, May 17, 2002 (10:20) * 1 lines 
 
That was v. sweet John *grin*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 403 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, May 17, 2002 (12:08) * 7 lines 
 
This is something for your eyes.


PONTIKONISI or MOUSE-ISLAND in GREECE, CORFU ISLAND


John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 404 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, May 17, 2002 (12:19) * 5 lines 
 
Thank you ES-BE
It is the truth I think. But birthdays are also a good chance to break our monotony. "Smile".

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 405 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Fri, May 17, 2002 (12:30) * 1 lines 
 
lovely little island - looks very peaceful and picturesque :-)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 406 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, May 17, 2002 (14:06) * 5 lines 
 
Indeed ES-BE
It looks like a remaining stone on the God's sieve from those that were created Greece. (See topic 28/ response 151). Who knows that it was so beautiful? But it is devoted to God as you see.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 407 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Fri, May 17, 2002 (15:11) * 1 lines 
 
An excellent use for such a lovely spot. :-)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 408 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, May 18, 2002 (17:39) * 3 lines 
 
John Dear, I looked at your exqiisit photograph and decided it was a miniature model of a tiny Greek island. On closer inspection, it is one of your magnificent classic stucco buildings on the only sea I know that is as blue as the Pacific is in Hawaii. Thank you for sharing more eye-candy.

Birthdays are special because they remind me how much better my life is for particular people having been born. Iki naturally comes to mind. Thank you!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 409 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, May 21, 2002 (04:32) * 3 lines 
 
Birthdays of our children’s is reminding us our past. But our birthdays is reminding us our parents and its life mainly. I remember how slow was the life of my parents and I wonder what is the maximum speed of the recent life. I don’t know but I fear that today’s increasing momentum is destroying any flavour and any essence from the human’s life. Where is the pedal of brakes?

John


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 410 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May 21, 2002 (13:36) * 1 lines 
 
John, if you ever discover the pedals for the brakes of life, please tell me their secret location. They exist here, but it makes life difficult when we must interact with the rest of humanity. That is why travel does not appeal to me as much as it used to do. When I get to California or even Honolulu, my pulse quickens and my heart races - neither of which I find pleasing. My ability to cope with masses of rushing humanity becomes less with each passing year. Our world has become very complex! Come to Hawaii and enjoy the pursuits of your inner child.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 411 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, May 21, 2002 (20:41) * 19 lines 
 
I think the term is Koyaanisqatsi (Hopi for 'Life out of balance') - this
came to mind from a film I saw many years ago in a different epoc of my
life. It must have been during that time I just wanted to hyper accelerate
through all the mundane of life to the conclusion. Sort of blowing off the
9 course meal for the desert. Years and some wisdom later, I am doing the
slowing down thing as well. Problem is that now I have numerous diversions
and interest pulling me in all ways. There are days when I work on stuff
and there are days I dont even turn the computer on. Life is cyclic
between those extremes to varying degrees. It is good I have these
diversions but even now, I try to do a technical Feng Shui and isolate
and focus on one primary project task - I fail miserably at this the same
as when I look at several cases of books (technical,philosophical, foolishness)
and try to decide which ones I will keep and which I will get rid of.
I guess, ultimately, this will all be decided but for now, I keep bouncing
around life's sampler.

73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 412 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May 21, 2002 (22:52) * 3 lines 
 
Your tastes are eclectic, Mike. That is the best of all worlds. You will never be bored. I am like that also. I continue to read several books at the same time and discuss the most mundane or most abstruse subjects depending on the company or lack thereof. Keep at it. Your like will be much the richer for it!

I like your Hopi. I think I need to read more!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 413 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May 21, 2002 (22:54) * 1 lines 
 
Let us know of your success with technical Feng Shui. I wish you luck!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 414 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, May 25, 2002 (21:58) * 23 lines 
 
This ship is currently docked in Hilo Harbor. Ihave never seen such a large civilian ship! It makes little Hilo look very tiny, indeed.



Tonnage 91,000
Length 964.6 feet
Beam 105.6 feet
Draught 26.3 feet
Cruising Speed 24 knots;
Guest Decks 11;
Elevators 10;
Electric Current 110/220 AC;
Country of Registry Liberia;
Classification Society Lloyd¹s Register;
Engines/Propellers Gas Turbines/Pods;
Guest Capacity (basis two) 1950;
Guest Staff Ratio 2:1;
Space Ratio 46.6;
Crew;
Crew Size: 999;
Nationality of Officers: Greek
Nationality of Hotel Staff: European/International
Nationality of Cruise Staff: European/American


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 415 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, May 25, 2002 (22:03) * 1 lines 
 
I wish I had known it was here. I would have looked a lot more carefully and taken some of my own photos of it so you could see how enormous it truly is. With 1000 Greeks in town, perhaps I could have gotten one to teach me a bit of the language! *Sigh* Imagine ME on a tropical island with 1000 Greek men and my not knowing it?! That photo does not do it justice. It is absolutely enormous.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 416 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, May 25, 2002 (22:12) * 1 lines 
 
Want to check out this lovely ship? http://www.royalcaribbean4me.com/celebrity_cruises/Infinity/celebrity_cruises_infinity.htm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 417 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, May 27, 2002 (19:50) * 1 lines 
 
it's a celebrity cruise ship, then? wow!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 418 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 27, 2002 (23:04) * 1 lines 
 
Indeed ! That ship elicits "WOW" from people who have never uttered the word before. You really cannot understand the vast size of this ship unless you are standing right beside it. They presented Hilo with 3000 new visitors in a single day. That is a sizeable percentage of the local population! In fact, it is about 10% of Hilo!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 419 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 27, 2002 (23:33) * 3 lines 
 

Memorial Day 2002






 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 420 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, May 30, 2002 (16:58) * 7 lines 
 
Hi All

Nothing new to report except to say hi.

73 de aa9il
mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 421 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May 30, 2002 (19:51) * 4 lines 
 
Thanks for checking in, Mike. You are alwayg a joy to behold ( I am picturing you with massive massive head set plugged into your boat anchor du jour and a brass key by your side and a log book open. That's the way my dad always looked so I put you in his stead.

Keep the faith. Communicate wiht an alien!
73's and 88's


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 422 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, May 30, 2002 (21:36) * 1 lines 
 
and if you do talk to an alien, tell us about it in paraspring (just don't tell the FBI *laugh*)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 423 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May 30, 2002 (23:35) * 1 lines 
 
....or the USAF...*ROTF*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 424 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, May 31, 2002 (04:48) * 12 lines 
 
...talk to an alien? "Smile".
It makes me thinking some eventualities.

We are captive in a three dimensional environment. But we are creatures of 2.5 dimensions. We understand well the "length ", "width" and the "altitude". But we cannot traveling in the third dimension (which is the altitude) without mechanical help.

If they exists more than three dimensions in the universe, we are watching part of it. We can not sense something that perhaps exist in the 4th dimension even if it is very close in front of us; except if it will become in some of our dimensions or in our COSMOS. It is the only logical though that can answer in some mysteries today.

Our science is also limeted in three dimensions. We can "touch" more than three dimensions only by mathematics and logical thoughts.

We don't know yet if our electromagnetic transmissions are really travelling in more than three dimensions.

John


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 425 of 1049: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Fri, May 31, 2002 (11:00) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Birthday Marcia! *blowing birthday kisses toward Hilo*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 426 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, May 31, 2002 (13:22) * 30 lines 
 
Happy Birthday Marci!

Also, its kind of funny you mentioned the boatanchor - couple of
nights ago I was listening to 20m CW and was just goofing around
with different filter widths, BFO settings, audio response, etc.
One of the things you can do with the R390A is calibrate the main
tuning oscillator to the mechanical counter (frequency readout).
I set the BFO to zero beat, tuned to 14.000 MHz, locked the mechanical
drive and adjusted the main tuning oscillator to 14.000. Ok, big deal...
but when I released the main knob, there was no backlash of the tuning,
the radio just stayed parked right on zero beat (i.e. no beat frequency
tone indicating that something electrically or mechanically drifted).
I just had to marvel at that - a 50 + year old radio that works like
a charm. Sort of the same satisfaction as listening to a Jaguar XKE
during idle or a Hammond B3 organ with the rotating Leslie speakers.

Anyway, regarding aliens and such - If I were to speak to any aliens,
I would surely invite them over for tea!
It is interesting regarding the possible methods of hyper parsec travel
which goes with the concept of warped spacetime, worm holes, etc to cover
vast distances. Most likely, hyper dimensional space travel is the only
way to get from point A to point B. These higher dimensional portals
could exist all around us - just need to be able to work in the higher
dimension to utilize or observe.

anyway, blah..blah..blah

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 427 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, May 31, 2002 (13:40) * 4 lines 
 
We're lookin' for you on echolink Mike!

See http://repeater.org for details.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 428 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, May 31, 2002 (14:23) * 8 lines 
 
Hi Terry
I had a chance to listen in during my last very brief trip through
Austin - need to get the software downloaded and interface then
should be good to go!

Mike
AA9IL



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 429 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, May 31, 2002 (15:00) * 1 lines 
 
You'll love it, it's been a total transformation of our repeater.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 430 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, May 31, 2002 (19:17) * 1 lines 
 
the AF will blow you off and then send a team of investigators out *laugh*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 431 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun  3, 2002 (00:46) * 1 lines 
 

~*~*~*~Happy Birthday, Viky~*~*~*~




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 432 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Mon, Jun  3, 2002 (07:52) * 9 lines 
 
Hello Everybody, I have been back from my trip for some time but haven't been
back on Geo. So here I am.

Marcia & John thanks for your concern about my welfare here in Karachi. Your
messages have been very comforting. Yes, it's getting quite hot here and the
latest headline is that in case of nuclear attack there will be total
destruction for fifteen miles. I hope and pray that mankind will not go that
crazy.-- Sikander



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 433 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Jun  3, 2002 (08:58) * 1 lines 
 
What is the word on the street in Karachi about the liklihood of war? Of nuclear war? You are definitely square in the middle of the planet's hot sport right now.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 434 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jun  3, 2002 (17:13) * 1 lines 
 
so good to see you again, maharaja!! *HUGS*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 435 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun  3, 2002 (17:49) * 1 lines 
 
We are all praying for you, Sikander! No matter what one calls his supreme being, it is the one who is being invoked for your safety from all parts of the globe. I suggest that this nuclear possibility will end in no winners and the whole world will be affected. I am certain there are some serious negotiations going on of which the media are unaware. Good! Such things are best done away from the scrutiny of public opinion.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 436 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun  3, 2002 (17:51) * 2 lines 
 
Welcome back, Sikander. I forgot my manners in my joy at seeing your post.
My warmest Hugs of Aloha are also with you. Be safe!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 437 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Tue, Jun  4, 2002 (09:49) * 18 lines 
 
Nice to be back.
Thanks Marcia, Terry, & Wolfie. It's very comforting to have you all
as friends.

Terry, news in the streets of Karachi is mixed. Some think that it's nothing
but political drama, some think war is imminent but will not go nuclear,
some, like myself, think it's time we became Houdini's students. Life is
going on normally but there seems to be obvious question mark on the faces
of the elderly. There are also those who have relatives on the other side
and are the most concerned.

Today they showed an interesting documentary on the Discovery channel.
Well preserved mummies in the Xinjiang province of China. If I heard it
correctly they called them Churchin Mummies. These are mummies of European
people. The oldest one is of a lady called the Lulan Beauty and is about
4000 years old.

Live & Learn.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 438 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Jun  4, 2002 (11:49) * 1 lines 
 
I heard Musharraf and the Indian PM are having an icy staredown at the conference table. Why can't Kashmire just be it's own state with self determination, the problem seems to be the presence of India and Pakistan in what should be a sovereign nation, am I right?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 439 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Tue, Jun  4, 2002 (16:48) * 6 lines 
 
Yes Terry that's the basic right of the Kashmiri people. I believe that is
what Pakistan too has always asked for, well at least that's what we have
always been led to believe and that's what the majority of the Pakistani
people believe. Gen.Musharraf and Mr.Vajpayee really had an icy
staredown, but I think Musharraf won the stare. "laugh". I like the bold
steps he has taken. None of his predecessors would go even half the way.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 440 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jun  5, 2002 (00:04) * 5 lines 
 
Sikander, you get the Discovery Channel also?! I too watched that lady of Xinjiang. Sharing the same interesting television documentaries makes you see so much closer. Please watch for programs about Hawaii. They have them frequently. I like the thought of sharing things!

Intersting insights about the perilous times you are erxperiencing. Your General Musharraf has the mandate of the people. Now I can see why. Dangerous times require resolute and wise men. May this be true now. I do wish you were watching from a far greater distance than you are now!

Be safe, Sikander. You are part of our family now!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 441 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Wed, Jun  5, 2002 (06:22) * 14 lines 
 
What a surprise Marcia that you too were watching the same program. I was
simply fascinated by it. Especially, about how well they are preserved. I
think if someone from their time saw any of these mummies, they would actually
recognize the person.

I had seen mummies at the Cairo Museum and the British Museum but to me they
didn't seem to be recognizable. These are!

I do admire Gen.Musharraf but I didn't like his stunt about the referendum.
Actually, his popularity went down a little due to it. Personally, I think
Mr. Vajpayee is afraid to enter into a dialogue with him.

Your comforting assurances have helped a lot. I do feel safe and I feel
proud of being part of the family.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 442 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jun  5, 2002 (14:41) * 5 lines 
 
*HUGS*

Remember that our leaders are politicians and sometimes their mouths go faster than the brains supposedly controlling them. A loosened tongue has caused more than one leader difficulties. A good man will recover, put it behind him adn move on promising himself not to do it again. Check out our former President Clinton if you think Pakistan is alone in this difficulty.

For those who may care but wonder what to do, John and I are in contact with our esteemed Sikander via email for more lengthy discussions of comfort and just to keep in contact. This is very important, now. They know it is the greatest reason for my taking the laptop computer with me.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 443 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Jun  5, 2002 (18:34) * 1 lines 
 
you guys, the discovery channel is my favorite and i love all the shows on ancient egypt and mummies (world-wide mummies)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 444 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Thu, Jun  6, 2002 (08:13) * 3 lines 
 
Hi Wolf
Did you see the feature on the mummies of Xinjiang Province in NW China?
I think it was fantastic.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 445 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Jun  6, 2002 (17:42) * 1 lines 
 
i believe i did but not recently--they had a mummy show last year too


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 446 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Thu, Jun  6, 2002 (19:04) * 5 lines 
 
Marcia flatters me. Imagine "esteemed Sikander". But so nice of her to take
her laptop with her to keep in touch. Have a nice time Marcia.
John did you receive my last email. If not, then thanks again for the useful
info you have given. All you Geo guys are so knowledgeable. I am learning
a lot.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 447 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Thu, Jun  6, 2002 (19:05) * 2 lines 
 
Forgot to include a querry in my last posting. Why doesn't Topic 50 appear
in the main menu?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 448 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Thu, Jun  6, 2002 (19:08) * 1 lines 
 
Sorry, I meant the "Welcome to Geo" page, not the main menu.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 449 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Jun  6, 2002 (20:56) * 3 lines 
 
it doesn't show up when you check all conferences on the welcome to geo page?

marcia, i miss you already!!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 450 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun  7, 2002 (15:31) * 6 lines 
 
I'm here, world! Sikander, if you use http://spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/browse/Geo/all/new
all conferences with posts you have not read yet will show up. That is where I log into Spring and into Geo. If it does not even show up on http://spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/browse/Geo/all/ it may mean you have inadventantly hit the "forget" button so you must find the "remember" one to cure that. Let me know if it works.

Yes, My Dear. You are greatly esteemed by John and me and the rest of us who have come to know and to value you.

I was missing so long because David was setting a wireless network so I can talk to you even from outside under a tree using his modem while he uses it for other things. HUGS all. It is HOT here but I am happy to be on a continent again!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 451 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Fri, Jun  7, 2002 (16:45) * 6 lines 
 
Thanks Marcia I will try the way you have explained and let you know.
Attaboy to David for setting up wireless network for you. Enjoy your stay
on the continent.
John could you please confirm your email address, perhaps I entered it
wrongly in the my last email to you.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 452 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun  7, 2002 (21:38) * 3 lines 
 
John's email is tsatsaragosj@yahoo.com.

Save your congratulations until David gets my instant messengers working online. As it currently stands, I can use MSN but no one uses it except for Wolfie. Actually, I do not know what the difficulty is. Despite his tweaking and rebooting all day only the internet and email works.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 453 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sat, Jun  8, 2002 (01:56) * 11 lines 
 
Wireless network! What high technology services you have Marcia! You must be proud for David. I like the idea to work under a tree or in the summerhouse. Your son is perfect again. He cares for your comfort.

I will try helping you Marcia!
If Internet and e-mail are working successfully, the problem is not exists in the wireless (or not) connection. Probably depends on security settings of your browser or on security settings of some protection programs that are perhaps used. I suggest you disable any security program and adjust your browser to a lower protection level.
Perhaps this is the solution.
From the other hand you have to drink more liquids against hot weather.

Enjoy your family and the continent part of your country.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 454 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Sat, Jun  8, 2002 (19:09) * 2 lines 
 
Yeah Marcia, John's idea is good. Now's the time to take cold mint tea.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 455 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Sun, Jun  9, 2002 (07:37) * 2 lines 
 
Things are cooling down a bit here. Thanks to all of you for your prayers.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 456 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun  9, 2002 (09:01) * 5 lines 
 
Yesterday, in a blistering hot car park, I would have been delighted to have joined you in that mint tea. As it was I drank a LOT of water, instead. I am not relenting on my prayers for your safety and for peace. I hope it is so easily defused, but I think it is not.

Sikander, we passed by some jasmine bushes (or what passes for them in California) and I thought of you! Do you drink your mint tea hot even in such high temperatures? Last night I wanted something HOT!!!




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 457 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Jun  9, 2002 (11:33) * 5 lines 
 
It is hot also here. But exists a spectacular ravine only a few minutes from my house. It has many sycamore tower trees. A small river is drive through it with enough noise. A simple restaurant-cafe is there. But it has many and big tanks where they breed trout. It is an oasis there because the temperature is almost 6-8 degrees lower.

You need something hot easily there. You need also a jacket.

John


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 458 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun  9, 2002 (13:20) * 1 lines 
 
David has many jackets which we all wore last night. We are cool inside houses and cars and stores. We will go into the mountains tomorrow. I hope. I am also downloading Yahoo IM on Iris's old computer so if you see me please contact me and I will use her old keyboard to answer. Not all of the keys work so please try to understand what I am saying.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 459 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Jun  9, 2002 (19:21) * 3 lines 
 
oh have fun in those mountains marcia and be careful!! take lots of digitals for us!

i love mint julep tea but i've never tasted it hot! sadly, no one around these parts knows what i'm talking about--guess i'll have to start brewing it myself!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 460 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun 10, 2002 (07:39) * 3 lines 
 
When I get back East I'll check into the Mint Julep tea. It better not have bourbon in it or I'm not gonna drink it... tell us more!

Off to Shasta!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 461 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Jun 10, 2002 (09:55) * 1 lines 
 
Shasta as in Northern Calif?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 462 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jun 10, 2002 (16:58) * 3 lines 
 
YES!!!!

no bourbon for me either...i guess i meant to call it just mint tea because the only mint julep version i can find has the liquer in it.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 463 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Mon, Jun 10, 2002 (17:35) * 2 lines 
 
Yes, I have mint tea in hot weather too because if the tea is kept in the refrigerator it has the totally opposite effect. It has cooling and soothing
effect. Good for digestion too.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 464 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun 10, 2002 (17:49) * 3 lines 
 
It is true that body temperature liquids are immediately usable by your body whereas you have to warm cold liquids before they can be used which uses calories and makes you even warmer. Sikander is correct.

I am back from seeing 4 volcanoes, three of which are the Cascades - and in the far distance, the Sierras with snow on them. I collected some lovely pumice *;)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 465 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Jun 10, 2002 (20:33) * 16 lines 
 
Hi all

Back again - been a nutz of a week but a couple of interesting things
to report - saw an iridium flare during the June vhf contest last weekend
but the cool visual was what I think was the contrail from the shuttle
launch. While flying back from Miami, thirty minutes into the flight and
starboard to the plane, I saw what looked like a distinct vapor column
- this was some minutes old (?) and was already spreading from wind
shear currents. Different from any of the surrounding clouds (including
storm clouds). No final verification but neat none the less. Anyway,
happy soon to be summer!

73 de aa9il
mike
r-c-i



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 466 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Jun 11, 2002 (11:53) * 3 lines 
 
I wonder what is the radioactivity background near a volcano. I really don’t know. Is there some danger from possible radioactive materials? Do you know some easy and quick and not expensive test for it? I think that I know one.

John


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 467 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Jun 11, 2002 (12:39) * 5 lines 
 
I remember that I was collecting samples of stones in quarries near Volos when I was in high school. I remember also my attempts to analyze those samples in my room. It looks very funny today. I wanted to make the experiments of my school chemistry book in my room. I had also some explosions..."laugh".
I got out alive finally.

john



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 468 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Jun 11, 2002 (14:35) * 13 lines 
 
Greetings John and all

I would suspect that detecting radioactive characteristics of volcanoes
would be performed using similar equipment to 'down hole' sensors used
by the oil companies - these are tube like enclosures containing data logging
and sensors that is fed down the drilling hole - telemetry/data is sent
back up via cabling. Due to the extreme environment, I suspect volcanic
sensing equipment is packaged in a most robust housing.

73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 469 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jun 11, 2002 (20:44) * 5 lines 
 
I just asked David and he suggested I look it up. I shall when I get a moment. He is not sure of the state of the science, but he did spend a lot of time monitoring radon gas emissions from Kilauea for just such eruption predicting - or relevance thereto. Mike's suggestions are also a strong possibility. Interesting thoughts. I'll be checking when I get a few minutes.

David is loading satellite viewing information into his palm computer so we have our evening entertainment ready. Congratulations, Mike for catching the iridium flare. Impressive, aren't they! Subscribe to SeeSat and you will havde more information than you know what to do with. I'm jealous of your shuttle launch contrail. I'd definitely add it to my list of seen astronimical phenomena!

Clear skies and warm nights, all. I'm off to study the heavens!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 470 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Jun 12, 2002 (11:56) * 13 lines 
 
Hi Marci and geoites

Clear skies and warm nights sounds good - its misty and cooler (!) here.
Kind of makes me feel like I live further up north than I really do.
Re satellites, I sometimes run InstantTrak to get position info. On clear
nights here when the ambient light pollution is not too bad, you can sometimes
see N to S and S to N satellite traversals. Look forward to hearing more
about the volcanic sensors.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 471 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Thu, Jun 13, 2002 (16:34) * 2 lines 
 
Forgive my ignorance Marcia, but is SeeSat a website?
Enjoy your study of the heavens.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 472 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Jun 13, 2002 (16:39) * 1 lines 
 
This refers back a few posts. Marcia and Wolfie I had some wonderful hot mint tea in a North African (as in cusine, not location) restaurant about 6 weeks ago. We got the whole pot and had to pour it through a strainer into little cups.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 473 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Jun 13, 2002 (17:44) * 1 lines 
 
i love drinking herbal tea that way--my opa (german grandfather) grew his own herbs and we had it as tea--very good stuff.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 474 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Fri, Jun 14, 2002 (06:51) * 5 lines 
 
Hi Everybody!
Sorry about the bad news from Karachi. Just as I was beginning to feel
that things were getting better. I thought I should let you all know that
I am in good health. I know you all care.
Please pray that common sense and concern for humanity may prevail. Thanks


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 475 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun 14, 2002 (13:09) * 10 lines 
 
No, Sikander, we use Heavens Above to find out what we are seeing. SeeSat is a message board for professional astronomers world wide and others intersted. I have occasionally posted there, as well.

SeeSat
http://satobs.org/seesat/seesatindex.html

Heavens Above
http://www.heavens-above.com/

My my profpimd sorrow for what is happening in Karachi. I have been out of the news loop since We have been immersed in computer rebuilding and netowrking.
Hugs, Sikander. I will catch up on my email to you!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 476 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Fri, Jun 14, 2002 (16:45) * 5 lines 
 
Thanks for your comforting words Marcia. I had guessed that you were busy
with the networking. Take it easy and enjoy your stay in California.
I discovered yesterday that the highest telescope on earth is also in Hawaii.
I have forgotten the name of the place. Thanks for the website addresses and
the hugs. Look after yourself Marcia.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 477 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun 15, 2002 (10:15) * 3 lines 
 
The networking works splendidly. Any one of four computers can use the print command on the computer and have it print out in the office where the main computer lives. And, we can download programs from one another's hard drive. I find that rather amazing and VERY time-saving. Next I have to get closer to the east coast (flying again and more security checks)and set up a network there. I hope I was a good student. This time I am the computer "expert" so I have all components needed. I highly recommend doing this. Your children and youcan all be online at the same time all doing separate things and no one can see that the other is doing. And, only one telephone line is occupied!




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 478 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun 17, 2002 (15:53) * 5 lines 
 
My laptop PC died last night so I am without a computer for the week. I will also be travelling tomorrow so wish me luck. The dead latop is remaining in the care of my son who will install a new one, format it and load the programs we use then send it to me ASAP. With new memory and a bigger new hard drive, it should be awesome. If not, I'm giving up on it.

Also plan to set up a network at my destination so I can be online and use the isp where I will be instead of bothering anyone with my difficulties. Take care of Geo for me. I will check in on Thursday on my host's computer just to see that everything is working right.

Thanks! and *HUGS* I had no idea how confusing life can be when the computer isn't working right!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 479 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Jun 18, 2002 (19:04) * 8 lines 
 
Hi Marci

Hope you have a fun and safe trip and get back on the inet when
you can. Hopy you also have a fun solstice!

73 de Mike
aa9il



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 480 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Jun 19, 2002 (06:06) * 1 lines 
 
We'll see you Thursday night then! Sounds like the laptop will be worth waiting for with the upgrade. Travel safe!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 481 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jun 20, 2002 (12:20) * 4 lines 
 
Thanks for the good wishes. It must have worked since after getting though being chosen far more frequently than necessary for secuity body searches and complete undoing of my carry one things, I managed to get a great seatmate out o
Dallas-Fort Worth - a HAM aand a hardware troubleshooter for computers! We had a great trip trading war stories!

Still waiting for my laptop while my son tries to find time to fix it. Tomorrow we are off to a symposium where my host will present a paper on Melungeons and on the way I will get to see really neat rocks and stuff like that. I am really excitied ! But, is it ever hot here. What happened to the tradwinds?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 482 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Thu, Jun 20, 2002 (14:39) * 4 lines 
 
You are charging your batteries Marcia. I have the impression that you are like drinking a warm pleasurable teacup. Close your eyes to difficulties and Enjoy it. Cosmos is marvelous if we want to see it from the correct side, as you make usually.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 483 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Jun 20, 2002 (17:01) * 3 lines 
 
Hi Marcia! I've missed your frequent postings at Spring. Enjoy the symposium tomorrow. Maybe you'll post some interesting new items at the Mulungeon conference. Don't forget to mention the neat rocks that you'll be seeing on the way here at Geo.




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 484 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Jun 20, 2002 (17:04) * 3 lines 
 
Happy Summer Soltace! Okay, I'm early. It's actually tomorrow.

Happy Winter Soltace to those in the southern hemisphere, Anne and Rob! I hope that the snow has abated for you, Rob.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 485 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Jun 21, 2002 (00:24) * 3 lines 
 
Happy Solstice!

Bang a Gong!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 486 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Jun 21, 2002 (05:00) * 6 lines 
 
Earth's Instantaneous Velocity (on its path around the Sun) will be at the minimum value tomorrow. I am talking about 28 Km/sec. Then, Earth will start to accelerate again. Be ready tight your belt and stop smoking. We will go closer to the Sun!

Happy Solstice to all!

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 487 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, Jun 21, 2002 (05:44) * 1 lines 
 
Enjoy your solstice!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 488 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun 24, 2002 (13:37) * 8 lines 
 
Wow! I missed the Solstice while attending an conference ("Union") in the Hills of Tennessee. Bet something had to be right. That evening, after my host and future Geo's archaeologist gave his paper (he drove me there through the most spectacular scenery I have ever seen - and most amazing geological structures in the foothills of the Applachians.

Saturday night we heard there was a little old place down a tiny valley ("holler") so off we went. A big "rustic" wood and corrugated sheet iron structure seated about 1000 while the rest of us sat outside with the moon and fireflies. We listened to the purest of country music and bluegrass and NOTHING was plugged into the electricity!!! I was overjoyed. Anthropology in actuality. Then a few guys from down the road dropped in and we were treated to a long session with Johnny and June Carter Cash. We were all surprised and delighted. During the course of the evening no matter who was doing the music folks would just get up and start dancing. Clog and buck dancing, mostly. It was fantasic and I would love to go back for more!
Look up The Carter Family Fold in Hiltons if you want to know more about it.

My host for the duration is a fascinating man whose conversations go on for hours into the night. I could not have chosen a better travelling companion for this journey into Americana.

(They were amazed that I was from Hawaii - they looked like I had told them I was from another planet!)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 489 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Jun 26, 2002 (13:19) * 8 lines 
 
"Flooded" with an infrequent genus of butterfly Eastern Thessaloniki and enough regions of Central Macedonia in Greece.



It is a hazard only to green fallow that is expected from the thousands butterflies according to scientists. They maintain that their overpopulation, is owed in the climatic conditions that prevailed the spring and encouraged their procreation.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 490 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jun 26, 2002 (13:32) * 6 lines 
 
How incredibly lovely! I can think of much worse plagues than too many butterflies! Tent caterpillers and Gypsy moths were unusually bad this year in my current location. Happily they had run their course before I got here, but my seat mate flying in told me of buring them out of his trees to save the trees from certain death by doing so.

The Falls of the Ohio location is http://www.fallsoftheohio.org/center.html
I do want to see the fossil beds. Then I want to go see some fossils I can collect.




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 491 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Wed, Jun 26, 2002 (16:59) * 4 lines 
 
Warmest Aloha Marcia. I saw the photo album of the Falls of Ohio you have attached. They are beautiful but to you it must be like paradise. By the way, where areyou these days? Did you get the picture of tooth I finally succeeded
in getting properly scanned. I tried to paste it in this space too, but it
seems that this space only accepts text.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 492 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jun 27, 2002 (12:58) * 7 lines 
 
Aloha and Big Hugs, Sikander!!! I thought sure I had lost you! I did not get your tooth since I cannot get my home email here (until I get my own laptop and have it forwarded.) I am delighted that you were able to scan something so we could all see it. I am in the southeastern USA in Kentucky and Tennessee. This part of the US has small farmers and poor but proud people who are self sufficient and ask no one for help. I guess they are closer to what made America great than any other citizens. However, for the benefit of their children, it might be better to have better schooling and health. However, they are tending tobe stubborn and to cling to the old ways, so they continue to do things they way their ancestors did them. Some do have electricity and many have little TV antennas but many more still do not have indoor plumbing. It is interesting but something inside me recoils at this primitive lifestyle. Books are great things. There can be more to life than grinding poverty in this country of g
eat wealth. *Sigh* It is difficult, but no one can make another live differently if they do not chooe to do so. A,d. I never want to eat HOMINY again!!!

The Falls of Ohio is a state park so I cannot pick up rocks there. I will enjoy learning of what fossils are there, however. Then, I have been promised a fossil expidition by a collector who says he knows nothing about them, but knows their precise classifications right down to genus and species! Sikander, I will think of you each time I find anythng. By the way, I did write to your email address on record here - did you see it? I have lost your and everyone else's email addresses when my hard drive broke. I am currently
BluegrassHula@aol.com. I'd love to hear from you!

You too, John!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 493 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jun 27, 2002 (13:00) * 1 lines 
 
What I really need is a field guide to the geology of this area. There are bound to be books available at the state park if not elsewhere.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 494 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Jun 27, 2002 (16:22) * 14 lines 
 
Hi Marci

Glad I checked this page - I still can not get past topic 32 when displaying
Geo on my laptop - ????? dunno
Anyway, sounds like you are having fun in rock country. Also, got your new
email address - I sent you a couple of emails to aloha.net but now figure
you wont see those until you get your replacement pc.

Nothing new to report here - just packaging up some microwave stuff for the
August contest.

73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 495 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Jun 28, 2002 (01:51) * 11 lines 
 
Hi Mike
I have the same problem when displaying Geo/All. Something is wrong. I e-mailed Terry before yesterday and also today about this problem.
I posted a test answer to your topic 35. So, your topic is visible if you select Activity within last week. The topics 33, 39, 60, 61, 62, 63, and 75 are not accessible for the moment. You can access each one of the other topics using:

http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/public/read/Geo/32
replace the number 32 with the number of the topic you want to access).

Best Regards

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 496 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Jun 28, 2002 (01:56) * 6 lines 
 
Hi Sikander
How are the things there now? I hope that you are OK. I can post in Geo any picture you may want to share with us. Simply send it to me by e-mail.

Warm regards from Greece

John


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 497 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Jun 28, 2002 (01:58) * 4 lines 
 
Surely, those people are more unadulterated Marcia. We must remember our past years when we were like those proud people. They are self-sufficient and this is very good. I wonder if they are in advantageous position against the most of us. They are more HUMANS!

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 498 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Fri, Jun 28, 2002 (08:41) * 13 lines 
 
Marcia,I had a feeling that there was some problem with your communication tool.
I have been sending you ecards every day and have not been receiving
any response. Will you be able to see all those cards when you get back to
your laptop? I have sent you an email too and have attached the mysterious
tooth. I will try to send it to John as he has so kindly offered to paste
it on Geo. Thanks John.
Marcia, you have got me all excited about Kentucky and Tennessee. People
living in the mountains I visit also live in this type of simplicity. It
does have its charms of contentment. However, the lack of education for their
children is a sad aspect. This has been one of my ideas that PACC (the place
where I work) should open centers in small towns close to such small farms
here in Pakistan, but it seems that my ideas fall on deaf ears.
Once again, nice to hear from you Marcia. I feel good now.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 499 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Sat, Jun 29, 2002 (20:08) * 8 lines 
 



This is a fossilized tooth. The color is a shade darker than it appears in
in picture. It was found in this broken state near the Khir Thar mountain
range approximately 5 miles east of the Khir-Thar National Park.
The size of the broken tooth is slightly over 1 inch and the girth of the bottom edge is about one inch and one-half of an inch. It seems very similar
to what I had seen on the Discovery channel as a dinosaur's tooth.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 500 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Sat, Jun 29, 2002 (20:09) * 2 lines 
 
John, thanks for helping me post this onto Geo50.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 501 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Jun 30, 2002 (01:46) * 6 lines 
 

I am sorry for the colors Sikander.
I found that your photo is clearer by this way. It is very interesting finding. I don’t know almost anything about Paleontology. I wonder if it is small in order to appertain to a Dinosaur.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 502 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Sun, Jun 30, 2002 (17:18) * 6 lines 
 
Yes John, the photo is much clearer this way. You see it is broken and
in view of the girth I suppose the entire tooth should be bigger. Perhaps
is belongs to a baby dinosaur i.e. if baby dinosaurs used to have teeth.
It is much larger to be of the two other large animals of the area i.e.
camels and buffalos.
Once again John, thanks for your help.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 503 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Mon, Jul  1, 2002 (07:37) * 6 lines 
 
John, there seem to be a lot of earthquakes going on these days. Is my area
safe?
By the way I did a little checking. There were a lot of little dinosaurs
too and the front teeth of the Tyrannosaurus were also much smaller than
its canines.
Best Wishes


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 504 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jul  1, 2002 (17:41) * 1 lines 
 
your tooth is strange to behold. how'd you know it was one?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 505 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Jul  2, 2002 (05:50) * 13 lines 
 
Hello friend Sikander and all geo-family.
It appears that Earth is enough anxious these days. I received five world signals during eighteen days. The last one was yesterday. You can see them in topic 67. A last 40-days summarise of my signals is appeared on the graph of my last world signals in Geo portal:WORLD SIGNALS. (They are updated every day).

Unfortunately I can't determine the source position of anyone of them. I will know if someone of them is near to me (Greece and part of the surrounding area), only a few days before the EQ. It will become clear by the 24-hour oscillation period signals.

I hope and pray for gentle events away from human.

I am not so familiar with the history of life on Earth. But it is a mysterious the sudden disappearance of dinosaurs from the face of Earth the moment that they were the prevalent genus on it. Possibly, the reason was a natural catastrophe. I wonder if a similar reason can destroy also the human genus in the future.

Be safe all of you.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 506 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Tue, Jul  2, 2002 (07:27) * 3 lines 
 
Hi Wolfie.
Yes it does seem strange by looks because it is broken. If you look at the
real thing it is nothing other than a tooth of some kind.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 507 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Tue, Jul  2, 2002 (07:33) * 3 lines 
 
John I looked at the "World Signals". The signals for Russia-China border
were very strong in the last week of June. I would say Amen to your prayers
for safety. You too look after yourself.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 508 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul  3, 2002 (16:06) * 7 lines 
 
Congratulations, Sikander! And thanks to John for assisting you with the Html code for posting your tooth. I am sending it on to those I know who are wiser than I am with Paleontology. This is a strange tooth for a dinosaur. Most that I have seen are pointy and conical in shape. Mammoth and Mastodon teeth are great monstrous grinding molars which are two hands full in size. You assuredly have a tooth or some remnant of animal life past. Exactly what is the puzzle. Let me check with a few sources!

Thanks and again, congratulations!

Broken??? Of course!!! That is the part of the conical structure missing! I studied the dinosaur fossils on exhibit in the Falls of Ohio Museum and the greatest of them had small incisors. The Canines did the killing while the molars did the grinding. Just thinking of this broken tooth with the core exposed makes mine hurt with sympathy!

Back to checking with someone far better versed in these things than I am.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 509 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Jul  4, 2002 (12:16) * 1 lines 
 
someone send me good ftp software! i can't believe this brand new computer doesn't have it already installed (if it does, i still can't find it anywhere)*SIGH*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 510 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Jul  4, 2002 (13:09) * 4 lines 
 
The best ftp software is here:

http://cws.internet.com/ftp.html



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 511 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Thu, Jul  4, 2002 (14:47) * 12 lines 
 
Large-scale police operation uncovers ''Nov. 17'' hideout in Athens
03/07/2002 23:31:05

Police launched a large-scale operation on Wednesday, locating a ''November 17'' terrorist organisation hideout in the Athens Patisia neighborhood, discovering weapons, rockets of all types, printed material and a computer.

Among the arms were military rockets of several types and firearms, while tests will be conducted on the computer to assess whether it was the one used to write the shadowy murderous terrorist organization's latest proclamations.

Initially, police evacuated the apartment complex and then entered the basement apartment, where the weaponry was discovered, with police bomb disposal experts entering first in the event that the apartment was booby-trapped.

http://zeus.hri.org/news/greek/apeen/2002/02-07-04.apeen.html#03

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 512 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Thu, Jul  4, 2002 (17:50) * 10 lines 
 
HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY TO ALL MY AMERICAN FRIENDS.

May the Bells of Freedom ring for all the thirsty freedom seekers in the
world.

Marcia, thanks for doing research on the mysterious tooth. Looking at
the real thing does make one think that it must have been conical. And, of
course, thanks again to John for helping me out.




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 513 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Jul  4, 2002 (19:15) * 3 lines 
 
Thanks for the good wishes, Sikander.

Time to go and shoot off some fireworks!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 514 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul  5, 2002 (22:21) * 5 lines 
 
Thanks all for fond wishes for America's Birthday. Sikander, I thought of you while spending the day hunting for fossils. I will photograph them and as soon as my fully repaired computer gets here early next week, I will ftp them to Geo and post them. Tomorrow we go back out again looking for more gravel bars in the nearby streams to hunt for more fossils. This is far too easy. They are just about where you can fall over them as you walk!

Terry, toured the Court where you once lived. LOVELY!!! Yes, they still have Shakespeare in the park nearby!

John, you are very dear to me for keeping Geo running smoothly. I will be back at work shortly and back on Yahoo too =) I can hardly wait !!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 515 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sat, Jul  6, 2002 (02:52) * 1 lines 
 
That's great that you stopped by there, do they still have the fountain in the middle of the median on St. James Court? The house where I lived was right by that fountain. Ah, memories.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 516 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Jul  7, 2002 (21:49) * 13 lines 
 
Hi all

Nice to be able to post here again. Marci, how is the tour going?
Just got back from a whirl wind tour of Tx (missed the flooding...)
Back up in the north country finally. Waiting for my weather balloons
to come in - bought two surplus 6 to 8 ft balloons for experimenting
with launching amateur payloads (radio, gps, camera, etc...). Also
just picked up the microcontroller for controlling the mess.

73 de aa9il
mike in IL
r-c-i



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 517 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Jul  8, 2002 (09:41) * 1 lines 
 
That sounds like great fun, launching ballons with transmitters. Are you going to keep them on some kind of tether or will they just float away?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 518 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Jul  8, 2002 (13:37) * 8 lines 
 
Hi Terry

These will be free flying balloons - hence all the gps/radio gear to track
it. Dont plan to really do anything until next year tho as far as launching
with a real payload.

Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 519 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jul  8, 2002 (18:28) * 1 lines 
 
Terry, have y'all been affected by the flooding? Yup, the fountain is in the middle of the grassy strip of lovely landscaping running the length of St James Court. The homes are NOT your usual town houses. These have large crystal chandeliers inside and pillars out front. Your house was on the left or right going in? I'd love to photoggraph it for you and post it. It is not far from where I am. We are close to the U of Louisville campus. Beautiful!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 520 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jul  8, 2002 (18:31) * 1 lines 
 
Mike! You are flying baloons now? Excellent on the GPS. I am currently the only one in my family without one. I think that needs to be my next purchase since I did not need to buy a whole new laptop. Besides, I can navigate around the Appalachians better and find my sources of specimens far better if I have one such modest instrument. They can be had for $100 online.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 521 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Jul  8, 2002 (20:13) * 4 lines 
 
Not nearly as much flooding here as there has been down South in San Antonio. My house was to the left going in, the Salyers owned it I believe. If you take shots, shoot several and I'll pick it out!

Great story on NPR tonight about how some folks are starting a project to photograph every major latitude and longitude intersection (except those in the ocenans), I'll look for it on NPR's site.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 522 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Jul  8, 2002 (20:35) * 19 lines 
 
Hi all

I missed all the excitement by the time I passed thru Austin last week although
the news showed the flood waters rising. When I got to the home qth west
of Houston, it was clear except for plenty of mosquitos.
Marci - this is a secret background project I have had some interest in for
a long time. When I was shopping at a surplus electronics store in Houston,
I was only going to buy a microcontroller board - imagine my suprise when I
found a stack of 6ft diameter surplus weather balloons still in the box.
These will be slated strictly for proof of concept testing of designs although
the long term goal is for high altitude. I plan to hang the usual meteorlogical
sensors but also plan to maybe do something like carry a vlf/elf receiver aloft
to record whistlers from 50000 ft or something like that. Anyway, will have
some real data to post to the Geo board then.

73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 523 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jul  9, 2002 (10:54) * 1 lines 
 
terry, how does that work? how do they know where the intersects are? will gps tell them?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 524 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Jul  9, 2002 (11:33) * 24 lines 
 
I just googled and found out more.

+ Searching With Latitude



Ever wondered what the scene looks like at 47ºN latitude, 21ºE longitude? Or 42ºS 147ºE? Searching by geographic location, especially for areas in our examples (near Transylvania and Tasmania, respectively) isn't something you'll want to try with most search engines. But if you're just dying to get a look at 37ºN 109ºW (near the four corners monument in Colorado), The Degree Confluence Project is your search resource of choice.

The goal of the project is to visit each of the latitude and longitude integer degree intersections (confluences) in the world, and to take pictures at each location. There are 64,442 latitude and longitude degree intersections in the world (counting each pole as one intersection). Of these, 47,650 meet the goals of the project after removing many confluences near the poles. Of these, about 12,000 are actually on land, which the project either has or plans to catalog in its database.

The project welcomes submissions -- if you live near a confluence, or plan to travel near one, consider submitting your own photograph and story to the project.

The Degree Confluence Project
http://www.confluence.org/index.php

Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
http://www.getty.edu/research/tools/vocabulary/tgn/index.html
Enter the name of a geographic place and your results will include latitude and longitude information.

Host Name to Latitude/Longitude
http://cello.cs.uiuc.edu/cgi-bin/slamm/ip2ll/
This utility searches the Whois database for the location of web hosts or IP addresses. US sites are resolved to the city; Canadian sites are resolved to their province, and non-US sites are resolved to the country's capital.




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 525 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Jul  9, 2002 (11:36) * 8 lines 
 


Here's one close to home, well, my home anyway.

visited by Craig Davidson)

17-Sep-2000 -- After a weekend of partying in Austin, Texas it was time to head home to Houston. The 30N 98w Confluence is just a few miles south of Austin so I just had to go take a look. It's located on the Blanco River between Wimberley and San Marcos Texas. Both towns are recreational and retirement communities for nearby Austin and San Antonio. The Texas hill country is a beautiful place to live. We will have to mark this one up as another attempted confluence because I was unable to get within 2 miles of the spot. The H-O Ranch is on the north side of the confluence with a locked gate and the Freeman Ranch is to the south of the confluence. The Freeman Ranch gate was open but I was concerned that someone would lock the gate behind me so I didn't go in today. I noticed that the Freeman Ranch is owned by Southwest Texas State University so I would think it would be easy to get permission to enter the property on another day. I will be back.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 526 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul  9, 2002 (13:03) * 5 lines 
 
Amazing stuff here! Terry, I'll take several shots of St James Court for your pleasure and deja vu. The carriage trade must have had their enclave there because it is still regal and lovely inside the gates. When did you live there?

Interesting about the intersections. I'll be taking some photos of such when I am in California using my son's GPS.

Mike, your secret is safe with us. How amazing this might prove to be. I like the way you think!!! keep us posted, and I hope the wx keeps your balloons still aloft on course. Transponders are a wonderful thing!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 527 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Jul  9, 2002 (13:11) * 1 lines 
 
I lived there from 1969 to 1971. I was a freelance photojournalist for the Louisville Courier Journal and Times and a City Planner.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 528 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul  9, 2002 (13:27) * 1 lines 
 
Oh, how interesting!! (Somebody actually planned this city?! Sorry, I couldn't resist!) I'll be taking photos next time we go out. Don, my host, is also interested. He was gracious enough to post on Geo 17 (archaeology, of course!) He will be an excellent addition to our Geo family and is eager to join in discussions or to answer questions.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 529 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Jul  9, 2002 (14:58) * 16 lines 
 
Hi all

One of the things that the vhf and up amateur group uses for contest scores
is based on maidenhead grid squares. Thus, when you make a microwave contact
in one grid square then move to the next, it counts for another point. I'll
have to pull out the map and see if there are any major lat/lon convergence
points near by.
Also, re the balloon project - I would suspect that there should be some
interesting observations 75000 ft up. There is a good web page for Edge
Of Space Sciences www.eoss.org which goes into quite a bit of detail of
amateur launched balloons and payloads.

73 de Mike
aa9il
r-c-i



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 530 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul  9, 2002 (15:02) * 1 lines 
 
http://www.eoss.org for those who wish to use a hot link. I have always wondered what a maindenhead grid looked like. Please do add it to Geo. I am as curious as the rest. If you need the html command, email me and I will send it to you!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 531 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Jul  9, 2002 (15:57) * 25 lines 
 
Hi there

A good link on grid squares and how they apply to ham radio is:
http://www.arrl.org/locate/gridinfo.html
On the frequencies I work at, contacting a station in 5 different
grids is enough to claim an award. Of course, the clever ones would
go to a 'four corners' and hand out 4 easy contacts (sometimes!)
but you still have to do that 80+ mile contact to get that 5th grid.
When you 'rover' during a vhf-microwave contest, usually you drive
around in the most efficient course to hit major grid squares to hand
out contacts. Of course, you have to find a high point to park and
set up the radios/antennas. This is a good practice for a road rally.

For the 10ghz and up microwave contest that I will participate in,
you can move 10miles and that will suffice as a new location to count
for a contact. One strategy I plan to do is work up and down the
Lake Michigan shore line and give out a contact every 10 miles (if I
can find access to the lakefront without cutting through someones yard).

73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i

Hopefuly I might even have some pictures of this foolishness during the
contest....


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 532 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 10, 2002 (10:08) * 5 lines 
 
Oooh YES!!! Photos please! QSL card too if you can scan one for us. I think many are not familiar with how they look.

There are several rare isolated unpopulated counties in California. When they hcve county DX contests, a guy locates at the for corners of the junction of these counties and moves slightly to allow all to catch these rarities. Is that cheating? At least the guy out there with the drinks cooler and fast food is working hard! he is also usually alone or with one single other guy using one rig.

Good luck, Mike!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 533 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Jul 10, 2002 (11:55) * 11 lines 
 
Hi there

Doing the four corners of a grid is totally legit - I have done the equivalent
during contests by going to the next grid line. The only catch is to make sure
these points have some elevation for a line of sight contact.

BTW, is there any IM or IRC for the geo site?

73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 534 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 10, 2002 (12:11) * 3 lines 
 
Not really. We should do that. Most of my contacts are on Yahoo IM but a few are on AOL (Please save yourself some anguish and use the AOL IM for non AOL users even if you use AOL for your connection to the internet!) Only Wolfie uses MSN. Suggestions, Mike? I have found ICQ too RAM intensive to be practical. Even on my home monster computer ICQ tends to make it freeze.

Suggestions from all are welcome. Currently I am bluegrassHula on AOL IM. I will be back to Kilauea83 on Yahoo as soon as my laptop gets here!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 535 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Jul 10, 2002 (13:23) * 12 lines 
 
Ok, dont really have an IM id yet but can always get one - via aol or yachoo
I think I hit the IRC channels once but the conversation ratio was pretty
dead - I have also endured the yachoo chat pages (supposedly created for
scientific chat topics) but it was full of teeny bop's flaming each other
as well as 'the end of the world is near' ranting, and general boorishness.
There is better signal to noise ratio on the bar car I sometimes ride on
when taking the train home. Once I get an id (mostlikely very soon - like
today...) I can pass it along. Thats one of the reasons I like the board so much is that it has a great S/N ratio.

More details as they happen!
73 de Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 536 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 10, 2002 (20:16) * 1 lines 
 
Ok Mike. I'd really suggest Yahoo, but private room chat or one on one seems to work best (one on one, that is.) This night finds me still laptopless and is more than a little discouraging. I will email son and have him trace it. Untill I have it I am not on Yahoo but on Don's computer. Stay tuned!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 537 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sat, Jul 13, 2002 (00:21) * 21 lines 
 
VILLAGES OF THE LAND BEHIND THE MOUNTAINS, ZAGORIA, GREECE

Evidence of human existence goes back to more than 40,000 years B.C. in the Epirus region of Northwest Greece. Covering some 9,203 square kilometres, it has a unique environment with its very own identifiable culture. The first Greeks settled in Epirus as early as 2000 B.C. Its name has derived from the meaning "Infinity" and has been described as the very roof of the Greek race.

Tucked away deep in the Pindos Mountains, North of Ioannina, there is a part of Epirus known as Zagoria, a place of immense natural beauty. The villages of Zagoria are uniquely endowed with extraordinary natural beauty, a vast temperate forest ecosystem, distinctive architecture, cultural wealth and the sheer romance of an ancient way of life. From the Slavic word meaning "behind the mountains," Zagoria is defined by the Gamila (Tymfi) and Mitsikeli Mountains as well as the Aoos River. It is a part of the massive Pindus Mountain Range that stretches from Albania to Central Greece.

A vast proportion is heavily wooded, surrounded by a truly exciting geography, showing a remarkable diversity for such a relatively small area. Imposing mountains, luxuriant valleys are interspersed with rivers, waterfalls and streams. Towering cliffs and breathtaking ravines are around every bend, each one steeper and deeper than the next. None make a more lasting impression than the beautiful Vikos Gorge does - reputedly, Europe's largest ravine.



The gorge is often described as Europe's Grand Canyon, which perhaps is a little misleading. The main Vikos Gorge is just 12 kilometres long and approximately 2 kilometres wide - much smaller than the Grand Canyon. It does, however, plunge vertically for over a kilometre. It is this more tangible, more concentrated, but still awesome scale that makes the Vikos Gorge such an intense and involving experience.


One of the bridges in Zagoria Villages

As stone is one of the main natural local resources, it features strongly in all other construction. Some of the most striking, of this love affair with arches, are the famous Kipi bridges, possibly the best surviving example of a craft that flourished throughout the region during the Ottoman rule. The most amazing feat of engineering are the Vradeto steps, which took years to complete. This snaking, paved, banistered staircase skilfully conquers a palisade, winding up a near vertical cliff face. Until recent times, this was the only link between the village of Vradeto and the rest of the region.

http://www.travelux.co.uk/zagoinfo.html

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 538 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jul 15, 2002 (16:45) * 5 lines 
 
How absolutly lovely! John, you live amongst the most stunning vistas on earth.I wonder if you get time to look at them. Thank you for sharing!

I am now on my newly restored laptop and logged in on my host's line.I will work on networking with him so we can both used the phone connection at the same time.Meanwhile I have downloaded the pictures I have taken and am ready to post a few of them.

I am very happy to be back in contact and with my own computer! My marci@aloha.net email is working again. Thanks to David for resurrecting my laptop at such minor expense!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 539 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Jul 16, 2002 (12:48) * 9 lines 
 
Howdy howdy

Glad you had your PC woes corrected! Looking forward to seeing your
pictures. Also, still am planning to get some shots at various grid
locations during the upcomming 10ghz contest.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 540 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Tue, Jul 16, 2002 (17:32) * 3 lines 
 
Congratulations on getting your laptop restored Marcia. Wow! it did take
a long time. What part of the earth are you enjoying at this moment, I mean
your location. A warm Aloha to you.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 541 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Jul 17, 2002 (06:13) * 13 lines 
 
High eventuality for thunderstorms in Louisville, Kentucky this afternoon!

This radar weather image is special dedicated to Geo hostess and to our friends there.


(It is always updated)


From
http://www.wunderground.com/radar/station.asp?ID=LVX19

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 542 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 17, 2002 (15:10) * 5 lines 
 
Thank you for the updating weather graphic.I am still in the southeast and inthe area covered by the map John posted. I have been listening to aircraft reporting uneven flying conditions due to these cells moving through the area. It is overcast, so if I go missing again it is only temporary and I shall return! As soon as the sky settles down again.

Aloha Sikander!I am very happy to be back. I missed my family in Geo more than you can imagine!

HUGS!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 543 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Jul 17, 2002 (16:31) * 4 lines 
 
It will be nice to read your many postings to all the topics. Now, if I
can get in the habit of posting more!

Mike


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 544 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 17, 2002 (17:01) * 5 lines 
 
Mike, for a guy who is used to keying in CW, you do a splendid job of posting!
(CW for those not radio-oriented stands for Morse Code in the lingo of Hams.)

I have tons of backload to post and comment on. There is no stress in GEO. Take off your shoes and get comfy. That is what family is all about!



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 545 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Wed, Jul 17, 2002 (18:01) * 6 lines 
 
Yes Marcia we'll wait for you.

John, what a fantastic way to show Marcia's location. Thanks, you're just
as great as Marcia.

Warm wishes to everyone in GEO.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 546 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 17, 2002 (19:03) * 1 lines 
 
Sikander, this sort of kudos is surely not earned by me, but John is most worthy. I have saved John's image to my desktop so I can watch the storms appreoach. I have not had this luxury for a very long time. I think it is veryt exciting - even if it gets a bit frightening on occasion. I really do not need to become part of a tornado to have fun!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 547 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 17, 2002 (22:59) * 1 lines 
 
However, I am always grateful for support of any kind in word and deed. Thanks for posting. Many wonderful hugs of Aloha for staying around Geo!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 548 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 17, 2002 (23:10) * 1 lines 
 
Thus far into the night, no thunder storms have materialized. I think they are waiting for me to go to bed! Again, thank you John! You have provided me with an "active desktop!"


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 549 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Jul 18, 2002 (07:27) * 1 lines 
 
The rains go on and on here, this may turn out to be the rainiest month in the history of Austin. We're on the verge of major floods if the "big one" hits us again. Definitely we're on watch down here in central Texas.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 550 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 18, 2002 (10:34) * 3 lines 
 
Worrying for you, Terry. I know you are on a major creek in one of your houses. We could sure use the rain, though we got none last night. It is waiting for me to go out to lunch, I'll bet! Still overcast but pleasantly cool outside if you don't have to work hard. Otherwise it is very humid and one gets damp in short order from exertion. That is rare for me. In Hawaii, it just evaporates. California is the same.

Watching your weather on the portal page weather link John so kindly and expertly set up. You are there, too!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 551 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Jul 18, 2002 (21:31) * 1 lines 
 
didn't houston just get some major rain too?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 552 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 18, 2002 (23:57) * 1 lines 
 
San Antonio did ! When I was through Dallas it looked VERY dry. I hope it moderates soon. Too much rain is a serious problem, anywhere! But, especiallyh in the location of central Texas where it is usually so hot and dry. Feast or famine just like the rest of the world with the odd weather happening. Send some east, Terry. We can use it in Louisville!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 553 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Sat, Jul 20, 2002 (08:50) * 2 lines 
 
We need some rain here too. Karachi seems to be on the verge of having
extreme water shortage problem.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 554 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 20, 2002 (11:12) * 1 lines 
 
Texas is a BIG state, but it surely has more than its share of the rain lately.I will get out my ethnographic material and summon up a Native American rain dance. It might not work, but it also could not hurt !


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 555 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Sat, Jul 20, 2002 (19:09) * 1 lines 
 
Perhaps if we invite Gene Kelly to the rain dance, it might work. "laugh"


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 556 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 20, 2002 (20:13) * 5 lines 
 
Oh Sikander, you are brilliant! If I could sing and dance as well as GeneKelly did in Singin' in the Rain we would have deluges wherever I go. Alas I do not. In Hawaii, where rain is abundant, they have an old Hawaiian tradition that rain is a blessing, and if you pick certain flowers it will rain. Ithink it just rains as a part of the climate and atmspheric flow patterns.

But,Like all mythology, they have a reason for each phenomenon they cannot explain. Back when these superstitions were created, there was MUCH we did not understand! Are we so different today? Have you knocked on wood lately?

It was fantastic talking to you in my evening yesterday, Sikander, and John, welcome back to my monitor. I have missed talking less formally and getting to know how the world is treating you all.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 557 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Jul 22, 2002 (05:39) * 11 lines 
 
Over Evripos channel, at the centre of the city Halkis.



I was there the past Thursday and Friday. I saw the amazing strong tidal phenomenon under this bridge. It is as a river inside the sea.

Many legends exist, trying to justify the almost unique tide phenomenon. Some researchers stayed on the illusion of explaining it while some others, unable to explain it, stayed admiring its magnificence. The water-flow in Evripos channel is changing direction about every 6 hours, a rare physical phenomenon, triggering the imagination and the curiosity of humans since the prehistoric times, searching for mythological, astronomical, physical and philosophical explanations. The place where the old bridge is built, is the narrowest point of the channel, and the water current can reach the speed of 15km (9 miles) per hour! It is really interesting to watch the reversion of flow direction that happens about every 6 hours. The exact time of reversion is determined by the position of the moon.

http://www.virtualtourist.com/m/.142118/1129/?s=H

John


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 558 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Jul 22, 2002 (05:41) * 9 lines 
 
I was here during my weekend with an old good friend. It is at the east Mt Pelion.



More photos here:
http://www.pilion.net/papanero/pne-pict.htm

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 559 of 1049: Sikander Zawawi  (TheMaharaja) * Mon, Jul 22, 2002 (09:32) * 5 lines 
 
Be they legends or traditional beliefs or superstition in scientific
terms, I find them to be romantic. So Marcia, whether it rains or not after
picking that special flower, I would look towards heaven, close my eyes and imagine that drops of rain were falling on my face; I love traditions. The
same goes for legends John. By the way John I saw all the pictures.
Papa-Nero beach looks a beautiful place for spending the week-end. Lucky you.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 560 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jul 22, 2002 (16:55) * 3 lines 
 
John, Hawaii's beaches hide in shame compared to the spendors of Greece's lovely silicate beaches. This truly is beautiful. AND, If I had all the time in the world and access to the necessary resources, I could happily spend the restof my life hunting down the scientific reason behind myth and folklore of phenomena found on earth. I also find traditions wonderfully imaginative and containing much truth as they understood it at the time. Skiander, perhaps we might post what is traditional explainations in Pakistan...?! I suspect GeoMysteries might be a good place to begin.

Beautful Pictures. I will try to find a saiche or tidal bore on another river or yours depending on the availability. I have also witnessed this and it amazingly powerful. The entire Bay of Fundy in Maine is involved in one of the world's strongest. More as I find it.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 561 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Jul 23, 2002 (17:56) * 1 lines 
 
I think that there is also a river mouth in northern China which is subject to something similar. The highest tides in the world have reportedly been measured in the Bay of Fundy.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 562 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Jul 24, 2002 (04:21) * 9 lines 
 
Hi all,
Hawaii is the place where Earth gives birth to a new baby... land. Do you know any new-born infant that is beautiful?
From the other hand, Hawaii can show to human eyes, how is paradise and hell simultaneously!
The hell of fire in your volcanoes has also its unique beauty.

My poor opinion is that a place can be part of paradise or hell, depending on our company. Hell can be paradise if we have the appropriate company.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 563 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Jul 24, 2002 (04:37) * 24 lines 
 
Hi Cheryl and all,
You have right. Here is additional information about the highest tides on Earth.

The Highest Tides on Earth occur in the Minas Basin!!

The tides on Earth are strongly influenced, in addition to astronomical factors, by the sizes, boundaries, and depths of ocean basins and inlets, and by Earth's rotation, winds, and barometric pressure fluctuations. Tides typically have ranges (vertica high-to-low) of a metre or two, but there are regions in the oceans where various influences conspire to produce virtually no tides at all, and others where the tides are greatly amplified. Among the latter regions are the Sea of Okhotsk, the northern coast of Australia, the English channel, and in Canada at the Ungava Bay in northern Quebec and the Bay of Fundy between New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The tidal ranges in these regions are of the order of 10 metres.



The highest tides on Earth occur in the Minas Basin, the eastern extremity of the Bay of Fundy, where the average tide range is 12 metres and can reach 16 metres when the various factors affecting the tides are in phase (although the highest tides occur typically a day or two after the astronomical influences reach their peak).

The primary cause of the immense tides of Fundy is a resonance of the Bay of Fundy-Gulf of Maine system. The system is effectively bounded at tis outer end by the edge of the continental shelf with its approximately 40:1 increase in depth. The system has a natural period of approximately 13 hours, which is close to the 12h25m period of the dominant lunar tide of the Atlantic Ocean.

Like a father pushing his daughter on a swing, the gentle Atlantic tidal pulse pushes the waters of the Bay of Fundy-Gulf of Maine basin at nearly the optimum frequency to cause a large to-and-fro oscillation. The grestest slosh occurs at the head (northeast end) of the system. Because Earth rotates counterclockwise in the Norhern Hemisphere, the tides are higher in Minas Basin (Wolfville-Truro area) than in Chignecto Bay (Amherst-Moncton area).

Although it is the gravitation of the Moon and Sun that raises the tides, the energy in the churning waters is extracted from the rotational energy of Earth spinning on its axis. Near Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, a tiny portion of this energy is being converted into commercial electrical energy in the only tidal power plant in the Western Hemisphere. The peak output of the Annapolis Basin generator is 20 megawatts, about 1% of Nova Scotia's electrical power capacity.

Tidal friction both lengthens the day and increases the size of the orbit of the Moon. The day is lengthening by about 1 second every 50,000 years, imperceptible on a human time scale, but of profound significance to Earth's rotation over a few billiion years. If the Sun does not first incinerate our planet, in the distant future there will come a day that is as long as the lunar month (each then equal to about 40 present days) and a more distant Moon will stand stationary in the sky, as does Earth now in theh lunar sky. But this situation will not endure, for solar tides will still be present and will cause the Moon to approach Earth once more.

More
http://www.valleyweb.com/fundytides/

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 564 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Jul 24, 2002 (18:08) * 2 lines 
 
Thanks for the detailed information on the Bay of Fundy tides, John.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 565 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 24, 2002 (20:56) * 2 lines 
 
I have only seen the lower Bay of Fundy tidal bores. That is awesome in itself.
Thank you for not only the information but also for the excellent map. I know people who have wanted to surf that wave all those miles to the inland terminus!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 566 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Jul 25, 2002 (15:03) * 20 lines 
 
Australia's first camel dairy to open

An Australian man plans to set up business milking camels.

Neil Waters will open the country's first camel dairy near Alice Springs.

Neil, who runs Camels Australia, says the milk has a similar nutritional quality to goats' milk.

He told the ABC website: "Hopefully we'll be milking half a dozen this year - and once we can sort that out we can find out how many camels it's going to take to get plenty of litres of milk.

"It'll take a while before we can actually train them up to milking - they generally don't like you playing with their teats."

Story filed: 10:37 Thursday 25th July 2002


Animal tales
Farming

orange.co.uk/today



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 567 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Thu, Jul 25, 2002 (23:33) * 28 lines 
 
THE BRAIN WORKOUT
Research shows that exercise boosts more than your butt:
It makes you smarter, too
By JUDI SHEPPARD MISSETT


The connections between physical, emotional and mental health are widely accepted, and scientific research indicates that regular exercise plays a vital role in achieving optimal health in all three areas.
Physically, exercise has a positive influence on everything from weight control to cancer and heart-disease risk. Mentally and emotionally, exercise is a natural stress reducer, self-esteem-booster and anti-depressant.

But here's a benefit that is often overlooked: Exercise stimulates mental acuity, as well.

The biological changes prompted by exercise improve our "capacity to master new, and remember old, information," says Dr. John J. Ratey, Harvard University professor of clinical psychiatry and author of "A User's Guide to the Brain." Ratey explains that "physical movements call upon many of the same neurons used for reading, writing and math" and that "physically active people reported an increase in academic abilities, memory retrieval and cognitive abilities."

Scientists once believed that people lost brain function as they aged, due to an outright loss of nerve cells. Today, research indicates that memory lapses are more likely due to a breakdown in the synapses or connections between nerves. In fact, researchers from the University of California at Irvine found that a healthy brain continues to grow new neurons indefinitely, which can actually slow the brain's aging process and even reverse existing damage. But a healthy brain is a product of a balanced lifestyle that includes proper nutrition, stress management and mental and physical exercise.

Stimulate your mind
What makes physical exercise so important? In addition to reducing stress, aerobic exercise washes the brain in fresh oxygen and increases the production of growth agents for nerve cells. Study participants at the Beckman Institute for Science and Technology at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who moved from a sedentary to active lifestyle (three 45-minute aerobic workouts per week) improved their mental performance by as much as 25% in six months.

A diet rich in antioxidants is also helpful. Reactive forms of oxygen, called free radicals, are a natural by-product of our metabolism. Free radicals break down cell membranes throughout the body and can affect cell connections in the brain. While our bodies produce antioxidants to protect and repair cells from this process, the production slows with age; hence the need for dietary assistance.
People whose diets included Vitamins C, E, B and beta-carotene scored higher on memory tests and appeared to maintain mental function better than those who did not get adequate amounts of these nutrients. Fruits and vegetables are a great source of antioxidants.

Finally, experts recommend giving your brain a mental workout as well. Word puzzles, hobbies, socializing, reading, travel (any thought-provoking activities) stimulate the brain, increasing blood flow and strengthening both brain cells and the connections between them.

The following exercise is an excellent addition to any program. It strengthens the muscles of your hips, while improving balance and challenging your posture stabilization muscles. Begin by standing tall with your feet hip-width-apart. Point your right foot out to the side, as you reach your arms out for balance. Keeping your hips level, slowly lift your right leg a few inches off the floor. Pause briefly, standing tall and balancing on your left foot before lowering your right foot back to the floor. Repeat 10 to 15 times before repeating the movements on the opposite side.

http://www.nydailynews.com/city_life/health/story/5046p-4688c.html

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 568 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 26, 2002 (10:29) * 1 lines 
 
*sigh* I hate sweating. Is there any other way to bathe the brain in Oxygen by hiking in a cool climate? It seems we have to be miserable to achieve anything. I personally find a good lively night-long discussion more stimulating than a hot run. And, plenty of sleep is also necessary.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 569 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug  2, 2002 (23:27) * 27 lines 
 
for John:

Pre-Olympic sailing event to be held this month Athens, 02/08/2002
(ANA)

An Athens 2004 pre-Olympic sailing regatta will be held from Aug. 16-23 off the
Aghios Kosmas coastal district in southeast Athens.

The event is designed to allow athletes to be familiarized with the maritime and
weather conditions at the specific sailing venue. The regatta is the first of two
sailing test events.

The first pre-Olympic regatta will be held at temporary facilities of Aghios
Kosmas, while a new Olympic Sailing Center is under construction and is
expected to be ready for a second test event in August 2003.

The Athens 2004 organizing committee (ATHOC) has promised to conduct
a series of test events based -- as closely as possible -- on a real
event environment.

Although only one test event is scheduled for each competition at each Olympic
facility, sailing is the only sport for which two pre-Olympic events have been
scheduled.

http://www.goGreece.com/news/headlines/story.html?id=7203




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 570 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Aug  3, 2002 (20:50) * 3 lines 
 
julie: not geo-related, since i know you're in the so cal area, please be on the lookout for stolen birds from local petstores (in the past week or so):

http://www.beakstreet.com/alert.htm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 571 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Aug  3, 2002 (23:25) * 1 lines 
 
Good grief, Wolfie!!! I suspect they have left the state by now just like stolen cars!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 572 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Aug  4, 2002 (09:16) * 1 lines 
 
actually, they think they're looking for a quick buck....very sad since some are babies and will need to be handfed every two hours.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 573 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Aug  4, 2002 (15:57) * 1 lines 
 
In this heat (if it is close to being as hot as here) they will not survive, I fear. Babies need special handling and temperature controls. How terribly sad.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 574 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Aug  4, 2002 (18:30) * 1 lines 
 
indeed!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 575 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Aug 12, 2002 (13:01) * 33 lines 
 
Skywatchers await celestial display


The Perseids are particularly spectacular and appear in the constellation Perseus.

Astronomers are predicting a spectacular display of shooting stars over the next few days.
Dozens of meteors are expected to shoot across the sky every hour.

The Perseids should be visible as streaks of coloured light in the night sky before dawn on Tuesday.

"Tonight we'll probably see - if we're lucky and there's a good clear sky - an increased number of shooting stars, or meteors as astronomers prefer to call them," Robin Scagell, of the Society for Popular Astronomy, told the BBC.

"It happens at this time of year each year and it's been happening like this as long as people can remember, certainly way back until around the beginning of the Christian era."

Comet trail
Meteors are streaks of light in the sky caused by small pieces of comet dust disintegrating in the Earth's atmosphere.

When comets pass close to the Sun, they begin to evaporate and leave behind a trail of gas and dust.

They are among the fastest meteors, hitting the atmosphere at 60 kilometres per second.

They occur each August when the Earth runs through the dusty debris from comet Swift-Tuttle.

How to see the Perseids:
Choose a dark location, away from city lights. Look up towards an unobstructed part of the sky. Face away from the Moon. When the Earth passes through this trail, we have a meteor shower.


Source: BBC NEWS (Monday, 12 August, 2002, 10:51 GMT 11:51 UK).

Note for Geo friends:
To find where is the constellation Perseus, you can use your local night sky map, which included in our Geo Portal pages for you.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 576 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Aug 15, 2002 (23:34) * 2 lines 
 
Did anyone get to see the Perseids? Thanks for putting it in the Portal page.
I was in the mountains of Tennessee with just about total sky availability but nothing showed up due to high cloud cover.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 577 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Aug 16, 2002 (17:54) * 1 lines 
 
alas, no. i was too tired to get up at 2AM!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 578 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug 16, 2002 (20:54) * 3 lines 
 
I did hear to amateur radio operators talking about their success. One saw "more than one hundred" during his time outdoors. I guess it was pretty good if you had the energy and skies to view it.

...Next time!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 579 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Aug 20, 2002 (23:20) * 6 lines 
 
AURORA ALERT:
Middle Latitudes should be
able to view Aurora. Go look. Radio
users should be able to work some
Aurora-mode propagation.
More at http://prop.hfradio.org/


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 580 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Aug 21, 2002 (10:01) * 13 lines 
 
Auroral Activity Extrapolated from NOAA POES


Left: North pole, Right: South pole

The above plots show the current extent and position of the auroral oval at each pole, extrapolated from measurements taken during the most recent polar pass of the NOAA POES satellite. "Center time" is the calculated time halfway through the satellite's pass over the pole.

Source: http://www.sel.noaa.gov/pmap/index.html

Note: The above images are continuously updated.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 581 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Aug 21, 2002 (17:46) * 15 lines 
 
I suspect we are all too far south except for Cosmic Mike.

Auroras over North America
http://www.spaceweather.com

As night fell across North America on Tuesday, August 20th, the
interplanetary magnetic field near Earth turned south--a condition that
favors geomagnetic activity and Northern Lights. At the time this notice
was issued (Aug. 20th at 8:30 p.m. PDT) a geomagnetic storm was in
progress with observers in New Hampshire reporting colorful auroras. Sky
watchers should remain alert for Northern Lights so long as the storm
continues (visit spaceweather.com for updates). Canada, Alaska and the
northern tier of US states (from Maine to Michigan to Washington) are
favored; the hours around local midnight are usually the best times to look.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 582 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Aug 22, 2002 (12:51) * 6 lines 
 
Hi all

must be aurora time - we had thunderstorms all last night and today...

73 de Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 583 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Aug 22, 2002 (23:57) * 1 lines 
 
That is precisely what relatives in the Northeastern US said! A sure indication of cloudy or stormy weather is a CME event!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 584 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Aug 23, 2002 (04:03) * 3 lines 
 
I think that it is not CME’s result. We have also CRAZY WEATHER in Greece. Temperature was only 17 degrees last night. I never remember such low temperatures in the August. We have strong rain every evening! But we are OK. Instead, the rest planet counts many deaths from unexpected natural disasters.

John


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 585 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Aug 23, 2002 (11:58) * 1 lines 
 
had no idea that yucky weather could indicate CME!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 586 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug 23, 2002 (21:02) * 1 lines 
 
It means if there is an aurora to be seen, and we want to see it, it rains so we can't see it.Auroras are caused by CMEs. Therefore, from a very strange set of logical thoughts comes an invalid conclusion that CMEs cause bad weather. Just like eclipses do and meteor showers. *Sigh*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 587 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Aug 24, 2002 (09:03) * 1 lines 
 
and anytime the space shuttle rips itself through our atmosphere (my dad's theory)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 588 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Aug 24, 2002 (11:21) * 1 lines 
 
Your dad is an original and independent thinker, is he not?! I had never heard that theory. Of course, On certain bad days I may be wearing blue socks. Does that mean....?? *;)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 589 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Aug 25, 2002 (18:32) * 39 lines 
 
Is NOTHING sacred anymore?

Womens' knickers could have protected kilt-wearing soldiers


Scientists experimented with women's underwear impregnated
with chemicals as protection for Scottish soldiers wearing kilts.

Newly declassified documents from the Public Record Office
show the research was carried out in 1939 amid fears that
Highland regiments could be vulnerable to mustard gas burns.

The Sunday Times reports they have traditionally worn nothing
under their kilts.

It reports experts at Porton Down in Wiltshire, the government's
chemical weapons research establishment, carried out
experiments using woollen stockings and knickers soaked in
chemicals.

They were designed to protect the soldiers from gas attacks
which inflicted serious burns during the First World War.

The documents reveal five volunteers were kitted out in long
golf stockings with extended woollen tops, tucked into ladies
"Vedonis woollen knickers impregnated with protective
chemicals dissolved in white spirit".

They were exposed to mustard gas intermittently for five days.
Although they were protected against burns, it was decided the
plans were impractical and too expensive.

The paper reports it was also accepted the soldiers would be
unlikely to agree to wear such undignified clothing.

The kilt was withdrawn as official battle dress in 1940. British
soldiers were not subjected to German chemical attacks in the
Second World War.
http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_657072.html?menu=news.scienceanddiscovery


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 590 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Aug 27, 2002 (00:22) * 38 lines 
 
Type with your eye


The eyetracker can work out where you are looking

Software which allows computer users to write without touching the keyboard has been developed by scientists at Cambridge University in the UK.
Dubbed Dasher, the text entry system could transform computing for people unable to use a normal keyboard.

Designed by David MacKay and David Ward in the University's Department of Physics, the system uses an eyetracker which can deduce where the user is looking on the screen.

Letters continuously appear on the screen, with Dasher displaying the most likely pairings or triplets of letters. It can even guess whole words.

Few spelling mistakes
Dasher's knowledge of English is cumulative so it will remember new words and has already digested some classic authors such as Jane Austen and Lewis Caroll in its attempt to help users write quickly and accurately.

"The software works like a video game in which the user steers ever deeper into an enormous library," explained Dr MacKay.

The system is faster than other eyetracking systems producing up to 25 words per minute compared to the 15 word per minute currently possible.

"Not only is this faster than any alternative writing system driven by an eyetracker, the frequency of spelling mistakes is about five times smaller and the new system is also less stressful to use," added Dr MacKay.

Its inventors stress that Dasher has not caused any eyestrain in experiments.

Useful in China
But users preferring not to rely on their eyes can also use a mouse, rollerball or touchpad.

Dasher will be developed as an open source software project, Dr MacKay said.

It is hoped that the software will be useful for handheld computers or mobile phones where there is no space for a keyboard.

It could also prove invaluable in the burgeoning markets in Japan and China.

Both languages have thousands of characters meaning they are poorly suited to conventional keyboards.

The research was published in the journal Nature.

Source: BBC NEWS



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 591 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Aug 27, 2002 (19:15) * 1 lines 
 
I hope this is more successful than the voice typing software I have used. The one I tried could not even get my name right. This eye-typing sounds very promising for the handicapped. I am most hopeful for its success.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 592 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Aug 27, 2002 (19:16) * 74 lines 
 
Meteorite' hits girl

Siobhan Cowton: "I saw it fall from above roof height"
The odds against being hit by a meteorite are
billions to one - but a teenager in North
Yorkshire may have had one land on her foot.

Siobhan Cowton, 14, was getting into the
family car outside her Northallerton home at
1030 BST on Thursday when a stone fell on
her from the sky.

Noticing it was "quite
hot", she showed it to
her father Niel.

The family now plan to
have the stone analysed
by scientists at Durham
University.

"I saw it fall from above roof height," Siobhan
told BBC News Online.

"It looked very unusual, with a bubbled surface
and tiny indentations like volcanic lava.

'Shiny'

"It was shiny on one side and looked rusty as if
it contained iron.

"I've seen shooting stars before - but nothing
like this. This does not happen very often in
Northallerton."

Mr Cowton, 45, told BBC News Online he would
take the stone to be analysed himself.

"It is not going to
leave my sight
because it is a very
rare find," he said.

"It is worth a lot to
Siobhan.

"We will have it
mounted in a glass
presentation case so
she can keep it for the
rest of her life.

"After all it is not
every day you get hit by a meteorite.

"The odds of winning the Lottery are better."

The stone could have come from Mars,
according to expert on Earth impacts Dr Benny
Peiser, of Liverpool John Moores University.

"It could be billions of years old and come from
the earliest formation of the solar system," he
told the Daily Mail newspaper.

Most meteors are between five and 60
centimetres (1.95 in and 1 ft 11.5 in) long,
according to Durham University physical
geography lecturer Dr Ben Horton.

"Sometimes they have shallow depressions and
cavities," he said.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/2218755.stm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 593 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Aug 28, 2002 (04:40) * 5 lines 
 
I'm afraid for how can learn correct language the new generations. Is it possible only with eyes?
They will lost the second way of communications!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
They have already lost the voice way because they communicate typing messages on its Cell Phones!!!!!!!!!!!!!

John


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 594 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Aug 30, 2002 (12:59) * 4 lines 
 
Okay, this is just for fun. It's a link to the Celtic Zodiac, which is based on a 13 sign lunar calendar. The signs are mostly trees, atleast all are plants; as it was originated by Druids that would make sense. I just find astrology fun in general and hope that this site being essentially a Wiccan site doesn't upset anyone.

http://www.ladytia.com/celt/zodiac.htm



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 595 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug 30, 2002 (19:04) * 1 lines 
 
I found that site long ago and lost track of it in the meanwhile. Thanks for posting it. I seem to be a Hawthorn and my planet is Vulcan As for the rest, you will have to judge that for yourselves. I find it very amusing! Thanks, Cheryl.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 596 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Aug 30, 2002 (19:07) * 1 lines 
 
and as your twin, marica, i'm a hawthorn too!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 597 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug 30, 2002 (22:01) * 1 lines 
 
Indeed, and for you it is fitting that what applies to me also applies to you. Btw, it got Geo's resident Geologist right on target!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 598 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Sep  4, 2002 (14:49) * 4 lines 
 
Hi all
Interesting zodiac site - seems I'm an Ash person!

73 de Mike


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 599 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Sep  4, 2002 (16:04) * 1 lines 
 
The site is fun to visit. I'm a Rowan.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 600 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Sep  4, 2002 (16:06) * 17 lines 
 
If you ever lived in an apartment and thought that you had irritating neighbors. Can you imagine living in this building.



Relief as the Cows Upstairs Move Out
Fri Aug 30,10:26 AM ET

ISTANBUL (Reuters) - A Turkish woman has begun selling the cows she kept in upstairs apartments in the city of Trabzon, to the relief of her neighbors.


Local alderman Osman Terzi said health and safety officials had ordered the cows to be cleared out of the first and third floors of the building in the Black Sea port city.

"I have learned that Fatma Kocaman has started selling her cows, which is a very pleasing development," the Anatolian news agency quoted him saying on Thursday. It said she had kept "a large number" of cows there.


"It's hard to believe someone would keep cows in an apartment. For years me and the locals have wondered what to do...The area has suffered a lot. Noise, smell and manure everywhere make a very ugly scene," Terzi said.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 601 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Thu, Sep  5, 2002 (02:00) * 5 lines 
 
Hi all
I am Ash Tree person according to Celtic Zodiac. Just like Mike. But I have not seeing something for our exploratory nature. It is really interesting finally.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 602 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Sep  7, 2002 (15:59) * 225 lines 
 
John and Mike are very creative and electrically adept gentlemen. How fitting they are the same sign. I find most of this just as fun, but occasionally they get come characteristic or another right on target. That is amazing. I guess we take what we want from each. In that vein I post the following totally irrelevant information:

Fishing Guide the Stars
by Kramer Wetzel
For the Week of 9/5-11/2002


Virgo: You can't really see it, but I'm sure you can feel it. Mars lines up
with the Sun during the next few days. This is akin to taking a stock truck,
and adding all the things under the hood that matter. Once you get all that
extra stuff crammed onto the motor, the truck moves pretty fast. The thing
is, you can't see all the modifications. We used to call these street
"sleepers" because you never knew it was a highly modified vehicle until you
got stuck eating its dust. Likewise, you can't see Mars right next to the
Sun, but take my word for it, he's there, and trust me on this one, he's
adding a lot of fuel to that Virgo fire engine. You can brag about this, you
can take credit, make boastful claims, or, you can do this the right way:
let them eat your Virgo dust. It's that simple. Instead of telling us what
you can do, just put your foot into it. Show us what you can do.

Libra: This is the week I lose popularity with Libra fans. Maybe not all,
but most them will have unkind thoughts and words directed towards me. The
deal is, there's great stuff stirring for other signs right now. But like
most of my "brushes with fame," all this great stuff hits at some time when
the focus is directed towards other people. Most of my fine, Libra friends
understand how this works. What makes me unpopular is the concept that this
means someone else gets the attention. That's a big problem. It's the big
time right before your special birthday, and you feel like I'm directing
everyone's attention away from you. It's not me, but you get the idea. We're
all right around the corner from what should be a really good Libra Birthday
blast, and all I can suggest is it's a time to let other people have the
spotlight. Matter of fact, you're going to feel like your timing is off,
your mouth doesn't quite say what you want it to say, and nothing seems to
work quite the way you want it to. As long as nothing is going the way you
want it to, why not relax about this issue. You and I both know that your
birthday party month is around the corner. Look a little further down the
road than just this week, and you can see where it will be good, all good.
Let someone else enjoy the limelight now -- your turn is coming.

Scorpio: Within the confines of the great state of Texas, it's finally
starting to cool off some. Welcome relief, if you ask me. With the somewhat
cooler temperatures, there's a little itch that you get under your Scorpio
skin. I'm all for scratching that itch. I'm all for you doing just what it
is that you want to do. Skip the bad news. Skip listening to "prophet of
doom" astrologers. Miss Venus is going to be creeping into your sign -- this
is a good thing. Now, Miss Venus is a little self-indulgent at times.
Imagine that, a Scorpio who might want to indulge herself [himself, itself,
whatever]? Instead of fighting that urge, and instead of me telling you to
stick to business, stick to work, stick to important stuff, I'd suggest by
this time next week, you should be having yourself a high time. You know, go
ahead and have some fun. Don't complain to me if no one around you wants to
play. If a certain party doesn't want to be included in your party plans,
then move on to the next one. It's really that simple. I call a situation
like this a numbers a game, because you might have to make several calls
before you find a willing participant or two, but keep calling. I'd estimate
your averages are better than anyone else's about now. Just because some
folks are a little down, that doesn't mean you should be, too.

Sagittarius: Depression is a ticklish subject. Different people deal with
depression in different ways. Some folks require loads of medication,
therapists, and toys to massage the ego. Other folks, like me, just do a
little shopping. Nothing like acquiring some new music, or a new book, to
help ease the pain. While spending money is also lots of fun, it might not
be the best time for such an activity this coming weekend. The feeling of
depression, though, there's a good chance that it occurs. Get over it. Move
your body. Change your location. That might not really solve the problem,
that might not address the core issue, but it does make you feel a little
better at the moment. As soon as next week gets here, you're feeling about
100% better. You have a little edge to you, though, and you can thank Mr.
Mars for that. He's in Virgo, and as such, he creates a tension angle to our
sign. Activity is good. Anything that gets you on your feet, out the door,
and moving along is what works for you. I would suggest that you use a
little more caution when moving about. With this Mars tension, I'm usually
tempted to try to do too much. While too much of a good thing is always
appealing to a Sagittarius, this next few days, too much might not be in our
best interest.

Capricorn: I'm fortunate because most of the residents of Shady Acres
Trailer Park don't really believe in astrology too much. I don't get called
upon by my neighbors to do readings. One place I lived, I had a neighbor who
would not hesitate to knock on my door at 3 in the morning, "Hey, I thought
I saw your light on, can you just look at my chart real quick like? I just
met this guy tonight...." Such interruptions aren't always bad, but on that
one occasion when I was "entertaining" a particular female, the neighbor's
intrusion didn't go over too well. [And people wonder why I now live like a
monk!] With an exception of one, untimely, interruption, you've got what is
basically a good couple of days coming along. There's one problem, though,
and I'm not sure that you're going to be quite prepared for it. It's like
that neighbor knocking -- at the most inopportune moment. You're like me,
suddenly you have two females, one who gives you money, the other, the one
you spend that money on, and one of the two is glaring at the other one.
Confused? You should see what it looks like from my very innocent point of
view. Usually, you -- and I -- can talk our way out such situations.
Usually. Except for this one instantaneous of apparently bad timing, though,
things are pretty good. Good luck explaining.

Aquarius: There's a unique kind of influence that just hit you. The deal is
this coming weekend is great time to put some plans into action, put some
ideas into action, get ready to launch some new project. Here's the hot tip:
it's not something that you do alone. As soon as I suggest an activity along
those lines, though, there's a great host of my fine Aquarius friends who
all assume that this means it's a time for "relationship stuff." I was
really looking for something out-of-the-ordinary, though, something more
along the lines of a career type of project. Sure, there's plenty of time
for that romantic stuff, if you so desire. But I'd really like to get your
attention more directed towards a career goal. This might -- or might not --
have something to do with your job. Career, in this definition, is what you
like to do, what you called to do, and what you do because you want to.
Doesn't necessarily mean it's your job. Might be. Or might be some big deal
you've been meaning to attack. Try getting up early this coming weekend, and
get after this little project.

Pisces: It's only happened once or twice, but my mistakes -- which are
usually good fodder for self-deprecating jokes -- come to mind under this
astrological influence in your chart. I carefully wrote down a time when I
was supposed to meet a client. Then, I bumped the time ahead by half an hour
so I could get there a little early. Forgetting that I had advanced the time
I wrote down, I bounced ahead another half hour, so I was set to exactly one
hour early for an appointment. Now, on that fateful day, I took one look at
the appointments for the afternoon, and I figured I needed an extra half
hour to get there, and an extra half hour to grab a quick bite, so suddenly
I was now three hours early. I can't say for all local newspapers, but our
local version really doesn't include a whole three hours of material in it.
Starting to get the picture? I was way ahead of schedule. I was as close as
it gets to being bored. While I enjoy chatting up that one Gemini waitress,
seeing as how I was going to be there for more than three hours, I started
to wear out my welcome. With Mars in his relative position, you're going
want to check your schedules a little closer than I do. And with the Sun
over in Virgo, too, you're going to find that folks don't seem to be running
on the same timetable that you're on. Plan accordingly.

Aries: I was off on one of my rambling jaunts around town the other
afternoon. It's too much trouble to gas up the truck, and the walk is
restful in an athletic way. Besides, where I set out for, whatever the
destination might be, the route can always change where I go. I tend to
meander in and around several of the neighborhoods, just trying to work it
all in. This sort of synergistic way of dealing with life is not always a
good model for Aries. Pick a single direction, unlike me, and follow it.
Now, on that one afternoon last week, I slipped my phone into my pocket as I
didn't want to be out of touch. Not wearing my normal shorts, but some fancy
"dress slacks" shorts instead, I encountered a problem I didn't know about.
The way the pockets are cut, the phone rubs my leg, and it dials itself some
of the numbers on speed dial setup. So my phone started talking to, in no
particular order, a red headed Capricorn, Ma Wetzel, and some girl in El
Paso. Not too mention that one Virgo, as well. When I finally corrected the
errant phone's behavior, it was too late. I had a voice mail box full of
messages from my buddies (and Ma Wetzel.) Check the details. Make sure your
phone [or other communication equipment] doesn't start randomly dialing
folks up, just so they can hear you walking along.

Taurus: Something is hurrying you along. It's like a pressure I get behind
my eyes some times. "I know there's fish out there, and I can feel they want
to bite me," I sense. Lovely sense. Too bad it's not always the case. I seem
to spend a greater portion of the previous month [August], out at the lake,
catching little, if anything. This just goes to show that I understand that
feeling you've got, it's about the same thing. Now, before you get too
upset, let me explain further -- the feeling is that there is something
"pending," something is "about to happen," and I'm agreeing with you about
this. For a change, I'd also suggest that your sense of this impending
action is 100% accurate. Your timing might be a little off, but it's going
to start this weekend, then carry itself forward into next week. You'll be
surprised, this could be something very big. [That's "very big" in a good
way.]

Gemini: Topwater action is supposed to be picking up by now. One of the
lakes I really like has several creek bottom coves, and there will be a
stretch of shallow water, a "shelf", covered with various forms of aquatic
weeds. Dragging the right lure right across the top of the weeds has a
remarkable effect, Them big, old bass rise right up, then it's a mighty
fight to the finish. The real trick in this situation is to find that
"right" lure. What's going to work best to get the thing you want [big bass]
to take your hook [lure]? The 30 seconds or so or action, while you reel
that monster fish in, that's the fun part. It's the getting ready part that
is so important. My personal favorite is a type of lure with a few ball
bearings in it. These little orbs of metal rattle around and create a sonic
disturbance. It's more like altering the fish that a target is passing right
over their fish heads. Usually works quite well. Now, with the beginning of
a new lunar cycle, you need to make a little noise, a little extra Gemini
noise, like those ball bearing, and you can attract a little extra attention
to whatever it is that you want to attract attention to. This can be a deal
you're working on. This can be a mate you're trying to land. Could be any
combination of these elements. A little "kicking topwater action" is all but
assured -- provided you make the right noise to attract what you want to
attract.

Cancer: Two things are happening. One, you're a lot more vocal by now. Two,
despite your golden voice, you're less inclined to able to sway us to your
point of view. As an addendum to that last thought, even if you're right,
you're still having trouble convincing us to see it from where you stand. In
fact, it doesn't matter how smooth and silky you deliver that message, and
it doesn't matter how right you are, the message itself is not getting
through. Content versus medium, an old debate from the last few years,
that's for sure. Instead of worrying about the content, why not just
concentrate on the delivery mechanism? As long as no one is really listening
to what you're saying, just how you're saying it, why not work on the
delivery method? Stretch that vocabulary, find some new words. Grab a
dictionary or use that built-in thesaurus. You can always follow one of my
useful guidelines: never use one word when three or four will do. Makes the
editor a little cranky, but the words flow in such a melodic way that the
effect is like poetry. Pretty little poesy is your strength, use it.

Leo: Put the plastic away. I forget the details, but I think it's something
like consumer debt has never been at a higher point than right now. I could
be wrong, and I don't trust all the statistics I read on the web. Or in
newspapers, for that matter. But don't add to this consumer debt number, not
at this point. You've got a good bit luck, a long streak you've been
promised, but the way to take advantage of this good luck is by not spending
one, thin Leo dime. Unless, of course, it's to get a reading from me. But
even then, opt for the cheaper route, not the deluxe edition, not right now.
You and I both know that you deserve the deluxe treatment. I'm just
suggesting that right now isn't the best time for you to purchase this
deluxe treatment for yourself. So whether it's a report or reading from me,
or if this is something else, you might want to think twice before you pony
up that credit card number. Go a little easy on the spending. Make sure it's
something you need instead of something you just want. A little delay in the
gratification department goes a long way to saving you from some unwise
decisions.

(c) 2001, 2002 Kramer Wetzel for astrofish.net

--
Kramer Wetzel

http://www.astrofish.net



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 603 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Sep  7, 2002 (16:11) * 89 lines 
 
For something completely irrelevant:


Chinese Love Zodiac

Love horoscopes zodiac signs by TraiStar™ presents the following characteristics of each Chinese zodiac love sign.

Dragon

Dragon, like Aries, are independent, enthusiastic about their lover, and fall in love fast.
They are the most domineering of all Chinese zodiac signs, and easily get hot-headed
and quick-tempered when angry. They are most compatible with Rat and Monkey.

Snake

Snake, like Taurus, are physical, sensuous and attracted to beauty. They are also
materialistic and seek their comforts, and get very jealous. They are most compatible
with Ox and Rooster.

Horse

Horse, like Gemini, are youthful, intellectual and charming. They are also impatient and
reckless at times. They have many love interests and find it difficult to commit to one.
They are most compatible with Tiger and Dog.

Sheep

Sheep, like Cancer, are nurturing, sensitive, shy and dependent on their relationship.
When angry, they sometimes sulk rather than confront their partner. They are seeking
the security of home and family. In love, they often are the clingy types. They are most
compatible with Rabbit and Pig.

Monkey

Monkey, like Leo, are entertaining, persuasive and creative. They can also be
mischievous and promiscuous. As lovers they are very playful and passionate. In a
committed relationship, they are loyal and steadfast. They are most compatible with Rat
and Dragon.

Rooster

Rooster, like Virgo, are seekers of perfection in their relationships. They are
industrious, protective and can also be blunt, critical and rude if they don't like
something or someone. As lovers they are discreet, and do not easily reveal their
feelings. They are most compatible with Snake and Ox.

Dog

Dog, like Libra, are caring, unselfish, and make a terrific companion. They are also
fearful of change, do not easily make decisions, and take a long time to heal when hurt.
They demand honesty and equality in their relationship. They are willing to stay by their
partner through thick and thin. They are most compatible with Horse and Tiger.

Pig

Pig, like Scorpio, are diligent, unpretentious and can also be pigheaded and gullible.
They are the sign of good fortune and are generous in their love. They have strong
libidos and demand that their partners satisfy their desires and needs. They are
passionate, and can make great partners with the promise of commitment and
companionship. They are most compatible with Rabbit and Sheep.

Rat

Rat, like Sagittarius, are charismatic, charming, popular and seek companionship. They
are explorers and like to stay active and are definitely not the homebody type. In love
they can be flirtatious, fall in love quickly, but settle down once they find the right partner.
They are most compatible with Dragon and Monkey.

Ox

Ox, like Capricorn, are steadfast, reliable, and sometimes bossy. They are self reliant,
narrow minded and stick to what they know. They are not partiers, but can be intimate in
private. They fall in love slowly, yet remain loyal partners for those who provide them a
steady secure relationship. They are most compatible with Snake and Rooster.

Tiger

Tiger, like Aquarius, are optimistic. They can also be impatient and unconventional,
seeking newer pastures. In love, they are strong and passionate, and can be dominant.
They need a partner who can thrive with excitement everyday. They are most
compatible with Horse and Dog.

Rabbit

Rabbit, like Pisces, are thoughtful, wise, compassionate and sometimes cunning. They
are quite romantic, emotional, and imaginative. They require close intimate
relationships to take them away from the hardness of daily life. They need a partner who
is loyal and can share their heart. They are most compatible with Sheep and Pig.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 604 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Sep  7, 2002 (16:12) * 1 lines 
 
Wolfie, you and I are horses. I think they are wrong about the commitment accessment, but the youthful and charming works! *;)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 605 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep  9, 2002 (19:00) * 97 lines 
 
The following makes a lot of sense to me -p especially since I was singled out in airport screening for thorough checks. I am NOT a threatening sort of person!

Subject: Politically Correct Airport Screeners



To ensure we Americans never offend anyone, particularly fanatics intent
on killing us, airport screeners will not be allowed to profile people.

They will continue random searches of 80 year old women, little kids,
airline pilots with proper identification, Secret Service Agents, who are
members of the President's security detail, 85 year old Congressmen with
metal hips and Medal of Honor Winners.

Please pause for a moment and take the following test:

In 1972, at the Munich Olympics, athletes were kidnapped and massacred
by:
(a) Olga Kobut
(b) Sitting Bull
(c) Arnold Schwartzenegger
(d) Muslim males between the ages of 17 & 40

In 1979, the US embassy in Iran was taken over by:
(a) Lost Norwegians
(b) Elvis
(c) A tour bus full of 80 year old women
(d) Muslim males between the ages of 17 & 40

During the 1980s, a number of Americans were kidnapped in Lebabnon by:
(a) Bart Simpson
(b) The King of Sweden
(c) The Boy Scouts
(d) Muslim Males between the ages of 17 & 40

In 1983, the US Marine barracks in Beirut was blown up by
(a) A pizza delivery boy
(b) Pee Wee Herman
(c) Geraldo Rivera
(d) Muslim males between the ages of 17 & 40

In 1985, the cruise ship Achille Lauro was hijacked and a 70 year old
American passenger was murdered and thrown overboard by:
(a) The Smurfs
(b) Pamela Lee Anderson
(c) The Little Mermaid
(d) Muslim males between the ages of 17 & 40

In 1985, TWA flight 847 was hijacked in Athens, and a US Navy diver was
murdered by:
(a) Captain Kidd
(b) Charles Lindberg
(c) Mother Teresa
(d) Muslim Males between the ages of 17 & 40

In 1988, Pan Am Flight 103 was bombed by:
(a) Scooby Doo
(b) The Tooth Fairy
(c) Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid
(d) Muslim males between the ages of 17 & 40

In 1993, the World Trade Center was bombed by:
(a) The Backstreet Boys
(b) Grandma Moses
(c) Dr. Pepper
(d) Muslim Males between the ages of 17 & 40

In 1988, the US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania were bombed by:
(a) Mr. Rodgers
(b) The Muppets
(c) The World Wrestling Federation
(d) Muslim males between the ages of 17 & 40

On 9/11/01, four airliners were hijacked and crashed into the World
Center, the Pentagon and an open field in Shanksville, PA, wherein
thousands of people were killed by:
(a) Wile E. Coyote

(b) The Supreme Court of Florida
(c) Mr. Bean
(d) Muslim males between the ages of 17 & 40

In 2002, the United States fought a war in Afghanistan against:
(a) Enron
(b) The Lutheran Church
(c) The NFL
(d) Muslim males between the ages of 17 & 40

In 2002, reporter Daniel Pearl was kidnapped and murdered by:
(a) Bonnie and Clyde
(b) Captain Kangaroo
(c) Billy Graham
(d) Muslim Males between the ages of 17 & 40

NOPE, NO PATTERN HERE!!!!!!!! AND, IF YOU THINK YOU FOUND
ONE, FORGET IT! IT WOULDN'T BE POLITICALLY CORRECT AND
COULD POSSIBLY OFFEND SOMEONE....


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 606 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 10, 2002 (19:09) * 24 lines 
 
For September 11th... it is nice to know we are not alone;

MEMORIAL FOR THE 9/11 VICTIMS IN THESSALONIKI

A memorial service for the victims of the 9/11 terrorist strike was held today at
the US Consul of Thessaloniki.

In his short speech after the service, the Minister of Macedonia-Thrace, Giorgos
Paschalidis, noted that Greece shares the pain of the American people and
characteized security as a basic human right.

The Mayor of Thessaloniki, Vassilis Papageorgopoulos, testified the grief of
Thessaloniki citizens and stressed that the souls of the victims send out a
message to rebuild a safe global society, while he expressed his opinion that the
war against terror has started bearing results.

US Consul General in Thessaloniki John Coenig thanked all Greeks for their
solidarity to the US, which he assured them America will never forget. Mr. Coenig
ended by saying that "together we can make the world a safer place".

The ceremony was attended and given a human dimension by Greek American
fireman from NY, Peter Critsimilios, who stated that New York firemen will
continue to go through the debris until everyone lost is brought home.
http://www.goGreece.com/news/headlines/story.html?id=8046


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 607 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 10, 2002 (20:57) * 33 lines 
 
Homeland Security Threat Level has
been rasied to HIGH ALERT (Orange) from Yellow.

The announcement is official
this afternoon Sep 10, 2002 from news conference
help by Attorney General John Ashcroft.

EXPLANATION of Orange Shown Below

Detailed information on the NEW
Homeland Security Coded Advisory System
codes and explanation can be found at
http://www.emergencyemail.org/homeland
A printable version is also available for posting.

Please forward this information to those you think
may benefit and for e-mail and wireless signup.

THE EMERGENCY EMAIL NETWORK, INC.
http://www.emergencyemail.org/

..................................................................

ORANGE THREAT EXPLANATION

High risk of terrorist attacks.
In addition to the previously outlined Protective Measures, the following
may be applied:

Coordinating necessary security efforts with armed forces or law
enforcement agencies;
Taking additional precaution at public events;
Preparing to work at an alternate site or with a
dispersed workforce; and Restricting access to essential personnel only.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 608 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 10, 2002 (20:58) * 1 lines 
 
I know people who will not go to work in major metropolitan cities tomorrow! I plan to fly next week. I hope they have it sorted out by then.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 609 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Sep 11, 2002 (11:42) * 1 lines 
 
This should not beed to be said, but from listening to a lot oc opionions lately, it needs to be reiterated. That airline security file I posted should have read RADICAL Muslim msn. To accuse all Muslims of being radical is unthinkable. Sikander grieves with all peace-loving people and I am concerned for his well-being. He has not checked in lately.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 610 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Sep 15, 2002 (16:05) * 1 lines 
 
I fly eastward tomorrow. Wish me luck.I'll let you know how my airport ordeal was. I feel like a veteran and it does not bother me to be searched.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 611 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Sep 23, 2002 (11:06) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Autumnal Equinox! Except for Rob and Anne, to whom I should wish a Happy Vernal Equinox! Has anybody tried to balance an egg on its end today?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 612 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Sep 23, 2002 (19:30) * 1 lines 
 
is it too late?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 613 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Sep 23, 2002 (19:33) * 1 lines 
 
(ok, i tried it and mine rolled all over the place)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 614 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Sep 24, 2002 (05:19) * 5 lines 
 
Hi all,
Oh I missed the Autumnal Equinox! We are travelling closer to the Sun with increasing velocity. What is this story about balancing an egg?

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 615 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Sep 24, 2002 (09:29) * 3 lines 
 
John, the story about the egg is that on two days out of the year, the Vernal Equinox and the Autumnal Equinox, an egg can be balanced on it's end and remain that way for some time. The exact reasons for this have to do with the positioning of the Earth on its axis on those two particular days.

A TV station in Pittsburgh balanced an egg during the weather segment of the morning news and when I caught the evening news; the egg was still balanced.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 616 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Sep 25, 2002 (04:24) * 12 lines 
 
Hi Cheryl, Wolfie, and all,
Thank you Cheryl for the information about the egg balancing. I had not heard about it before. But I feel that something is not in the correct position. Are you sure that this is possible during equinoxes and not any other time?

I am naturally "doubting Thomas". I must always understand and explain the WHY!

I have also some knowledge of astronomy as amateur astronomer. I searched the eventuality if it can be true this story. I found that there is no any astronomical reason why you should be able to balance raw eggs on the equinoxes as opposed to any other day.

In fact, you can balance a raw egg on end on any day, if you are lucky or enough patient in order to try! You will have success finally. I subscribe it.

The story of the balancing eggs must be a myth that came from the past.

John


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 617 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Sep 25, 2002 (06:20) * 1 lines 
 
I had never heard of the egg, either. Unhappily I did not have any eggs in the house so I could not try balancing it. John's right about the raw egg. So is the fact that a cooked egg will spin very nicely, but a raw one will just sit there due to the fluid inside which has more drag.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 618 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Sep 25, 2002 (17:59) * 3 lines 
 
i've heard the egg balancing story before but i can't get it to work.

marcia, any idea why we've lost the graphics in here?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 619 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Sep 27, 2002 (19:33) * 3 lines 
 
Only that Terry has been doing massive restructuring of Spring. You will also note that John has been unable to update his seismic graphs or is doing so from his website research because we cannot FTP either.

*sigh*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 620 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Oct  7, 2002 (15:33) * 8 lines 
 
Hi Marci

Still alive but been tied up with work annoyances for the past couple
of weeks - anyway, hope to be more frequent.

73 de AA9IL
Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 621 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Oct  7, 2002 (15:41) * 1 lines 
 
Darn those annoyances!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 622 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct  8, 2002 (17:37) * 5 lines 
 
*sigh* Yup, annoyances happen on the road to improvement. I think they call it character-building. Annoyances fits better, though. Glad to have you check in from time to time. I'll bet you are having colder weather, too.

Now, if only Sikander would check in. I worry about him!

Are these little squares yours, too, Terry???


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 623 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Oct  8, 2002 (17:46) * 1 lines 
 
Little squares?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 624 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct  9, 2002 (18:46) * 1 lines 
 
For a while yesterday everything on Geo had little programming squares between each letter of each word of titles and all things except for posted text. Very strange! I should have photograhped it for you with a screen capture.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 625 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Oct  9, 2002 (21:20) * 1 lines 
 
still can't see any pics though....


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 626 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Oct 10, 2002 (05:10) * 1 lines 
 
Maybe it's a permissions problem, I'll look in to it.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 627 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct 10, 2002 (17:12) * 3 lines 
 
Most items are restored except for the graphics which make up the title on the index page. I am delighted John's graphics are restored to the portal page.

I suspect the permission is disabled or generic and can't find Geo's graphics.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 628 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Oct 10, 2002 (20:01) * 2 lines 
 
I need more details! Email me exact info as soon as you notice it, let me know exactly what you were trying to do, what username/pwd etc. you were using and exactly which directory/file you were updating.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 629 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct 13, 2002 (19:37) * 5 lines 
 
John!!! I need to talk to you. I'm not sure where you have your files but they are in Geo. I'll email you, Terry. I did manage to make an ersatz title while we untangle this graphics difficulty with John's work

Test...




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 630 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct 13, 2002 (19:54) * 5 lines 
 
Ok, that works! Now what is wrong with the title page of Geo...

test...




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 631 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct 13, 2002 (19:55) * 1 lines 
 
Aha! http://www.spring.net/geo/JohnVolos/Public is not visible on the internet AND CANNOT BE SEEN TO FUNCTION AS A PART OF GEO!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 632 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Oct 14, 2002 (10:50) * 1 lines 
 
I'll take a look right away.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 633 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Oct 14, 2002 (14:12) * 1 lines 
 
terry-please fix topic 34 (space science news) it keeps showing up and there's nothing to see. once i take a look see, the topic still shows up as unread!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 634 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Oct 14, 2002 (14:24) * 1 lines 
 
ok will fix


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 635 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Oct 14, 2002 (14:46) * 60 lines 
 
Things work well now for both John and for me asregardsGeo. Thank you VERY much, Terry!!!

My son sent this to me.... not comforting!

Thursday, October 10, 2002
Pentagon admits troops unaware of chemical tests
Thousands of Hawaii civilians also did not know they were being sprayed with bacteria


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

By Matt Kelley Associated Press

WASHINGTON: The Pentagon acknowledged yesterday that some soldiers engaged in chemical and biological weapons testing in the 1960s may not have been
fully informed about the
secret experiments conducted at sea and in five states from Hawaii to Florida. Some tests used the military's deadliest nerve agent, VX.

Thousands of civilians in Hawaii and Alaska also probably were unaware they were sprayed with relatively mild bacteria meant to simulate germ weapons
such as anthrax, the Defense
Department's top health official said.

Dr. William Winkenwerder, assistant defense secretary for health affairs, said there is no evidence anyone died as a result of the classified tests,
which were part of biological
and chemical warfare programs the United States abandoned in 1970.

Four people at the military's Deseret Testing Center in Utah were infected during biological weapons work, but all recovered, said Dr. Michael
Kilpatrick, another Pentagon health
official. Records do not show who the people were or what germs infected them, Kilpatrick said.

At a news conference, the Pentagon released declassified summaries of 28 of the tests, showing for the first time the scope of open-air testing of
chemical and biological agents
on American soil. About 5,500 service members participated in the tests.

"It's pretty deplorable that the DOD held this info up for so long," said Rep. Mike Thompson, D-Calif., at a House Veterans Affairs subcommittee
hearing.

The agency has commissioned a $3 million study to determine if test participants are getting sick because of their exposure.

So far, 55 veterans have filed claims with the VA blaming their health problems on their participation in chemical or biological tests.

The civilian exposures came during tests in Alaska and Hawaii that involved spraying Bacillis globigii, a bacterial relative of anthrax, from
airplanes.

At the time, BG was considered to be harmless.

Later, researchers discovered it could cause infections in people with weak immune systems.

One of the tests, called "Big Tom," involved spraying the bacteria over Oahu in May and June 1965.

Winkenwerder said there is evidence that local authorities were told of the tests, though public notification probably did not occur.

Two other tests in Hawaii, named "Pine Ridge" and "Tall Timber," used a chemical agent code-named BZ in forest preserves southwest of Hilo. BZ, a
compound of benzilic acid,
causes stupor, hallucinations and confusion. It was meant to incapacitate enemy soldiers, according to Pentagon summaries of the tests.

For example, from April through June 1966, bomblets containing BZ were ignited in the upper Waiakea Forest Preserve.

The Pine Ridge and Tall Timber tests were meant to determine how to disseminate BZ "in or below a jungle canopy," the test summaries said.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
U.S. DoD Deployment Health Support



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 636 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Oct 21, 2002 (09:54) * 13 lines 
 
Hi all

lovely news... makes me wonder if the 'flu season' is a bit more than
it is...

Anyway, still alive in backgroung mode but enjoy reading Geo posts (Hi Marci!)
Only a couple more weeks of this grad skool semester and the eventual
completion of the rebuilding of the radio room and life might return to some
form of normalcy (whatever that is....)

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 637 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Oct 24, 2002 (15:12) * 3 lines 
 
Marcia, love the "Coprolite Happens" graphic.

Mike, good luck in attaining normality, or nomalcy, or whatever. I hope you have better luck than I have lately.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 638 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Oct 25, 2002 (09:15) * 7 lines 
 
Hi Cheryl

Not sure if I could identify normality if I saw it. Constancy of the
current observed reality is probably what Im looking for.

de Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 639 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct 25, 2002 (15:49) * 3 lines 
 
Big good luck Hugs, Mike! Lesser men than you have survived grad school and lived to tell the tale. Go get 'em!

Yeah,My thoughts exactly about flu season. UGH. I thought pollution was bad on the mainland, but at least here you can see what you are breathing. Comforting news yesterday was that the "pollution season" is over. And, I forgot to celebrate!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 640 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sun, Oct 27, 2002 (12:40) * 3 lines 
 
Hi Mike. Good luck with grad school and of finding "the constancy of current of observed reality." Reality, what a concept!

Pollution season is over? I didn't realize that there was a "pollution season". Having seasonal allergies, I am aware that pollen season is over. That makes me very happy.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 641 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Oct 28, 2002 (09:10) * 8 lines 
 
Hi all

I know the mosquito season is over - the temp is now in the 30-40s with
talk of rain/snow! The squirrels are all hoarding nuts and the geese are
in mass migration so ol' winter is near.

73 de Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 642 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 29, 2002 (13:36) * 1 lines 
 
Your hostess is currently going through a very difficult time in her life. Please bear with me while I try to get my life back together.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 643 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Oct 29, 2002 (15:31) * 1 lines 
 
Understand! Take your time, we'll miss you but your sanity and health are paramount. I'm hoping things will all fall in to place for you.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 644 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 29, 2002 (15:36) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks Terry. If it does not fall into place, this will be a missed opportunity of massive proportions. I can use all the good thoughts I can get. At the moment I am merely waiting for life to resume. I may have to make it happen one way or the other.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 645 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Oct 29, 2002 (15:42) * 2 lines 
 
So you're in Kentucky now and you've wrapped things up in Hilo?



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 646 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Oct 29, 2002 (18:20) * 1 lines 
 
*HUGS*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 647 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 29, 2002 (20:38) * 1 lines 
 
*sniff* Thanks Wolfie! I need hugs !!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 648 of 1049: Mike Kana  (aa9il) * Thu, Oct 31, 2002 (09:47) * 6 lines 
 
Hi Marci

Hugs and hang in there! Crank up the scanner tonight and listen to
the Halloween shenanigans for a good laugh.

73 de Mike


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 649 of 1049: Mike Kana  (aa9il) * Thu, Oct 31, 2002 (09:59) * 4 lines 
 
Happy Samhein to All!

73 de Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 650 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Nov  7, 2002 (11:49) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Samhein to you, Mike. Still waiting to hear you on Echolink.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 651 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Nov 11, 2002 (09:13) * 7 lines 
 
Hey Terry

Been mucho busy with work foolishness but will try to log into 'link.
Also, trip to Austin is in the works so I will be on the radio for sure!

73 de Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 652 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Nov 11, 2002 (12:44) * 1 lines 
 
Sounds great, do you know what dates you'll be in town?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 653 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov 12, 2002 (15:06) * 1 lines 
 
Marcia will be returning to Hilo permanently shortly.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 654 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Nov 12, 2002 (16:13) * 3 lines 
 
Wow, good to hear from you again Marcia!

Hope things are going ok.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 655 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Nov 12, 2002 (18:32) * 1 lines 
 
*HUGS* marcia, we are all pulling for you. hang in there sweetie!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 656 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Nov 12, 2002 (18:33) * 1 lines 
 
that was supposed to be *HUGS*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 657 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Nov 13, 2002 (08:30) * 5 lines 
 
Hi Marci

Glad to hear you again! I always associate seeing your postings with Hawaii!

73 de Mike


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 658 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Nov 18, 2002 (18:31) * 30 lines 
 
Guess what is waiting for me to arrive in Hilo:
(I just wonder what kind it is!)

Intel Celeron
1.8 GHz
256 MB DDR SDRAN
64 MB Memory
80 GB Ultra DMV Hard Drive
DVD / CO-RW Combo
Mix Burn & Play
16x8x8 Max Speed
Integrated
10 / 100 Base T
LAN Interface
MX 70
17" Multi-Media Monitor
Optimized For
Digital Images
Quick Connect Internet Keyboard
Stereo Speakers
Multi-Mouse
Pre-installed Software

Lexmark X125
All-In -One
Color Scan-FAX-Copy-Phone (Hand Held)
Stereo Speakers


WOW!!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 659 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Nov 18, 2002 (18:32) * 1 lines 
 
Hi Mike! Hugs are always waiting for you! You'll get lots of stuff from Hawaii soon. Meanwhile bounce a few signals off the meteorites and let us know of your success!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 660 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Nov 18, 2002 (19:17) * 6 lines 
 
That's a great system. The only thing I would add would be a second 80 or120 gb hard drive. Since they're so cheap and your data is so valuable.


You can set up a second hard drive to instantly become your main drive with all your data intact if your primary drive crashes.

Nice, Marci!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 661 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov 19, 2002 (17:39) * 3 lines 
 
How do I link them? Just as another drive as in all peripheral hardware? What a fantastic idea. Then I can save all of Geo in a very safe place! Thanks for mentioning it, Terry.

Don is about to take receipt of a new Gateway of just about the same capability. I am looking into his getting a Minute Man MBK300 for back up. He does so much work writing manuscripts he needs something for back up when power is interrupted.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 662 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Nov 19, 2002 (18:17) * 1 lines 
 
You just add the second drive to the ide cable that connects to the motherboard and set the jumpers on the drive for 'slave' or 'cable select'. The first drive is jumpered as the master. At Frys (http://www.outpost.com) a 120 gb IBM ide hard drive, 7200 rpm is $159.00 which is not a bad investment for safeguarding your data. You might find a better deal at http://www.pricewatch.com (search for IBM 120 gb drives or high capacity drives in general). Drive crashes can happen. And a second drive is usually the cheapest backup system.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 663 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov 19, 2002 (18:40) * 1 lines 
 
Sounds great. There is a Fry's near my son's house. I can investigate that in a week or so. Thanks!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 664 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Nov 19, 2002 (19:10) * 1 lines 
 
You must be talking about the one in San Jose? Or is there one up North now?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 665 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 22, 2002 (17:43) * 1 lines 
 
There is a Fry's just west of Sacramento. I got my Iomega Zip drive there plus a bunch of other goodies a few years ago.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 666 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, Nov 22, 2002 (18:12) * 1 lines 
 
I noticed that in the Austin ad they had a 250 gb hard drive on sale. The 120 gb IBM may still be the best value though.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 667 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Nov 25, 2002 (19:36) * 3 lines 
 
Many hugs and good wishes to you, Marcia. You're going back to Hilo, to your beautiful garden. The orchids growing in your tree. I hope that all we be well for you.




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 668 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Nov 25, 2002 (19:39) * 3 lines 
 
Happy Thanksgiving to all the American posters and lurkers at Geo!

As for everyone else from all parts of the world, have a great fourth Thursday of November. Unless you're on the other side of the International Date Line from the U.S., in which case I should you a great fifth Friday of November.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 669 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Nov 26, 2002 (09:02) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Thanksgiving to you too Cheryl!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 670 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Nov 27, 2002 (19:39) * 1 lines 
 
HAPPY THANKSGIVING TO ALL MY GEO FRIENDS!!!!!!!!!!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 671 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Nov 28, 2002 (07:37) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Geo Thanksgiving Wolfie!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 672 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Nov 28, 2002 (11:39) * 2 lines 
 

Happy Thanksgiving, America!





 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 673 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Nov 28, 2002 (11:42) * 3 lines 
 
Sorry I missed Canada's on November 1st.

Thanks for the good wishes, all. Atthe moment I have offers from my sisterin New York, from son and wife in California and home. Sooner or later I am going to have to return and take care of business, as they say. Today I get dinner out with my favorite archaeologist *;)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 674 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Dec  2, 2002 (16:57) * 11 lines 
 
Happy belated Thanksgiving to all!

Back in the snowy Chicago land area. Hard to believe that
a week ago I was sitting outside at Shady Grove in Austin
enjoying the nice weather and company.

73 de AA9IL
Mike r-c-i

p.s. also going to have to post a message in radio regarding the
cool pirate FM station heard in Austin last weekend.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 675 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Dec  2, 2002 (17:40) * 2 lines 
 
It's Shady Grove weather today, I didn't catch you on the repeater this time.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 676 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Dec  2, 2002 (20:17) * 28 lines 
 
Howdy howdy

I was able to speak with George and Micky plus heard some ilink activity
(one local, the other from DL land). Anyway, have to be a bit more frequent
on ilink - especially since skool is finished for the year and I have some
free time. Guess I can rant about the pirate...
Last saturday night, was cruising around downtown around 10pm - at the
suggestion of the YL, I should see what was on the radio rather than
run through the CD collections - anyway, went to FM mode and hit scan
and heard some really grungy metal - stuff that you would never hear on
commercial FM. Listened to the banter between tunes and determined that
yes, this was NOT commercial FM. Woohoo! Anyway, while the YL did the
shopping thing at the Christmas expo at the Palmer center, I drove to a
quiet street and listened to the station for a while. Now, this was
tres phun as the selections were all types of Black/Death/Sludge Metal
- as I stated before, no commercial station save for college radio would
play this kind of stuff. This was followed up by some kewl anarchy punk
when the next show started up at 11am - this stuff was going until the
wee hours of the morning and I was most happy to hear that free radio
was back in Austin. Now, Im not a metal head - I do like early Deep Purple
Hawkwind, Uriah Heap, Nirvana, Husker Du type tunes but never got to much into
the underground death metal scene but I listened to that show at ear bleeding volumes and it was damn fun. (Right now listening to early Clash on the short
wave but thats another story...). Listen around on Saturday nights in the
downtown around 96.9 (I think) and see if they pop up again.
Fight For Free Radio!

de Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 677 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Dec  2, 2002 (20:20) * 4 lines 
 
correction - the times was 11 PM to well past 1 am for the time
just to set the record straight....

de M


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 678 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Dec  2, 2002 (21:03) * 1 lines 
 
I heard George and Bob talking about that and they mentioned they heard about it from you.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 679 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec  8, 2002 (19:29) * 3 lines 
 
Here it has been all talk about putting up more and more repeaters. The same with Kentucky Hams. Seems they are extrememly active now that cold weather has come.

Happy beautiful snow, Mike. We had 5 inches of it in Louisville and it was beautiful - and VERY cold. I had forgotten how cold!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 680 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus  (terry) * Mon, Dec  9, 2002 (06:49) * 1 lines 
 
We can't put up many more repeaters, because most of the frequencies are assigned, esp, 2 meters and 450 mhz. There's still a lot of frequencies in 1.2 ghz, 220 and 6 meters. Snow in Louisville, wow, that's a lot. Just rainy here. Heavy lightning strikes nearby last night, so I unplugged all the computers and electronics for the night. Just getting plugged back in.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 681 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Dec  9, 2002 (09:30) * 17 lines 
 
Hi all

Wow, yall had more snow than we did - the snow has been clearing but
its been very cold - 13deg F this morning. The ice fishers have been
out on the lake setting up huts since it froze over. I have been
inside planning on working on radio stuff (great indoor activity).
IL is full up on repeaters with the exception of 1.2ghz. 220 is full
of repeaters but who is on them??? The snow is nice because you can
see all the critter tracks (quite suprising the amount from the night)
Heard two hoot owls this morning - must have been out on an all night hoot!

73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i

p.s. Been listening to the latest KGSR compilation that I picked up while
in Austin - good music. I miss being in Austin....


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 682 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Dec 10, 2002 (19:01) * 2 lines 
 
Sheesh, Mike. Warmer in your refrigerator !!!
Getting the pics resized and FTP'd so you can see Looeyvill in all its pretty snow now long turned to slush. Ugh!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 683 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Dec 12, 2002 (16:43) * 7 lines 
 
Hi all

Just goofing off on the computer for a moment. Nothing dramatic
to say except howdy....

73 de Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 684 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec 12, 2002 (18:14) * 2 lines 
 
Howdy is fantastic! Happy you are around. I am decorating Geo for the season :)



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 685 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Dec 12, 2002 (18:47) * 3 lines 
 
Love the holly. Didn't the Romans decorate their homes with holly for the Saturnalia? Marcia would know.

Io Saturnalia all you classicists out there! Remember, it is coming up.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 686 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec 12, 2002 (23:09) * 1 lines 
 
This is true. Some hundreds of posts back several of us discussed all of the mid-winter celebrations and lore from our distant past. Seems we were terrified that the sun might never come back!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 687 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec 12, 2002 (23:10) * 1 lines 
 
I just wish we had our original title back so I could put better decorations up. *SIGH*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 688 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 16, 2002 (00:01) * 2 lines 
 
I am back in Hawaii. Not pleasedwith the situation and the house is a MESS!!!
Thank you for holding my hand across the pacific. I hate flying over the sea.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 689 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Dec 16, 2002 (16:52) * 11 lines 
 
Hi Marci and welcome back.
The Winter Solstice is approaching - woo hoo! Funny weather
around here - it was in the mid 40's for the past couple of
days so HAARP must be transmitting or something. Lots of
vapor contrails in the sky.
Anyway, saw a flock of migrant white swans in the lake yesterday
which was neat and listened to some very bizarre stream of conscience
radio broadcasts on shortwave last night - tis the season!

73 de Mike
AA9IL


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 690 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Dec 16, 2002 (17:42) * 3 lines 
 
Happy (Almost) Winter Solstice, Mike and everyone else! The flock of swans must have been beautiful.

Marcia, it's wonderful to hear that you had a safe trip. I hope that it wasn't too stressful. Or if it was, that you're recovering nicely. Sorry to hear that you found the house a shambles when you arrived.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 691 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 16, 2002 (21:38) * 1 lines 
 
It is so overcast and rainy here I can hardly tell day from night. Rain forests may be important to the rest of you, but don't try living in one.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 692 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Dec 20, 2002 (10:24) * 32 lines 
 
Drunk elephants kill six people

Drunken elephants have trampled at least six people to death in the northeast Indian state of Assam, local officials say.

The herd of wild elephants stumbled across the supplies of homemade rice beer after they destroyed granaries in search of food.

The incident happened near Tinsukia, 550 kilometres (344 miles) from the Assam capital, Guwahati.

"They smashed huts and plundered granaries and broke open casks to drink rice beer. The herd then went berserk killing six people," a forestry official told AFP news agency.


Police said four of those killed were children.

According to experts, elephants often emerge from Assam's forests in search of food.

But much to the annoyance of the local residents, they destroy rice fields and granaries.

Environmental questions

Growing elephant numbers and the devastation of the animal's natural habitat are partly to blame for the problem.

Officials in Assam say at least 150 people have been killed by elephants in the last two years.

The deaths have led villagers to kill up to 200 elephants.

"It has been noticed that elephants have developed a taste for rice beer and local liquor and they always look for it when they invade villages," an elephant expert in Guwahati told Reuters news agency.

The region is home to more than half of India's elephant population, estimated at 10,000.

The Assam Government's protection of elephants over the last 20 years, including a ban on their hunting, has led numbers to increase to about 5,500.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/2583891.stm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 693 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sat, Dec 21, 2002 (13:15) * 11 lines 
 
Christmas Reindeer Loses, Uh, Its Ornaments

Reuters

A star reindeer in a South African shopping mall's Christmas display lost a little of its seasonal pride and joy after complaints from shoppers. Managers at one of Cape Town's upscale malls, "castrated" the plastic animal after receiving complaints about shiny golden Christmas tree ornaments hanging between its hind legs, officials said Thursday.

Hein Conradie, a spokesman for the company which made the display, told the Cape Argus newspaper that the ornaments were "anatomically correct for an animal of that size" and were prominent because of the reindeer's central position in the display.

"Generally, we find it wiser to use sexless reindeer," Conradie said.

http://radio.weblogs.com/0106101/2002/12/16.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 694 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sun, Dec 22, 2002 (13:41) * 11 lines 
 
Time for seasonal felicitations:

Merry Christmas
Happy Hannukah
Joyous Kwanzaa
Happy Ramadan & Eid Greetings
Happy Winter Solstice (Happy Summer Solstice to Rob and Anne)
Io Saturnalia
Happy Boxing Day (to those in the UK and Canada)
and
Happy New Year


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 695 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 23, 2002 (14:49) * 4 lines 
 
You find the most enchanting things to post, Cheryl. Drunken elephants?! Wh
Who could have imagined.

I am going to pretend the holidays are not here for my own sanity.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 696 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Dec 24, 2002 (19:06) * 15 lines 
 
CHOCOLATE MATHEMATICS

Get a calculator first.
1. First of all, pick the number of times a week that you would like to have chocolate. Try
for more than once but less than 10.
2. Multiply this number by 2 (just to be bold).
3. Add 5 (for Sunday).
4. Multiply it by 50 - I'll wait while you get the calculator.
5. If you have already had your birthday this year add 1752. If you haven't, add 1751.
6. Now subtract the four-digit year that you were born. You should have a three-digit
number. The first digit of this was your original number (i.e., how many times you want
to have chocolate each week). The next two numbers are YOUR AGE! (Oh YES it
is!!!!!)

Happy Holidays from HL


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 697 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Dec 25, 2002 (10:39) * 1 lines 
 
MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 698 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Dec 25, 2002 (10:40) * 1 lines 
 
well, you guys know I meant to have that a bit bigger!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 699 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 25, 2002 (13:52) * 1 lines 
 
We knew, Wolfie! HUGS!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 700 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec 26, 2002 (21:55) * 7 lines 
 
Since this has come up before and still needs rebuttals I post it here as well as in Geo 24:

* Hoaxers vs. Rocket Scientists: Even NASA Unsure How to Counter Claims of Faked
Moon Missions

http://www.space.com/news/oberg_hoaxes_021221.html
Is that the moon or a studio in the Nevada desert? How can the flag flutter when there's no wind
on the moon? Why can't we see stars in the moon-landing pictures?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 701 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, Jan  3, 2003 (11:36) * 28 lines 
 
ported:

Topic 50 of 86: 'Et Cetera'
Resp 716 of 717: Curious Wolfie (wolf) Fri, Jan 3, 2003 (11:11) 3 lines

I spent New Year's Eve in bed sound asleep, waking only to hear my
neighbors shout and fireworks going off. Happy New Year!!

Congratulations on your retirement, John. Now you'll be able to
devote more time to your inventions and the work you were meant to
do--earthquake hunting!!

Topic 50 of 86: 'Et Cetera'
Resp 717 of 717: John Tsatsaragos (tsatsvol) Fri, Jan 3, 2003 (11:57) 9 lines

Thank you Wolfie,
Yes I will try to improve my method on EQ prediction. It is real that
I never stopped this attempt. I am in good point now. But I want
more. I must answer on every possible scientific question.

Doing flash back into the past we hitch on our mistakes. But life is
continued and we must command what we believe that appertain to each
one of us.

HAPPY NEW YEAR

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 702 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Jan  5, 2003 (06:32) * 1 lines 
 
Wolfie you have a web author account and I need to get you some information. Please mail or call me and I'll pass this to you.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 703 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Jan  5, 2003 (19:54) * 1 lines 
 
Cool beans!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 704 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jan  5, 2003 (23:36) * 1 lines 
 
Wolfie has been missed. Especially by me. Cool Beans, Indeed.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 705 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jan  6, 2003 (09:35) * 1 lines 
 
*HUGS*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 706 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Jan  6, 2003 (18:42) * 13 lines 
 
Congratulations on your retirement, John. You'll no doubt be busier than ever with your scientific work on earthquakes. The best of luck to you. I hope that you and your family had a great St. Basil's Day, if you've celebrated it yet. It falls on New Year's Day, doesn't it? Still, is it Jan. 1 on the Gregorian calendar or the Julian calendar?

According to the Julian calendar this would be Christmas Eve; so Merry Christmas to the Eastern Orthodox. I know someone from the Ukraine who is celebrating tomorrow, Jan. 7th.

Hello, Wolfie! Hope that you and the pups and alpha male had a great New Year's.

Marcia, here's hoping that 2003 is a better year for you. Have a wonderful New Year.

Terry, last and certainly not least, hope that you had the best of holiday seasons.

Happy (Belated) New Year to all!




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 707 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan  7, 2003 (01:11) * 3 lines 
 
Hugs to Cheryl. How much better this year will be for me!!!

I do worry about John. He has my lover....


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 708 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Jan  7, 2003 (01:13) * 12 lines 
 
Hi Cheryl and all
Thank you for your wishes. Yes! I plan to expand my research, as it is possible to me. I will keep the entire Geo family informed.

Eastern Orthodox Church has two groups; One that follow the old Julian calendar (they are called especially as "Old Calendar Christians") and one that follow the new calendar. The second is extreamly multitudinous in Greece. We belong in the second group. Religious sentiment is very strong in Greece.

We celebrate Christmas on 25th of December, St. Basil's Day on 1st of January, Epiphany on 6th of January, and today (7th of January) is my name day.

I wish you a PEACEFUL AND HAPPY NEW YEAR with GOOD HEALTH.
Dreams of every one will be realised.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 709 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan  7, 2003 (01:26) * 1 lines 
 
I knew January 7th was your Name Day. Somewhere on Geo I have mentioned my best wishes for your day.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 710 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jan  7, 2003 (09:45) * 1 lines 
 
what's a Name Day?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 711 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan  7, 2003 (11:58) * 1 lines 
 
In Greece, they celebrate the saint's day for whom they were named more than they do their actual birthday. John's saint's day is today, the 7th of January. I don't think there is a saint Marcia,,,


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 712 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Jan  7, 2003 (17:45) * 5 lines 
 
Marcia, you did mention that Jan. 7th is John's name day. So it would seem that John was named in honor of St. John the Baptist as his feast day for "New Calendar" Orthodox followers is Jan. 7. Which is different than for Catholics and mainline Protestants.

Since I had a Catholic upbringing, I do know that the feast day for St. John the Baptist is June 24. In France, St. John's Eve, June 23 was tradionally the day when couples became engaged to be married. Throughout much of Europe St. John was associated with the summer solstice, much as Christ, (Christmas, the mass of Christ) was associated with the winter solstice. In Northern Europe the birch tree was associated with the summer solstice and later St. John; while, particularly in Germany, the evergreen was associated with the winter solstice and later Christ.

I'm digressing. Sorry. Here's hoping that John had a wonderful name day!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 713 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan  8, 2003 (13:20) * 1 lines 
 
You are wonderful, Cheryl. Digresssion is what makes Geo so special. Thanks for the information. I was raised Episcopalian (Church of England) did not do much with saints days.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 714 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Jan 17, 2003 (14:52) * 7 lines 
 
Hi all and Happy Gnu Year!

Hope to be back soon!

73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 715 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jan 17, 2003 (19:57) * 1 lines 
 
I Hope you are not snowed under, Mike! Michigan can be brutal this time of year! Take care and return as soon as you can. We miss you!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 716 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sat, Jan 18, 2003 (05:53) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Gnu Year! Just intalled a bunch of gnu stuff here.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 717 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jan 18, 2003 (12:52) * 1 lines 
 
Oh Good! I wonder if my FTP works yet so I can put the index.htm so I can change the horizontal bars. We need gnu ones!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 718 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Jan 20, 2003 (08:25) * 3 lines 
 
What user are you trying to use ftp as? marcia or marci? Or geo?

I may need to create a geo user for you and test it. I'm having a problem right now with the easyadmin interface so I can't do anything till we've finished troubleshooting.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 719 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 21, 2003 (17:46) * 1 lines 
 
I log in as Geo as I recall.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 720 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Jan 21, 2003 (19:00) * 81 lines 
 
Sorry to turn the subject from gnu's to cats. Still, have a Happy Gnu Year, just the same. Isn't Chinese New Year almost upon us. Is the upcoming year the Year of the Horse?

Anyway, back to cats. This is from the CNN site.

Cloned Cats Aren't Necessarily Copies
By KRISTEN HAYS

COLLEGE STATION, Texas (AP) - Rainbow the cat is a typical calico with splotches of brown, tan and gold on white. Cc, her clone, has a striped gray coat over white.

Rainbow is reserved. Cc is curious and playful.


Rainbow is chunky. Cc is sleek.

Wayne Pacelle of the Humane Society might be inclined to say: I told you so. But then, so would cc's creators at Texas A&M University.

Sure, you can clone your favorite cat. But the copy will not necessarily act or even look like the original.

Cc (for carbon copy) is just over a year old. Her birth Dec. 22, 2001, was big news when it was announced last February because it was the first time a household pet had been cloned. Previous mammal clones were barnyard animals like cows and goats.

Cc's creation was funded by Genetic Savings & Clone, a company that hopes to make money from people's desires to duplicate their favorite pets. Last February, in the journal Nature, the A&M researchers published details of the project and DNA test results that showed cc was a clone.

But people who hope cloning will resurrect a pet will be disappointed, said Duane Kraemer, one of A&M's animal cloning experts.

Experts say environment is as important as genes in determining a cat's personality. And as far as appearance, having the same DNA as another calico cat doesn't always produce the same coat pattern.

``This vindicates the opposition we espoused from the beginning, that cloning does not lead to duplication,'' said Pacelle, senior vice president of the Humane Society of the United States.

``Not only does cloning not produce a physical duplicate, but it can never reproduce the behavior or personality of a cat that you want to keep around. There are millions of cats in shelters and with rescue groups that need homes, and the last thing we need is a new production strategy for cats.''

Before the birth of cc, Genetic Savings & Clone had hundreds of pet DNA samples stored at a cost of $895 for healthy animals and $1,395 for sick or dead animals.

Lou Hawthorne, Genetic Savings & Clone chief executive, has estimated that the cost to create a clone will initially be in the low five figures and later drop to the low four figures.

Though cc's arrival sparked a deluge of calls from pet owners, more research is needed to figure out how to produce consistently healthy clones before the company can start doing it commercially, said Ben Carlson, the company's spokesman.

``A year ago, we said we'd start commercial services in a year, and here we are a year later,'' Carlson said. ``It's really impossible for us to make a certain prediction as to how long it's going to take to develop the technology to get successful results.''

There is a demand from dog lovers, but scientists so far have been unable to clone a canine.

In fact, cc's creation was the result of a dog lover, not a cat lover. University of Phoenix founder John Sperling wanted a duplicate of his collie mix, Missy. With his $3.7 million, Texas A&M launched the ``Missyplicity'' project over four years ago.

Now, Missy is dead, euthanized last year because of an inoperable growth on her esophagus. Sperling has redirected his funding to the Sausalito, Calif.-based Genetic Savings & Clone, which he hopes will one day deliver a clone of Missy.

Carlson said the company tells pet owners that cloning won't resurrect their pet and that the company has turned away some customers clearly interested in getting the same animal.

``In the short term, it's easy to exploit that misperception,'' he said. ``But in the long term, it's unethical, and the pet owner will quickly find that, `Hey, this isn't Fluffy, this puppy doesn't recognize me or know all the old tricks.'''

However, he said cloning could reproduce what a pet owner considers to be exceptional genes, particularly from an animal with unknown parentage or one that has been spayed or neutered.

``A small percentage of the population know exactly what they want and they want to stick with it - another animal as similar as possible,'' Carlson said. ``That's the motive we've encountered among our clients.''

But disclaimers could go unheard by pet owners desperate to duplicate an animal, said University of Pennsylvania bioethicist Arthur Caplan, a critic of cloning and companies that purport to sell it.

He said animal lovers bond with pets because of their personalities and behaviors, not the genetic material that defines the immune system or blood type.

``The new cloned dog won't know the old tricks - you have to teach them,'' Caplan said. ``It doesn't matter how many genes they have in common.''

With the Missyplicity funding gone, Texas A&M will continue trying to break new ground in cloning farm animals, wildlife and dogs, but it is finished with cats and any commercial pet venture.

As for cc, the Texas scientists say she has shown no signs of genetic defects.

``She's been perfectly healthy and perfectly a cat ever since her birth,'' Kraemer said. ``That's true of all our clones. You'd have to be told they were cloned in order to know'' they weren't conceived the natural way.

Even so, cc has been protected by a sterile environment, a precaution to make sure she is healthy; visitors are not allowed to pet her.

That will change gradually when she moves into her new home with Kraemer and his wife, Shirley. The Kraemers will introduce her slowly, first exposing her to people who have cats before letting her cavort with their other two felines.

In time, they plan to breed cc and let her produce some carbon copies of her own. But they are looking for just the right tom.

``Our geneticists haven't gotten back with that information,'' Kraemer said.

On the Net:

Texas A&M University's cat cloning announcement:

http://www.tamu.edu/aggiedaily/press/020214cat-pics.html

Genetic Savings & Clone: http://www.savingsandclone.com/

Missyplicity Project: http://www.missyplicity.com


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 721 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 21, 2003 (20:45) * 1 lines 
 
Identical twins are not even clones and how much alike can one get?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 722 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 21, 2003 (20:47) * 1 lines 
 
why are my buttons messed up? The "help" one has a frame around it...


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 723 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Jan 23, 2003 (10:10) * 1 lines 
 
I am having to re-enter all the sites, all the dns entries and all the users ont eh system today. There are bound to be a few glitches. Everyone is going to have to do a password change by phone so iether call me at 512-699-4000 or email me your phone number. I'm going to toughen up our own "webland security"!


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 Response 724 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Jan 23, 2003 (19:46) * 1 lines 
 
just checking in with my fellow geoites! cheryl, thanks for posting the cat article in springark. i've not been very good at keeping up.


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 Response 725 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sat, Jan 25, 2003 (08:25) * 1 lines 
 
You're welcome, Wolfie.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 726 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jan 31, 2003 (21:38) * 4 lines 
 
Please don't think I have deserted the cause. I have contracted a very nasty Polynesian virus and have trouble standing up, let alone writing and reading.


Where is John Tsatsaragos? I am most worried about him!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 727 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sat, Feb  1, 2003 (11:33) * 3 lines 
 
Get well soon, Marcia.

I hope that John comes back soon, as well.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 728 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Feb  1, 2003 (13:38) * 2 lines 
 
My profound sorrow at the demise of Shuttle Columbia is breaking my heart.
I have no words to say my sorrow. We had forgotten how truly dangerous these missions are. God Bless All.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 729 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Feb  2, 2003 (07:11) * 6 lines 
 
I share your sorrow Marci. And concern for John.

That virus does sound nasty! Hope you get feeling better soon. When you do get well, I'll tell you about geo's new chat and about http://stonedom.com which I hope you'll take part in!

Get well!



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 730 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Feb  2, 2003 (09:40) * 1 lines 
 
get well soon, marcia. i share your sentiments for the families of those lost on columbia.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 731 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  4, 2003 (17:17) * 3 lines 
 
Still very dizzy and spend most of the day laying down. That way, I can't fall down! I share this malady, whatever it is, with several others in Hilo and with the other occupant in the house. Be assured I will come back and post as soon as I can see with both eyes!

Thanks for your good wishes, all. Our Archaeologist is also not doing well, so I have to get better ASAP!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 732 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar  1, 2003 (07:23) * 7 lines 
 
John is still missing. I wish he would check in just to say hello!

Lance is missing also but think his power is out from the ice storm

Don is too busy for Geo at the moment, understandably

So am I, but will change soon I hope!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 733 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Mar  2, 2003 (05:33) * 1 lines 
 
I hope too!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 734 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Mar  2, 2003 (08:25) * 9 lines 
 
Hi kids

The schedule is finally clearing so here is my hello to all. Might
even have time to do some posting to the old gaia m. thread as well!

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i
(currently stuck in scenic Detroit....)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 735 of 1049: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Mar  3, 2003 (07:55) * 5 lines 
 
Hi All,
I am back in Volos (and in Geo) after long time. I was in Athens without any computer. Happily, I have a new laptop now. But I need to install my useful programs in it. I am sorry for my long absence. I hope that you can forgive me a little.

John



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 736 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  7, 2003 (09:22) * 7 lines 
 
John, you are forgiven all. I know you are busy. We are just delighted you are back with us and have that necessary laptop!

"Scenic" Detroit...ugh! During my summer and fall of traversing the USA from California to Kentucky, I studiously avoided changing planes in Detroit. Be safe, Mike. We need you. Are you without radio? I never travel without at least my scanner (not the computer kind) radio.

Lance is back but I need to find something to interest him here to get him posting again.




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 737 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  7, 2003 (09:58) * 23 lines 
 
I don't encourage political thought in Geo because it is so contentious, but the following was sent to me by my daughter-in-law. It says it all.

GET THE AMERICANS

You probably missed it in the rush of news last week, but there was actually a report that someone in Pakistan had published in a newspaper an offer of a reward to anyone who killed an American, any American.

So an Australian dentist wrote the following to let everyone know what an American is, so they would know when they found one:

An American is English, or French, or Italian, Irish, German, Spanish, Polish, Russian or Greek. An American may also be Canadian, Mexican, African, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Australian, Iranian, Asian, or Arab, or Pakistani, or
Afghan. An American may also be a Cherokee, Osage, Blackfoot, Navaho, Apache, Seminole or one of the many other tribes known as native Americans.

An American is Christian, or he could be Jewish, or Buddhist, or Muslim. In fact, there are more Muslims in America than in Afghanistan. The only difference is that in America they are free to worship as each of them chooses. An American is also free to believe in no religion. For that he will answer only to God, not to the government, or to armed thugs claiming to speak for the government and for God.

An American is from the most prosperous land in the history of the world. The root of that prosperity can be found in the Declaration of Independence, which recognizes the God given right of each person the pursuit of happiness.

An American is generous. Americans have helped out just about every other nation in the world in their time of need. When Afghanistan was overrun by the Soviet army 20 years ago, Americans came with arms and supplies to enable the people to win back their country. As of the morning of September 11, Americans had given more than any other nation to the poor in Afghanistan.

Americans welcome the best, the best products, the best books, the best music, the best food, the best athletes. But they also welcome the least.

Some of these "imports" were working in the Twin Towers the morning of September 11, 2001 earning a better life for their families. I've been told that the World Trade Center victims were from at least 30 other countries, cultures, and first languages, including those that aided and abetted the terrorists.

So you can try to kill an American if you must. Hitler did. So did General Tojo, and Stalin, and Mao Tse-Tung, and every bloodthirsty tyrant in the history of the world. But, in doing so you would just be killing yourself. Because Americans are not a particular people from a particular place. They are the embodiment of the human spirit of freedom. Everyone who holds to that spirit, everywhere, is an American.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 738 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  7, 2003 (20:50) * 1 lines 
 
*AMEN*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 739 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar  8, 2003 (13:29) * 1 lines 
 
*HUGS* Wolfie. You were foremost in my mind when I posted it. *;)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 740 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar 12, 2003 (21:56) * 1 lines 
 
I must be away for a few days. I'll be back ASAP.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 741 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Mar 30, 2003 (11:27) * 1 lines 
 
Come back soon!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 742 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr  1, 2003 (00:10) * 2 lines 
 
I am back... Wonder what there is in store for me with my therapist to deal with the problems at home.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 743 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Apr  7, 2003 (20:08) * 10 lines 
 
Hi Marci
Glad you are back - this is only my second post for a long while
- been busy with school starting up again, work stuff, plus finally
getting the ham shack back together again. Anyway, I keep threatening
to do some posting so will try to be a bit more frequent in the future.
Hope all is well with yall.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 744 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr  7, 2003 (23:57) * 1 lines 
 
Get it all done at once, Mike! *HUGS* you need to get this elderhostel education over so you can live a little. Will be expecting you soon! Y'all know I have to learn how to speak mainland instead of Hawaiian-pidgin?!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 745 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Apr  8, 2003 (18:30) * 11 lines 
 
Hi Marci

Oh, I have a long way to go to that master's degree so I just have to do
fun things in between homework. Just ready to have a radio room again
since all projects are kind of on hold at the moment. I would love to
hear (or read) more Hawaiian-pidgin since there is plenty of mainland
around here.

73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 746 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Apr  9, 2003 (18:11) * 1 lines 
 
Wow, a radio show! What are the details on that?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 747 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 11, 2003 (18:00) * 1 lines 
 
Oh Mike! Hawaiian Pidgin is a very uncouth sounding patois, but hilarious and very useful when trying to short-cut an oral message. Everything runs together and some of the words are Corrupted English, some plain Hawaiian, some Portuguese and some Japanese. Some are of unknown origin. It is fun to listen to the road crews switching between talking to their bosses in perfect English , and then lapsing into Pidgin when talking with one another.I can do it. My son can, too! The ones that scare me are those who will never hear good spoken English.


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 Response 748 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Apr 14, 2003 (19:42) * 15 lines 
 
Hi all

Being an engineer, uncouth patois is right down my alley (well, not always...)
- I do try to maintain some social skills however remedial.....
Anyway, probably like what I used to listen to while working on an oil crew
in TX many years ago.
Hi Terry - I have been thinking about buying some hours on WBCQ but that is
waaaaay down the line into the future. I have the music material picked
out, as usual, just a time/money issue.
Anyway, have a groovy spring! (it actually got above 80 here - last week
we had a major ice storm)

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 749 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr 20, 2003 (17:12) * 3 lines 
 
Happy whatever Spring feasts you are observing from Vernal Equinox to Passover to Various calendar versions of Easter.

Be safe and do not eat too many sweet things *;)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 750 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr 20, 2003 (17:13) * 1 lines 
 
While New York is having heat waves, Mike has ice storms. I hope you all have good weather for any traveling you will be doing this season!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 751 of 1049: JOE  (g7hvp) * Sun, Apr 20, 2003 (18:49) * 6 lines 
 
In England we are having a heat wave temps in
the middle 70 F normaly about 40F and no rain
for five weeks, come to sunny England for your
holidays.

Joe


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 752 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Apr 20, 2003 (21:07) * 1 lines 
 
We had a high around 73 today too! But the pool water is holding at 83 degrees. I'm so glad it doesn't lose it quickly!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 753 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr 20, 2003 (21:40) * 3 lines 
 
It was cool and full of squalls here over the weekend. 75 F was our highest. It suits me better to be cool with the surrounding rain forest and high humidity!

I can bet England is beautiful now.....*sigh* Oh, to be in England...


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 754 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Apr 21, 2003 (10:44) * 1 lines 
 
Mid 70s here today too.


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 Response 755 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Apr 22, 2003 (00:41) * 1 lines 
 
high 60's today but that pacific breeze will sure put a chill in yer bones!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 756 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May  2, 2003 (18:02) * 1 lines 
 
Summer is upon us now. Hot and humid all over, but Hawaii stays in the low 80s year round, while the rest of the world gets hotter and colder.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 757 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sat, May  3, 2003 (16:10) * 1 lines 
 
Summer's been here a while. The pool temp is pretty high for this time of year, 89 degrees.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 758 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May  4, 2003 (00:23) * 1 lines 
 
Wow! That is hot, but you are in Texas. Does that have anything to do with it? I know you are inland quite a ways. I guess that might make it warmer.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 759 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, May  9, 2003 (09:59) * 10 lines 
 
Hi all

Spring is here as everything is turning green but the temps hover in the
40's-50's. Lots of migratory birds in and around the lake plus the usual
ducks, geese, etc. All the tulips are in bloom. Anyway, the school semester
is half way over and the Dayton hamvention is rapidly approaching. Woo hoo!

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 760 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May  9, 2003 (17:05) * 3 lines 
 
It sounds lovely, Mike. I miss spring. In fact, Paradise is boring. And, if Terry is reading this, he'd better be in his basement. Texas has tornado warnings all day. Floods elsewhere. Nothing much in Hawaii other than our ongoing eruption. I'd trade that for Spring any time!

Party hardy, Cosmo! And, sleep late afterward.


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 Response 761 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, May 10, 2003 (09:51) * 1 lines 
 
Marcia Marcia Marcia! *HUGS* I thought you had moved by now...do you still use MSN Messenger?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 762 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 11, 2003 (00:51) * 3 lines 
 
I'll boot it for you when I come online. I only talked to Lance and you on it and I knew you were busy. Welcome back to some R&R, Wolfie! *HUGS*

I'm still in *ugh* Hilo


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 763 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, May 19, 2003 (19:38) * 3 lines 
 
I was sent this quote in an email recently and found it very much to be "food for thought". So, I thought that it might be of interest to the posters (and readers) here at Geo.

We do not want churches because they will teach us to quarrel about God. We do not want to learn that. We may quarrel with men sometimes about things on this earth, but we never quarrel about the Great Spirit. We do not want to learn that. — Heinmot Tooyalaket (Chief Joseph) of the Nez Percés, 1873


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 Response 764 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May 22, 2003 (18:55) * 1 lines 
 
I read that and wondered where it might put it. Thanks, Cheryl. Here is an excellent choice! New stuff found at Stonehenge.... see Geo 17


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 Response 765 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, May 23, 2003 (09:18) * 10 lines 
 
Hi all

Stonehenge is one of the great places in the world! Wish I could be
there for a solstice - will have to make do with a solstice on the
(currently) chilly shores of Lake Michigan. Perfect time for a big
Druidic bonfire! Happy Memorial Day to all.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 766 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, May 23, 2003 (15:11) * 5 lines 
 
A great Memorial Day weekend to all. I read somewhere that Memorial Day used to be called Decoration Day. It was when people used to visit their family plots in cemeteries to clean the headstones and place fresh flowers on the graves, hence, to decorate them. I'm not sure when it became Memorial Day. Although I do know that it was observed on May 30 for many years before being changed to the fourth Monday in May.

Cosmo would you have to get a permit to have a big Druidic bonfire on the shores of Lake Michigan? Still, it would be a suitable place to observe the summer solstice.

I'm off to Geo 17 to check the new Stonehenge finds.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 767 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, May 23, 2003 (15:48) * 28 lines 
 
Tiny Diamonds Found in Oil
Philip Ball


Black diamonds found in the Gulf of Mexico might have been formed from crude oil, say researchers1.

These diamonds are unlikely to be a girl's best friend. They contain just a few dozen carbon atoms, equivalent to less than a billion billionth of a carat.

But the molecules, called diamondoids, could have practical uses. Artificial versions are already used in drugs to treat Parkinson's disease and viral infections. The tiny diamonds could also provide molecular-scale girders for nanotechnology.

Diamondoids contain atoms of carbon and hydrogen joined into networks like tiny climbing frames. The smallest of the carbon frameworks, a molecule called adamantane, consists of ten carbon atoms linked into a cage, each capped by a hydrogen atom.

Larger diamondoids are built up from many adamantane cages. If one linked cages together indefinitely, the result would be a diamond - a crystal of regularly stacked carbon atoms.

Diamondoid molecules containing up to 11 adamantane cages have been found in oil deposits by a team led by Jeremy Dahl of ChevronTexaco Energy Research and Technology in Richmond, California2. In the lab, no one has been able to get beyond the four-cage version.

It's still a mystery how rigid diamondoids form from the floppy hydrocarbon chains that make up oil. One possibility, say the researchers, is that large molecules are made from smaller diamondoids in reactions with methane gas, catalysed by clay minerals. If this is the case, there's no reason why the diamondoids should not continue to grow until they become microscopic diamonds.

The diamondoids could also form black agglomerations of tiny diamond crystals called carbonados, say Dahl and colleagues. Carbonados seem not to have formed at the high temperatures and pressures that give rise to normal diamonds, leading some scientists to speculate that they were formed in space and delivered to the Earth in meteorites.

Dahl's team has studied the structure and properties of a diamondoid in which six carbon cages are linked in a disc. They have separated enough of this compound from crude oil to form tiny crystals.


References
Dahl, J. E. P. et al. Isolation and structural proof of the large diamond [sic] molecule, cyclohexamantane (C26H30). Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 42, 2040 - 2044, (2003). |Article|
Dahl, J. E. P., Liu, S. G. & Carlson, R. M. K. Isolation and structure of higher diamondoids, nanometer-sized diamond molecules. Science, 299, 96 - 99, (2002). |Homepage|

http://www.nature.com/nsu/030512/030512-13.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 768 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 23, 2003 (15:49) * 5 lines 
 
Memorial Day was created after WWI to set aside a day to remember and to decorate the graves of the fallen heroes of that war. It was changed to Memorial Day when we had more wars and far more fallen heroes.

I've actually been to Stonehenge on Solstice day in June. By mistake! I counted wrong and had planned to be at Avebury for that day, but we ended up with the bogus Druids and other assorted New Age followers at Stonehenge. It was curious and completely false. I was embarrassed for everyone involved. They got to be so messy in the following years they forced the closing of the interior of the momument to the public. I was so glad I got there before then. I remember one notable day just sitting on the soft grass at the base of one of the megaliths and just absorbing the atmosphere. It is quite remarkable there!

My solstice day was so leaden and dark it was hard to imagine the sun had risen at all. *Sigh*


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 Response 769 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 23, 2003 (15:50) * 1 lines 
 
Oooh, black diamonds in oil! It makes sense since they are both a form of carbon. I just never knew they occurred together! Thanks, Dear!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 770 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sat, May 24, 2003 (10:35) * 10 lines 
 
Hi Marci

I hope this year's Solstice will be a good one for you!
Anyway, probably just a small campfire for me... When I went to
Stonehenge, it was already roped off to keep all the nuts and ravers
from messing about (and silly tourists like myself...). Still, a
mystical and magical place if there ever was one.

73 de Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 771 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 25, 2003 (18:16) * 3 lines 
 
Oddly enoough, Mike, I was dead set against visiting Stonehenge because of all the whacko-hype I had hoped to avoid. We were on our way back to Salisbury from Avebury when we passed it. My son pleaded with us to stop so HE could see it. How could I refuse?! We entered the sarsen horseshoe and it was absolutley transforming. I could absolutely feel the field of energy around that one tallest monolith still standing. Could it have been that we had just seen "2001 A Space Odyssey" ?? I was prepared to tolerate those stones in my life experince. Little did I know it would set off a collectng binge of all books Stonehenge. Too bad they kept you out of the monument and on the periphery. I would not have missed that for anything!

BTW, take your kids when you travel. They open doors where you did not even know there WERE doors!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 772 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, May 27, 2003 (15:10) * 27 lines 
 
Hi Marci

I really wished I could have walked up and touched the stones - oh well.
Avebury would have been a great place to visit as well but we were on one
of the tours on a fixed itenary. I have picked up several magazines and
books on the ancient stone circles, barrows, etc and it is most fascinating
reading. There was one UK published magazine titled 'Ley Hunter' that
provided a serious analysis on the orientation of stones, mounds, pathways,
'death roads' etc without the silly tie ins to weird paranormal topics.
Now, Im into the study of weird paranormal stuff as well, but you have
to draw the line somewhere! ;-)
Anyway, there are powerful sites in the world where you could just feel
the energy of the place (whether it was intersected by lines or not...).
One such place I did have the chance to experience was Enchanted Rock
near Fredricksburg TX. This is a huge granite dome (actually three domes)
that had tremendous spiritual significance to the native peoples of the area.
I had a chance to crawl through the caves/fissures of the central dome
and after dodging crevases, sliding between narrow crawlspaces, crawling
up a chimney, doing a 90deg bend, and wiggling forward and out of a tiny
'port hole', I felt nothing short of a rebirth - that I had left the
open day, passed through Mother Earth, and was released back to the day
again. This is something I will hold on to for the rest of my life.

Anyway, have a groovy day!
73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 773 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, May 29, 2003 (09:06) * 11 lines 
 
That is a great spot, enchanted rock. I'm due for a revisit. It's a
power spot, definitely.

If you're not lucky enough to get there in person you can go on Robert M.
Reed's "virtual field trip to Enchanted Rock"

http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~rmr/E-rock/E-rock.html






 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 774 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sat, May 31, 2003 (14:35) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Birthday, Marcia! Have a wonderful birthday and a great year!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 775 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, May 31, 2003 (15:35) * 6 lines 
 
Thanks Cheryl. *HUGS*

Mike, we got into ley lines and other "lunatic fringe" (an unkind term!) on Geo 31.
There are megalithic lore and People living in England who recounted their experiences. BTW, when you next go there, goto Avebury and walk through West Kennet Long Barrow. It truly has magic, too.

Terry, are you taking any measuring equipment or are you just working on "being in the moment" at the Texas site? Please tell us your experiences!!


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 Response 776 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Jun  1, 2003 (14:26) * 1 lines 
 
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, MARCIA!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 777 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Jun  2, 2003 (18:34) * 38 lines 
 
Reading Rob's recent posts made me think that we here at Geo had forgotten to note the 50th anniversary of the first successful Everest climb. Why did Rob's posts make me think of that? Because Rob is from New Zealand and one half of the team who first reached the summit of Everest was Edmund Hillary, who is a New Zealander. The other half of the team was Tenzing Norgay, who was a Sherpa.
Below is an article from the "Toronto Star" from May 29, 2003.

KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — Nepal celebrated the 50th anniversary of the conquest of Mount Everest today, welcoming the world's mountaineering elite and Sir Edmund Hillary, who with his late Sherpa partner, Tenzing Norgay, made the climb that inspired generations to push the limits of human endurance.

Nepal also granted Hillary honorary citizenship for his five decades of service to the Sherpa community — building schools, hospitals and an airfield that has opened the once pristine mountain to hundreds of climbers each year.

Tenzing died 17 years ago. His son, Jamling Norgay, told 225 fellow Everest summiteers from 35 countries they were celebrating a day in history that took "humans a step further into the spirit of adventure."

Since 1953, some 1,300 people have climbed the world's highest peak, either from the Nepal or Tibet side, and all those still living were invited to the week-long party that Nepal's government hopes will spur tourism, the country's main foreign currency earner.

"Everest is not the most difficult mountain in the world, but it's the most famous," said Scott Darsney, 41, of Unalaska, Alaska, a 1992 climber who said he was partying every night with old friends and catching up with the Sherpas who helped him reach the summit.

"This happens only once every 50 years," he said, "and I don't think I'll be around for the next one."

Teodor Tulpan, who led Romania's first expedition to the summit on May 20, patted his heart and said he was full of emotion at being in the same room with Hillary, but said he had been saddened at the sight of frozen corpses of some of the 175 or more mountaineers who died trying to reach the 8,850-metre summit.

The risk of trying to bring bodies down from the heights is great and there is no soil in which to bury them.

Prime Minister Lokander Bahadur Chand also recalled "those brave climbers who lost their lives" as he honoured a parade of vibrant, cheering mountaineers who waved to each other, filmed each other with small movie cameras, signed autograph books and flashed their anniversary medals in a joyful ceremony at Kathmandu's modern convention centre.

"Climbing is about freedom and fun," said British mountaineer Allan Hinkes, who has climbed all but two of the world's 14 peaks of 8,000 metres or more. Most are in Nepal.

"It's important that you encourage more and more people to come, so you can tap into that little gold mine called Everest," Hinkes told the Nepalese. "People want to go to the summit of the world."

But Hillary and some older pioneers, such as Junko Tabei of Japan, the first woman to climb Everest, urged the government to restrict the numbers allowed on Everest at one time. They say that people lining up to climb fixed ropes is not real mountaineering.

A record 22 expeditions, with seven to 10 climbers each, went up the mountain this season, and the government has no plans to cut back. It collects $75,000 (U.S.) per expedition. The Sherpas also don't favour restrictions, as they live for the whole year on what they earn during a few weeks when Everest can be climbed.

For years, Sherpas have been called the unsung heroes of Himalayan climbing, but recently they have been breaking Everest records and becoming famous on their own. More than half of the summiteers honoured today were Sherpas.

Appa, 42, who scaled Everest this season for the 13th time, and Lakpa Gyelu, 35, who raced from the 5,300-metre base camp to the summit in a record 10 hours and 56 minutes, came down the mountain just in time for today's events. Swathed in layers of ceremonial silk scarves, they got more press attention than anyone except Hillary and the Nepal royal family.

"If the Sherpas were not there, Mount Everest may well not have been climbed in 1953," said Capt. M. S. Kohli, leader of the 1965 Indian expedition.

Hillary said he had declined a chance to celebrate the golden anniversary in London with the Queen, although the British government had organized the 1953 expedition, because he wanted to be in Nepal. He held his celebratory dinner with his Sherpa friends, after a tea party hosted by Nepal's King Gyanendra and Queen Komal.

http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1052251688773&call_pageid=968332188492&col=968705899037


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 778 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun  9, 2003 (21:24) * 5 lines 
 
Thanks, Cheryl. I watched the National Geographic special about it and I completely forgot to mention it here!

Aloha Mike! Thanks for the good wishes!

Today's Birthday girl.......


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 779 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun  9, 2003 (21:25) * 2 lines 
 
Happy Birthday, WOLFIE
*HUGS*



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 780 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun  9, 2003 (21:27) * 1 lines 
 
Someone needs to tell those climbers in Nepal to carry their own waste and rubbish out when they leave. That has become a real nuisance! Heaven forbid it turns into just another Mount Trashmore!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 781 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Jun  9, 2003 (21:36) * 11 lines 
 
Hi Marci, Happy Birthday Wolfie!

Kind of funny name 'Mount Trashmore' - in flat northern IL, landfills
are being turned into mole hills which are called Mount Trashmore.
Two more days then finals will be over and something remotely close
to 'normal life' returns. Woo Hoo!

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 782 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun  9, 2003 (22:35) * 3 lines 
 
Yay! Your college is letting out late! The one here is already deserted.

Oahu has a huge Mount Trashmore... and Califonia has rival foothills to the Sierras in their attempts to get rid of their copious amounts of rubbish. Here we try to incinerate it at the power plants to make electricity. I wonder why they do not?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 783 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Jun 10, 2003 (11:38) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Birthday Wolfie!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 784 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jun 10, 2003 (23:08) * 3 lines 
 
thanks for the b-day wishes!!!

marcia, i ordered a sim. alexandrite ring as a gift!!!! can't wait for it to come in so i can tell you all about it (and i sure hope it's as pretty as they say)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 785 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Jun 11, 2003 (12:33) * 1 lines 
 
Hope that you had a Howling Good Birthday, Wolfie! Hope that your alexandrite is a beauty.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 786 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Jun 11, 2003 (17:53) * 3 lines 
 
i just hope the company is legit--been trying to call them to ensure just that.

thanks cheryl!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 787 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jun 12, 2003 (19:18) * 1 lines 
 
I'd love to hear about your new Alexandrite ring.... I also want one if they are as advertized! Great choice, Wolfie! What is the setting made of?Mine is set in white gold, but I also know a lady with one set in silver.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 788 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Jun 13, 2003 (19:26) * 3 lines 
 
it is set in gold, emerald cut, one 2.5mm diamond on each side. it is a simple setting in 14K.

and it came in today and it's on my finger and i'm in heaven!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 789 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Jun 13, 2003 (19:26) * 1 lines 
 
the stone is 1.14 c and has a nice color change for being lab-created. definitely not colored glass!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 790 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun 14, 2003 (17:38) * 3 lines 
 
Lab created gems should be a flawless version of the stuff found in nature. Don't knock it. I am all eagerness to have one, too, now!




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 791 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sat, Jun 21, 2003 (12:23) * 3 lines 
 
Happy Summer Solstice!

I won't be a northern hemisphere-centrist. Happy Winter Solstice to Rob!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 792 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun 22, 2003 (21:20) * 3 lines 
 
Happy Solstice! Just keep those New Age "Druids" away from the stone circles!

I wonder if anything looks different when you are standing on your head in the southern hemisphere...


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 793 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus  (terry) * Fri, Jun 27, 2003 (12:53) * 3 lines 
 
Never tried it.

Belated Happy Solstice. It was actually cool last night in the Austin area, down to 65, but we're in the 90s today. Definitely summery.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 794 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun 27, 2003 (19:00) * 1 lines 
 
I'll be joining summer in the Northern temperate zone as soon as I can get out of Hilo. I'll be moving !!! ASAP!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 795 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sat, Jun 28, 2003 (14:45) * 5 lines 
 
Terry, I hope that you're enjoying the summer there in Austin.

Marcia, I noticed a that the beautiful photo of waterfall on my kitchen calendar was taken at the Three Hundred Springs section of the Green River in Kentucky. Have you ever been there? I did find a link to some information about it. It also seems that there are fossils to be found there, as well. Little ones which are about the size and shape of Cheeri-o's. Hope the link works.

http://216.161.14.72/roadtrip/roadtripgreenky.htm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 796 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun 28, 2003 (15:34) * 1 lines 
 
Not that I recall, Wolfie. Three Hundred Springs is a place I will put on my to visit list. It looks fantastic. I know Don will know the Green River since the ACE is in charge of tending our waterways. I'll check with him! OOOH! They have crinoids! (Those are the cheerio-looking fossils)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 797 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Jul  1, 2003 (15:21) * 1 lines 
 
Marcia, maybe you were replying to an earlier post by Wolfie; but it was I, not Geo's favorite lupine who asked if you'd ever been to Three Hundred Springs. As for the crinoids, at the link I posted it was noted that you could make a necklace out of them! If they are the size of Cheerio's, wouldn't you need a lot of them? Plus, where would you wear it?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 798 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Jul  1, 2003 (15:23) * 1 lines 
 
Today is Canada Day. I think that Canada is officially 136 years old, as a nation, that is. Anyway, to all you Canadians, Happy Canada Day!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 799 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Jul  1, 2003 (15:25) * 9 lines 
 
Hi All

Happy belated Solstice - I spent the Solstice in Austin but I could never
get into the 442.150 until the last night I was in town so no shout outs.
I did get to goof off at a few of my old slacker hangouts however.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 800 of 1049: AdaVW  (shdwmoon) * Fri, Jul  4, 2003 (14:55) * 1 lines 
 
Hi Marcia, I'm Ada and I'm the new keeps mistress over at Drool. I have a couple of questions I'd like to ask you from when you were "mistress of all keeps". Would it be possible for you to email me? Thanks!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 801 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Jul  6, 2003 (18:41) * 1 lines 
 
Which slacker hangouts? Hole in the Wall?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 802 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Jul  6, 2003 (22:47) * 11 lines 
 
Hi Terry

The Hole in the Wall is open again! Was happy to see that - naw, went
to Crown and Anchor pub which was stumbling distance from where I use
to live back in my Austin daze. Also, the usual - Half Price books,
Waterloo, up and down Guadolupe st. Didnt make it to the big rock
in the middle of Zilker park, tho.... Also, no Mad Dog's And Beans
or Inner Sanctum Records. sigh...

Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 803 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Jul  7, 2003 (04:48) * 4 lines 
 
Waterloo down by Lamar and Sixth?

Did you see the groundbreaking area for the new Whole Foods?



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 804 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Jul  7, 2003 (20:20) * 8 lines 
 
Howdy

Is that the large cleared area across from the current Whole Foods?
I thought there was some attempts by a large corporate chain book
store to build there.

Keep Austin Weird!
de Mike


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 805 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Jul  7, 2003 (20:33) * 2 lines 
 
They failed. TRh big book chain backed out so it's just WF now.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 806 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul  8, 2003 (00:18) * 4 lines 
 
Wow, I miss a day and suddenly everyone shows up for a party.
Cheryl, you're right and I will be in KY by the end of the month :)))

I am trusting Austin's weird qualities to the experts. Can it get any more weird? Any advice to an about to become southern belle?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 807 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Jul  8, 2003 (09:31) * 2 lines 
 
We're determined to make it as a weird as we can and resist any efforts to
the contrary!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 808 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Jul  8, 2003 (12:14) * 14 lines 
 
Hi Marci

Consider yourself a Southern Belle - I think the parasol is
optional. I saw some posts that you were moving to the lower
48 - hope your move goes well. Anyway, despite all the efforts
of developers, corporations, and city council, Austin still maintains
quite a few of its weird graces that I always liked about the place.
Its just that they are more down in the noise floor so you have to
dig a bit more.

73 de Mike
aa9il
r-c-i



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 809 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul  8, 2003 (16:23) * 5 lines 
 
I've seen some of the finer dives for BBQ on the food channel.I guess you can find a good place to eat no matter now weirdly you dress. That is good news!

Thanks for the good wishes, Y'all. I'll be frying okra before you know it.

a few decades of fighting mildew and weeds is more than enough. I will be happy to be back in America. (I say that advisedly!)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 810 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jul  8, 2003 (19:58) * 1 lines 
 
you've always had the charm of a southern belle!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 811 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Jul  9, 2003 (13:29) * 7 lines 
 
Mmm, isn't Hawaii America? Let me guess from your addition of the "(I say that advisedly!)" there's more going on there than meets the eye. Anyway, you will be back on the mainland. You'll be on the other end of the Ohio River from me. The Ohio does start in downtown Pittsburgh.

Now as for that okra. Well, okra is a member of the hibiscus family. Personally, it's one of those foods which I never touch; because it's furry and slimy. It's that way naturally, so I never blame it on the cook.

There are a lot of bars in Austin. I think there's one street were you can work your way down the bars on one side of the street and then, if you're able, work your way up the bars on the other side. Anyway, Austin is a big college town, the University of Texas, which has one of the best law schools in the US.

Wolfie ought to know all about southern belles being one herself.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 812 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Jul  9, 2003 (18:21) * 3 lines 
 
fried okra is yummy and it is good in gumbo too. just fix yerself a nice tall glass of sweet tea and sit on the porch!

(these Kaliforniuns just don't do sweet tea--have to make it myself)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 813 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Jul 10, 2003 (07:54) * 14 lines 
 
Picked up a Mauii customer for some websites last nights. I guy named
Neil Coshever who we are hosting six websites for. He's a friend of Ames
Doty of Austin, Texas who is a renowned gem and mineral merchant. Neil
was one of Ames mentors when he was first getting started.

The sites are:

http://www.omram.com

http://www.sacredearth.com

And there will be four more at least.




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 814 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 10, 2003 (20:00) * 3 lines 
 
Sweet tea! Yes! A nice southern tradition so you don't have to knock the bottom of your glass apart with a spoon trying to dissolve the sugar! Always order lemon, too. Geo's archaeologist loves fried Okra. I'll learn to eat it too, just after I learn to cook it right. I think it is one of the few he will eat willingly. Yes, it is a hibiscus.

I'll save the allegiances of the locals for an email. Let us just say they keep Japan green by taking their money elsewhere.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 815 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Jul 14, 2003 (12:05) * 5 lines 
 
Wolfie, since you live in the vicinity of Los Angeles, (I think), the thought of your "Kaliforniun" neighbors intentionally putting sugar in anything is funny. So I would imagine in Lalaland sweet tea is a no-no. Everyone one is on the zone diet, or Atkins, or else they're into health food. Still, you be who you are and brew your sweet tea and fry your okra.

On another note, today is a holiday: In France. Yes, it's Bastille Day. Happy Bastille Day.

Is it safe to order French Fries again? I've always just called them fries anyway.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 816 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 15, 2003 (17:22) * 1 lines 
 
Fries are safe. I eat nothing with a French accent. We tend to "Americanize" everything anyway. Enjoy! Happy yesterday was Bastille Day. I wonder how I missed it. Lawyers? Realtors? Packing? All of the above !!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 817 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Jul 16, 2003 (08:45) * 3 lines 
 
We signed up a couple of Hawaiian guys, Neil Cosherver and his buddy.
http://www.omram.com ... they're just have four sites but Neil is also
adding a diamond site. For the trade mostly.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 818 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Jul 18, 2003 (13:27) * 7 lines 
 
Body matches missing weapons expert

By Gideon Long LONGWORTH (Reuters)

Police have found a body that matches that of a mild-mannered scientist who disappeared after becoming unwittingly embroiled in a furious political dispute about the Iraq war. The softly spoken 59-year-old had been thrust into the limelight by a row over whether the government hyped the threat from Iraq in order to justify joining the U.S.-led war. The political fallout was almost immediate. Prime Minister Tony Blair's government promised an independent judicial inquiry into events leading up to the death of Dr David Kelly, if it is confirmed. Blair has refused previous calls for a wider inquiry into the government case for war in Iraq. Kelly's family reported him missing overnight after he went for a walk in the Oxfordshire countryside on Thursday with no coat and stayed out despite a rainstorm. Police found a body in a wood near his home earlier on Friday. "We can confirm that the body matches the description of Dr Kelly. The body has not been formally identified," a police spokeswoman said. Kell
, a microbiologist at the Defence Ministry who had worked for U.N. inspectors in Iraq, had been grilled by parliamentarians on Tuesday after admitting he spoke to a reporter for Britain's BBC radio. The reporter, Andrew Gilligan, said in May a senior intelligence source had told him the government "sexed up" data to emphasise the threat from Iraq. That report sparked parliamentary hearings into how the government made the case for war, forced Blair onto the defensive and pitted government officials against the broadcaster in a heated war of words. Blair spoke to top officials about the case from aboard a flight to Tokyo from Washington. "The prime minister is obviously very distressed for the family of Dr Kelly," a spokesman said aboard the flight. If the death is confirmed the defence ministry would hold an independent judicial inquiry, presided over by a judge with access to all government papers, he added. Kelly's discomfort in the spotlight was evident from his demeanour at the foreign affairs comm
ttee hearing. Speaking so softly he could barely be heard, he admitted he had met Gilligan but denied telling him Blair's communications chief Alastair Campbell had ordered intelligence on suspected Iraqi banned weapons to be hyped. Kelly appeared shell-shocked when parliamentarians at the hearing described him as "chaff" and a government "fall guy", put forward to shield top officials from blame. Kelly's wife Jane described him as deeply upset by the hearing, family friend Tom Mangold, a television journalist, told ITV News. "She told me he had been under considerable stress, that he was very very angry about what had happened at the committee..," Mangold said.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 819 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Dec 17, 2003 (07:51) * 11 lines 
 
Today is an anniversary of an important event in the history of aviation.

NYTimes.com/Opinion/December 17, 2003

The foggy lens of history has been kind to Wilbur and Orville Wright. We regard the boys from Dayton, Ohio, as American heroes who, 100 years ago today, flew the first airplane and ushered in the age of air travel. At the time, though, the brothers' achievement was barely recognized — and their motives were far from visionary.

On Dec. 17, 1903, the Wrights took turns making short ascents over the dunes of Kill Devil Hills, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, N.C., in a propeller-driven biplane powered by an internal combustion engine. They each got airborne twice — with Wilbur going the farthest, 852 feet in 59 seconds — before a gust flipped the plane while it was on the ground. Both men were somewhat blasé about their success at Kitty Hawk; although they recognized that what they had done was important, they felt that the actual experience of flying did not live up to their expectations.

Here's the link to the rest of the article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/12/17/opinion/17HOFF.html?ex=1072242000&en=f1b62252f06a6368&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 820 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Dec 18, 2003 (06:30) * 5 lines 
 
I saw the footage on the news last night of Bush talking in the rain at
Kitty Hawk, and then the Wright replica plane taking off and crashing in a
mud puddle. What they did was hard, hard, hard. They must have had
extraordinary good luck, the right winds and conditions on that day a
hundred years ago.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 821 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 22, 2003 (14:31) * 3 lines 
 
I have watched all of the PBS programs about the first flight. Fascinating!

Happy Winter !!! I LOVE snow!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 822 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Dec 22, 2003 (16:52) * 13 lines 
 
Happy Winter Solstice! Enjoy the snow, Marcia.

It's time for those winter holiday greetings:

Merry Christmas
Happy Hannukah
Joyous Kwanzaa
Happy Winter Solstice, (Happy Summer Solstice to Rob)
Io Saturnalia

and...

Happy New Year


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 823 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Dec 22, 2003 (17:03) * 5 lines 
 
Happy Solstice to all from balmy Chicago (48 deg F this afternoon)

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 824 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 22, 2003 (17:58) * 1 lines 
 
Mike, we are supposed to get snow for Christmas eve.... you must be getting it, too? Cheryl should, also. Just in time for Santa Claus!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 825 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Dec 23, 2003 (14:50) * 1 lines 
 
Yep, the snow should be here on Christmas Eve, which should make Santa and the reindeer happy. When I was little I used to leave cookies for Santa Claus and carrots for the reindeer. I thought that they might be hungry, too.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 826 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Dec 23, 2003 (22:07) * 1 lines 
 
I left shredded wheat for the reindeer. It looked like stuff found around animals so I thought it was appropriate. Children think very differently from adults. Too bad they quit that delightful trend.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 827 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Dec 30, 2003 (17:33) * 13 lines 
 
Hi All

No Snow except for a dusting. Last night flew back from TX and it was
in the mid 30's - walked down Clark street near Wrigleyville in Chicago
and had a nice snow flurry hit for about 1 minute then was over. Supposed
to be up to 40 for New Years Eve so no snow tire chains on the truck
just yet. No reindeer but the squirrels are all over the place! Plus
heard two hoot owls hooting back and forth a couple of nights ago.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i
Keeping the shack warm with the R390A and the Hammarlund SP600


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 828 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Dec 30, 2003 (18:36) * 3 lines 
 
Hi Cosmo. Our echolink node is 135043. Give me a holler!




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 829 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Feb 26, 2004 (15:05) * 17 lines 
 
Hi Marci and Geoites

Apologies for being so infrequent as of late - was out of the
country for a while and have returned to the not so frosty
mid west. Shortwave has been the main entertainment as this is
the only decent source for unbiased/noncorporate news.
Im kind of re-acquainting my self with my old web haunts as
well - was kind of in a weird state this week as I hit a
major age milestone (40) and got way too analytical - the
best tonic for that is to decouple from the ambient vibes
and just be a techno-goof which I excel at on occasion.
Any, just goofing off and wanted to post to the site and
will be a bit more frequent.

73 de Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 830 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, Feb 27, 2004 (09:04) * 2 lines 
 
Catch Bob, Lance, George, Bill and the gang on 7270 during the day. 10 am
checking. 3911 at 10 pm. 5 pm is the switchover time to 80 meters.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 831 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar 18, 2004 (17:26) * 5 lines 
 
Welcome back, Mike.

I have also been missing due to author finishing book I am editing (and he needs the internet to confirm certain data). I'll be more regular now though I am eager to have a regular PC to use rather than this laptop. My son is into building "super computers" and he needs an excuse to build another one. I volunteered!

I hope someone has opened a topic about "The Passion of the Christ" on movies. I just saw it.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 832 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Apr  4, 2004 (20:59) * 18 lines 
 
Hey Marci and Geoites

Ok on the authoring stuff - I jump on every once in a while
when work/school do not get in the way (and sometimes when
they do...) I get distracted WAY too easy....
Anyway, been thinking about building a whistler receiver
during the summer lightning storm time and be ready for
listening when next winter arrives - then can post to the
dormant Gaia-M page which I kind of neglected for too long.
There are a couple of good sources for whistler sound files
including some CD recordings (including experimental music).
I also found out about a project that MIT conducted in the
late 60's near my home town in Texas where they were doing
Solar radar experiments - that would have been cool to see!

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


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 Response 833 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Apr  8, 2004 (06:10) * 1 lines 
 
Do it, Mike! Build it and make sound files for your website so we can hear them. My dad made me one quite a while ago and I loved it. I'm sure yours will be much more sophisticated. Have you a Pope Cell with it?


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 Response 834 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Apr  8, 2004 (06:11) * 1 lines 
 
...and take pictures if you get to the MIT lashup in Texas!!!It is a Good Thing to share!


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 Response 835 of 1049: Mike Kana  (aa9il) * Mon, Apr 12, 2004 (22:58) * 11 lines 
 
Hi Marci and Geoites

I would love to find a picture of the original radar - there are
quite a few descriptions on the web - on such url is:

http://www.lofar.org/science/urd100/Solar_Terrestrial.html

More details to follow....

73 de Mike
r-c-i


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 Response 836 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Apr 15, 2004 (11:54) * 15 lines 
 
Chimps Off the Old Block

Chalk one up for the girls in the hunt.

They're faster and better at it than boys -- at least in the chimpanzee world, where they are more successful than the guys at "fishing" for termites.

That's the indication of a study by Lincoln Park Zoo Director of Field Conservation Elizabeth V. Lonsdorf and colleagues.

The study, "Sex Differences in Learning in Chimpanzees," appearing in today's issue of Nature, finds distinct sex-based differences akin to those found in human children in the way in which young chimpanzees develop termite fishing skills.

Female chimpanzees start to fish for termites at a younger age than males, the findings indicate. They're more proficient than males once they've acquired the skill. And they use a technique similar to their mothers', something their male counterparts don't.

Lonsdorf and the University of Minnesota's Lynn E. Eberly and Anne E. Pusey observed over a four-year period 14 chimps -- eight male and six female -- and their mothers during termite fishing sessions. The results show a sex-based learning difference that might date at least to the last common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans, according to the team.

http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-chimps15.html


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 Response 837 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Apr 16, 2004 (14:09) * 16 lines 
 
More dead dolphins found in Gulf of Mexico


MIAMI, April 16 (UPI) -- Four more dead dolphins have been found in shallow Gulf of Mexico waters off the coast of the Florida Panhandle, federal wildlife officials said.

The total number of dead dolphins found since March 10 is 108, the Orlando Sentinel reported Friday.

The most recent dolphin was found Wednesday near the tip of the St. Joseph Peninsula near Apalachicola, Fla. The other three were found in the same general area in the last week.

Officials had found another 103 Dolphins during an 18-day period in March and another in the interim between the two outbreaks.

"We thought it was over, but we have been receiving a few more animals here and there," said Blair Mase, fisheries stranding coordinator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Miami.

The deaths are being blamed on a neurotoxin released by red tide algae, but so far no red tide algae has been found in the area.

http://washingtontimes.com/upi-breaking/20040416-101757-6771r.htm


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 Response 838 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 20, 2004 (12:21) * 3 lines 
 
Hawaii should have chimps. They certainly have enough termites to keep the world's population well fed.

I watched a NOVA (or was it Nature?) about strandings. Then the special program about Nicola Tesla. I wonder if they still contemplate research on dolphin sensitivity to the radio waves now being used by the military...


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 Response 839 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Jun  5, 2004 (12:56) * 1 lines 
 
i hadn't heard a thing about those dolphins in the gulf. how sad!


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 Response 840 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun 25, 2004 (19:35) * 1 lines 
 
It is quite possible I will be returning to Hilo for a short visit. Hmmm. Always did want to show off the volcano to a flatlander from Tennessee *;) I am brushing up on my Spam recipes though he says he will never eat any of it.


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 Response 841 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Jun 26, 2004 (11:49) * 1 lines 
 
MARCIA!!! there you are *HUGS* was getting worried about you, girlfriend!


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 Response 842 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sat, Jun 26, 2004 (13:00) * 3 lines 
 
What about spam with scrambled eggs and papaya? Or is it mango?

Isn't there some sort of spam cooking competition in Hawaii that draws the state's chefs from top restaurants and hotels to show off their spam creations?


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 Response 843 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Jun 27, 2004 (13:49) * 1 lines 
 
why is spam so popular in Hawaii? i thought it was just a joke, but maybe i'm not the only one wondering?


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 Response 844 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Jun 28, 2004 (10:35) * 1 lines 
 
Spam is very popular in these parts, well once a year anyway at Spam-o-rama on Town Lake in Austin.


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 Response 845 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jun 28, 2004 (16:07) * 1 lines 
 
really??? *LAUGH* i may have to take a day trip to see that one!


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 Response 846 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Jun 30, 2004 (07:55) * 58 lines 
 
http://www.spamarama.com/

It was the early spring of 1976. Dick Terry and I were fraternizing one afternoon and Dick was bellyaching about how chili cook-offs had become so common-place." I mean, anybody can cook chili." Dick observed, "All you need is some kinda meat, some water, chili powder, comino, and maybe some cayenne, garlic, and/or onion, and you got yer basic chili. If you're from north of the Red River, you might throw in some kinda beans, but basically, that's about all it takes to make 'chili.'" " Yeah, not much of a challenge there, is it?" I responded.


" Now if someone could make SPAM® edible," Dick continued, "That would be a challenge. We ought to have a a 'SPAM®-Off.'"
" Yeah, a 'SPAMARAMA™!'" I blurted out. "We could ask George Majewski over at Soap Creek Saloon if he'd like to host it, and we could have it on April Fool's Day." " Let's do it!" Dick agreed.


And that, in a nutshell, is the beginning of the very first, longest running and funnest SPAM® event in the history of the entire universe. I never thought that it would last more than a year or two. I never thought it would attract more than a handful of Spamophiles who had been cooking and eating the infamous potted pork product since World War II. I never thought there were so many things you could make out of SPAM®!
But I was wrong! .......

David Arnsberger
The Potentate of Potted Pork Parties



Excerpt from the Austin Chronicle

Austin's Quintessential Silly Bar Party
SPAMTASTIC™ SPAMARAMA™
BY VIRGINIA B. WOOD
March 31, 2000
In the spring of 1984, my wholesale dessert business and catering company entered the seventh annual SPAMARAMA™ with a dish called SPAMBOLI™. Though we garnered only an honorable mention in the professional division, a local TV news crew did stop by our booth for a chat. CNN just happened to pick up that story, and for the next 24 hours, I was discussing the making of SPAMBOLI™ on international news. People called my mother from all over to tease her about my serendipitous TV appearance. "I thought you told us she was in Austin making fancy desserts and catering, but I saw her on the news talking about how to cook with ... SPAM®," my aunt cackled. Mother, who had never served SPAM® in our household a day in her life, was not amused.


That's SPAMARAMA™ for you: Austin's quintessential silly bar party where the unexpected, the ridiculous, and/or the disgusting are always likely to happen. You see, the pandemonious pork pattie party was the product of an earlier, simpler time when the city didn't take itself nearly so seriously as it does today. It's one of those events that defines a certain laid-back aspect of Austin, Texas, in the last quarter of the 20th century that seems to be disappearing. For the last 22 years, SPAMARAMA™ has been one of the traditional rites of spring, like Eeyore's Birthday Party or cutting class/calling in sick because the weather is beautiful and it's an obvious lake day.


Back when SPAMARAMA™ first started, there weren't too many upscale restaurants or CIA-trained chefs here in River City, but the cook-off always attracted a broad cross-section of amateur and professional cooks. Some guys, such as multiple SPAMARAMA™ award-winner John Myers (aka Chef SPAM®) always went the haute cuisine route with dishes such as SPAM® Oscar, SPAM® Cordon Bleu, or SPAM® Puffs. Other guys, like Kevin Rollins, took a completely different direction and perennially competed for the "Worst" dish, creating delicacies like SPAM-ALAMA™ Ding-Dongs and other questionable food items too disgusting to describe even in an alternative newspaper.....

Original article


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Excerpt from the Daily Texan

SPAM® Takes the City by Storm!
By Dan Kleiner
On April 1, a torch left New York City headed for Austin with a can of SPAM sitting atop it where the fire should have been. When a girl ran with the torch through the gates of Waterloo Park on Saturday, it began the 26th year of a festival inspired by the meat product that fed England during World War II.

SPAMARAMA™ drew thousands - an estimated 8,000 to 9,000 people - to the park for music, food, rides and the SPAMALYMPICS. " SPAMARAMA™ has gone through a lot of changes, and this year is no different," said Norman Kieke, the executive director of Disability Assistance of Central Texas, SPAMARAMA™'s main sponsor. "It grew out of a small neighborhood function and gets better every year. We are always very excited."

The SPAM®-related festival started out small as an alternative event to April Fools' Day barbecues at the original Soap Creek Saloon. It has since moved to Waterloo Park and picked up the support of Kieke's organization, which receives 50 percent of the proceeds and uses them to provide employment support, technology training and general assistance to disabled Central Texans.

Local rock band Uranium Savages opened the festival and the second event, a SPAM® toss, began the SPAMALYMPICS. The youngest competitor, 11-year-old Alex Hager, opened the SPAM® calling contest, which is just like hog calling but with the word "SPAM®." His unique call, a series of armpit noises followed by a call of "Here SPAM®, here SPAM®!" took the gold medal.

Returning to defend their title in the SPAM® toss were Mark and Cody Mikeska, a father-son team with four previous SPAM® tosses under its belt. SPAM® tossers throw a chunk of SPAM® to each other at increasing distances until someone drops it. After three rounds of flying SPAM®, which sometimes christened spectators with SPAM® juice, the defending champions were pitted against two other teams. The Mikeskas won the 2004 championship. "The key is getting enough elevation under the SPAM®," Mark Mikeska said after their victory.

Many groups occupied tents, including 10-year SPAMARAMA™ veterans the Squealage People. The men dressed up as the Village People with pig-like modifications. Nathan Hinds, who drove from San Marcos for the festival, said he was particularly proud of their accomplishments this year. "Today we have a concoction called 'Queer Pork on a Straight Fork'," Hinds said. "We have won the 'Worst Taste' award eight of the last nine years, and we're darned proud of that."

After sampling the creations of various culinary artists, spectators saw the most heated and controversial SPAMARAMA™ event - the Collegiate SPAM® Relay. The race pitted UT students against contestants from Texas A&M University in a relay. It started out dead even, but by the final SPAM® handoff, the Aggies had gained a slight lead. UT's Randy Gonzalez, a 23-year-old chemical engineering senior, narrowed the lead but lost control of the SPAM® in the last few seconds. Victory went to Texas A&M, inciting booing and calls for a rematch from the crowd

After a short break, people began surging forward, pushing and leaning to get as close to the stage as possible for the final event. For years, the SPAM®-eating contest was known as the SPAM® cram. This year, the International Federation of Competitive Eating sponsored the event, bringing with it Rich and Carlene LeFevre, two of the world's most renowned eaters. The couple whizzed through SPAM® burgers, and Carlene performed her trademark "Carlene bounce," jumping up and down to settle food in her stomach. After the final bell, Rich came out on top, having eaten just more than six 12-ounce SPAM® burgers. Carlene won second place with just under five. When asked about the level of competition, Rich LeFevre said, "I was only worried about Carlene."

With the conclusion of the Spamalympics came the awards presentation for the cook-off winners. The Squealage People successfully defended their Worst Taste title with "Queer Pork on a Straight Fork," and the Lone Star Cafe-sponsored Spalamo team won the Best in Show prize for its Alamo-shaped SPAM® appetizers



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 847 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Jun 30, 2004 (07:57) * 1 lines 
 
It's usually held in April.


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 Response 848 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Jul  1, 2004 (12:28) * 1 lines 
 
well, next year then!!


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 Response 849 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, Jul  2, 2004 (13:25) * 1 lines 
 
You may want to visit Austin at some point wolfie, it has a lot going on.


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 Response 850 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul  6, 2004 (19:36) * 3 lines 
 
Spam!!! Yay! I love the stuff and no one here will even give it shelp space in their homesfor survival food! I am already hungry for Spam musubi. *sigh*

Wolfie, I am slowly ediging closer to you. Tennessee next month but not permanently yet...


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 Response 851 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Aug 11, 2004 (09:26) * 38 lines 
 
Cat pounces on pilot mid-flight

An escaped pet cat created a scare on a Belgian airliner, forcing the crew to turn back to Brussels 20 minutes into its journey. A "lot of coincidences", as the airline told BBC News Online, ended with the animal running wild in the cockpit and attacking the co-pilot.

The captain ordered the Vienna-bound plane back after about 20 minutes.

SN Brussels Airlines stressed the incident had been a fluke and the crew had observed all safety regulations.

"We 100% support the decision made by the captain," Geert Sciot, the airline's communication vice-president, told the BBC.

Nobody, he said, could tell what an agitated cat what might do in the circumstances, scrabbling around amid the sensitive equipment in the cockpit of the Avro RJ.

"It took a long time to catch it," he noted, describing the offending beast - said by Brussels newspaper La Derniere Heure to be a tom by the name of Gin - as "very aggressive".

Kick theory

As an investigation got under way into Monday's incident, Mr Sciot explained that it appeared to be essentially a freak accident, caused by a series of circumstances:


* the cat's owner was apparently sleeping when it escaped from its travelling bag

* a child in a neighbouring seat may have interfered with the bag, releasing the cat

* nobody alerted the crew before the cat slipped into the cockpit as meals were being served to the crew

The airline spokesman pointed out that the cat aboard Flight SN 2905, travelling from Oslo via Brussels to Vienna, was being conveyed in accordance with international regulations.

These allow for a single pet weighing no more then five kilos to be carried in a suitable piece of luggage in the cabin.

He stressed, too, that the cockpit had been open for no more than "five to 10" seconds, in respect of safety guidelines brought in after the 11 September 2001 hijackings over America.

The pet's owner had some questions to answer back on the ground as the other 57 passengers were put on another flight but no action was taken against the cat itself.

"It's a very nice animal but apparently, sometimes, an aggressive one," said Mr Sciot, noting that the cat had "travelled a lot" as its owner went to cat exhibitions.

One possible reason for the creature's sudden fit of fury may have been an unconfirmed report that it was "kicked by somebody in business class" on its way through the cabin, he added.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/3551672.stm


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 Response 852 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Aug 20, 2004 (12:50) * 79 lines 
 
A little bit of history concerning the Olympics. One century ago the Olympics were first hosted by an American city, St. Louis. It wasn't really a stellar presentation.

These games were a sideshow in every sense.

We usually have the image in our minds that the Olympics are really big business. The hosting cities go out of their way to make sure that everything runs smoothly and that the best facilities are provided for the competing athletes.

But, it wasn't always this way.

Take the 1904 St. Louis, Missouri Summer Olympics for example. These games were only the third summer games ever held (There actually were no winter games at this time - they were added in 1924.). The original games were held in 1896 at Athens and were then followed by the 1900 Paris games.

The St. Louis games could hardly be called an international competition. Since traveling overseas from Europe was extremely expensive at the time, the competition consisted mostly of Americans and Canadians (of the 681 athletes, 525 were from the United States.). It should be pointed out, however, that the Olympics were not intended to be a competition among nations at the time - it was a competition among amateur athletes from around the world. It was the job of the amateur athlete to find his way to the games at his own expense. No one cared if you couldn't get there.

Needless to say, the 1904 Olympics were of relatively minor importance. They were originally scheduled to take place in Chicago, but President Roosevelt urged for the games to be held in St. Louis because the Louisiana Purchase (World) Exposition was being held there at the same time to showcase the world's newest technologies (electricity, automobiles, airplanes, etc.).

The Exposition organizers built a permanent gymnasium and a stadium with enough seats to hold some 35,000 spectators (This may sound like a lot of people, but it's really nothing when you compare it to the estimated 20 million people that attended the Exposition during its six month run.). The entire event lasted from Monday, August 29 to Saturday, September 3, 1904. There were no events scheduled for Friday, so the entire series of Olympic games lasted for just five short days.

At this point you probably don't see too much wrong with this scenario. Unfortunately, when the games were actually held, they were a disaster.

To start, if you were considered to be a minority, you had to compete in separate games. These games came under the high-sounding name of "Anthropology Days" which were held on August 12 and 13, 1904. These games were designed to face "costumed members of the uncivilized tribes" against one another. Never-to-be classic Olympic games were included - mud fighting, rock throwing, pole climbing, spear throwing, and... you get the idea...

Things went downhill from there.

In swimming, Hungary's Zoltan Halmay won the 100m and 50m freestyle. Originally, Halmay beat American J. Scott Leary by just one foot in the 50m event. However, the American judge ruled that Leary had won. This ruling resulted in a brawl between the two, so the judges ordered a rematch. Halmay won on the second attempt. (They couldn't check the videotape at this time in history.)

An American gymnast named George Eyser won two gold, two silver, and one bronze medal at the games. Quite a remarkable feat when you consider the fact that he only had one real leg - the other leg was solid wood (His leg was amputated when he was run over by a train - Ouch!).

Now for the competition that they would really like to strike from the record books - the Marathon.

The marathon was run on a very humid, 90+ degree day. The 40 kilometer course started with five laps around the stadium track. The runners then left the stadium and embarked on a dusty, unpaved course that took them up-and-down over seven different hills. The path was marked by red flags that designated the way. A vanguard of horsemen cleared the trail along the way. They were followed by doctors, judges, and reporters in the newly invented automobiles. The net result was a constant cloud of dust kicked up into the runners' faces. They were literally forced to eat dust.

The first man to cross the finish line was Fred Lorz from New York City. Lorz had completed the race in just over three hours time. When he entered the stadium, the crowd roared with excitement. Photographs were taken of President Roosevelt's daughter Alice placing a laurel wreath over Lorz's head.

Lorz's moment in the limelight did not last very long. Just as Lorz was about to accept his medal, officials learned that Lorz had been spotted passing the halfway mark in an automobile. It seems that Lorz had been suffering from cramps, so he hitched a ride at the 9 mile point. He then rode in the vehicle for another eleven miles, at which point the car overheated and broke down. He waived at the spectators and fellow runners along the way. Lorz, now rejuvenated from his ride, chose to run the rest of the race.

Lorz claimed that he never meant to fool anyone - he just couldn't resist the praise and adulation of the roaring crowd. Lorz was immediately banned for life from any future amateur competition. This ban was lifted a year later allowing him to win the Boston Marathon (we'll assume that he was closely watched).

So, if Lorz didn't win, who did?

It was a British-born man named Thomas Hicks who ran for the American team. Hicks ran the race in 3:28:53. When he ran into the stadium the crowd was less than enthusiastic. After all, they had already cheered for a winner, even if he had been disqualified.

Of course, good little Alice Roosevelt was again ready to pose with the winner. But she couldn't. Hicks had to be carried off of the track. It seems that Hicks had begged to lie down about ten miles from the finish line. Instead, his trainers gave him an oral dose of strychnine sulfate mixed into raw egg white to keep him going. This was not enough - they had to give him several more doses, as well as brandy, along the way. By the end of the race, Hicks had to actually be supported by two of his trainers so that he could cross the finish line (essentially, he was carried over the line with his feet moving back-and-forth). Hicks was very close to death's door. It took four doctor's to get him in good enough shape just to leave the grounds, eventually falling asleep on a trolley.

Wait! That's not the end of the story! (can it get any more bizarre?)

It seems that another entrant was a Cuban postman named Felix Carvajal. Once Felix heard about the marathon, he announced that he was going to run. He had no money, so he quit his job and went into the fund raising business. He ran around the central square in Havana and jumped on a soapbox pleading for donations. He repeated this several times until he raised the necessary cash.

On his way to the race, Felix managed to lose all of his money in a crap game in New Orleans. As a result, he had to hitchhike his way to the games (not an easy thing to do in 1904). When Carvajal arrived at the games, he lacked any type of running gear. The officials were forced to postpone the start of the marathon for several minutes while he cut the sleeves off his shirt and the legs off his pants. He ran the race in lightweight street shoes.

During the race, Felix didn't seem to fatigue easily. He constantly conversed with the crowd, even running backwards at times while he spoke to them in broken English.

But wait, in keeping with the 1904 tradition it had to get worse for poor Felix:

He blew any chance of victory by getting hungry. He first ate some peaches that he stole from a race official. He then took a detour into an orchard to munch on some green apples. Big mistake - he developed stomach cramps and had to temporarily drop out of the marathon. Eventually, Felix got back in the race and managed to come in fourth place. He probably would have won if he had not gotten the munchies.

Hold it - the marathon is still not over!

The marathon included the first two black Africans to compete in the Olympics - two Zulu tribesman named Lentauw (real name: Len Taunyane)and Yamasani (real name: Jan Mashiani). They wore bibs 35 and 36, respectively.

The only problem was that these two tribesmen were not in town to compete in the Olympics - they were actually the sideshow! Yes, they were imported by the exposition as part of the Boer War exhibit (both were really students at Orange Free State in South Africa, but no one wanted to believe that these tribesmen could actually be educated - it would have ruined the whole image).

Lentauw finished ninth and Yamasani came in twelfth. This was a disappointment, as many observers were sure Lentauw could have done better - that is if he had not been chased nearly a mile off course by a large, aggressive canine!

The marathon was over, but there is still one more little story to go along with this:

It seems that two of the patrolling officials driving in a brand-new automobile were forced to swerve to avoid hitting one of the runners - they ended up going down an embankment and were severely injured.

In the end, the St. Louis Olympics (along with the previous Paris games) proved to be such a disaster that the Olympic Committee was forced to hold interim Olympic games in 1906 at Athens, in an attempt to revive the flagging Olympic movement. These games were not numbered, but were attended by twenty countries and put the Olympics back on a steady course to success.

An interesting useless sidenote: Iced tea made its debut at the 1904 Exposition. It seems that it was so hot during the Expo that the staff at the Far East Tea House couldn't even give away their product.

What to do? What to do?

Very simple - they poured the hot tea over ice cubes! The drink quickly became the Expo's most popular beverage.

And yet another useless fact: A teenager named Arnold Fornachou was selling ice cream at his exposition booth. He ran into a big problem - he ran out of the paper dishes on which to serve the ice cream. In a stroke of genius, he noticed that the guy in the next booth, a Syrian named Ernest Hamwi, was selling waffles. Arnold rolled one of Ernie's wafer-thin waffles up and invented the ice cream cone. Within ten years more than one-third of all ice cream was served in a cone.

Useless? Useful? I’ll leave that for you to decide.

http://home.nycap.rr.com/useless/st_louis_olympics/


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 853 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Aug 20, 2004 (17:55) * 1 lines 
 
not useless, where would we be without waffle cones and iced tea *licking my jowels in anticipation*


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 Response 854 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Aug 22, 2004 (03:22) * 1 lines 
 
That's great Cheryl. I'm going to post some things in the sports conference, there's an Olympics topic there too. Tivo has been working overtime all week.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 855 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Aug 23, 2004 (06:57) * 3 lines 
 
Terry, I'd completely forgotten that there was a sports conference. I've got to get over there to check the Olympics topic.

You're such an omnivorious lupine, Wolfie. Enjoy those ice cream cones washed down with some iced tea. Actually, I love them, too.


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 Response 856 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Aug 28, 2004 (21:04) * 3 lines 
 
I am going to be heartbroken when there is no more Olympic programming to watch. As ide from the games, I am enjoying the background scenery! I think there has not been such exquisite vistas in all of Olympic history as there has been this time from Athens. My complaint is there has not been any coverage of sailing that I have been able to find. As a veteran sailor, I am most disappointed.

Great stuff from Cheryl. I never thought to worry about cats in the passenger compartment of planes...


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 Response 857 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Aug 28, 2004 (21:11) * 3 lines 
 
MARCIA *HUGS*

sadly, i've missed most of the olympics coverage (esp one of my faves, gymnastics). hope i don't miss the winter games.


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 Response 858 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Aug 31, 2004 (07:59) * 1 lines 
 
It was a great Olympics. Greece, despite naysayers, pulled it off without any mishaps or terror incidents. And the giants of USA, Russia and China competed in many events. Congrats to USA women's soccer, basketball and beach volleyball where they had stunning performances.


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 Response 859 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Sep  3, 2004 (17:34) * 3 lines 
 
Applause all round to the organizers and the people of Greece for a most cordial and event-filled safe Olympics. I miss them already.I have also been assured I can have cable put in for the next one - the Winter Games from Torino, Italy.

I judge a great deal by how the Olympic anthem is handled. The men's chorus did an especially beautiful rendition, and in Greek as it was meant to be.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 860 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Sep 22, 2004 (09:45) * 45 lines 
 
Indians mark "historic moment"

By Sara Jean Green
Seattle Times

WASHINGTON — With the dome of the U.S. Capitol as a backdrop, thousands of Indian people from across the Americas gathered on the National Mall yesterday to witness the opening of the Smithsonian's new National Museum of the American Indian.
Before any speeches were made, 25,000 people from more than 500 tribes, including two dozen tribes from Washington state, participated in the Native Nations Procession, a five-block walk from the Smithsonian Castle, the first building built on the Mall, to the museum, built on the Mall's last piece of available land.

Seventeen years in the making, the $220 million, 400,000-square-foot museum is the first in the country dedicated exclusively to Native Americans — and the first to allow Native Americans to tell their stories in their own way. Indians were involved in every stage of the museum's development, from conception to construction, and comprise 75 percent of the museum's staff.

"This is a historic moment. It is the single-most-important achievement for Native people this century," Linley Logan said as the procession streamed past him. He's a Seneca from upstate New York who worked for the museum in the early '90s before moving to Seattle with his Tlingit wife and four children; he's also a board member of the Seattle-based United Indians of All Tribes Foundation.

"This is an insider's perspective on Native values and Native culture," he said of the new museum.

Presenting that perspective — and gaining acknowledgement for the multitude of contributions Indians have made, from food domestication to military service — is long overdue, said Bob Charlo, a member of the tiny Kalispel tribe from north of Spokane. Charlo traveled to Washington, D.C., with a group of Muckleshoots for both the museum opening and a dedication ceremony two days earlier at the Pentagon. The ceremony was to bless one of three totem poles carved by members of the Lummi Nation to honor those killed in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

"For me, it's been a real spiritual journey, a kind of quest or pilgrimage," said Charlo, who lives in Auburn. "There's a lot of blank pages in the history books that should be filled with our history ... [but] we're getting past that 'invisible people' stage."

If anything, yesterday's procession and dedication, covered by more than 400 journalists from across the Americas, was meant to show that Native peoples and their cultures are very much alive.

With 8,000 more participants than expected, the colorful and dramatic Native Nations Procession alone spanned over three hours. From Native Alaskans, with their red-and-black wool blankets wrapped around their shoulders, to Aztec Indians, who wore elaborate, plumed headdresses, the procession provided a visible reminder of the vast diversity of the first peoples of North, South and Central America.

Some tribal members sang songs and played hand drums as they walked; others waved to spectators lined up six deep along the parade route, shouting greetings to familiar faces.

Sage sweetened the air, and the sounds of flutes and pipes drifted across the Mall.

Two prominent Indian U.S. senators, Dan Inouye, D-Hawaii, and Ben Nighthorse Campbell, R-Colo., walked at the head of the procession with Alejandro Toledo, a Quechua Indian and president of Peru.

Film director and activist Robert Redford and Seattle architect Johnpaul Jones, who was integral to the museum's design and construction, were among the estimated 80,000 people who attended the opening ceremony.

After the procession, a handful of dignitaries addressed the crowd from a stage that would later be graced by singer Buffy Sainte-Marie and the band Indigenous, as part of the weeklong, music-and-arts First Americans Festival.

As the first drum beat sounded to indicate the start of the museum dedication, a woman dressed in fringed leather slid her fingers across her forearm and whispered to a friend, "I just got goose bumps."

W. Richard "Rick" West, director of the museum, said the site, "located in the shadow of the national Capitol itself," would be "a spiritual marker in recognition of the first citizens of the Americas."

"Once in a great while, something so important and so powerful happens that history seems to stand still in honor," said West, who wore white buckskin and a chief's headdress. "We have felt the cruel and destructive edge of colonialism, but in our minds and in our histories, we are not its victims."

The museum, he said, is to be a symbol of hope, representing the potential for "a new, mutual understanding and respect" that can make "possible true cultural reconciliation."

Smithsonian Institution Secretary Lawrence Small predicted that the newest museum in the institution's 158-year history would draw so much attention it would become "a gateway of discovery to all other Smithsonian museums on this Mall."

"It will be yours for generations and generations to come — and that is a promise we will keep," Small said.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2002042767_museum22m.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 861 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Sep 22, 2004 (20:28) * 1 lines 
 
heard about that on the news and then right after that segment, they went on to talk about native american prisons and the filth they live in (both physical and mental). talk was that they might turn it back over to the native americans and get the bureaucracy out of it....i didn't know there were gov't run prisons for native americans.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 862 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Sep 23, 2004 (13:17) * 1 lines 
 
Wolfie, I didn't know that there were still government run Native American prisons. I knew that there had been but wasn't aware that they still existed. I missed that story; thanks for noting it.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 863 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Oct  2, 2004 (22:44) * 1 lines 
 
Native Americans are citizens of the United States of America just like the rest of us. However, they are recognized as autonimous and therefore have jurisdiction over small crimes. If it becomes a federal crime, the FBI gets into it just as it would if any of us committed a crime. (I just asked the house expert on such matters.)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 864 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Nov 18, 2004 (07:13) * 15 lines 
 
Beavers have dam good time with stolen casino money

Greensburg, La - These eager beavers had a whole new slant on money laundering.

A bag of bills stolen from a casino was snapped up by beavers who wove thousands of dollars in soggy currency into the sticks and brush of their dam on a creek in eastern Louisiana.

"They hadn't torn the bills up. They were still whole," said Maj. Michael Martin of the St. Helena Parish sheriff's office.

The money was part of $70,000 to $75,000 taken last week from the Lucky Dollar Casino in Greensburg.

St. Helena Parish deputies searched for the money for days until a lawyer, hoping to make a deal with prosecutors for a client, called and said the money had been discarded in the creek, Police Chief Ronald Harrell said.

Officers quickly found two of the bags, Martin said, but couldn't find the third until deputies started breaking down the beaver dam to drain the pond it was holding. That was when they saw the dam's expensive decoration. They eventually found the missing bag, which the beavers hadn't completely emptied.

Altogether, deputies found about $40,000, and they expect to find the rest in a safety deposit box at a bank in Mississippi, authorities said.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 865 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Nov 18, 2004 (19:38) * 1 lines 
 
*laugh* I read this one when it first came out and just had to laugh. Thanks for posting it Cheryl!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 866 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, Nov 19, 2004 (06:39) * 1 lines 
 
That's funny.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 867 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Nov 21, 2004 (19:03) * 1 lines 
 
Oh my! recycling money has taken a new turn. This is the first I had heard of it! Thanks Cgheryl, for the laugh. Now go watch Mt Etna erupt http://www.ct.ingv.it/UfMoni/


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 868 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Nov 24, 2004 (11:50) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks for the link, Marcia.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 869 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Nov 24, 2004 (11:52) * 21 lines 
 
This is a bit of silliness for Thanksgiving.

Happy Thanksgiving to American Geoites (is that a word) and wishes for a great fourth Thursday to everyone else.

The Parrot

A young man named John received a parrot as a gift. The parrot had a bad attitude and an even worse vocabulary. Every word out of the bird's mouth was rude, obnoxious and laced with profanity. John tried and tried to change the bird's attitude by consistently saying only polite words,
playing soft music and anything else he could think of to "clean up" the bird's vocabulary.

Finally, John was fed up and he yelled at the parrot. The parrot yelled back. John shook the parrot and the parrot got angrier and even ruder.
John, in desperation, threw up his hand, grabbed the bird and put him in the freezer.
For a few minutes the parrot squawked and kicked and screamed. Then suddenly there was total quiet. Not a peep was heard for over a minute. Fearing that he'd hurt the parrot, John quickly opened the door to the freezer.

The parrot calmly stepped out onto John's outstretched arms and said, "I believe I may have offended you with my rude language and actions. I'm sincerely remorseful for my inappropriate transgressions and I fully intend to do everything I can to correct my rude and unforgivable
behaviour."

John was stunned at the change in the bird's attitude. As he was about to ask the parrot what had made such a dramatic change in his behaviour, the bird continued,

"May I ask what the turkey did?"

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 870 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Nov 24, 2004 (13:47) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Thanksgiving!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 871 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Nov 25, 2004 (09:39) * 1 lines 
 
HAPPY THANKSGIVING!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 872 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Nov 25, 2004 (10:19) * 1 lines 
 
It's here.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 873 of 1049: heidi jaccarino  (felisecffan) * Thu, Nov 25, 2004 (15:49) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 874 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Nov 25, 2004 (18:04) * 1 lines 
 
Welcome Heidi.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 875 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 26, 2004 (13:19) * 37 lines 
 
Happy Thanksgiving, All, and here is more fun for Thanksgiving, thanks to HL




Twas The Night Of Thanksgiving!

TWAS THE NIGHT OF THANKSGIVING, BUT I JUST COULDN'T SLEEP
I TRIED COUNTING BACKWARDS; I TRIED COUNTING SHEEP.

THE LEFTOVERS BECKONED - THE DARK MEAT AND WHITE
BUT I FOUGHT THE TEMPTATION WITH ALL OF MY MIGHT

TOSSING AND TURNING WITH ANTICIPATION
THE THOUGHT OF A SNACK WAS INFATUATION.

I RACED TO THE KITCHEN, FLUNG OPEN THE DOOR
AND GAZED AT THE FRIDGE, FULL OF GOODIES GALORE.

I GOBBLED UP TURKEY AND BUTTERED POTATOES,
PICKLES AND CARROTS, BEANS AND TOMATOES.

I FELT MYSELF SWELLING SO PLUMP AND SO ROUND,
'TILL ALL OF A SUDDEN, I ROSE OFF THE GROUND.

I CRASHED THROUGH THE CEILING, FLOATING INTO THE SKY
WITH A MOUTHFUL OF PUDDING AND A HANDFUL OF PIE

BUT, I MANAGED TO YELL AS I SOARED PAST THE TREES....
"HAPPY EATING TO ALL; PASS THE CRANBERRIES, PLEASE."

MAY YOUR STUFFING BE TASTY, MAY YOUR TURKEY BE PLUMP.
MAY YOUR POTATOES 'N GRAVY HAVE NARY A LUMP,

MAY YOUR YAMS BE DELICIOUS; MAY YOUR PIES TAKE THE PRIZE;
MAY YOUR THANKSGIVING DINNER STAY OFF OF YOUR THIGHS.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 876 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sat, Nov 27, 2004 (09:21) * 9 lines 
 
Hi all and Happy Turkey Day

Did the usual stuff and did not go to the over crowded
malls on Friday - got work done, stayed sane, and actually
accomplished some stuff. Had the shortwave on (as an
alternative to TV) and listened to the BBC.

73 de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 877 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Nov 30, 2004 (14:48) * 1 lines 
 
Check in with at 10 am on 7270 if you get the chance!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 878 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Nov 30, 2004 (20:10) * 6 lines 
 
Howdy howdy

Is that time for weekdays/weekends? Was curious if Bob
checks in from Razorback country.

73 de Mike


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 879 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Dec  1, 2004 (07:13) * 1 lines 
 
He checks in more than anyone. He's pretty regular at 10 am on 7270.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 880 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Dec  3, 2004 (18:30) * 3 lines 
 
Wish I could get him but the current receiver doesn't even get regular AM. I'm stuck in FM-ville

Back to Hawaii next month. Everyone do eruption dances for Kilauea


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 Response 881 of 1049: Lucie  (alyeska) * Sat, Dec  4, 2004 (20:43) * 1 lines 
 
LOL. Will do


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 Response 882 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec  6, 2004 (15:23) * 12 lines 
 
Ok Geoites - there is good stuff ^ up ^ there this month:
The 2004 Geminid Meteor Shower

The best meteor shower of 2004, the Geminids, peaks on Dec. 13th.

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2004/06dec_geminids.htm?list89800


Science@NASA stories are available in Spanish at our sister site,
Ciencia@NASA .




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 883 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Dec  6, 2004 (20:35) * 1 lines 
 
oh, cool! i need to remind myself to get out and look at the night sky. thanks marcia!!! (my firewall wasn't allowing me to use msn so just in case you had been looking for me).


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 884 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Dec  9, 2004 (16:12) * 11 lines 
 
Will do a proper volcanic jig!

Also, the Winter Solstice is rapidly approaching so bang on drums
and jump around then as well.

FM only? Time to hit the local ham fest and dig up a shortwave
with ssb or cw. Conditions on HF have been good as of late with
the summer thunderstorms moving to the other side of the globe.

73 de Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 885 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Dec 10, 2004 (08:38) * 2 lines 
 
I'm really lookin forward to the fast approching winter soltice. These progressively shorter, short days are really getting to me.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 886 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, Dec 10, 2004 (13:59) * 1 lines 
 
Feels like it was just summer and we're already upon the darkest night.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 887 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Dec 21, 2004 (11:35) * 5 lines 
 
It is colder than you can imagine for this far south and I have been dribbling faucets so the pipes don't freeze. I love winter but insulation is also a good idea.

Wolfie did you see any meteors? Did anyone? Nothing here but my son has seen the comet!

More in weather. We're gonna get a white Christmas !!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 888 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Dec 21, 2004 (15:21) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Winter Soltice! Unless you're Rob, in which case, Happy Summer Solstice!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 889 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Dec 21, 2004 (17:10) * 5 lines 
 
yes, Happy (insert season here) Solstice! *grin*

marcia, meant to get out and look but it was a school night. what comet???

they're teasing us with a white Christmas too (flurries, slim chance). but it's supposed to get really cold!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 890 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Jun  7, 2005 (09:41) * 35 lines 
 
Dolphin mothers pass tool use to daughters

Andreas von Bubnoff

6 June 2005; | news@nature.com

Australian dolphins learn to hunt with sponges stuck to their noses.

Bottlenose dolphins are known to be smart, but a study of tool use has emphasized just how clever these mammals can be. Female dolphins in an Australian bay seem to be learning from their mothers how to stick marine sponges on their noses to help them hunt for fish, researchers say.

"It is the first documented case of tool use in a marine mammal," says Michael Krützen of the University of Zurich, Switzerland, who led the study into how the trick is passed from one generation to the next. Rather than being an inherited trait, the tool use is probably being learned by daughter dolphins from their mothers, the researchers report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences1.

Sponge-using dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) were first described in 1997 in Shark Bay, 850 kilometres north of Perth, Australia2. Since then, all dolphins known to use this tool have come from the same bay, and the vast majority have been female. Direct observations have been rare, but researchers think the dolphins use the marine sponges to disturb the sandy sea bottom in their search for prey, while protecting their beaks from abrasion.

The knack of learning to use tools from fellow creatures is thought to be very rare. Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) have been seen to use two stones to crack open nuts, for instance, and this is thought to be a culturally acquired trait3. In other instances tool use seems to be inherited. New Caledonian crows (Corvus moneduloides), for example, use twigs to gain access to food in nooks and crannies of trees, and can do so without having been taught by another crow4.

Daughters of Eve

To see whether the dolphin behaviour was inherited, Krützen and his colleagues analysed DNA from 13 spongers, only one of which, Antoine, was male, and from 172 non-spongers.

They found that most spongers shared similar mitochondrial DNA, which is genetic information passed down from the mother. This indicates that the spongers are probably all descended from a single "Sponging Eve". The spongers also shared similar DNA from the nucleus, suggesting that Eve lived just a few generations ago.

But not all the female dolphins with similar mitochondrial DNA use sponges. And when the researchers considered ten different means of genetic inheritance, considering that the sponging trait might be dominant, recessive, linked to the X-chromosome or not, they found no evidence that the trait was carried in DNA. "It's highly unlikely that there is one or several genes that causes the animals to use tools," says Krützen.

Andrew Whiten, a researcher who studies cultural tradition in chimpanzees at the University of St. Andrews, UK, says the work is very thorough. "Krützen and his colleagues have done a painstaking genetic analysis," says Whiten. But he cautions that there is as yet no evidence that dolphins can pick up tool use by observation.

Copy cats

Krützen points out that young dolphins spend up to four or five years with their mother, giving them lots of time to pick up the trick. "We know they are seeing it all the time," says Janet Mann, a co-author of the study from Georgetown University in Washington DC. In general, dolphins are known to imitate each other very well, Krützen adds.

Mann says the males probably learn sponging from their mothers as well, but do not engage in it when older, perhaps because they are too busy pursuing fertile females to engage in complicated foraging. She hopes to catch the dolphins in the act of learning sponge use from their mothers soon.

Krützen plans to study whether the sponge users have any advantage over non-spongers. A preliminary study of the fat content in dolphin blubber suggests that spongers get food that other animals do not, Krützen says.

http://www.nature.com/news/2005/050606/full/050606-2.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 891 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jun  7, 2005 (18:55) * 1 lines 
 
cool--thanks cheryl!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 892 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Jun 22, 2005 (14:08) * 17 lines 
 
Giant Popsicle Melts, Floods New York Park

NEW YORK - An attempt to erect the world's largest Popsicle in a city square ended with a scene straight out of a disaster film — but much stickier.

The 25-foot-tall, 17 1/2-ton treat of frozen Snapple juice melted faster than expected Tuesday, flooding Union Square in downtown Manhattan with kiwi-strawberry-flavored fluid that sent pedestrians scurrying for higher ground.

Firefighters closed off several streets and used hoses to wash away the sugary goo.

Snapple had been trying to promote a new line of frozen treats by setting a record for the world's largest Popsicle, but called off the stunt before it was pulled fully upright by a construction crane. Authorities said they were worried the thing would collapse in the 80-degree, first-day-of-summer heat.

"What was unsettling was that the fluid just kept coming," Stuart Claxton of the Guinness Book of World Records told the Daily News. "It was quite a lot of fluid. On a hot day like this, you have to move fast."

Snapple official Lauren Radcliffe said the company was unlikely to make a second attempt to break the record, set by a 21-foot pop in Holland in 1997.

The giant pop was supposed to have been able to withstand the heat for some time, and organizers weren't sure why it didn't. It had been made in Edison, N.J., and hauled to New York by freezer truck in the morning.

http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20050622/ap_on_fe_st/popsicle_disaster_2


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 893 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Jun 22, 2005 (19:16) * 1 lines 
 
*laugh*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 894 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Jul  1, 2005 (10:11) * 3 lines 
 
Where is everyone?

Well, if there any Canadians out there reading the Geo conference, let me take this opportunity to wish you a Happy Canada Day!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 895 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul  2, 2005 (18:32) * 5 lines 
 
Happy Canada Day from here, too.

I am going to try my best to write up field notes on Geo 89 (not 88 as previously reported) of our archaeological and other scientific adventures. I have three - at least - ready to work with and one about done. Others are being planned as we try to avoid busy summer traffic days and locations. I'll do a kind of travelogue and rate it as to what I expected and how children might enjoy it.

Thanks Wolfie and Cheryl. Geo is not self sustaining - it never seems to write its own posts even though I send it beams most of the time. *;)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 896 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Jul  3, 2005 (19:31) * 3 lines 
 
Cheryl, I prowl about but haven't been posting much :-( Sure miss Marcia's regular updates!! Hi Marcia *HUGS*

Am late but Happy Canada Day!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 897 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Jul 11, 2005 (13:37) * 12 lines 
 
Hi all and Happy Canada Day

I miss Marcia's postings as well! I have been very absent
myself as of late and even though graduate school finished
for the summer, I didnt make good on my promise to do some
postings here including some very much needed rejuvination of
gaia magnetosphere. So, anyway, enuf with the excuses so
Id better build or record something so I can post.

Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 898 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Jul 12, 2005 (23:53) * 1 lines 
 
Bob's in town. We're doing the http://touroftexas.com.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 899 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Jul 14, 2005 (19:33) * 6 lines 
 
Howdy howdy
Cool beans - please pardon the bw but I will be on 2.150 on 7-18
maybe catch you then.

73 de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 900 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Jul 22, 2005 (12:59) * 46 lines 
 
The world's unluckiest book?

By Martina Smit

The world's most magnificent book is also one of the unluckiest: it was lost on the Titanic, bombed and its bookbinder drowned.

But finally the jewelled binding of Persian poet Omar Khayyam's Rubaiyat may have had a stroke of luck. This week it found a new home at the British Library's Treasure Gallery, where it went on public display.

The lavish cover, probably the most expensive ever produced, includes over 1000 gems, 5000 coloured inlays and more than 50 square feet of gold leaf.

English bookbinder Francis Sutcliffe, of Sangorski & Sutcliffe, took almost two years to complete the first binding in 1912.

For months he had told his friends of his dream to bind the Rubaiyat in that way, says British Library bookbinding curator Philippa Marks. It was one of the most popular books in Victorian times.

To prepare his designs, the binder studied snakes at the London Zoo and human skulls at an anatomist.

At first the book went on sale for £1,000, a fortune in those days. Yet due to an economic slump and a UK coal strike an American bought it for only £405.

It was shipped across the Atlantic on the Titanic, but was lost along with over 1,500 lives when the cruiser hit an iceberg four days into its maiden voyage.

Six weeks after finishing the Great Omar, Mr Sutcliffe also drowned in the sea at Selsey Bill, Sussex.

Stanley Bray, nephew and apprentice of the bookbinder, took on the task of recreating the firm's masterpiece. Working in his spare time from 1932 to 1939, he used the original designs, including garnets, olivines, rubies, topazes, and turquoises.

However, despite being locked up in a safe, the book was destroyed in a Second World War bombing in 1941.

Undaunted, Bray salvaged the gems that survived the blast to recreate the binding once again. But he had to wait until the age of 80, after he had left the firm, to complete the 4,000-hour task.

His widow, Irene, bequeathed the famous volume to the British Library when she died last year.

The library's bookbinding curator does not heed warnings that the Great Omar might be cursed.

"I take some comfort in the fact that this is the third version," Ms Marks said. "Maybe it is a case of third time lucky."

The design on the front cover is made up of peacocks. On the back there is a Persian mandolin made of mahogany, inlaid with silver, satinwood and ebony.

The inside of the front cover features a tree of life with a snake, while a skull forms the centerpiece of the death composition on the inside of the back cover.

And what is it worth now?

One can value the jewels and the rare illustrations by symbolist painter Elihu Vedder, Ms Marks said.

"But you can't put a price on history."

http://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/display.var.615334.0.the_worlds_unluckiest_book.php



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 901 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Jul 22, 2005 (13:00) * 17 lines 
 
Beast sighting investigated

POLICE have been called out to investigate another sighting of the Beast of Bexley.

Officers from Bexleyheath police station went to Upton Road, Bexleyheath, after a teenager reported seeing the giant black cat in undergrowth by Bexleyheath Golf Club.

Tom Shinners, 15, of Farnham Road, Welling, was on his way home from a friend's house at around 10.30pm on July 12 when he saw the cat.

He told News Shopper: "I heard a rustling in the bushes as I was walking past and as I looked through the metal fence, I saw this giant black cat trotting across the grass.

"I only saw it for a few seconds before it disappeared again into the undergrowth."

He added: "I didn't know what to think, so I rang the police."

A spokesman for Bexleyheath police confirmed officers did visit the scene but found nothing.

http://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/display.var.615128.0.beast_sighting_investigated.php


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 902 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Jul 22, 2005 (18:06) * 3 lines 
 
that book is lovely....let's hope the curse is broken! thanks, cheryl.

am gonna add the beast of bexely to sitings in springark. interesting!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 903 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Oct  1, 2005 (17:57) * 3 lines 
 
I DO wish I could see that book. I know theirs is better than my ages old paperback version. As for that large cat... Wolfie do add it to the strange and wonderful springark topic dealing with such.

I have so much to add to this topic if anyone considers it worth reading. Madoc has surfaced again as a progenitor of the Melungeons and others in Appalachia, and there is at least one new book about a King Arthur conspiracy (isn't it always a conspiracy?!)...


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 904 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Oct  1, 2005 (17:57) * 1 lines 
 
Hey Mike !! SO good to see you online. How is the radio telescope going?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 905 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Oct  1, 2005 (19:02) * 1 lines 
 
Finally I got my email changed everywhere on Spring so it is correct. *whew* I remembered how!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 906 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Oct  1, 2005 (21:16) * 1 lines 
 
King Arthur seems to be involved with the Da Vinci code too!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 907 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Oct  1, 2005 (22:02) * 1 lines 
 
OH MY word !!! I guess that made Arthur a templar too? DB has written a long paper debunking Welsh writings in the continental USA. It is so frustrating when people are determined to be fooled.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 908 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Oct  2, 2005 (21:06) * 7 lines 
 
yes, but it is interesting fodder!

truly, for me, who cares if Jesus was married? ok, it doesn't matter TO ME. and trying to find out about any children they might have had does one thing---bragging rights.....as far as i'm concerned, i'm already related to Him.

people are looking for something to touch in order to make their faith tangible, y'know? if i can show you that Jesus was real because we have a bloodline, then i'm not crazy for believing it.....all it means is that people are LOSING their faith when they reach out for any "new" version of their truth.




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 909 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Oct  3, 2005 (11:08) * 7 lines 
 
Hi Macia!
No work on the telescope lately - been working on some
microwave communications gear but now with school in
session, I need to focus on the books. Glad to see
all the postings on Geo as of late.
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 910 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Oct  3, 2005 (12:34) * 1 lines 
 
Oh dear, I had quite forgotten the book and exam grind. Good luck to you, Mike! You have an enthusiastic cheering section in Geo if you need them. What kind of courses are you taking this semester? How strange no matter where my life leads me I am in walking distance of a college. I love that !!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 911 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Oct  3, 2005 (12:36) * 3 lines 
 
Wolfie, you have the exactly correct concept of the DaVinci Code and Holy Blood Holy Grail information. It does make for interesting reading, though. I love history and this is just one more way to make it pallitable.




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 912 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Oct  3, 2005 (17:25) * 5 lines 
 
Please try this - and read the answers

http://www.newstarget.com/gullibility.html

I am a learner, though I suspect if I could have spent more time at it, I'd have done a bit better.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 913 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Oct  3, 2005 (17:56) * 16 lines 
 
Hi Marcia, Wolfie, and Geoites

Taking some computer project process courses right now - mostly
stuff about how do a computer project from start to finish. This
is a bit of a switch from the coding scene.
Been keeping track of the thread on the DaVinci Code - that was
one book I need to get to read (or actually put in queue to read)
but first currently slogging through Gravity's Rainbow and also
a new Noam Chomsky book which is a good thought provoking read so far.

One of my favorite times when I lived in Austin was being near the
University so I could go to all the foreign films at the Union, plus
the used record and book stores to goof off.

73 de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 914 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Oct  3, 2005 (18:10) * 3 lines 
 
Ah another fan of bookstores. I have to be hauled from them bodily, almost kicking and screaming.

I'd appreciate a quick critique of Holy Blood Holy Grail (fact) vs The DaVinci Code (fiction) and should I bother to read the latter.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 915 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Oct  3, 2005 (18:17) * 6 lines 
 
I'll have to look back through the thread to get the context (plus, really, read the two to make an educated critique). So, will do that then try to
make a lucid post....
Also, it is sooo cool to be going to the recent posts and seeing all your entries!

73 de Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 916 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Oct  3, 2005 (18:21) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks Mike. It is fantastic to see all of you coming out of the fissures of Geo. It sounds like the crack of doom on Mordor - but that is yet another good book.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 917 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Oct  3, 2005 (18:28) * 9 lines 
 
I think we were just missing our GeoNymph to get things rolling. BTW, what thread was the DaVinci code discussion going on so I can get a context? From
what previous posts I have read reminded me of a book I bought long ago that was on of many conspiracy books: The Gemstone Files which traces back alot of the evil secret conspiracies that took place in the 60's and 70's in the US govt and world political stage. There were some add on sections one of which was titled 'Tales of the Vatican Crypt' with all kinds of secret conspiracies as well. Of course, there was a section by Robert Anton Wilson who wrote the greatest conspiracy fiction (or fact???) book: The Illuminatus! Trilogy
So, there are all kinds of shadows, cliques and cults, and dark secrets going on behind the scenes. ooo, scary. ;-) But fun reads none the less.
Also, wanted to mention I was reading some of the other posts in the screwed section and really enjoyed the geoguy's one - will have to reactivate THAT
one as well.

73 de Mike
rci



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 918 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Oct  3, 2005 (19:13) * 3 lines 
 
My dad was a Freemason as were both grandfathers and on back - and they are supposed to have been conspiring about something. They and the Knights Templar are favorite targets of conspiracy theorists. I sometimes miss Art Bell... but not all that much. The internet is full of robust blogs debating theories. DB is currently writing learned papers for learned journals critiquing the claims. It is amazing what some people believe, but it is no more interesting than REAL science!

*SIGH* GeoNymph is back *;) (not everyone here knows I have another alias!)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 919 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Oct  3, 2005 (19:59) * 14 lines 
 
Howdy howdy

I treat alot of that stuff as 'file under interesting to an extent but dont let it overwhelm' These past couple of days, I have come to the conclusion that
real science is enough of a pursuit as there are tangible results/research
to be found. I have even come to some conclusions about what to focus my
finite energies on including radio (not the ham/astronomy radio but broadcast)
that even that is going to take a back seat. If I do anything like that
it might be a podcast for kicks. Yep, you are right about the REAL science
and along with my school studies, there will be a bit of time to dedicate
to astronomy, microwave propagation, and of course, the VLF and ELF signals
of the earth. And read books, photography, etc. etc....

73 de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 920 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Oct  3, 2005 (20:58) * 7 lines 
 
i got "free thinker" on that little gullibility test!

there was a thread on DVC? my father recommended it...but he likes to read and discuss controversial things....still, i plan to.

marcia, i'm with you on being dragged out of bookstores kicking and screaming...i am absolutely fascinated with them.....i love being around books, having them on my bookshelves, flipping through them, whatever. and i HATE leaving a bookstore empty-handed! sad to say, but the AM is the first one to moan and groan when we're running the streets and i say, hey, let's run into B&N! (he forgets that ours has a starbucks inside and that's my alterior motive--they put something in that coffee, i'm telling you)....

and i'm with mike on this place being empty----i would come in here and become sad because you, marcia, hadn't been around (not that the others posting weren't good company).....it's hard to keep momentum when the person spinning the wheel is absent....*HUGS*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 921 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Oct  3, 2005 (22:24) * 6 lines 
 
is free thinker smarter then learner? I bow to your superior wisdom.

OH dear !!! I promise never to leave again. It was like part of me was missing. A very large and nice part. YOU !!!

Imagine this house ... here in Louisville. I had arrived late at night from far too many years where mildew and cockroaches eat what the termites didn't of your library. This is an old house here. Little windows and LOTS of blank walls. Each and every wall has bookcases lining them floor to ceiling. There is one room that has a library table in the middle and his old books are in there. It smells glorious !!! The bed upstairs is in the middle of the room (under dangling Dracula) because we need the walls for more books. My laptop is on a table in another room beside the desk that holds the large pc. I am in the middle so the bookcases can line the walls. yet daily more books arrive. Some written by the master of the house and some as reference for the next volume. I absolutely love it here. AND, these are all books I want to read! Interestingly, what I sent of my library fits in nicely even if there is not room for it. Mine is cultural anthropology (history, archaeology etc) under the guise of
just about anything on the planet that interests me. Yup, if heaven exists, I hope it has a BIG library !!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 922 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Oct  3, 2005 (22:31) * 1 lines 
 
I stopped (long ago actually) doing what did not interest me, Mike. If you have a source of modest income you can do pretty much what you want to do and read the books that fascinate you, Btw, we call it "lunatic fringe" archaeology - that stuff with Welsh speaking Amerindians and space people building Stonehenge. They seem never to run out of the fanciful, so I created a topic just for such discussions as ley lines and crop cicles. I think it is Geo 28, but anyone is welcome to post a comment wherever he are inspired.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 923 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Oct  4, 2005 (08:50) * 1 lines 
 
Wolfie, I scored in the "free thinker" range too. Maybe that's how we both ended up here at Geo?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 924 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct  4, 2005 (14:25) * 1 lines 
 
I created Geo because I am and will always be a "learner" who keeps company with free thinkers to learn new things *;) It works for me !


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 925 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Oct  4, 2005 (16:27) * 9 lines 
 
Hi all

Can I join the free thinker club too?? I took the test and found the
discussions behind the answers as interesting as the questions. All
this time I just thought I was a jaded cynic.

73 de Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 926 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct  4, 2005 (18:39) * 3 lines 
 
THAT very quality of the test is why I posted in in Geo. I learned more from the discissions than I knew going in. That is always worthwhile.

Am currently "helping" prepare a paper on grave houses. Are there any out there you'd like to share?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 927 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Oct  4, 2005 (19:23) * 16 lines 
 
Hi Marcia and Geo Folk

Im interested (tis the season, after all...) in the thread on grave houses
or rather what they are and in what culture are they referenced.
Aside from the traditional cemetaries, crypts, etc, I have read some articles
about neolithic, iron age, bronze age, etc barrows, grave sites, etc - the most interesting articles were in a UK publication 'Ley Hunter' (no, not a mazazine
for pickup lines for singles bars...) but rather a serious scientific and learned discussion on ley lines, ancient sites, folklore, traditions, and
so on. One article dealt with death roads and spirit paths which included
many interesting examples of European and UK isle sites and legends.
Once again, an interesting web site to research - alas, the paper publication
no longer exists.

73 de Mike
r-c-i




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 928 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct  4, 2005 (20:31) * 8 lines 
 
Gravehouses: They are structures built directly above inground interments. They do NOT contain human remains. They are constructed to protect graves over with they are erected. Gravehouses have been reported in Indian settlements on the upper peninsula of Michigan - L'Anse and Vieux Desert Indian Reservation in Baraga County. Other examples (all are associated with Indian tribes) in the western Great Lakes area are known. (Thank you DB)

Further photos and information:
http://www.tngenweb.org/darkside/index.html

If you scroll down on the above link you come to a citation of the resident archaeologist :)

"OBSERVATIONS ON THE FORM AND FUNCTION OF MIDDLE TENNESSEE GRAVEHOUSES", Donald B. Ball, Tennessee Anthropologist, Tennessee Anthropological Association II(1):29-62. 1977.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 929 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Oct  4, 2005 (21:29) * 7 lines 
 
boy am i glad you posted a definition because i was getting kind of scared--as in, how do i know if i'm living in one *laugh*

free thinker means, i think, that we have a healthy dose of realistic cynicism....besides, one of the things good about being in the military and being able to talk to all of you (and having my dad, the philosopher) was learning that i could look at something from around it rather than just being spoonfed stuff.....but, if i had taken the test in my youth, i'd be a dumb-arse, because i was so naive. thank goodness for you guys and documentary type tv channels that help me learn!

there isn't anything wrong with being a learner...i never want to stop learning!

i love the sound of your house, marcia! the AM thinks bookshelves are clutter......my bookshelves are covered in books, papers, collectibles and everything is spilling over because i only have 2! but, i did draw up a plan to put a wall-size bookshelf framing my windows in the computer/hobby/office/catch-all room....wonder if the AM will actually make it for me or if i have to do it myself *frown*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 930 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Oct  4, 2005 (21:31) * 3 lines 
 
oh, and for us 3 free-thinkers, how many more would it take to make up 5% of the population? did you guys notice that little statistic?

oh, and this is soooo off-topic, sort of, you need to take the color quiz--this thing is accurate (at least it had me down to a tee)....http://www.colorquiz.com (follow the directions and don't think too hard)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 931 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Oct  4, 2005 (21:33) * 1 lines 
 
now that i've gone to look at the gravehouse link, it reminds me of mosoleums (sp) except that the body is buried in the ground...any pictures of ones that are still standing or did i not dig enough (oh, there i go with the puns....y'know, i don't even think about them, i don't do it on purpose)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 932 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Oct  4, 2005 (23:52) * 1 lines 
 
mausoleums.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 933 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (10:36) * 10 lines 
 
Hi all

Not quite geo related but free thinking related - go to the Democracy Now
website and download the interview with Studs Terkel (Chicago historian,
writer, speaker, and all around good guy) which took place today (10-5). Most
excellent. I hope I can achieve a 10th of that level of observational analysis
and clarity.

73 de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 934 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (10:50) * 1 lines 
 
Can you copy and paste the url for us short attention span types?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 935 of 1049: Mike Kana  (aa9il) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (12:12) * 2 lines 
 
www.democracynow.org



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 936 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (13:29) * 28 lines 
 
I'm not sure where to put this but Dan Johnson was my son's best man. He called me "mom" and we will all be the poorer for his untimely death.

Wednesday, October 5, 2005 - Page updated at 10:58 AM

Washington state seismologist dies in log truck accident

The Associated Press

HUMPTULIPS — Washington state seismologist Anthony Qamar was one of two men killed in a log truck accident on winding U.S. 101 north of Hoquiam, officials said.

Qamar, 62, research associate professor of earth and space sciences at the University of Washington, died in the crash along with Daniel J. Johnson, 46, a University of Puget Sound geophysics professor, UW seismology spokesman Bill Steele said.

Qamar and Johnson were on their way to the Olympic Peninsula to collect instruments and data concerning the "slow-slip" quake that recently occurred off the coast, Steele said.

The scenic road between Hoquiam and Humptulips on the western Olympic Peninsula was closed in both directions for about 8 1/2 hours after the crash.

State Patrol investigators wrote that because of an apparent equipment failure, logs fell off a trailer being pulled by a northbound 1992 Kenworth truck.

Johnson, who was driving a 1998 Saturn, went off the road to try to avoid the hazard but the car was still hit by some of the logs and shoved into timber and brush. Johnson and Qamar were pronounced dead at the scene.

The truck was totaled but the driver, Garland Eugene Massingham, 40, of Centralia, escaped injury.

Steele said Qamar, who joined the Washington faculty in 1983, had been a key scientist among those at the university who study earthquakes and volcanoes. Steele called his death a "huge loss" that has devastated colleagues.

"He was always cheerful, always helping anyone ... always the first to volunteer to take stuff on," Steele said.

Copyright © 2005 The Seattle Times Company



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 937 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (13:44) * 3 lines 
 
Some of those gravehouses (talk about seasonal and items far too close to home) are small and are nothing but roofs with lattice work around the sides. The wooden ones are falling into ruin since the people who erected them have long since gone. That is, despite the custom of picnics at graveyards to tidy up the ancestors' resting places. It is a rather nice tradition. I thought it was bizarre until I went the first time. Now on my 4th year, I am also a family memeber and can see right where I will rest for eternity. The astronmizing from there should be spectacular !!It's called Shady Grove but there is not a single tree there. Grave houses abound however in adjacent cemeteries.

I was born a learner. If I ever lose my curiosity, just nail down the lid. I would have to be dead. Keep at it, Wolfie. If you don't use it you might lose it and that simply would NOT do.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 938 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (13:45) * 5 lines 
 
Marcia, thanks for clearing up exactly what gravehouses are; I thought they were mausoleums, too.

Mike, I visit the Democracy Now website about three or four times per week. The Studs Terkel interview is really worth checking out.

Wolfie, that is an interesting point that free thinkers are estimated at 5 percent of the population, and three of us are here at Geo!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 939 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (13:47) * 1 lines 
 
Marcia, I'm so sorry to learn about the truck accident in Washington State and Dan Johnson's untimely death. Is your son doing okay with news? Are you doing okay, yourself?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 940 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (13:49) * 1 lines 
 
OK I took the color test. A lot they got right. Hmmm I was considering which color pen I'd choose not what color I'd wear. I wonder if that makes a difference.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 941 of 1049: Mike Kana  (aa9il) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (14:08) * 8 lines 
 
Hi all

Regarding seeing where one is laid to rest, it was kind of an odd feeling when I bought a plot and saw the spot - I commented to my partner that seeing
that spot kind of lends an ultimate finality to one's life. I, of course,
really want a traditional viking's funeral....

73 de Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 942 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (15:00) * 5 lines 
 
It really is odd. I'd like the Viking funeral as well. I can't imagine putting someone you had held in your arms just a few days prior into the ground.

A picture of my "other" son http://www.komotv.com/stories/39603.htm. Thanks for asking. The kids are doing ok though the widow asked my son to take her to the scene when they get up there. That is going to be painful beyond anything I can imagine. All I can do is grieve with him.

Free Thinkers Rule!!! Only 5 %??? rarified company, indeed. Thanks for being her.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 943 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (15:01) * 1 lines 
 
Being here... was that Freudian?!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 944 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (18:50) * 7 lines 
 
*LAUGH* (about the freudian slip)

*HUGS* am sorry to learn of Dan's death too. Please send our condolences to your son (and accept them for yourself as well). Visiting the site is going to be difficult.

am going to have to go to that democracy site after my shows tonight (lost and invasion)

isn't a traditional viking funeral where they send you out to sea in a burning ship? i'd rather not think about my mortality....


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 945 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (21:05) * 4 lines 
 
Looking at your grave plot is very odd indeed. Somehow I managed to think of an infinite life or at least one stretching far into my future. What is really odd is there is a headstone for DB's mother with her name on it and she is very much
alive. That was oddest of all. Not sure I am ready for that quite yet but you never know.

Thanks for your condolences. I will forward them to a guy who has lost his brother and best friend (he got to choose his own brother since he was an only child). These next few days will be very difficult. I draped a few little white flowers around a moai he brought back for us made from Easter Island volcanic tuff exactly like the big ones. Very difficult, indeed.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 946 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (21:08) * 3 lines 
 
Mike, does your partner share curiousity with us? Please let him know he is very welcome at Geo even if he wanders off topic (and how can you do that when the topic is "et cetera" ??!!) Fire up the boat anchora. Winter is coming and cleaner signals!

Is anyone around here involved with RACES (emergency Ham radio)? I am guessing they saved the day in the last two hurricanes again !


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 947 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (21:59) * 1 lines 
 
no, it's bad enough that i'm chained to the computer and have to tear myself away----i've seen relatively few ham operators around these parts--saw them in L.A. though.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 948 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Oct  6, 2005 (11:25) * 52 lines 
 
Trio wins physics Nobel for shedding light on optics

By Niklas Pollard

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Two Americans and a German won the Nobel Physics Prize on Tuesday for optical research giving extremely accurate measurements that could one day be used in deep space travel or three-dimensional holographic television.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the prize to Roy Glauber, John Hall and Germany's Theodor Haensch for studying light and harnessing lasers to create a "measuring stick" to gauge frequencies with extreme precision.

Such precision will one day be needed for "navigation on long space journeys and for space-based telescope arrays," the Academy said, while Haensch, the youngest of the winners at 63, said it could even lead to "3D holographic television."

Talking from Munich, Haensch told Reuters he was "overwhelmed, happy and speechless" but the party would have to wait: "I have no time to celebrate right at the moment. People are waiting with champagne but I have to go to the airport to go to San Francisco."

Hall, 71 and from Colorado, said he might use his share of the 10 million Swedish crown prize money to endow a scholarship in science and technology.

"I'm very interested in helping young people that don't have financial means," he told Reuters.

CANDLES TO LASERS

"We get most of our knowledge of the world around us through light," said the Academy, calling optics "the physicists' tool for dealing with light phenomena."

The winning trio's research answered such questions as how candle light differs from laser beams in a CD player and how light can measure time more accurately than an atomic clock.

"All three of them deserve the prize," said Peter Rodgers, editor of Physics World magazine. "The general area of quantum optics and lasers is an area in which there has been a lot of progress in recent years. This prize reflects well on progress in that area."

Harvard University's Glauber, 80, said he was woken at home in Massachusetts by a call from an Academy official but he first thought it was a joke. "I could scarcely believe him," he told a news conference at Harvard.

Glauber, who took part in the Manhattan Project in World War Two which developed the atomic bomb, wins half of the prize money, though he expressed surprise that there was a cash award. "Nobody mentioned money."

He laid the groundwork for the Nobel-winning work by establishing the basis for quantum optics in 1963, providing a theoretical description of the behaviour of light particles.

STILL A BABY

Decades later, Hall and Haensch, from the University of Colorado and the Ludwig-Maximilians-University respectively, worked on determining the colour of the light with extreme precision.

Haensch used even-spaced laser pulses "like the teeth of a comb or the marks on a ruler" to determine the value of frequencies and Hall refined this technique.

Explaining what his and Haensch's teams of researchers had accomplished, Hall said: "Most people have been using a radio dial to scan frequencies to find the right music, we've made it possible to do the same in the optical realm."

"One of the best applications is to test whether what we teach in physics is true or just approximately true," he said.

Hall, retired from an organisation funded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, said he is also working on a project to use related laser technology to identify security hazards in airports. When asked how that would work, he would only say, "Come back in a year."

"It's like a newborn baby," said Hall of laser science. "You know it has fantastic potential but it's much too early to say what it will achieve."

(Additional reporting by Stephen Brown, Peter Starck and Simon Johnson in Stockholm, Philip Blenkinsop in Berlin, Patricia Reaney in London, Jason Szep in Boston and Keith Coffman in Denver)



© Reuters 2005. All Rights Reserved.

http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=topNews&storyID=2005-10-04T222633Z_01_YUE480773_RTRUKOC_0_UK-NOBEL-PHYSICS.xml&archived=False



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 949 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct  6, 2005 (15:47) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks Cheryl. That's amazing stuff. I don't even begin to understand what they are talking about. I'm guessing "approximately true"


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 950 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct  6, 2005 (16:16) * 40 lines 
 
Back to Seasonal stuff. The following article amazed and appalled us:

Lament for lost grave stones

Oct 6 2005

By Martin Smith


City council bosses have admitted they have lost almost 50 historic gravestones from an ancient burial ground in Coventry.

The blunder was revealed during the investigation into the missing gravestone of former Mayor of Coventry Thomas Luckman, as revealed by the Evening Telegraph in June.

Relatives of Mr Luckman, who was mayor in 1782, have been trying to discover the fate of the one-tonne memorial since it disappeared in 1999.

Story continues Continue story

Now in a letter to Peter Johnson, Mr Luckman's great- great- great- great grandson, the council has admitted a "vast amount" of archaeological material has gone missing.

Tony Auty, the council's head of development project, said: "....the original intention was to reuse them all [the gravestones], as paving material in the Phoenix Initiative.

"At a later stage, it was decided by the Phoenix Initiative project director not to use the gravestones and those that were still on site were disposed of.

"The project director and his staff no longer work for the city council so I am unable to ascertain why the stones were not reused and why no record was kept of how, when and where they were disposed of."

Father-of-three Mr Johnson, of Magpie Lane, Balsall Common, who is a retired chartered accountant, said the situation was a farce.

He said: "It saddens me greatly.

"It is appalling that this sort of thing happens in this day and age. It is vitally important to keep these things because they show where we have been.

"It seems to demonstrate the lack of care and under-standing on the part of the city council."

The gravestone of Mr Luckman was unearthed in 1999 as archaeologists began digging at the site of Coventry's first cathedral, off Priory Row.

Mr Luckman, a printer and freeman of the city, was buried in St Mary's graveyard in 1784 and his wife, Mary Parry, joined him 20 years later.

No remains of either were discovered when the graves were dug up but members of Mr Luckman's family wanted to preserve the gravestone.

http://iccoventry.icnetwork.co.uk/0100news/0100localnews/tm_objectid=16217310%26method=full%26siteid=50003%26headline=lament%2dfor%2dlost%2dgrave%2dstones-name_page.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 951 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct  9, 2005 (00:55) * 3 lines 
 
Terry can you tell me how to access the pictures I put on http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/read/porch/35

Mine is not working nor are many others. I had a request for mine and I can't access it.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 952 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Oct  9, 2005 (16:38) * 1 lines 
 
What's the picture url you're using?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 953 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct  9, 2005 (16:45) * 1 lines 
 
I have no idea what it is now and that is why I am not doing ftp or posting anything graphic. I need to email you .


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 954 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct  9, 2005 (22:09) * 46 lines 
 
and keeping with the Halloween season:

Prehistoric cannibalism at Yorkshire Dales

New research on bones discovered in six Dales caves (Yorkshire,
England) has revealed that farming in the area dates back thousands
of years - and with it a history of cannibalism. Dated bones found in
caves at the western edge of the limestone uplands have been taken as
evidence of rituals that involved adult skulls and other body parts
along with animal bones. The macabre finds included human bones which
have been smashed up and the marrow removed, leading specialists to
conclude they had been at the centre of a cannibalistic ritual.
Excavations took place in the caves during the 1920s and 30s.
Material from the finds was collected by Dales farmer Tom Lord's
grandfather and has finally been the subject of precise radio-carbon
dating by Oxford University.
Mr Lord said: "The radio-carbon dating evidence indicates the
presence of farming communities much earlier than previously thought,
as early as anywhere in Britain. What is so exciting is that the
dated bones were found in caves where there is clear evidence for the
special treatment of human remains.The caves would not have been easy
to find in the wooded landscape of that time, and are also small and
generally unsuitable for normal occupation."
At least four human skulls were found in a small cave in
Giggleswick Scar during excavations around 1930. One surviving skull
was directly radio-carbon dated and shown to date from about 3,600
BCE. Now experts are trying to work out why early farming communities
sought out the caves and used them for ritualistic activities.
An archaeologist and human bone specialist from King Alfred's
College, Winchester, Stephany Leach, said there was evidence of adult
human skulls being deliberately deposited in two caves. "By contrast,
a skull was amongst the missing body parts of a man placed in a
natural recess in the wall of the third cave," she said. "His jumbled
up remains were mixed together with fragmentary animal bones,
including domestic cattle, domestic pig and sheep. Many of the animal
bones had been smashed for marrow extraction, suggesting rituals took
place at the cave. The man's tibia was also deliberately smashed for
marrow extraction, suggesting at least part of his body had been
eaten."
Some of the prehistoric artefacts which have been found,
especially pieces of pottery, are datable on stylistic grounds, and
are all from a much later period, often dating between about 3,000
BCE and 2,000 BCE.

Source: Yorkshire Post Today (8 October 2005)



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 955 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Oct 10, 2005 (08:40) * 41 lines 
 
The 2005 Ig Nobel Prize Winners
The 2005 Ig Nobel Prizes were awarded on Thursday evening, October 6, at the 15th First Annual Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony, at Harvard's Sanders Theatre. You can watch archived video of the live webcast.

AGRICULTURAL HISTORY: James Watson of Massey University, New Zealand, for his scholarly study, "The Significance of Mr. Richard Buckley’s Exploding Trousers."
REFERENCE: "The Significance of Mr. Richard Buckley’s Exploding Trousers: Reflections on an Aspect of Technological Change in New Zealand Dairy-Farming between the World Wars," James Watson, Agricultural History, vol. 78, no. 3, Summer 2004, pp. 346-60.
WHO ATTENDED THE IG NOBEL CEREMONY: James Watson

PHYSICS: John Mainstone and the late Thomas Parnell of the University of Queensland, Australia, for patiently conducting an experiment that began in the year 1927 -- in which a glob of congealed black tar has been slowly, slowly dripping through a funnel, at a rate of approximately one drop every nine years.
REFERENCE: "The Pitch Drop Experiment," R. Edgeworth, B.J. Dalton and T. Parnell, European Journal of Physics, 1984, pp. 198-200.
WHO ATTENDED THE IG NOBEL CEREMONY: John Mainstone

MEDICINE: Gregg A. Miller of Oak Grove, Missouri, for inventing Neuticles -- artificial replacement testicles for dogs, which are available in three sizes, and three degrees of firmness.
REFERENCES: US Patent #5868140, and the book Going Going NUTS!, by Gregg A. Miller, PublishAmerica, 2004, ISBN 1413753167.
ACCEPTING: "The winner was unable to travel, and deliverd his acceptance speech via videotape."

LITERATURE: The Internet entrepreneurs of Nigeria, for creating and then using e-mail to distribute a bold series of short stories, thus introducing millions of readers to a cast of rich characters -- General Sani Abacha, Mrs. Mariam Sanni Abacha, Barrister Jon A Mbeki Esq., and others -- each of whom requires just a small amount of expense money so as to obtain access to the great wealth to which they are entitled and which they would like to share with the kind person who assists them.

PEACE: Claire Rind and Peter Simmons of Newcastle University, in the U.K., for electrically monitoring the activity of a brain cell in a locust while that locust was watching selected highlights from the movie "Star Wars."
REFERENCE: "Orthopteran DCMD Neuron: A Reevaluation of Responses to Moving Objects. I. Selective Responses to Approaching Objects," F.C. Rind and P.J. Simmons, Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 68, no. 5, November 1992, pp. 1654-66.
WHO ATTENDED THE IG NOBEL CEREMONY: Claire Rind

ECONOMICS: Gauri Nanda of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for inventing an alarm clock that runs away and hides, repeatedly, thus ensuring that people DO get out of bed, and thus theoretically adding many productive hours to the workday.
WHO ATTENDED THE IG NOBEL CEREMONY: Gauri Nanda

CHEMISTRY: Edward Cussler of the University of Minnesota and Brian Gettelfinger of the University of Minnesota and the University of Wisconsin, for conducting a careful experiment to settle the longstanding scientific question: can people swim faster in syrup or in water?
REFERENCE: "Will Humans Swim Faster or Slower in Syrup?" American Institute of Chemical Engineers Journal, Brian Gettelfinger and E. L. Cussler, vol. 50, no. 11, October 2004, pp. 2646-7.
WHO ATTENDED THE IG NOBEL CEREMONY: Brian Gettelfinger and Edward Cussler

BIOLOGY: Benjamin Smith of the University of Adelaide, Australia and the University of Toronto, Canada and the Firmenich perfume company, Geneva, Switzerland, and ChemComm Enterprises, Archamps, France; Craig Williams of James Cook University and the University of South Australia; Michael Tyler of the University of Adelaide; Brian Williams of the University of Adelaide; and Yoji Hayasaka of the Australian Wine Research Institute; for painstakingly smelling and cataloging the peculiar odors produced by 131 different species of frogs when the frogs were feeling stressed.
REFERENCE: "A Survey of Frog Odorous Secretions, Their Possible Functions and Phylogenetic Significance," Benjamin P.C. Smith, Craig R. Williams, Michael J. Tyler, and Brian D. Williams, Applied Herpetology, vol. 2, no. 1-2, February 1, 2004, pp. 47-82.
REFERENCE: "Chemical and Olfactory Characterization of Odorous Compounds and Their Precursors in the Parotoid Gland Secretion of the Green Tree Frog, Litoria caerulea," Benjamin P.C. Smith, Michael J. Tyler, Brian D. Williams, and Yoji Hayasaka, Journal of Chemical Ecology, vol. 29, no. 9, September 2003.
WHO ATTENDED THE IG NOBEL CEREMONY: Ben Smith and Craig Williams

NUTRITION: Dr. Yoshiro Nakamats of Tokyo, Japan, for photographing and retrospectively analyzing every meal he has consumed during a period of 34 years (and counting).
WHO ATTENDED THE IG NOBEL CEREMONY: Dr. Yoshiro Nakamats

FLUID DYNAMICS: Victor Benno Meyer-Rochow of International University Bremen, Germany and the University of Oulu , Finland; and Jozsef Gal of Loránd Eötvös University, Hungary, for using basic principles of physics to calculate the pressure that builds up inside a penguin, as detailed in their report "Pressures Produced When Penguins Pooh -- Calculations on Avian Defaecation."
PUBLISHED IN: Polar Biology, vol. 27, 2003, pp. 56-8.
ACCEPTING: The winners were unable to attend the ceremony because they could not obtain United States visas to visit the United States. Dr. Meyer-Rochow sent an acceptance speech via videotape.

http://www.improb.com/ig/ig-top.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 956 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Oct 10, 2005 (08:41) * 1 lines 
 
Marcia, say it isn't so, cannibals in Yorkshire! Yikes!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 957 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Oct 10, 2005 (21:05) * 3 lines 
 
I had only heard of the ones in Ireland. And the ones living in a cave in England. Very isolated cases yet horrible to contemplate. I see Yorkshire is gaining notoriety.

Thanks for the ig Nobel Prizes. I lost the place they were online and was delighted to see our lady in Pittsburgh was on top of things. Exploding trousers?! The images in my mind are amazing.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 958 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 11, 2005 (23:01) * 7 lines 
 
More for the season to be macabre

Andritsa Cave's chamber of secrets
Late 6th-century finds retrieved from the Argolid cave and exhibited at theByzantine and Christian Museum begin to unfold the story of a group of peoplewho sought refuge there and slowly starved to death
CHRISTY PAPADOPOULOU




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 959 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 11, 2005 (23:01) * 2 lines 
 
more of the above information and story connected with this horrific event
http://www.athensnews.gr/athweb/nathens.print_unique?e=C&f=13150&m=A29&aa=1&eidos=S


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 960 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 11, 2005 (23:20) * 8 lines 
 
Clinton and Lewinsky names for new Chinese condoms
2005/09/21

Participants of one of the most scandalous adulteries in the modern history, ex-US president Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky suddenly became involved in sexual life of the Chinese.

As China Daily newspaper reports Chinese company Guangzhou Haojian used their names as trademarks for condoms.

http://www1.newsteam.ru/


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 961 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Oct 12, 2005 (09:17) * 19 lines 
 
China bear bile farmer eaten by own animals

BEIJING: A Chinese man who raised bears to tap them for their bile, prized as a traditional medicine in Asia, has been killed and eaten by his animals, Xinhua news agency said yesterday Six black bears attacked keeper Han Shigen as he was cleaning their pen in the northeastern province of Jilin on Monday, Xinhua said.

''The ill-fated man died on the spot and was eaten up by the ferocious bears,'' it said, citing a report in the Beijing News.

In practices decried by animal rights groups, bile is extracted through surgically implanted catheters in the bear's gall bladders, or by a ''free-dripping'' technique by which bile drips out through holes opened in the animals' abdomens.

More than 200 farms in China keep about 7,000 bears to tap their bile, which traditional Chinese medicine holds can cure fever, liver illness and sore eyes.

Bear farming was far more widespread before the cruelty involved came to light and Beijing introduced regulations to control the industry in 1993.

Animal welfare groups have called on China to completely ban bear farming, arguing that traditional herbal medicines can serve the same purposes as bear bile.

Xinhua said police sent to the scene of Monday's killing injected one of the bears with tranquillisers ''but failed to tame the mad animal''.

Police then threw meat into the bears' pen to distract them so they could recover Han's remains, it said without elaborating.

http://www.newkerala.com/newsdaily.php?action=fullnews&id=34476


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 962 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Oct 12, 2005 (09:20) * 3 lines 
 
Well, as far as Clinton and Lewinsky being used as names for Chinese condoms -- at least, they're names are being linked with safe sex. Okay, that stretching it. I'm going to stop before another bad pun overtakes me.

The article on the find in the cave in Greece is really interesting, and especially sad.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 963 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Oct 12, 2005 (18:31) * 3 lines 
 
no, pun away, cheryl!

thanks for the bear post--isn't it weird how some animals eat their caretakers? there must be a phenom for this but i'm to scared to do any research on it....it's terribly ironic!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 964 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Oct 15, 2005 (16:29) * 1 lines 
 
Oh this is way too funny. Eaten by bears is just compensation in my book. Oh Cheryl, you are clever beyond measure. Maybe I should have put that is the screwed topic for Geoites about the Lewinsky-Clinton safe sex stretching. It is more like truth stretching. At least they think it IS sex. And it's only safe if you don't get caught *;)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 965 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Oct 16, 2005 (17:26) * 1 lines 
 
reminds me of those SNL bear skits, seen those?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 966 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct 16, 2005 (18:54) * 1 lines 
 
Not for ages ! Have you seen the rubbish containers in Yosemite that are supposed to be bear-proof? Is Anything really bear proof?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 967 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Oct 16, 2005 (22:27) * 1 lines 
 
A few things, perhaps.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 968 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 18, 2005 (12:01) * 1 lines 
 
Geo weather is frozen. Help! I have no idea what is the matter with it but I tried ot post twice before I noted the comment that the topic was "frozen"


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 969 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Oct 18, 2005 (12:05) * 1 lines 
 
same thing happened to me, it said i gave an invalid command *frown*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 970 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 18, 2005 (12:15) * 1 lines 
 
I just thawed it. I guess Terry turned out the lights when he left and froze it in time. Anyway it works now :)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 971 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Oct 18, 2005 (12:51) * 2 lines 
 
Nope, dint turn any lights out.



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 972 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Oct 18, 2005 (13:30) * 1 lines 
 
must've hit some kinda switch though! hey, i can't get into restaurants at all, everytime i wait for it to load am timed out. what gives?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 973 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Oct 18, 2005 (13:58) * 1 lines 
 
I'll do a reboot. Sounds like the server is sluggish.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 974 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 18, 2005 (14:28) * 1 lines 
 
Restaurants is very slow to the point of timing out on my server.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 975 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 18, 2005 (14:29) * 12 lines 
 
I tried to get here http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/browse/restaurants/all/new


I got this message
Internal Server Error
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.

Please contact the server administrator, webmaster@www.spring.net and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

Apache/1.3.27 Server at www.spring.net Port 80


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 976 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Oct 18, 2005 (18:39) * 1 lines 
 
that's the same one i got and i emailed it to terry.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 977 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct 19, 2005 (20:47) * 1 lines 
 
The peoblem still persists. We need wer to work his magic and unstick it.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 978 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Oct 19, 2005 (21:36) * 1 lines 
 
yeah, the restaurant conf is still broken. i even cleaned out my cache and everything.....


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 979 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct 19, 2005 (22:10) * 1 lines 
 
It's not you. It is broken to both AOL's browser (uck) and my Netscape.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 980 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Nov  2, 2005 (16:10) * 6 lines 
 
Although a bit late...

Happy Samhein to All!

cos...



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 981 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Nov  3, 2005 (10:25) * 1 lines 
 
Uh huh.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 982 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Nov 13, 2005 (16:36) * 1 lines 
 
Yo Cosmo! Thanks. I danced around my bone fire and ate all the candy the kids didn't claim *;) and thought of Geo


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 983 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Nov 16, 2005 (19:56) * 14 lines 
 
Hi Marci and Geoites

Tres Cool - I had a quiet evening handing out the sweets
to the neighborhood kids - I put the shortwave on some
strange digital station which made weird noises and
pointed my HeNe Laser out the door - the kids didnt
know what to make of it.

Too cold (or maybe just right) for a bonfire - hit
the low 30's today and had the first snow flurries.
Good night to stay inside and listen to the ray-de-oh.

de Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 984 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov 16, 2005 (23:12) * 3 lines 
 
Sounds like good snuggling weather. Tonight I am watching the little weather program in my laptop go to 32° F for the first time this season. It really feels cold. Yesterday at about this same time it was 73° . I am watching for our first flurries. I hear they had a few south of here away from the moderating Ohio River.

Listening to the scanner ray-de-oh tonight.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 985 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Nov 17, 2005 (10:46) * 7 lines 
 
Howdy howdy Marci
Curious as to what excitement you hear on the scanner - up where we
are and near the big city, there is plenty of activity but there is
some movement up to the 800mhz area with fancy trunking radios which
I dont have - still plenty of PD and business activity around 460Mhz.
Also, do you still have your shortwave? You might hear alot more
of the local shortwave stations in the US via groundwave propagation.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 986 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Nov 17, 2005 (17:55) * 3 lines 
 
I really do need to get me another short wave radio. My old Sangean finally bit the dust. It was the only one I brought when I moved. That is on my Santa list even if I have to get it myself. Scanner traffic is huge here and I do have a trunk tracker model but confine my listening mostly to the UPS hub air traffic. I can find out about fires in other states and weather phenomena and " dog-sized rats" on the runways. Unless there are a lot of sirens going off. Then I hit the banks that hold the fire and police frequencies. Most of them don't use the trunks unless they are on a big job taking several hours, so that isn't a problem. I also listen to local ham repeaters just to keep current.




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 987 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Dec  7, 2005 (13:15) * 47 lines 
 
On the trail of the Borneo cat-fox

The discovery of a new mammal in the Asian rainforest was greeted with excitement. But how many other mysterious creatures are lurking in the undergrowth, asks James Meek

The Guardian


The saddest thing about the discovery of a mysterious new mammal on the forest paths of Borneo, is that the creature itself will never know how rare, endangered and exciting to the world's media it is. If the creature, possibly a carnivore not previously known to world science, photographed loping through the darkness, advancing then retreating, its eyes glowing like carriage lamps, had been Colleen McLoughlin putting out the rubbish one night, she would probably have measured the impact of the sighting over the following days at the newsagent's.

But the nameless little beast scampering through the Kalimantan leafmould is unselfconscious about its rarity and feels neither the loneliness nor the isolation which the human world has projected onto it. It just wanted to vanish back into the obscurity from which it was plucked by a World Wide Fund for Nature paparazzo. Relentlessly, one by one, under the banner of protecting the world's wide places, scientists and conservationists are stripping the mystery from these very places by exposing the last unknown mammals.
The existence of what may, or may not, be the latest in a string of new mammals to have been discovered in the last decade was announced in Jakarta on Monday. As with many of the previous discoveries, the evidence is, at least at first, indirect - not the animal itself, captured or seen by a scientist, but two blurry photographs showing, first, a skinny scurrier like a wingless bat with a long fat tail, its muzzle obscured by a leaf, and second, the same creature from behind, with haunches like a monkey and a tail like a well-fed ginger tom.

If past discoveries, such as the Vietnamese otter-civet or the Borneo ferret-badger are a guide, the newbie may come to be known as the cat-dog-fox-monkey-lemur. Then again, the head of the team which discovered it goes by the name of Stephen Wulffraat, so it could, in theory, end up being named after him.

Dr Wulffraat's mobile in Indonesia wasn't working yesterday and his fellow mammal-hunters were, in the main, all deep in far wooded places where telecommunications are only a rumour.

Ginette Hemley of the World Wide Fund for Nature, which along with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) has been the main organisation backing the scientists who have discovered new mammals, was cautious about the new creature's identity. "This is potentially a new species," she said. "It has not been confirmed. Doing that will require physical evidence we do not yet have."

The WWF's next stage is to catch one. "We plan to set some live traps to catch a specimen, or two if we can, and use appropriate experts who know about small animals like this and essentially do measurements and analysis and take some samples."

If there appears to be a degree of urgency in the WWF's mammal-hunting team, it's because time is not on their side. Earlier this year the Indonesian authorities, with the backing of a Chinese bank, announced a multi-billion-pound plan to plant oil palms in the high mountain forests where the mystery beast lives.

The WWF is sceptical about the project - oil palms do not grow well at high altitude, and there are other areas of Borneo which would appear to be more suitable. The organisation suspects a grab attempt for the old-growth timber on the high ridges.

"We're not opposed to an oil palm plantation being developed, as long as it's done in a way that is not going to harm biodiversity," says Hemley.

Incredibly, the Borneo cat-dog-fox-monkey-lemur may be the third previously unknown mammal discovered this year. In a hunter's market in central Laos, a WCS researcher, Robert Timmins, came across a short-legged rodent with a hairy tail and a long snout, as if it started out as a rat, toyed with guinea pigness, and ended up as a squirrel. In this case, "previously unknown" is strictly a culturally relative term. The animal was on sale along with some vegetables, and was well enough known by local Laotians to have a name: the kha-nyou. Several years previously Timmins discovered a new species of striped rabbit in the same region.

"Sceptics might say that if we are still discovering such amazing new animals then why are people worried about wildlife loss; but, of course, it is an indication of how little we know, and a window on to what we could be losing without ever knowing," he said at the time of the kha-nyou encounter.

The notable mammal discoveries of the last decade have been made not by Indiana Jones-style mammal-hunters but by scientists who were not necessarily looking for what they found. Timmins, for instance, was working on an anti-poaching programme in Laos when he came across the kha-nyou.

The discovery of 2005's third new mammal, the kibunji or Highland Mangabey, a black-faced monkey with a punky quiff which lives in Tanzania, was made independently by two groups of scientists who only became aware of each other's work when they met in a bar in Dar es Salaam and began drinking together.

Tim Davenport, a British scientist working with WCS, said yesterday that since his photographs of the monkey were published in Science, he and his collaborators had obtained a specimen of the animal - a monkey killed by a Tanzanian farmer during a crop raid - and was subjecting it to DNA analysis to disprove early questions over whether it really was a new species.

"There's this assumption that Africa is fairly well known, but it's surprising how little is," he said last night. "And the places where the interesting things are yet to be found tend to be these remote mountain ranges."

Davenport acknowledged that "discovered for science" would be a more accurate phrase than "discovered", since a monkey which raided village vegetable gardens and had a local name had clearly been known to locals for thousands of years.

He and his team first heard about the kibunji during a routine survey of village life and hunting in the areas on the fringe of the wild country they were surveying - a standard technique to enrich scientific knowledge of an area.

"We started hearing about this animal," said Davenport. "This area has a lot of spirit animals and we were trying to work out which is a real animal and which is a spirit animal, which is very difficult. At first we thought the kibunji was a spirit animal and it turned out to be real. Now I take the possibility of other spirit animals turning out be to be real more seriously."

One such possibility, yet to be discovered or proved fictitious, is the Rongwe tiger. "It's some sort of striped animal, and we haven't come across anything more than the description. Whether it's a striped hyena or aardwolf way out of its range, or whether it's a spirit animal, or a new species, we can't be sure. But finding these things is often the thing that gets us out of the tent in the morning".

http://www.guardian.co.uk/conservation/story/0,13369,1660581,00.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 988 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Dec  9, 2005 (23:51) * 1 lines 
 
Cheryl that is a sensational article. Many thanks for posting it. I had not heard of this. Wow, I am at one of those rare moments of speechlessness. Again thanks.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 989 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Dec 12, 2005 (11:22) * 1 lines 
 
You're welcome, Marcia. I'm glad you found it sensational.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 990 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Dec 16, 2005 (16:13) * 10 lines 
 
Hnmn since we have been interested in The Matter of Britain in the Books conference for a long time, AE sent this to ponder. They've been at it for far longer than first anticipated.

Tools Found in Britain Show Much Earlier Human Existence

By Guy Gugliotta

A chance discovery on a routine field trip to England's Suffolk seacoast led to evidence that humans reached northern Europe 700,000 years ago, about 200,000 years earlier than previously thought, scientists said yesterday.

To view the entire article, go to http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/12/14/AR2005121402249.html?referrer=emailarticle



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 991 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Dec 21, 2005 (16:47) * 1 lines 
 
They have been there for a long time.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 992 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Dec 21, 2005 (16:49) * 3 lines 
 
Happy Winter Soltice! That's Happy Summer Soltice to Geo Friends in the southern hemisphere.




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 993 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec 24, 2005 (05:38) * 268 lines 
 
Solstice and a good many religious holidays happen right about now. It seems the lack of sun and warmth in winter was a serious concern as far back as we could ponder such things:

Today on SPACE.com --- Friday December 23, 2005 -- http://www.space.com/


In today's issue:

Science/Astronomy:
* Moon to Hide Star Christmas Morning (see below)
* New Moons and Rings Found at Uranus
* Mars Water Assumptions May Be All Wet
* Image of the Day: Oh Christmas Tree, Oh Christmas Tree

Spaceflight:
* For Scientist and Englishwoman, Pluto Mission is Precious
* Remembering the Real Space Cowboys
* Ariane 5 GS Lofts Indian, European Satellites into Orbit
* Congress, Pentagon Move To Rein in Space Programs
* Stardust Capsule Headed For Utah Landing
* Holiday Supply Ship Rockets Toward ISS
* ASTRONOTES: Pluto Mission to Carry Piece of SpaceShipOne
* NEW! Daily Space Trivia

NEW! LiveScience.com
* Top Science Stories of 2005: A Year of Incredible Impact
* LiveScience Amazing Images: Upload Your Cool Pictures Now!
* Intelligent Workplace: The Office of the Future
* Christmas Tree's Survival Secret Discovered
* Scientists Predict What You'll Think of Next
* LiveScience.com: Cool Science Galleries

NEW! Cool Stuff:
* Comets Through Time: Myths and Mystery
* Vote for the Best Cosmic Images of 2005!
* Amazing Images Hall of Fame
* NEW Podcast Episode! ZeroG - a Personal Journey into Weightlessness
* New Gallery: Imagining Saturn and Titan
* Visit Our Collection of Space Wallpapers
* Get the weather from anywhere on Earth...with WeatherBug!
* New! Search for Your Next Hi-Tech Job Opportunity Now!

Entertainment: Movies, Television, DVD, Games and much more...
* VOTE NOW: Rate Your Favorite Space Movies
* NASA Astronaut to Help Build Martian Bedroom
* Man Pays $100,000 for Virtual Space Station
* 'Chicken Little' Throws Fowl Ball
* Gallery: Walking on the Moon in 3D
* New Songs Added...Explore the SpaceBox!

Recent Headlines:
* Japan Considers Plans for Homegrown Spacesuit
* Robotic Space Spiders To Crawl Sub-Orbital Web
* New Telescope to Revolutionize Asteroid Warning System
* Building Blocks of Life Found in Planet-Forming Disk
* Latest News and Updates on the Mars Rovers
* Cassini's Journeys: Headquarters for mission news, Saturn and more

Plus...

* Uplink, SPACE.com TV and NightSky
* Starry Night, TeamSETI

-----------------------------------

Science/Astronomy:

* Moon to Hide Star Christmas Morning
http://www.space.com/spacewatch/051223_night_sky.html

A nifty holiday gift occurs for those living in parts of western and central Canada, the Pacific Northwest and parts of the Rockies and Plains States on Christmas morning when a fat waning crescent Moon will occult the bluish 1st-magnitude star Spica, one of the brightest stars in the sky.

* New Moons and Rings Found at Uranus
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/051222_uranus.html

Astronomers have discovered new rings and small moons around Uranus and found surprising changes in satellite orbits around the giant planet.

* Mars Water Assumptions May Be All Wet
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/051221_mars_dry.html

The apparent discovery of ancient salty lakes or seas on Mars by NASA's Opportunity rover last year is viewed as one of the most significant developments in planetary science.

* Image of the Day: Oh Christmas Tree, Oh Christmas Tree
http://www.space.com/imageoftheday/image_of_day_051223.html

Even outer space is joining the year-end celebration with this new image of a star-forming region called the Christmas Tree cluster taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

-----------------------------------

Spaceflight:

* For Scientist and Englishwoman, Pluto Mission is Precious
http://www.space.com/news/051223_newhorizones_people.html

It is the first ever flight to Pluto and the first planetary flyby in decades, but for its lead scientist and one Englishwoman NASA's New Horizon mission will mark a milestone for space exploration.

* Remembering the Real Space Cowboys
http://www.space.com/adastra/adastra_cowboys_051223.html

Earlier this year, there were two events almost back-to-back. The first involved the authors of "The Real Space Cowboys", while the other featured the widow of moonwalker Pete Conrad, with her book, "Rocketman." First up will be Buckbee and Schirra. Watch for Nancy Conrad in a future story.

* Ariane 5 GS Lofts Indian, European Satellites into Orbit
http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/051222_ariane_launch.html

Europe's Ariane 5 GS rocket successfully placed an Indian telecommunications satellite and a European weather satellite into orbit Dec. 21, marking the first time the heavy-lift rocket has conducted five launches in a calendar year.

* Congress, Pentagon Move To Rein in Space Programs
http://www.space.com/news/051222_2005_dod.html

This may be remembered as the year both Congress and the Pentagon finally lost patience with the military's trouble-plagued space programs, as lawmakers applied the brakes to new development projects.

* Stardust Capsule Headed For Utah Landing
http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/051221_stardust_update.html

NASA's Stardust spacecraft is en route to Earth, a time capsule carrying the fundamental building blocks of our solar system when it formed billions of years ago. Next month, the spacecraft is to eject to Earth a capsule filled with particles of interstellar and comet dust.

* Holiday Supply Ship Rockets Toward ISS
http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/051221_exp12_prog20_lnch.html

A Russian cargo ship launched toward the International Space Station (ISS) Wednesday laden with food, water and holiday cheer for the two astronauts living aboard the orbital laboratory.

* ASTRONOTES: Pluto Mission to Carry Piece of SpaceShipOne
http://www.space.com/astronotes/astronotes.html

The January liftoff of the New Horizons spacecraft bound for Pluto is toting a number of items, including a U.S. flag, as well as a compact disc containing more than 430,000 names.

* NEW! Daily Space Trivia
http://www.space.com/php/trivia/

One of Today's 5 New Questions: Which NASA field center controlled the study of the Mars surface by the robot Sojourner (1998) ?

----------------------------------

NEW! LiveScience.com
http://www.livescience.com/

* Top Science Stories of 2005: A Year of Incredible Impact
http://www.livescience.com/bestimg/?cat=best2005

YOU DECIDE: Rarely have science and nature dominated daily life and generated so much debate as in 2005. Did one issue emerge as the top story? LiveScience invites you to vote on the most significant development.

* LiveScience Amazing Images: Upload Your Cool Pictures Now!
http://www.livescience.com/amazingimages/

Upload your cool pictures of exotic locales, nature, weather, creatures and more!

* Intelligent Workplace: The Office of the Future
http://www.livescience.com/technology/051223_future_office.html

You spend all day there, and if the latest trends in green office architecture catch on you will soon start enjoying your workplace a lot more.

* Christmas Tree's Survival Secret Discovered
http://www.livescience.com/environment/051222_christmas_tree.html

Christmas trees and other conifers seem to have lousy plumbing systems and should be extinct. A new study reveals how they thrive.

* Scientists Predict What You'll Think of Next
http://www.livescience.com/humanbiology/051222_mental_brain.html

To recall memories, your brain travels back in time via the ultimate Google search, according to a new study in which scientists found they can monitor the activity and actually predict what you'll think of next.

* LiveScience.com: Cool Science Galleries
http://www.livescience.com/php/multimedia/imagegallery/

Where Science comes to Life...Visit our Image Galleries collection.

----------------------------------

NEW! Cool Stuff:

* Comets Through Time: Myths and Mystery
http://www.space.com/php/siteinfo/RSSinfo.php

Take a journey around the Solar System with this new multimedia adventure!

* Vote for the Best Cosmic Images of 2005!
http://www.space.com/bestimg/index.php?cat=best2005

We've singled out the top images. Now YOU Decide! VOTE NOW for the Best Space Images of 2005!

* Amazing Images Hall of Fame
http://www.space.com/amazingimages/

Upload your cool science and space-themed images now. Get your own homepage, vote for your favorites and more!

* NEW Podcast Episode! ZeroG - a Personal Journey into Weightlessness
http://www.space.com/php/siteinfo/RSSinfo.php

All Aboard! Join us on a Zero-G weightless flight!

* New Gallery: Imagining Saturn and Titan
http://www.space.com/php/multimedia/imagegallery/igviewer.php?imgid=3745&gid=273&index=0

Artist Kees Veenenbos used real spacecraft data to render scenes of Saturn and Titan.

* Visit Our Collection of Space Wallpapers
http://www.space.com/php/multimedia/downloads/wallpapers/

From the highest quality space art to intergalactic photography, find an image for your desktop every month of the year.

* Get the weather from anywhere on Earth...with WeatherBug!
http://www.space.com/php/weatherbug/

Type in your ZIP Code and hit "Go" to get your live local weather.

* New! Search for Your Next Hi-Tech Job Opportunity Now!
http://www.space.com/jobs/

Imaginova and CareerBuilder.com have partnered to bring you the best in job searching, resume posting, and online recruiting.

----------------------------------

Entertainment: Movies, Television, DVD, Games and much more...
http://www.space.com/entertainment/

* VOTE NOW: Rate Your Favorite Space Movies
http://www.space.com/php/multimedia/spacemovies/

Vote Now For Your Favorite Space Movie of All Time!

* NASA Astronaut to Help Build Martian Bedroom
http://www.space.com/entertainment/051203_astronaut_tradingspace.html

A NASA shuttle astronaut is will hang up his spacesuit for a day Saturday to try his hand at interior decorating.

* Man Pays $100,000 for Virtual Space Station
http://www.space.com/entertainment/ap_051110_virtual_spacestation_ent.html

In one of the largest sales yet of property in an online game, a Miami resident has bought a virtual space station for $100,000 and wants to turn it into a cross between Jurassic Park and a disco.

* 'Chicken Little' Throws Fowl Ball
http://www.space.com/entertainment/051104_ent_chickenlittle.html

Disney's first homegrown computer-animated film is one of the more painful moviegoing experiences in years, a contrived bit of barnyard pat dubbed Chicken Little.

* Gallery: Walking on the Moon in 3D
http://www.space.com/php/multimedia/imagegallery/igviewer.php?imgid=3594&gid=265&index=0

Take a sneak peek at scenes from the new IMAX movie Magnificent Desolation.

* New Songs Added...Explore the SpaceBox!
http://www.space.com/entertainment/spacebox/

Explore the SpaceBox! The Best, Worst, and Weirdest Music Inspired by the Cosmos!

----------------------------------

Recent Headlines:
http://www.space.com/news/

* Japan Considers Plans for Homegrown Spacesuit
http://www.space.com/businesstechnology/ap_051221_jaxa_spacesuit.html

* Robotic Space Spiders To Crawl Sub-Orbital Web
http://www.space.com/businesstechnology/technovel_spider_051221.html

* New Telescope to Revolutionize Asteroid Warning System
http://www.space.com/businesstechnology/051221_pan-starrs.html

* Building Blocks of Life Found in Planet-Forming Disk
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/051220_building_blocks.html

* Latest News and Updates on the Mars Rovers
http://www.space.com/marsrover/

* Cassini's Journeys: Headquarters for mission news, Saturn and more
http://www.space.com/cassini/




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 994 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jan 26, 2006 (15:49) * 19 lines 
 
In the interest of education: The Washington Post has published the winning submissions to its yearly contest, in which readers are asked to supply alternate meanings for common words.

The winners are:
1. Coffee (n.) the person upon whom one coughs.
2. Flabbergasted (adj.) appalled over how much weight you have gained.
3. Abdicate (v.) to give up all hope of ever having a flat stomach.
4. Esplanade (v.) to attempt an explanation while drunk.
5. Willy-nilly (adj.) impotent.
6. Negligent (adj.) describes a condition in which you absent-mindedly answer the door in your nightgown.
7. Lymph (v.) to walk with a lisp.
8. Gargoyle (n.) olive-flavored mouthwash.
9. Flatulence (n.) emergency vehicle that picks you up after you are run over by a steamroller.
10. Balderdash (n.) a rapidly receding hairline.
11. Testicle (n.) a humorous question on an exam.
12. Rectitude (n.) the formal, dignified bearing adopted by proctologists.
13. Pokemon (n) a Rastafarian proctologist.
14. Oyster (n.) a person who sprinkles his conversation with Yiddishisms.
15. Frisbeetarianism (n.) (back by popular demand): The belief that, when you die, your Soul flies up onto the roof and gets stuck there.
16. Circumvent (n.) an opening in the front of boxer shorts worn by circumcised men.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 995 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr  4, 2006 (19:51) * 15 lines 
 

Just thought you would like to know!

On Wednesday, at two minutes and three seconds after 1:00 in the morning,
the time and date will be

01:02:03 04/05/06



That won't ever happen again ever.
( until 2106 )





 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 996 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Apr  5, 2006 (17:44) * 1 lines 
 
it'll happen again in 2007.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 997 of 1049: Rob Glennie  (southernalps) * Wed, Apr  5, 2006 (20:28) * 9 lines 
 
Kia Ora

Here is something that would have been unique.

At 01:01.01AM 01/01/01 - its only 94 years, something like 8 months 25 days, 11 hours and 39 minutes (all times NZST), until it happens again.

Assuming the very low probability of me still being alive then, I would be 120.

Rob


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 998 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Apr  5, 2006 (22:37) * 14 lines 
 
You mean 2101 Rob?

Next year there will be
02:03:04 05/06/07 and then
03:04:05 06/07/08
04:05:06 07/08/09
05:06:07 08/09/10
06:07:08 09/10/11
07:08:09 10/11/12

then what?

08:09:10 11/12/13
etc.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 999 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Apr  6, 2006 (18:21) * 1 lines 
 
Let's see. I'll still be writing in Geo and Rob will be saving New Zealand from disasters, and Terry would still be remembering his college years and the lady in St James Court...


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1000 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Apr  6, 2006 (22:45) * 3 lines 
 
09:10:11 12/13/14

Yeah, her.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1001 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr 16, 2006 (17:00) * 1 lines 
 
Does anyone have access to a Girl Sount Song Book? I need to find the source of the song "O Beautful Banner" Brahms used it in his Academic Festival Overture just before the first iteration of Gaudeamus Igitur. Yes, I know this has nothing to do with Geo but I am a very curious lady, and I don't remember reading that Johannes Brahms was a Girl Scout. Thank you !


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1002 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Apr 17, 2006 (20:16) * 3 lines 
 
marcia, i found his overture here and it's downloadable--you have to be a member though (they have a free version and a pay version). hope it has what you're looking for.

http://www.classicalarchives.com/brahms.html#brahms_orchestral


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1003 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 18, 2006 (15:50) * 1 lines 
 
I am a member of that group and they have lovely stuff there. If you wonder what live performances by some of the most notable musicians in the Russian Republic are doing nowadays, listen to a few of the free options. I joined. And I do have that file, Wolfie. Thanks for finding it in case I had not yet gotten to it. I am looking for the source of part of that overture. Surely the Girl Scouts and Brahms had the same source. My question is what WAS it?!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1004 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Apr 18, 2006 (17:28) * 1 lines 
 
you mean Brahms didn't write it? i thought he did. when i googled o beautiful banner all sorts of stuff came up with america the beautiful and the star spangled banner being among them. hmmmmmm.....


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1005 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 18, 2006 (18:25) * 3 lines 
 
It was supposedly in a 1926 (?) church song book and adapted for girl scouts. That is where I first came upon the familiar music. We sang it as the flag was raised. I was a leader whose squad of girls picked a patch of poison ivy to camp in all week. We were lucky. Hardly anyone had any problems with it, but I was glad when the week was over.

Both of the American uses of that music postdate Brahms. He wrote the Academic Festival Overture in honor of Heidelberg University who was bestowing an honorary degree upon him. They were unimpressed. He had written it using a collection of student songs - Gaudeamus Igitur being the most famous. He did not write the original music for it nor the one we know as O Beautful Banner. Still searching.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1006 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 18, 2006 (18:34) * 18 lines 
 
Ok I was incorrect (my sources were in college, actually) and here is the story of this overture:

The Academic Festival Overture (German: Akademische Festouvertüre), Op. 80, was one of a pair of contrasting orchestral overtures (the other being the Tragic Overture, Op. 81) written by Johannes Brahms. Brahms composed the Academic Festival Overture during the summer of 1880 as a musical "thank you" to the University of Breslau, which had awarded him an honorary doctorate the previous year. Initially, Brahms had contented himself with sending a simple handwritten note of acknowledgment to the University, since he loathed the public fanfare of celebrity. However, the conductor Bernard Scholz, who had nominated him for the degree, convinced him that protocol required him to make a grander gesture of gratitude. The University expected nothing less than a musical offering from the composer.

Brahms, who was known to be a curmudgeonly joker, filled his quota by creating a "very boisterous potpourri of student drinking songs", entitled the Academic Festival Overture. The work sparkles with some of the finest virtues of Brahms' musical technique. The inventive treatment of the tunes appropriated from the student ditties (which include "Wir hatten gebauet ein stattliches Haus", "Fuchslieds", and most memorably in the triumphant finale, "Gaudeamus igitur") fully engages Brahms' sophisticated mastery of counterpoint and thematic development. Brahms manages to evoke ravishing euphoria without sacrificing his commitment to classical balance. The blend of orchestral colors is carefully planned and highlighted in the piece, which calls for one of the largest ensembles for any of his compositions: piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, contrabassoon, four horns, three trumpets, timpani, bass drum, triangle, and strings.

The Overture consists of four continuous sections:

* Allegro (C minor)
* Maestoso (C major)
* Animato (E minor)
* Maestoso (C major).

The composer himself conducted the premiere at a special convocation held by the University on January 4, 1881, to the chagrin (and mischievous delight) of many of the academics in the audience. Due to its structural refinement, its lyrical warmth, as well as its excitement and humor, the work has remained a solid staple of today's concert-hall repertoire. A typical performance lasts around 10 minutes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academic_Festival_Overture




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1007 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 18, 2006 (20:58) * 5 lines 
 
Here is the answer

The overture is in sonata form using the three university songs as the principal melodic material of this larger-than-usual orchestration. Brahms starts the piece in a minor mode which is consistent with his gruff personality. Trumpets then introduce the first melody’s theme, "Wir hatten gebauet ein stattliches Haus" ("We had built a stately house"). The entire orchestra then develops this first theme to a climax. As soon as it starts to fade away, the violins state the second song, "Fuchslieds", by soaring above the trombone and passing the melody back and forth between the strings and woodwinds. The full orchestra presents the last and most famous song, "Gaudeamus Igitur" as a stately and jubilant finale to the Overture.

http://www.gdyo.org/notes1002.htm


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1008 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 19, 2006 (11:15) * 8 lines 
 
Even more here. There is yet another student song used as is told below. I did find "Wir Hatte..." and it is indeed the source of "O Beautiful Banner". Next I need to find the source of that music.

Johannes Brahms received a thorough musical education in his youth, but his course of study never included a college experience. He studied composition and piano privately as a child-and it’s not every wunderkind who can claim to have played the bordellos of Hamburg by the age of thirteen. By 1850 Brahms had developed enough of a local reputation as a pianist to become the accompanist to the Hungarian violinist Eduard Reményi. In 1853, Brahms and Reményi embarked on a concert tour of Germany that eventually took them to Hanover, where Brahms attracted the attention of Joseph Joachim. At 21, Joachim was already established as a major violin virtuoso, and he was to become one of Brahms’s closest friends. When Brahms parted company from Reményi shortly thereafter, it was to Joachim that he turned. He spent two months with Joachim in Göttingen, auditing courses in philosophy and history at the University. This was Brahms’s closest approach to college life as a student.

Thus it is not so shocking that in 1877, when Cambridge University wished to offer him an honorary doctorate, Brahms’s desire for academic recognition was outweighed by his distaste for travel and publicity. Two years later, Brahms accepted an honorary doctorate in Philosophy from the University of Breslau, and expressed his gratitude by composing the Academic Festival Overture -from the students’ point of view! The overture is a medley of popular student drinking songs, but also functions as a mini-symphony. The overture opens with an accented eighth-note pattern and a bouncy melody, that will serve as a bridge between the sections. The first student song, “Wir hatten gebauet ein stattliches Haus,” is sung by the brass after a drum roll. We hear a vigorous presentation of the unifying melody again, but the texture lightens, and the strings begin a more flowing tune, “Der Landesvater.” Next, the bassoons introduce “Fuchsleid,” a silly hazing song. These elements are now developed and mixed together in what
ust be Brahms’s closest musical approach to the “New German” school, typified by Richard Wagner. Finally, the brass shout out “Gaudeamus igitur” over wild running scales in the strings.

http://www.columbiaorchestra.org/programnotes-021503.shtml


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1009 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 19, 2006 (11:22) * 7 lines 
 
This will be the final comment - search it out if you have never heard it. For most of my life it has been a favorite.

The cheerful, breezy, jovial "Academic" Overture was written by Brahms as a tribute of gratitude to the University of Breslau for conferring upon him the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. It, as well as the "Tragic" Overture, was produced in that city in 1881 under his own leadership. The overture is clearly enough identified with the University functions and particularly with the students' "Commersbuch." The whole overture is built up on themes taken from that memorable collection of German student songs now famous the world over, and some of them pleasantly familiar to our own colleges.

The overture begins at once with a stately theme announced in the strings pianissimo, horns, bassoons, and drums. After its development at some length, a subsidiary passage leads to the first of the student themes "Wir hatten gebauet ein stattliches Haus" ("We had built a Stately House"), taken in the basses and woodwinds. After some transition passages reference is made to the opening theme, which finally leads to the second of the student songs, "Der Landesvater" ("The Country's Father"). This is followed by another subsidiary passage in the woodwinds, closing the first part of the overture. The next section begins with the "Fuchs Lied" ("Fox Song") sung by the bassoons and clarinets with full orchestral accompaniment, which is carried from one group of instruments to another in a jolly manner. In the closing section all the students songs return, but with different modes of development, and lead at the close to the "Gaudeamus igitur," given in full force by the orchestra and bringing the overture to a tr
umphant conclusion.
http://www.music-with-ease.com/brahms-academic-overture.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1010 of 1049: Mike Kana  (aa9il) * Mon, May  1, 2006 (12:02) * 10 lines 
 
Hi all

Back again....
What interesting stories! I saw the reference to Heidelberg University
which brought back fond memories of walking the streets of Heidelberg to
visit the castle and also the numerous student beer halls. I could see
how jolly compositions could come out of such jolly places.

Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1011 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May  1, 2006 (17:48) * 7 lines 
 
Welocme back, Mike.

Happy Beltane all (or Beltaine depending on whose website you are reading) I studied Maypoles all day... I actually know someone who has danced around one. I have always been too young so I was merely a watcher. It used to be very pretty and came with Daisy Chains and lovely young ladies dressed in gauzy gowns.

Tell us about Heidelberg University, Mike. I am assuming you downed your quota of beer and sang the old songs. Wow how amazing to find you had been there. I could have saved myself a lot of hunting , but then where is the fun in that?!

The part that blew my mind was being told (thank you Æ) that part had been the National Antehm of Micronesia. I, as a student of National Anthems, did not know that and was most eager to learn. I now have a version of it in my collection.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1012 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, May 17, 2006 (12:02) * 81 lines 
 
Dolphins Name Themselves With Whistles, Study Says
James Owen
for National Geographic News

Dolphins give themselves "names"—distinctive whistles that they use to identify each other, new research shows.

Scientists say it's the first time wild animals have been shown to call out their own names.

What's more, the marine mammals can recognize individual names even when the sound is produced by an unfamiliar voice.

Bottlenose dolphins appear to develop so-called signature whistles as infants.

The idea that they use these whistles to identify each other was first proposed in 1991 after individuals were heard to make their own unique sounds.

"The challenge was to show experimentally that the animals can use these independent voice features as signature whistles," said Vincent Janik of the Sea Mammal Research Unit at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland.

Janik is the lead author of a study on the dolphin whistles to be published tomorrow in the Journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

He says the idea that dolphins use names "was fairly hypothetical, and some researchers regarded it as not possible."

Listening Dolphins

The research focused on wild bottlenose dolphins living in Sarasota Bay, Florida.

Acoustic recordings have been made of most of these dolphins, which have been studied for more than 30 years.

For the new study each dolphin's signature whistle was isolated from the recordings and then played back to the animals through underwater loudspeakers.

The team found that the listening dolphins responded strongly to recordings of the names of their relatives and close group members but largely ignored those of other dolphins.

Janik says the recordings were synthesized electronically to rule out the possibility that the dolphins recognized each other simply by the sound of their voices.

"It's the equivalent of a computerized voice, where you can't tell who is speaking by the voice alone," he said.

The study team says whistles that identify an individual would be especially useful to bottlenose dolphins, because they live in large groups and have complex social interactions.

"Group changes are incredibly dynamic, and you need a way of knowing exactly who's around you," Janik said. "Dolphins often prefer to spend time with particular individuals."

But living in the murky ocean makes it hard to hook up with your dolphin buddies.

"Finding each other isn't so easy in marine environments, because visibility is very poor—maybe just a couple of meters," Janik said.

"Instead of looking around, they really need some other obvious and reliable system to find another animal."

The researchers suggest the dolphins use acoustic communication and signature whistles to locate and identify individual animals.

"You really have to have something more than a voice. You need something that's as different as a name," Janik said.

Customized Whistles

The ability to develop individually distinctive calls requires vocal learning, a relatively rare skill that's seen in humans, dolphins, elephants, and a few other animals including certain birds.

Bottlenose dolphins are among the most versatile vocal learners and show cognitive abilities similar to those of primates.

The study team says young dolphins appear to create their own signature whistles from those of adult dolphins.

"They are listening to a lot of other whistles in the environment, then take parts of some that they've heard and put them together as a new one," Janik said.

Other researchers, however, have argued that dolphins don't have signature whistles.

In 2001 Brenda McCowan of the University of California, Davis, and Diana Reiss of the New York Aquarium in Brooklyn published a study suggesting that bottlenose dolphins don't use individual names but rather a shared contact call.

Their research was based on captive dolphins, which, Janik says, wouldn't have the same difficulties wild dolphins have with staying in touch.

"They don't live in the kind of complex environment that wild dolphins inhabit," he said. "They are in relatively small environs, in very clear water, and can see each other all the time."

Janik says that bottlenose dolphins may turn out to be just the first of various animals that use their own names.

Researchers have identified what could be signature whistles in other dolphin species, including spotted, white-sided, and dusky dolphins.

Some birds possibly also use names to communicate with each other, Janik adds.

"The one group of birds where that's possible is parrots," he said.

"Parrots have a very similar social structure to dolphins, and it seems they may also have a similar [naming] system."

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/05/060508_dolphins_2.html






 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1013 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, May 17, 2006 (12:18) * 22 lines 
 
Polar Bear-Grizzly Hybrid Discovered
John Roach

May 11, 2006—DNA analysis has confirmed that a bear shot in the Canadian Arctic last month is a half-polar bear, half-grizzly hybrid. While the two bear species have interbred in zoos, this is the first evidence of a wild polar bear-grizzly offspring.

Jim Martell (pictured at left), a 65-year-old hunter from Idaho, shot the bear April 16 on the southern tip of Banks Island (see Northwest Territories map), the CanWest News Service reports.

Wildlife officials seized the bear after noticing its white fur was interspersed with brown patches. It also had long claws, a concave facial profile, and a humped back, which are characteristic of a grizzly.

Now the genetic tests have confirmed that the hybrid's father was a grizzly and its mother was a polar bear.

"I don't think anyone expected it to actually happen in the wild," said Ian Stirling, a polar bear expert with the Canadian Wildlife Service in Edmonton.

Polar bears and grizzlies require an extended mating ritual to reproduce, Stirling said. Both live by themselves in large, open habitats.

To prevent wasting their eggs, females ovulate only after spending several days with a male, Stirling explained. "Then they mate several times over several days."

In other words, the mating between the polar bear and grizzly was more than a chance encounter. "That's what makes it quite interesting," he added.

Stirling says the hybrid has no official name, though locals have taken to calling it a "pizzly" and a "grolar bear."

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/05/bear-hybrid-photo.html


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1014 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, May 31, 2006 (13:58) * 3 lines 
 
It's that time of the year again. Yep. It's Marcia's birthday.

Happy Birthday Marcia!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1015 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, May 31, 2006 (17:10) * 3 lines 
 
Wow. Happy Birthday Marci!

Hope you have a wonderful time.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1016 of 1049: wer  (WERoland) * Wed, May 31, 2006 (18:04) * 1 lines 
 
Ditto!!! Happy Birthday!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1017 of 1049: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Jun  1, 2006 (20:04) * 1 lines 
 
I'm such a dork, sorry, twin, didn't mean to forget (started a new job but that's just a lousy excuse!). HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!!!!!!! *HUGS*


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1018 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Jun 13, 2006 (10:37) * 3 lines 
 
Happy Birthday Marcia!
From quasi-present Mike



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1019 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jun 14, 2006 (11:39) * 4 lines 
 
Thank you guys !!! I spent that weekend celebrating at Beale AFB air show and watched a U2 climb from ground to the edge of space in less than 30 minutes. There is no way to see it way up there so it dispensed smoke/powder to make trails which at such altitude just looked like dashes - very tiny like the sky had been perforated. If anyone wants to see real Americans, go to one of these air shows. They are full of upbeat clean tidy people who love this country as I do. We are America. The politicans and news people are not but they get all the attention.


Thanks again for the good wishes.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1020 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Sep 13, 2006 (20:08) * 5 lines 
 
Howdy again
That had to be real cool. Next best would be to see an SR-71

Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1021 of 1049: geomancer (cfadm) * Thu, Sep 21, 2006 (16:59) * 3 lines 
 
Bob's hotrodding mikes for the new ICOM 7000 series and selling them on ebay. Doing a pretty brisk little business.

I've been on hf some days at 10 am CST on 7270. Catch me there sometime.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1022 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Dec 12, 2006 (20:08) * 15 lines 
 
Hi all

Well, Ive sure been remiss in dropping in - school, work, and home
foolishness have kept me amused/annoyed. Anyway, decided to log
in and see if there were any geo activities lately. Also, Terry, tried
to email you a while back and bounced so if you coule email me, then
I have an email path to work from.
In my recent Geo-activity, went to the local gem/jewelry show - there
were a couple of vendors selling different rock samples so picked up
some galena (to make a crystal radio) and a small sample of the Nantan
meteorite. So, the rock collection slowly moves forward....

73 de Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1023 of 1049: geomancer (cfadm) * Sun, Dec 24, 2006 (11:05) * 1 lines 
 
Cool on the crystal rig, where'd you get the plans?


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1024 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan  2, 2007 (17:36) * 3 lines 
 
Oh Mike I did see the SR-71 at Beale AFB. The men who guard her are deadly serious about your not getting too close. However, it is better viewed from a small distance. It is hugs, it is black (thus the name "Blackbird") and it looks like flying death. I am still waiting to see my first stealth machine flyover. I hear that is truly exciting.

Oh, sorry for my absence. I have been editing two books and three manuscripts which will be pivotal in southeastern archaeology. Remember, you heard it here!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1025 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan  2, 2007 (17:38) * 1 lines 
 
Happy New Year



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1026 of 1049: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Jan 31, 2007 (17:54) * 12 lines 
 
Hi Marci and Geoites

Was very happy to see your post as it is just too quiet
around here. Good luck with your publishing projects!
Never seen a stealth flyover but I have seen the F117
prototype at Dayton (WP AFB, not the hamfest...). Anyway, school
marches on and been busy learning the ins and outs
of routers and other network gadgets. 10.1.1.1

Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1027 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb  9, 2007 (15:05) * 4 lines 
 
Let us know when you become a graduate and we will all celebrate, Mike

*GASP* does anyone remember what topic I was writing in when describing visiting a volcanic eruption? I have a new installment and I can't find it!
Thank you.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1028 of 1049: wer  (WERoland) * Sat, Mar  3, 2007 (11:59) * 1 lines 
 
http://spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/read/Geo/77


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1029 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Mar 21, 2007 (11:18) * 1 lines 
 
Okay, this the first full day of spring in the northern hemisphere -- but I am a little late in wishing everyone a Happy Vernal or Autumnal Equinox! Happy Sprng or Happy Fall -- depending on where you live.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1030 of 1049: geomancer (cfadm) * Fri, Apr 13, 2007 (22:26) * 3 lines 
 
Happy Spring!

Also very late this year.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1031 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, May 31, 2007 (13:05) * 3 lines 
 
It's here!!! Today is the day of which is the birthday of the legendary Geonymph, Marcia.

Happy Birthday, Marcia!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1032 of 1049: wer  (WERoland) * Wed, Jun  6, 2007 (11:12) * 1 lines 
 
And a belated one from me, too!!!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1033 of 1049: radio_cosmo  (aa9il) * Tue, Jun 19, 2007 (21:10) * 7 lines 
 
Hi all

Happy Birthday Marci!
Also happy solstice as that is around the corner!

73 de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1034 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Jun 21, 2007 (07:51) * 3 lines 
 
Happy Summer Soltice! To all those Geo-ites south of the equator -- Happy Winter Soltice!




 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1035 of 1049: geomancer (cfadm) * Tue, Jul  3, 2007 (20:52) * 1 lines 
 
Happy Solstice!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1036 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 28, 2007 (11:38) * 3 lines 
 
Happy "It's Tooo HOT in Kentucky!" We need rain. Thank you all for keeping the home fires burning and for your kind wishes. If you only knew how old I really am... In any case I will soon be the youngest grandmother on the planet with a whole new human life to educate about stars and rocks and volcanoes and other such good things. Happy Solstice too ! Would that it were autuman equnox however.

The books continue to be researched. I am newly back from Missouri and environs for one book and for the other we are likely to head toward Tennessee. I love doing this part. Writing it is just plain hard work. I am so lucky to be working with two of the best men in their fields who already know how to write.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1037 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 28, 2007 (11:48) * 1 lines 
 
I got an interesting email today from a man who is researching Madoc and his followers in the USA before Columbus. He somehow got the idea I did not believe in such stuff as they advocate and was not particularly happy about it. As Geo's archaeologist says, just present the evidence. I wish him well.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1038 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Jul 30, 2007 (13:42) * 1 lines 
 
What great news, Marcia! Of course, you'll be the youngest grandmother on the planet. What a lucky baby to have you as a guide to the stars, and rocks, and volcanoes . . . and all the other good things.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1039 of 1049: Donald B. Ball  (DonB) * Tue, Jul 31, 2007 (04:14) * 14 lines 
 
To avoid leaving an interesting aside to serious research in limbo, Marcia -- our capable hostess -- was so kind as to share with me the email she referenced in Response 1037 (see above). I felt that it was both fitting and appropriate to respond to this person's remarks and for the benefit of Geo's readers I post my comments to him herein (see below). To better establish some background for this communication, I will make the proverbial long story short and note that as a matter of folklore it has long been maintained that Madoc, an ancient Welsh prince, established a major settlement at the Falls of the Ohio on the Ohio River at present day Louisville, Kentucky, in (according to the source you wish to believe) the 6th or 11th century AD. In common with a wart, this story seems to grow with each telling and within recent years some individuals have gone so far as to claim that: (1) Madoc's faithful followers (40,000 of them!) left behind numerous rock inscriptions (most of the "Kilroy was here" variety) th
oughout the region; and (2) that King Arthur was among those who settled near Louisville with Prince Madoc. For those who enjoy fantasy and fairy tales, this story makes for an amusing evening's entertainment but unfortunately they unashamedly espouse this unfounded gibberish as firmly established fact. As a professional archaeologist who has worked in the Ohio Valley region for 30 years, I state without reservation that these claims have never been substantiated and are nothing but pure fabrication. For those seeking further substantive information on the numerous fallacies of this claim, I would refer them to the following journal article:
Ball, Donald B.
2006 Scribbles, Scratches, and Ancient Writing: Pseudo-Historical Archaeology in the Ohio Valley Region. Ohio Valley Historical Archaeology 21:1-29.

*****

Your recent email was forwarded to me on the premise that laughter is always the best medicine. I have read and examined in some detail the so-called historical and epigraphic "evidence" (using this term in its loosest possible sense) espoused by the reputed researchers you mentioned and am of the opinion that the greatest single fallacy in their reasoning is mistaking their misguided and delusional sincerity for fact. I find it of particular interest that within the 20th century well over 10,000 archaeological sites have been documented within the state of Kentucky alone and to the best of my knowledge not one of these has yielded any evidence of 5th century Welsh pottery, house types, community settlement, burial patterns, non-native faunal materials (e.g., sheep and horse remains), or any other tangible remains attributable to the presence of either Madoc or any of his countrymen in this region at that point in time.

The epigraphic evidence they present is neither more nor less than a complete farce. It is strange that the so-called Coelbren rock inscriptions presented as "evidence" of an early Welsh presence in the greater Ohio Valley regions bear absolutely no resemblance to the letters of that alphabet as recorded in the writings of Iolo Morganwg dating to the early 19th century.

It is sad to observe that some seemingly intelligent people unquestioningly accept these fanciful claims as historical fact. I would note that I have attended numerous state and regional archaeological conferences in the Ohio Valley region for going on 40 years and I have never seen either Alan Wilson or Baram Blackett present a scholarly paper at any of these meetings. In a similar vein, I fail to see that they have ever published even a single article in support of their claims in any reputable and peer reviewed scholarly journal in this region. This prompts me to ask, "What are they trying to hide?" From my perspective, it is abundantly obvious that they are all too aware that their claims will readily be exposed as nothing but unsupported gibberish.

Should you have any substantive commentary to offer on this subject, feel free to contact me. Alternately, if you have only further rants, raves, and nonsensical blather to offer kindly do not waste my time. Such communications are not worthy of a response and they will be promptly deleted.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1040 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 31, 2007 (17:55) * 1 lines 
 
Thank you, Thank you, Thank you ! Brilliant response from our most esteemed Archaeologist who is both a gentleman and a scholar. I suspect we will not hear from the original writer of the email though I wish he had brought his concerns to this forum.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1041 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 31, 2007 (17:59) * 3 lines 
 
Alas Cheryl, I taught that precious granddaughter's father all I know. He will be the chief descriptor but I have knitting needles he does not know how to use!

Thank you for your kind thoughts. I can hardly wait for her to get here!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1042 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Aug 16, 2007 (20:51) * 8 lines 
 
Allison Holly

Born 1:32 am, 8/16/07

7 lbs, 5 oz

19" long



 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1043 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Aug 16, 2007 (20:52) * 1 lines 
 
Suddenly, the Universe has been condensed into one small bundle.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1044 of 1049: wer  (WERoland) * Fri, Aug 17, 2007 (18:20) * 3 lines 
 
Funny how that happens, huh?

:-)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1045 of 1049: geomancer (cfadm) * Thu, Aug 30, 2007 (15:59) * 1 lines 
 
Funny stuff.


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1046 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Sep 19, 2007 (07:01) * 3 lines 
 
Wow, what wonderous and extraordinary things occur while I'm away. Marcia, enjoy marveling at the tiny new universe.

Welcome Allison Holly!


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1047 of 1049: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Oct 26, 2007 (07:14) * 27 lines 
 
Red-headed Neanderthals? DNA says yes: study

CHICAGO (AFP) - Some of our cave-dwelling Neanderthal relatives probably had red hair and fair complexions, much like modern-day humans of Celtic origin, according to a study released Thursday.

The finding comes from the first such analysis of DNA evidence taken from Neanderthal fossils recovered from El Sidron in northern Spain and Monti Lessini, Italy.

An analysis of the DNA revealed the ancient hominids carried a mutation in the MC1R gene that codes for a protein involved in the production of melanin -- a substance that gives skin its color and also protects it against ultraviolet light.

In modern humans, primarily of European descent, mutations in the MC1R gene are thought to be responsible for red hair and pale skin by dampening the activity of the protein.

The mutation observed in the Neanderthal genes was different from the one documented in humans, but when scientists inserted the Neanderthal gene into cells in a test tube, it seemed to have the same effect on melatonin production as the modern human genes, according to the study published in Science.

The genetic analysis doesn't seal the deal, but since the fossil record of Neanderthals does not include any samples of skin or hair, it is the best guide available, said Michael Hofreiter, a paleogeneticist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Leipzig, Germany.

Hofreiter said the number of red-headed Neanderthals was probably pretty small, possibly just one percent of the population and might have popped up in any part of Europe or Asia that the ancient hominids had settled.

The news did not come as a surprise to one leading scholar of Neanderthal evolution and biology.

"The stereotype of primitive peoples is that they are dark skinned, but some paleontologists have been speculating for 20 years that some Neanderthals must have been pale skinned because they lived in northern Europe," said Erik Trinkaus, a professor of anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.

"Light skin is adaptive at higher altitudes because it allows more UVB radiation to penetrate the skin and that promotes Vitamin D synthesis."

Neanderthals, whose ancestors diverged from that of modern humans about 300,000 years ago, colonized Europe and parts of Asia, dominating Europe until about 30,000 years ago.

The study suggests that the genes that confer pale skin and red hair evolved separately in humans and our closest extinct relatives.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20071025/sc_afp/scienceneanderthalsus


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1048 of 1049: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun 30, 2008 (19:52) * 1 lines 
 
I love this article about the red haired Neanderthal. I dated a flaming redhead in college and now he is a great and good friend. IN no way was he ever considered Neanderthal but a lot of the other men I dated qualified. Thanks for posting it. Wonderful! ( I also had red hair as a young child.)


 Topic 50 of 99 [Geo]: Et Cetera
 Response 1049 of 1049: Paul Terry Walhus  (paulterry) * Mon, Jul 21, 2008 (19:01) * 1 lines 
 
I saw the Geico Caveman at SXSW. He was extremely popular with all the women there and was surrounded by admirers most of the time, all female.

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