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Topic 8 of 99: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties

Sat, Jul 10, 1999 (20:44) | Marcia (MarciaH)
What they are, where they are and how to tell one in the rough.
845 responses total.

 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 1 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 14, 1999 (23:15) * 10 lines 
 
First, the attributes which defines something as being Precious and Valuable. *It has to be durable,
*It must be universally acknowledged as desirable,
*It must be rare.

There have been legends about eyes of idols which were fabulous gems from the Orient set into the center of worship in temples there. The Hope Diamond was one such stone, and what there is of it now is only half the original size.

Diamonds come in many colors. The British Museum of Natural History has on display cut examples of diamonds in blood red, emerald green, Golden-yellow,
Royal Blue, Turquoise, and various shades of champagne, pink and white. Each specimen is cut perfectly and sparklingly clear as a fine diamond should be. Some are so rare that they are tiny - as in the Greens and the Reds.

The hardest substance on Earth is the Diamond at 10 on the Moh's Scale of Hardness, but they are brittle. Slam you hand against a porcelain sink and your diamond may shatter to pieces from some tiny flaw in the crystalline structure. Daimonds are, after all, the purest form of Carbon, and they will burn with a hot blue flame and turn into Carbon Dioxide. I would like to recommend you take me at my word on this - there is no way to get it back to being a diamond after it has been consigned to the flames.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 2 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Thu, Jul 15, 1999 (08:57) * 3 lines 
 
tanzanite is a unique gem in that under different lights, the colors change. the colors range from deep sapphire blue, to purple, to gray when held on an angle. i thoroughly enjoy my piece of tanzanite and have noticed that they are increasing in popularity.

sapphire also comes in a myriad of colors to include green, white, and red.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 3 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 15, 1999 (13:59) * 1 lines 
 
And so is Alexandrite which is amethyst under incandescent light and green in the daylight. Mine even turned blue one time when we were high in the Sierras on an exceptionally clear day. I am taking the stones and metals in descending order of hardness. Next is the Sapphire / Ruby group.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 4 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Thu, Jul 15, 1999 (14:03) * 3 lines 
 
didn't know there was an order of business *grin*

sapphire and ruby are members of the berile group right?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 5 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 15, 1999 (14:04) * 1 lines 
 
BTW, of all the colors a sapphire may be - they cannot be red. Then it is a ruby! All others are Sapphires. (Don't know why but am researching it)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 6 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 15, 1999 (14:10) * 1 lines 
 
Sapphires and Ruby are Corundum. Beryls are softer and include Emerald and Aquamarine


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 7 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 15, 1999 (14:14) * 1 lines 
 
Wolf, as a fellow Emerald Baby, I lusted after that emerald green diamond I mentioned above. What a sparkle it had. That would have been some birthstone!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 8 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 15, 1999 (14:23) * 1 lines 
 
Ummmmm, I guess we will just go for which stones come up in discussion. No order unless no one posts. Then, I start teaching again (heaven help us *lol*)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 9 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Thu, Jul 15, 1999 (16:19) * 7 lines 
 
wait, are you a june or may baby? i'm june, so alexandrite and pearl are my precious gems.

have never cared for emerald that much. aquamarine is beautiful and i own three pieces.

i forgot that ruby and sapphire were so closely related!

i know the colors of some gems are directly related to an element found in their chemistry. off the top of my head, i can't think of what it's called!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 10 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 15, 1999 (21:26) * 4 lines 
 
May 31st is mine. Gemini is from May 22 to June 22? Something like that anyway.
Never cared for emeralds; I also have three pieces set with aquamarine (pretty hard to come by these days) - one I set myself!

Ruby is red due to iron and titanium makes them blue(very simply stated, and can be from other metallic salts as well.) Rutile filiment cause an asterism - a flaw, really - the result being a star ruby or a star sapphire (my original engagement ring!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 11 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Jul 16, 1999 (09:38) * 5 lines 
 
woohoo!

you're right about gemini. mine is june 8.

i see a lot of aquamarine in the jewelry departments here and tanzanite is about to get its own display shelf! of course, as the popularity increases, so does the price. found mine on a 50% off display and absolutely love it!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 12 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 16, 1999 (11:24) * 4 lines 
 
Wolf: i see a lot of aquamarine in the jewelry departments here
Are you sure you are not seeing light topaz? It is everywhere and relatively inexpensive. BTW, do not purchase any Deep blue topaz. To get that lovely color they take clear topaz and irradiate it. The darker the color the more radiation. The really dark and lovely London blue is actually radioactive. Put that think on your finger and wear it all the time and you may have some serious problems!

Tanzanite is lovely, but I Know a lady with a deep velvet indigo one. Stunning!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 13 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Jul 16, 1999 (12:22) * 3 lines 
 
i knew about how they darken topaz, i don't own any. um, the aquamarine i'm seeing is marked as such. lighter topaz stones are with the darker stones.




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 14 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 16, 1999 (13:21) * 4 lines 
 
Then, you are dealing with reputable jewellers. Beware of the ones who display the stones by color without identifying them. In cases like these it can save you a great deal of money and heartache - unless you are delighted with your stone and got what you think was a good deal on it

Back to my Birthstone, the emerald. Since I do not care for them, I have been hunting for a green stone I do like. That is not easy. One visit to Britain I found a little second-hand shop and asked to see the jewelry - rings in particular. He brought out a tray of uninspired stuff, so I asked him if he had any tasteful Victorian items. He drolly remarked that I could have either Victorian or tasteful, but not both. I chose an Edwardian Bezel set deep green tournaline set in 18K gold. Very plain and
very tasteful. I adore it and am very happy with it.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 15 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Jul 17, 1999 (09:36) * 1 lines 
 
and in 18K! wow!! i believe there are two stones for each month, but i'll have to find a reference for that. tourmaline is famous for the watermelon colors, right?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 16 of 845: wer  (KitchenManager) * Sat, Jul 17, 1999 (09:49) * 2 lines 
 
there are at least two...I think I've run across about
four for June...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 17 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 17, 1999 (10:46) * 3 lines 
 
Moonstone, Pearl and Alexandrite is what comes to mind for June...will check on that some more.

Tourmaline crystals grow in columns and are (the gem quality) usually green or black at the bottom fading into clear fading into rosy red at the tops, making a unique banding effect. That is how it got the obvious watermelon name. It is precisely the color of a ripe watermelon!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 18 of 845: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Mon, Jul 19, 1999 (21:13) * 3 lines 
 
What about for Oct? I seem to remember being told my birth stone is an opal- which, of course, makes me look like a corpse. :) Anything brighter as an option?
By-the-bye, excellent work Marica!
This place is great!! :)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 19 of 845: S B Robinson  (SBRobinson) * Mon, Jul 19, 1999 (21:16) * 1 lines 
 
ACK!!!! Marcia! really- i can spell when i remember to pay attention to what i'm doing! Sorry dear! *blushing*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 20 of 845: Karen Rosenberg  (KarenR) * Mon, Jul 19, 1999 (21:26) * 7 lines 
 
Whoa, honey. You have a *real* Alexandrite? Do you know how rare that is? Even the lab-created (same physical and chemical properties) are very expensive.

BTW, tanzanite doesn't change colors.

Tourmaline comes in many, many colors. I do like the green as well and better than emeralds, which are so cloudy and flawed usually.

Many stones (besides topaz) are irradiated for color. In Russia, they make blue diamonds that way or maybe it's just intense heat.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 21 of 845: Karen Rosenberg  (KarenR) * Mon, Jul 19, 1999 (21:28) * 1 lines 
 
And while we're on the subject, I think I heard that there were new sources of aquamarine on the market from China, which may account for greater quantities appearing in stores. From the ones I've seen, they don't have the same lovely greenish tinge and are more light sky bluish, which defeats the purpose of having an Aqua IMO.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 22 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Jul 19, 1999 (21:31) * 7 lines 
 
october also has rose zircon (a bright and delightful pink) am not sure if that's a precious stone or a cheap alternative to opal. i don't care for the white opal, but when you find it in the most intense irridescence, it can be quite beautiful (a fiery blue/aqua)...

tanzanite only appears to change colors in light, of this i am aware, but did you know that upon tilting it, it seems to be slate gray?

thanks for visiting marcia's geo board!

way to go, marcia, you're bringing droolers over!! woohoo!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 23 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Jul 19, 1999 (21:34) * 3 lines 
 
the aquamarine i own came from china and are more blue than green, but because of the faintness of the color and the fact that the colors you're wearing only enhances the color of the stone, i find it quite enchanting :)

do they irradiate aquamarine as well, to intensify the color?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 24 of 845: Karen Rosenberg  (KarenR) * Mon, Jul 19, 1999 (21:37) * 5 lines 
 
Wolf, hon, the quality of opals you see in this country makes people hate them!! What you will see in Australia would blow your mind! The normal opals are on fire with color leaping out. The black opals (which are really greenish) are gorgeous and I have something called boulder opals that are deep blue and green.

Blue zircon is very rare (isn't that an alternative for December).

I know they don't really change colors, but appear to be different colors in light. I have tanzanite and don't recall anyone ever saying it would do so. I'm a little rusty, but I know there's another stone beside alexandrite that would do that. It will come to me.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 25 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Mon, Jul 19, 1999 (21:40) * 3 lines 
 
hee hee hee...won't Marcia be surprised to see me here!?

And no, I've never heard of anyone irradiating Aquas.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 26 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Jul 19, 1999 (21:44) * 11 lines 
 
that's what i love about tanzanite. i fiddle with it all the time to see the way the light affects the color!!

have never owned a real alexandrite and really didn't know they actually were a stone (haha, and i'm a june baby)!!

about the opals, have a gemstone book and when i found the other colors opal can display i was quite impressed!

have never seen blue zircon, will have to look that one up.

we'll have to find some pictures to post here (i'll post some after i locate that book!!)

i would love to see australia period, not to mention all the stuff i'd find there *grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 27 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Jul 19, 1999 (21:44) * 1 lines 
 
you snuck in ahead of me again! *laugh* guess i don't type as fast as i used to...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 28 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Jul 19, 1999 (21:47) * 3 lines 
 
ok, i just went out on a search and found this website on birthstones. will investigate it and see if it's any good--

http://www.jewelrymall.com/birthstones.html


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 29 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Mon, Jul 19, 1999 (21:53) * 3 lines 
 
If you like the grey slateish look of tanzanite (although I prefer it in the more valuable blue-violet shade), you should see silver and violet sapphires!!

*oil up them digits* ;-D


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 30 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Jul 19, 1999 (21:56) * 3 lines 
 
actually, i love the tanzanite in that magical bluish purple, it's so vibrant!

the website is great. it lists modern, traditional, tibetan, indian, and other birthstones for each month. it further breaks it down into astrological birthstones. each month is broken down with references and places to purchase...really really interesting!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 31 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jul 19, 1999 (22:13) * 8 lines 
 
I turn my back to get another Topic going and what a super surprise I find in Precious stones. Thanks for all of the postings.
Opals - black ones are magnificent as are fire opals which are red to red-orange. Oil them to help keep their luster, but be aware that it is little pockets of fluid trapped in the stone which makes the rainbows ( just like in the sky) and they are fragile. Do not hide them in your refrigerator. Do not bang them against hard surfaces. They will shatter.

I have a blue Zircon and it is lovely- a medium steely teal blue color. I am wearing my real Alexandrite, and it turns three colors - though the third color only once in the High Sierra on a very clear day. Mine is green by Day and amethyst by night, but neither are very pretty colors. It turned blue in the Sierras!

Sapphires come in all colors of the spectrum except red. They are rubies.

Ok next posting is on Bi-refringence - which is the apparent colorshift in a stone. and Pleiochromism. Class tomorrow... I am delighted that you all came here to post!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 32 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Jul 20, 1999 (09:49) * 1 lines 
 
well, i shall now be on the lookout for alexandrite (if i can afford it!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 33 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 21, 1999 (16:45) * 2 lines 
 
Wolf, I wear my Alexandrite (Marquise cut set in white gold) on my wedding ring finger in honor of someone born in June. It looks great with any color setting, but it is usually set in white metal - estate and old world settings were silver and current ones use white gold - especially since the prices went up. If you cannot find a real one in something you can afford, I have seen some good ones which do the amethyst-to-green change rather well. They are also not cheap, but are much more affordable. Be
are of the ones which go from greyish to pinkish. That is what you find in Mexico and is another stone entirely (but I have one I love!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 34 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 21, 1999 (17:36) * 6 lines 
 
Dichroism Some gems are of a crystal structure which causes light from different angles to exhibit different shades of the same color. Rubies have this quality and it distinguishes them from all other deep red stones (Spinels and Garnets). All corundum gems - Sapphires - are dichroaic. (also known as Pleochroism

Birefringence The crystalling structure is such that it produces double images. Calcite, Zircon and others exhibit this quality. When looking through a faceted stone from the top, the bottom facets will appear double.

The occurrance of two different colors in the same stone viewed under differing light sources, as in Alexandrite is called something I cannot find (yet!)It has also been observed in green or bluish grossular Garnet from East Africa which have been observed to turn red. (Still hunting for the name of this optical quality...check out this URL as a possibility for your specimen
http://www.chatham.com/mainalex.htm)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 35 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 21, 1999 (17:50) * 12 lines 
 


The term for the two-color optical quality of Alexandrite is considered an extreme and very rare form of Dichroism

For more information on Alexandrites (including the price of flawless stones from Brazil = $20,000 per carat) http://www.houseofonyx.com/gem1.html

More on cut stones
http://18carat.co.uk/alexandrite.html






 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 36 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jul 26, 1999 (00:28) * 1 lines 
 
There are lesser grades of Russian Alexandrites which turn from brown to yellow, but I have never seen one.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 37 of 845: wer  (KitchenManager) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (03:53) * 1 lines 
 
I wonder what color German Alexanders turn...hmmm...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 38 of 845: Gi  (patas) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (12:20) * 2 lines 
 
Anything from red to pale, depending on how Marcia looks at them ;-)
This may well become one of my favourite topics...Well, the female brain has a large area attuned to shiny things, remember? :-)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 39 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (12:49) * 1 lines 
 
Depends upon what I have written in my last message to him, I guess...Gi, no telling my secrets in here... but you share that proclivity as well, as I recall...;)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 40 of 845: Gi  (patas) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (13:33) * 1 lines 
 
Indeed! And have already bookmarked that birthstone site Wolf told us about... am going hunting for it as soon as I can! The DH is feeling generous...;-)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 41 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (13:41) * 1 lines 
 
Check out the other ones I put on, too. Generous enough for an Alexandrite?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 42 of 845: Gi  (patas) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (13:51) * 2 lines 
 
I doubt that...
Alexandrite is now being used as the core for laser machines used in definitive epilation.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 43 of 845: wer  (KitchenManager) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (15:43) * 1 lines 
 
ooh...neato...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 44 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (15:48) * 1 lines 
 
Why are they using beryl rather than corundum? (William - do not even think about it!!!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 45 of 845: wer  (KitchenManager) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (16:32) * 2 lines 
 
but think of the cool designs that could be traced
out on me...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 46 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (16:37) * 1 lines 
 
The Illustrated man?! (I do not know what cool designs are there now!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 47 of 845: wer  (KitchenManager) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (16:40) * 1 lines 
 
that's true...hehe...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 48 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (17:30) * 5 lines 
 
please no pics, wer *grin*

i don't think i've ever seen an alexandrite in our local stores, probably have to go to some high-faluten place and that means i couldn't even afford to walk in the door.

the last time the big alpha wolf was generous i came home with a 1 carat anniversary ring *gush* it looks, to the untrained eye, more expensive than it really was, but this gal ain't complainin'!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 49 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (18:51) * 1 lines 
 
I gave you some resources on the net. Check them out first, and there are some better and better man-made ones as well.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 50 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (18:54) * 1 lines 
 
Wolf, I am grateful for small packages which sparkle. I am easy to please because I get so little anymore. Congratulations to Alpha Wolf and to you.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 51 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (19:42) * 3 lines 
 
oh, thanks! i forgot about the websites you posted, thanks for reminding me!!

and you know what else? since i go out of town on business, i treat myself to something special. have purchased several pieces of jewelry this way and because i'm frugal (for the most part) haven't broken the bank *grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 52 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (20:10) * 1 lines 
 
Good for you - I am frugal too, but on occasion...Glad to hear you say that, Dear!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 53 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Wed, Jul 28, 1999 (00:13) * 4 lines 
 
Quite the busy place!! Is there a gem sale going on? *whipping out her credit cards*

Alexandrite is now being used as the core for laser machines used in definitive epilation.
Hair removal?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 54 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 28, 1999 (10:43) * 1 lines 
 
It would seem so. Wish she'd get back and let us know. Are hedge trimmers far behind?!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 55 of 845: Gi  (patas) * Wed, Jul 28, 1999 (11:58) * 3 lines 
 
Hair removal is what i mean. Some of you know that part of my job is also hair transplanting. I haven't done any removal, but have seen it done and it seems pretty cool.
Ruby lasers can also be used for hair removal (as for removal of small vascular lesions and pigments), but apparently alexandrite lasers can do better in less time.
However, they are stupidly expensive and therefore hair removal by this means is also stupidly expensive.(I think it is probably worth it, though;-))


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 56 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 28, 1999 (15:26) * 1 lines 
 
You are our resident expert. Thanks for the input, my dear. (Please do not ornament or carve my friend...!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 57 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 28, 1999 (15:43) * 1 lines 
 
Ooh, I almost forgot, I have a laser-ruby ring set in heavy Mexican Silver. It is made from the leftover pieces of perfect rubies and is a rather good-sized stone for my little fingers, but the color is outstanding!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 58 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Jul 28, 1999 (15:45) * 1 lines 
 
neato!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 59 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Wed, Jul 28, 1999 (16:18) * 1 lines 
 
What do you mean re: laser ruby? Industrial grade?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 60 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 28, 1999 (19:20) * 1 lines 
 
Yes, they cut the middle out which is the most perfect part, and the rest is culled for the gem trade. Mine is flawless as far as I can tell (10x and higher magnification) Laser rubies are not "industrial grade" the way we think of "industrial diamonds" - to be laser material, the ruby must be flawless.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 61 of 845: roark muse-dwr  (roarksmuse) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (05:13) * 6 lines 
 
It seems like I can learn a lot here, if I ask the questions. However, you must not think my questions ignorant. the asker is ignorant and asking to learn because it seems interesting. That having been said --

I love diamonds, rubies, and sapphires. and emeralds too.
Marcia you mentions industrial diamonds - what exactly is ment by 'industrial diamonds'? The only way I know them is by color, different grades, and flaws.

I have rubies from Africa, which are beautiful, but not as bright as say a Burmese. How would I know whether it was a laser ruby? I, however, assume it is gem quality.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 62 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (11:15) * 9 lines 
 
There is no soch thing as a stupid question as far as I am concerned. I am delighted that you are interested enough to ask.

Industrial gem anything is so full of flaws that about the only thing you can tell about them is that they are diamonds by their hardness. They use them is drill bits and as abrasives. Industrial garnets are used as abrasives, also.
In short, purchase only from reliable sources unless you can test what you are buying. Most laser culls are thrown back into the vat and remelted. Mine came from a friend of my Father's who was in the laser business.

Your rubies sound lovely. Laser rubies are too perfect - that is the nature of man-made stones. It was a huge problem with the man-made emeralds. Natural emeralds have flaw internally and it was very difficult to achieve just the right flaw patterns as in natural stones. As to how they tell Burmese (the best in the world, btw) from any other rubies is to run tests to ascertain other trace elements in it. Each source has different readings. This is not something you want to do at home unless you have
he resources to buy some pretty exotic and expensive equipment.

Thanks for stopping by and do come back - love your questions!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 63 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (12:54) * 3 lines 
 
hey marcia, i went to one of the sites you listed and looked at the created and real alexandrites and what a price difference. looked at the cheapest real ones but couldn't find a setting i liked. (ditto for the created ones). my mom gave me an alexandrite ring but told me it wasn't real (stone or metal) and the stone came out and i lost it. now i feel bad that i thought it was so chintzy and that experience is what made me thing alexandrites weren't worth much. (silly me, i know *blush*)

anyway, the alpha male wolf asked me what i wanted for christmas and i almost blurted "an alexandrite!"


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 64 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (13:53) * 2 lines 
 
(Marcia) As to how they tell Burmese (the best in the world, btw) from any other rubies is to run tests
Natch, but Burma rubies look v. different from African. Burmas are definitely more cherry red, while the African are darker. I know, I have a Burma ruby ring. It's real purty. :)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 65 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (13:58) * 1 lines 
 
and about the emeralds. The term used to describe real ones is "occluded." They are cloudy and full of flaws and everyone knows it. That's why the man-made stuff looks so wrong because they are sparklingly clear. I'm sure there are some flawless pieces out there, set in royal headwear or sceptors, or dangling in pendants encrusted with diamonds, but it's so rare to find a clear emerald. Saw some huge emeralds at the Topkapi museum.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 66 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (17:12) * 6 lines 
 
Karen, as always we welcome your input. I have a very small ruby from my Grandmother (it was hers as a little girl) and have no idea of its origins, but it is a lovely cherry red. Sounds like it could be Burmese.

Perhaps it is time for me to get out the terms like occluded and other optical and physical things in a stone apart from the ordinary cat's eye ans asterism (which are flaws, too.) The treasury of Iran (wherever it is now) has the largest single emeralds known. On a box about the size of a double deck of cards and twice as high, the lid is one huge slab of the most incredible emerald. The sides and back are too. But it is Too Much! It is soooo green it hurts your eyes. If I had a scanner I would pu
it on the page...Soon!!!!

My Alexandrite is of second quality - which means it goes from Amethyst to forest green. I want a Chatham Created one. They are costly, but they do go from ruby to emerald. BTW, I hope you all buy or receive yours in the day time with a blue sky and sun shining. I got mine at night and it was amethyst no matter what light I used. I had to wait for morning to see it turn green. Then I had to wait for 20 more years to see it turn blue!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 67 of 845: roark muse-dwr  (roarksmuse) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (20:50) * 5 lines 
 
Thanks Marcia.

Karen, Burmese are much lighter and seem to me not cloudy. I know that the African ruby is darker. Both are beautiful in their own right. I have an African (3k) for everyday and 2 Burmese for special or different occasions. Emeralds are beautiful too. I don't care for the manufactured ones.

And Wolf, I hope you get that Alexandrite sooner than Christmas.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 68 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (21:18) * 1 lines 
 
Man, it must be nice to have every-day Rubies and Special-occasion Rubies... I asked you whether you were male or female in Horoscope. I am almost positive that you are of the XX gender - but I still might be wrong. Karen and roark are both from Chicago. Small world!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 69 of 845: roark muse-dwr  (roarksmuse) * Fri, Jul 30, 1999 (01:12) * 1 lines 
 
FEMALE; Diann, keep the horoscopes coming. I thought you made them up.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 70 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Jul 30, 1999 (09:05) * 3 lines 
 
my goodness a 3K ruby for everyday! you go, girl!!

ok, you all will think me a fool, BUT, i ordered two pieces with garnet. one is a black hills gold bracelet with links that each carry a piece of garnet and a matching ring. alpha male will never get me that alexandrite now! haha, black hills is so pretty i couldn't resist. it'll be here next week and i'll let you know.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 71 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 30, 1999 (11:28) * 1 lines 
 
I love Garnets more than rubies for their color. I have 4 garnet rings, one of which I bought on one of my visits to Britain, I also have a lathe pectoral corss set with cab garnets in havy silver. Truly magnificent stones! Let us know how you love them when you get them.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 72 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 30, 1999 (11:30) * 1 lines 
 
Welcome Diann =) Go happy to meet you. I think I need to hunt for better astrology stuff...some of that is pretty weird.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 73 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Jul 30, 1999 (12:34) * 1 lines 
 
astrology has been discussed at paraspring, genx, porch, and spirit! i don't believe in it, but some of it is really uncanny....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 74 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 30, 1999 (15:12) * 1 lines 
 
Did that long Gemini thing I posted sound like you? I am terrible with grocery carts. My son won't let me wield one!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 75 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Jul 30, 1999 (16:15) * 1 lines 
 
did i miss the long gemini thing? where did you post it? i have to have the cart when i need one. my kids want to run into everything with it and i can't stand the "no control" thing.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 76 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 30, 1999 (16:40) * 1 lines 
 
Porch 55.170


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 77 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Jul 30, 1999 (17:18) * 1 lines 
 
k!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 78 of 845: roark muse-dwr  (roarksmuse) * Sat, Jul 31, 1999 (00:41) * 5 lines 
 
wolf, you are so right about alpha wolf. You definitely have to take things into your own hands, like I did. I was loving myself.

about para: is there anyone over there that soothsays?




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 79 of 845: roark muse-dwr  (roarksmuse) * Sat, Jul 31, 1999 (00:42) * 1 lines 
 
Marcia, I almost forgot. are you a geologist?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 80 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 31, 1999 (00:54) * 1 lines 
 
I ended up with more credits in earth sciences (Geology, Paleo, Mineralogy, etc) than I did in my major so I got a split degree...you could call me a geologist without the math credentials.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 81 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 31, 1999 (00:56) * 1 lines 
 
Diann, I don't think there is a Soothsayer in Para, but you could check - or ask Wolf about a topic to open if you are one yourself. I would come forsooth! ...and forthwith.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 82 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Jul 31, 1999 (20:59) * 3 lines 
 
i'd be more than happy to open a soothsayer topic, not a problem!! say the word, and since i'm not extremely clairvoyant, because i'm sure i wouldn't be able to read your mind *grin*




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 83 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Sun, Aug  8, 1999 (17:33) * 4 lines 
 
There are more to garnets than the traditional burgundy ones you know. Let's see if I remember...there's tsavorite (named after the Tsavo park area of Kenya), which is green, and a necklace I have has a teensy little orange bit of garnet, which I believe is called Mandarin garnet.

Can't do the Black Hills stuff because they use mainly 12K or 10K gold and all the alloys that are put in for the color!! Bad enough some 14K will make black marks on my fingers, although I am a huge fan of rose gold and have many pieces both new and antique. For a minute there, I thought I was OT but it is "precious metals" too.



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 84 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Aug  8, 1999 (18:06) * 5 lines 
 
fortunately for me, i've no probs with the jewelry i wear regardless of chemical composition. karen, can you wear white gold, platinum, or silver?

the garnets on the BHG bracelet and ring (!!) are kinda orange-burgundy, real earth toned. it's very pretty.

have you all seen the orbis rings? (i think that's what they're called). you can interchange stones. saw some at a craft show that were $60 for the petite sizes and came with 8 stones. didn't get one, but maybe next time when i learn more about them and the kinds of stones used.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 85 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Aug  8, 1999 (18:17) * 3 lines 
 
Karen, you must have been reading my mind. I was about to post about garnets. I love the rich red ones, even better than *gasp* rubies just because of the color. (I think garnets are bad luck for my family. Son gave one in a ring to a lady and he is not seeing her anymore. And, when I was in California for 4 months I received a goregous ring of Garnets and I will most likely never see the donor again...) Tsavorite is an interesting stone - the rich green color is due to vanadium "contamination." Garn
ts come in colors varying from Yellow to violet with all shades of reds and oranges inbetween. Spessartine Garnets are a righ red-orange from Brazil and from such diverse places as New York City (found when they dug up a street) and in San Diego County, California. Uvarovite is deep tourmaline green and quite rare and therefore expensive, as are the violet stones. Grossular garnets have asbestos inclusions which impart a silky luster. I have a green one of these, but it is not transparent, so only of
nterest to my mineral collection. Most common red garnets are Almandine with the brown to deep red color. Pyrope is the ruby-colored one, and a flawless specimen can cost almost as much as a ruby of the same size. Rhodalite is the third form of red garnet is the most costly of the red garnets for a rare flawless gem.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 86 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Aug  8, 1999 (18:19) * 1 lines 
 
Wolf, your orangish brown-burgundy garnets are Hessionite.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 87 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Sun, Aug  8, 1999 (20:19) * 5 lines 
 
That same necklace has a little Pyrope in it as well. What's interesting is that the gems were cut by Swarovski of the crystal fame. Had never realized that they did gem cutting. So they are brilliantly faceted.

As soon as I posted, I realized I had forgotten Rhodalite garnets - Raspberry rhodalites - and the Hessionites. It will take a while, but it will all come back. ;-D

Wolf, I don't have any platinum and very little white gold, but I do wear silver all the time, with no problems at all. Now, I'm trying to remember which is the alloy that most people have problems with.... argh!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 88 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Aug  8, 1999 (20:33) * 1 lines 
 
Copper!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 89 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Aug  8, 1999 (20:42) * 3 lines 
 
One summer on sabbatical from UHH we visited my parents in Tucson, Arizona. There was a nice little arroyo (dry creek bed) which ran across the back of their property, and I discovered what the local kids were calling "sand rubies" - perfect dodecahedrons of Garnet - just a wee bit bigger than sand grains. I sat out there all summer and got a little vial full of the prettiest perfect little garnets - for my collection.

It comes back to me because I have my mineralogy texts right beside me =)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 90 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Sun, Aug  8, 1999 (23:15) * 1 lines 
 
Copper, no that's not the one. Besides, copper is what is used in rose gold. *still thinking*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 91 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Aug  8, 1999 (23:33) * 1 lines 
 
zinc? Tin?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 92 of 845: wer  (KitchenManager) * Sun, Aug  8, 1999 (23:58) * 1 lines 
 
pewter?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 93 of 845: wer  (KitchenManager) * Sun, Aug  8, 1999 (23:59) * 1 lines 
 
(Everybody join in! It's 20 questions in Geo!!!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 94 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Aug  9, 1999 (08:08) * 1 lines 
 
i don't know, thought it was copper as well....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 95 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug  9, 1999 (12:40) * 1 lines 
 
Me too - that is why they epoxy those copper "health" bracelets or else coat them with 24K gold (which is so thin and so soft that it will be gone before you have gotten any "benefits" therefrom.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 96 of 845: Gi  (patas) * Mon, Aug  9, 1999 (13:28) * 1 lines 
 
I think zinc is responsible for many allergies to metal alloys.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 97 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug  9, 1999 (13:35) * 1 lines 
 
I was wondering when we would shake the medical faculty of Spring out of the trees to offer their comments. Thanks, Gi. I suspect zinc, too. Copper can turn you colors (it turns me green,) but nothing like zinc...that makes lesions. Not a good thing!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 98 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Aug  9, 1999 (14:53) * 3 lines 
 
didn't know that about zinc!

so what do they use on those cheapy earrings? you know, the posts that, when you leave the earrings in overnight, you get a crust on the earring hole? (sorry about being so gross!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 99 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug  9, 1999 (17:19) * 1 lines 
 
They're supposed to be surgical steel if they are not gold...but on really cheap ones, it might be almost anything. Zinc is used to harden things like copper to make brass or bronze and to make gold and silver less fragile and more affordable.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 100 of 845: wer  (KitchenManager) * Mon, Aug  9, 1999 (23:18) * 1 lines 
 
and that happens to me even with nylon posts, Wolf...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 101 of 845: Alexander Schuth  (aschuth) * Tue, Aug 10, 1999 (09:04) * 1 lines 
 
Wooden posts here! Stick in the eye, anyone?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 102 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Aug 10, 1999 (10:04) * 1 lines 
 
never heard of nylon posts....was that a trick?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 103 of 845: wer  (KitchenManager) * Tue, Aug 10, 1999 (12:20) * 4 lines 
 
nope...you can buy some nylon earrings (usually kiddie ones) and
since I have a problem with all the metals I've tried (including
gold and surgical stainless) I thought I'd try them...still haven't
given titatium a trial run, though...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 104 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Aug 10, 1999 (12:51) * 1 lines 
 
i've heard that's the best for sensitive ears but expensive. the only earrings that don't give me probs if i leave them on too long are the ones used for piercing. they may be the surgical steel.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 105 of 845: Alexander Schuth  (aschuth) * Tue, Aug 10, 1999 (14:37) * 5 lines 
 
Over here are guilds of carpenters who wear a special and customary hat and work clothes. If a aprenticed carpenter wants to become a master, he has to wander from carpenter to carpenter, work for food and shelter only, and on the road beg for his fare.

They have through all time worn golden earrings; the piercing is an initiation rite to welcome the new brother: A pointed piece of wood is driven through the ear lobe with a hammer...

(Sweet dreams... I guess I'm off for now!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 106 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Sep 19, 1999 (13:16) * 1 lines 
 
ok, orbis rings. picked a sterling silver one today that holds 8mm stones. i got 10 stones with the ring plus a titanium ball for an extra $7. altogether, my total was $32. not too bad. there are precious stone balls that are available too, but of course the price is much higher. but silver balls and gold balls were $3 and $4 each. they had gold and silver rings for $170. unless i decide that these rings are the bomb, i'll have to hold out for a gold one.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 107 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Sep 19, 1999 (15:52) * 1 lines 
 
These are those lovely rings which have oscillating elements on them? Sounds like you got a deal. Please describe them. I love rings!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 108 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Sep 19, 1999 (16:27) * 2 lines 
 
well, they come in different styles. mine is sterling silver with two thin strands going up and over the middle attaching to the other side. the middle is empty and is the place where you slip the ball into. so be very careful when you take it off as the ball will fall right out the back. the balls are all highly polished. they look like balls with cat's eyes in them. mine are different colors but have seen precious opal, as well as balls encrusted with gems. you can change them out as the mood hits you
or to go with whatever you're wearing. some of the rings come together in the middle of your finger with a gap between for the ball to squeeze into, and some have just a decorative opening in the middle. hard to describe, before i scan mine, lemme see if i can find a site with bunches of them to look at. oh, the gold and silver were designed with silver as the main ring and gold decorating the opening for the ball.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 109 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Sep 19, 1999 (17:11) * 1 lines 
 
I have never seen anything even remotely like that. How interesting and lovely and just the thing to wear to those boring lectures when we must look like we are interested...look at your ring! (I used to peek at guys next to me in lecture halls reflected in the facets of my class ring...!) ... waiting for your success on scanning / website hunting ...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 110 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Sep 19, 1999 (18:14) * 1 lines 
 
so far, no luck on the web, but will try a different search engine!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 111 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Sep 20, 1999 (20:00) * 6 lines 
 
no luck at all yet. will keep trying. (don't try captive bead ring because you will get all the body piercing sites! unless you wanna)

(oh, and i actually have 12 balls, guess the lady didn't count the one in the ring already)...

and while i was there, i stopped at a pawn shop booth to see their orbis rings. this guy doesn't want to sell an orbis ring to me, he wants me to buy an aquamarine ring set in 14K for $100. i asked him what the clarity of the stone was and from which part of the world it was from. he said he didn't know and couldn't tell me (either question). he said that stuff about where a stone is originally from is a bunch of bull. well, my gembook certainly talks about where they come from. so i told him thank you ve
y much and took my business elsewhere. marcia, how can they sell aquamarine for $100? it had a large diamond shaped stone in the middle flanked by baguettes (sp?). i figured because the ring was pre-owned and not one whole piece and that the quality of the stone was fair at best. although my naked eye didn't see any inclusions.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 112 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 21, 1999 (15:42) * 2 lines 
 
The guy is wrong...he just does not want to be bothered to find out! It is not a real one, or the guy does not know his business. The price is way too low for one set in 14K.n Gotta get you a 10x jewelers loup to carry in your pocket (or a very good magnifier would do as well) so you can make your own accessments. You also need to check that it is not a doublet - a sliver of aquamarine glued to the top of a clear white stone making the entire thing look like aquamarine, but it is not, and is not wort
the money! Were the baguettes also of Aquamaring? I'll bet anything it was a zircon - much harder and more easily made into baguettes - and more cheaply grown in the lab. You were wise to pass it by!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 113 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 21, 1999 (15:44) * 1 lines 
 
uh...thanks for the warning about the body piercing sites. I have been guided to some by another, and have seen all I need to see...eeeeesh!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 114 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Sep 21, 1999 (19:36) * 1 lines 
 
haha!! i knew that when this guy wouldn't entertain my ideas and kept pushing other ring sets on me that he didn't have a clue! but all of the stones were claimed to be aquamarine! i want a jeweler's loup, where can i find one?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 115 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 21, 1999 (19:42) * 1 lines 
 
Any jewellers tool or stamp and coin collecting or rock collecting or hobby shop should have a 10x loup or folding one (an oval slipcase with a lens which swings in and out - mine is by American Optical)...even a store which sells glasses or telescopes or microscopes, binoculars or similar precision optics should have one. I'd try a craft or hobby place first, though.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 116 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Sep 21, 1999 (20:11) * 1 lines 
 
might be a tad easier on the pocketbook, huh? thanks for the info! now i'll either cry or leap for joy at what my own jewelry reveals!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 117 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 21, 1999 (20:16) * 1 lines 
 
It will be a revelation. But, before you peer into them, clean them first in a dilute solution of household ammonia...You don't want to see all that soap and whatever under there and think it is flaws in your stones! (The least specialized the place you buy your magnifier, the better the price will be!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 118 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Sep 27, 1999 (19:39) * 3 lines 
 
no loupe yet, but i do have a question regarding silver. i own mostly gold jewelry and haven't had this problem with them. the silver orbis ring tarnishes quickly on the underside (palm side) on the outside. i've cleaned it and in a couple of wearings, it's tarnished again. does this mean that the silver i have is of poor quality or what? there is a stamp inside of .925, i know this has something to do with the gram weight.

oh, and i absolutely cannot find a site on orbis rings. am going to look up some jewelry store chains and see what's up with them.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 119 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep 27, 1999 (20:14) * 1 lines 
 
Nothing wrong with your silver - it is .925 out of 1000% pure silver - the standard for Sterling. Your body chemistry is making it tarnish. I turn green from copper stuff...and some medications can do it, too, under your silver. Just coat the ones which do it to you (the rest are probably Rhodium plated)with a thin coat of colorless nail polish. Our air has enough sulfur in it from the eruptions that leaving silver out on display is foolish.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 120 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep 27, 1999 (20:16) * 1 lines 
 
I did not find an easily obtainable loupe, but I did see a good magnifier in Walmart in their pharmacy with the off-the-rack reading glasses. Check there.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 121 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Sep 27, 1999 (20:33) * 1 lines 
 
cool, thanks!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 122 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Oct 30, 1999 (23:46) * 27 lines 
 
Gemstones of the Zodiac

There are many variations on this list. Find your sign in the table and select the gem(s) indicated for more information.
Aquarius
Garnet
Pisces
Amethyst
Aries
Bloodstone
Taurus
Sapphire
Gemini
Agate
Cancer
Emerald
Leo
Onyx
Virgo
Carnelian
Libra
Peridot
Scorpio
Beryl
Sagittarius
Topaz
Capricorn
Ruby


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 123 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Oct 30, 1999 (23:48) * 2 lines 
 
The above list is in chart form which lost a lot in the transfer - it is at
http://www.jewelry4less.com/parts/zodiac.shtml


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 124 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct 31, 1999 (19:16) * 14 lines 
 
http://www.gemstone.org/gematic.html
Birthstones: choosing a gem for you

Most gem scholars agree that the tradition of birthstones arose from the Breastplate of Aaron: a ceremonial religious garment
set with twelve gemstones that represented the twelve tribes of Israel and also corresponded with the twelve signs of the zodiac
and the twelve months of the year.

Because ancient people did not always classify gemstones by mineral species like we do, there is some debate about which
gemstones were set in the breastplate and why. Because of this, different cultures around the world have developed different
birth stone lists. The modern day list that you know is only the most recent list: some older lists still exist. Some also argue that
the proper way to assign gemstones is according to astrological sign and not month. We think it is more fun to choose the ge
mstone that speaks to you from all the possibilities. Of course it is hard to keep track of all the lists. Enter the Gem-o-Matic!
Select your birthdate or other significant date or anniversary and the Gem-o-Matic will give you the list of all the birthstones that
correspond to that date!



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 125 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct 31, 1999 (19:18) * 23 lines 
 
http://www.gemstone.org/plate.html
The Breastplate of the High Priest


The instructions for fabricating the Breastplate of the High Priest, or the Breastplate of Aaron, can be found in Exodus 28, 15-30:

And thou shall make the breastplate of judgement with cunning work; after the work of the ephod thou shalt make it; of
gold, of blue, and of purple, and of scarlet, and of fine linen shalt thou make it.

Foursquare it shall be doubled; a span shall be the length thereof, and a span shall be the breadth thereof.

And thou shalt set in it settings of stones, even four rows of stones: the first row shall be a sardius, a topaz, and a
carbuncle: this shall be the first row.

And the second row shall be an emerald, a sapphire, and a diamond. And the third row a ligure, an agate, and an
amethyst. And the fourth row a beryl, and an onyx, and a jasper; they shall be set in gold in their enclosings.

And the stones shall be with the names of the children of Israel, twelve, according to their names, like the engravings
on a signet; every one with his name shall they be according to the twelve tribes....

And Aaron shall bear the names of the children of Israel in the breastplate of judgement upon his heart, when he
goeth in unto the holy place, for a memorial before the Lord continually.




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 126 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct 31, 1999 (19:19) * 30 lines 
 
I checked mine for May 31 and this is what it said

Modern birthstone: emerald

Zodiac gemstone for gemini: agate

Ancient traditional birthstones:

Hebrew: agate

Roman: agate

Arabic: emerald

Hindu: emerald

Polish: emerald

Russian: emerald

Guardian angel: amriel

His talismanic stone: carbuncle (garnet)

The custom of wearing birthstones probably first became popular in Poland in the fifteenth or sixteenth century. For more
information about the history of birthstones, try The Curious Lore of Precious Stones by George Frederick Kunz, a
fascinating compendium of all the powers that have been associated with gemstones through the ages. For example,
birthstones originally may have been worn each month by everyone, since the powers of the gemstone were heightened during
its month. If that is true, to get the full effect, you need to go out and get a full set of twelve and rotate them each year!



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 127 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct 31, 1999 (19:23) * 3 lines 
 
They got one thing right - Garnet is my favorite colored gemstone, and it is the talisman of my Guardian Angel...

I agree we should all have a complete set of gem stones...Yessssssss!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 128 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Oct 31, 1999 (19:29) * 1 lines 
 
what, a talisman of our guardian angels? and how do we find that?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 129 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct 31, 1999 (19:45) * 3 lines 
 
By going to this web site and entering your exact birthday (month and day) then hitting the submit button...
http://www.gemstone.org/gematic.html



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 130 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Oct 31, 1999 (19:56) * 27 lines 
 
ok, here's my stuff:

Modern birthstone: moonstone or alexandrite

Zodiac gemstone for gemini: agate

Ancient traditional birthstones:

Hebrew: emerald

Roman: emerald

Arabic: agate

Hindu: pearl

Polish: agate

Russian: agate

Guardian angel: muriel

His talismanic stone: emerald

cool!




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 131 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct 31, 1999 (20:01) * 1 lines 
 
Excellent! One would not wish to be without one's talismanic gem, now, would one...even if it is an emerald (not my fav stone.)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 132 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct 31, 1999 (20:03) * 1 lines 
 
Had I known earlier, I could have spent Halloween as a Stoplight...My Emerald Birthstone on one side and my talismanic Garnet on the other! (making notes for next year...)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 133 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Nov 12, 1999 (18:35) * 8 lines 
 
marcia, i finally got a stroke of brilliance! i scanned my orbis ring for you to see, including all the stones. plus, an ad for them at a local jeweler's. enjoy!

here's mine:


the ad (it's hard to see, i know, these are silver, but they come in gold and combos:




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 134 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Nov 12, 1999 (18:37) * 1 lines 
 
again, my apologies for the quality of them, but you get the idea (i hope)!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 135 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 12, 1999 (19:08) * 2 lines 
 
Thanks so much. Wolfie...Not at all what I imagined. How beautiful they are! And, Now I can see why you want one in Gold, as well. Quite nicely made and very secure for the stone. What a clever idea! How many different stones are available? Actually, in a setting that protective, you could use fairly soft gems which are usually not cut for rings because you cannot set them securely (Pressure to bend the prongs on the setting is enough to fracture the stones in some cases.)I just love it. Thanks aga
n!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 136 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Nov 12, 1999 (19:43) * 1 lines 
 
you can get all sorts of stones. mine came with 11 plus the titanium that i purchased separately. if you go to a jeweler's, you'll pay an arm and leg. mine was $32, ring and 12 8mm stones. i imagine the bigger the ring and stones the more they cost. at the place i picked up mine, they were silver with gold rings for $200.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 137 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 12, 1999 (19:49) * 1 lines 
 
Sounds fantastic. Ok, where did you get yours? From Lucky Looey on the corner in the bulging trench coat?! Or...the PX? (Hast thou an inside track on jewels? she asked pantingly)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 138 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Nov 12, 1999 (19:54) * 1 lines 
 
i got it from a vendor at an arts & crafts show. she had a ton of stones to choose from and the ring she was wearing had an opal in it! they don't carry them at the PX. but, there's a kiosk in the mall with them and some of the major jewelry store chains carry them.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 139 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 12, 1999 (19:59) * 1 lines 
 
Gonna have to look this season when I am at the Angel Tree for the Salvation Army. I leave him there to tend the tags and I go on Santa excursions and just plain looking...I'll even ask about them. If anyone would have them, they will be in our biggest mall (Does Zales carry them?)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 140 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Nov 12, 1999 (20:00) * 1 lines 
 
not that i've seen. bailey's does, do you have that chain? (be warned, they're expensive)..


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 141 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 12, 1999 (20:06) * 1 lines 
 
No, but my Mother's wedding set came from Bailey, Banks and Biddle in Philadelphia. Any relation? If so, they are *very* expensive, but also very nice things which are not available other places. I can barely afford to breathe the air in the store, but it does not cost anything to look. (...and I can elevate my patrician nose right along with the best of them so they dare not risk snubbing me and losing a sale to a potentially important customer!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 142 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Nov 12, 1999 (20:08) * 1 lines 
 
haha! i walk into a place like that even in my best duds and they snub me!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 143 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 12, 1999 (20:10) * 1 lines 
 
No, but my Mother's wedding set came from Bailey, Banks and Biddle in Philadelphia. Any relation? If so, they are *very* expensive, but also very nice things which are not available other places. I can barely afford to breathe the air in the store, but it does not cost anything to look. (...and I can elevate my patrician nose right along with the best of them so they dare not risk snubbing me and losing a sale to a potentially important customer!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 144 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 12, 1999 (20:13) * 1 lines 
 
The Philadelphia store is their original one, and the very air smells like money. it is the oddest place - hushed and subdued like a church with obsequious gentlemen in morning clothes waiting to relieve you of a considerable amount of your where-with-all. Bizarre and memorable for this little girl who remembers a Christmas there long ago.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 145 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Nov 12, 1999 (20:17) * 1 lines 
 
this place is a bit like that. i took my tanzanite to be checked because i could feel the stone move. they took it in the back, tightened the setting and gave it back in less than five minutes. no charge. i certainly didn't expect that!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 146 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 12, 1999 (20:45) * 1 lines 
 
That's the sign of a truly proper jewelry store which understands the value of making friends of their customers. Once, when Harry Winston was interviewed, his best advice to jewellers starting out in the trade was to keep a stock of modestly-priced engagement diamonds on hand...you never knew when a future wealthy patron was standing before you making his first purchase. Harry usually kept repeat customers of the wealthiest sort very happy, indeed!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 147 of 845: Gi  (patas) * Sat, Nov 13, 1999 (12:01) * 1 lines 
 
hey, that's why I stay with the bank where I have an account:they treated me like money even when I had none! :-)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 148 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Nov 13, 1999 (12:22) * 1 lines 
 
Indeed, they were very wise. It makes me wonder if the greed of today has made newcomers to customer service eliminate that nicety thus not creating patronage they can count on in the long term.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 149 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Nov 26, 1999 (22:44) * 2 lines 
 
guess what? went to the arts and crafts show again and got another orbis ring. AND they had an amber ball (it's real, i looked at it). the thing was they had it for $6 but charged only $2. hmmmm....there were so many people there that i didn't want to confuse anyone so i left with my "steal". there were many more stones to choose from this time and i only swapped one out of the set of 10 that i got with the ring. was so excited to find that amber stone! and all for $29 (sterling silver) a prettier sett
ng than my other one. will have to scan it for you to see.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 150 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Nov 27, 1999 (12:52) * 1 lines 
 
Man, I need to get to that show...Of course our big one is on each year during this tournament...so I never get to go to it. I am most interested in one, and am delighted you scored an amber stone for it. Cheers and Merry Christmas to you!!! (such a deal...*sgh*)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 151 of 845: Gi  (patas) * Fri, Dec  3, 1999 (22:45) * 1 lines 
 
Wolf, do scan your ring, I am so curious :-)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 152 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Dec  3, 1999 (23:00) * 1 lines 
 
(She has her Alexandrite for Christmas, as well...) Scan your new ring for us, too, Wolfie!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 153 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Dec  3, 1999 (23:02) * 3 lines 
 
Did you check her ring where she scanned it first?
http://www.spring.net/~bayou/orbisring.gif



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 154 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Dec  4, 1999 (17:05) * 1 lines 
 
you want to see the new one as well? (i'll see what i can do!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 155 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec  4, 1999 (17:27) * 1 lines 
 
Oh yes! Please!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 156 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Dec  4, 1999 (18:52) * 1 lines 
 
*grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 157 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec  4, 1999 (19:05) * 1 lines 
 
(Sitting quietly and patiently with my hands neatly folded in my lap and trying to be patient while you work so diligently with your scanner...)*smiling hopefully and eagerly*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 158 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Dec  4, 1999 (19:30) * 3 lines 
 
well, you asked for it:

the new Orbis Ring


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 159 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Dec  4, 1999 (19:31) * 1 lines 
 
no, DO NOT go there, it's way tooo big. let me cut it down:


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 160 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Dec  4, 1999 (19:42) * 5 lines 
 
ok, it's fixed but the name has changed:

This is really the new Orbis Ring

these rings are also called "interchangeable ball rings"


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 161 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec  4, 1999 (19:48) * 1 lines 
 
Ooooooooh....that is beautiful!!! More substantial than the other rings I recall seeing. Lovely! That is such a neat box it comes in, too. Gotta find somewhere here who carries them or tell them to get some in so I can see and admire and maybe even afford one for myself! *thinking...* Thanks! (Yep, you don't want to go to her first hotlink - it is not as advertised *grin*)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 162 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Dec  4, 1999 (19:52) * 1 lines 
 
i think with the popularity, they're adding styles. when i bought the first one, they didn't have many styles to choose from. they had a dolphin pendant too (but it was $60 with one stone). sterling silver, too. it was beautiful, to say the least. i'll see if the place has a web site, hopefully they do and you can see these pieces for yourself.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 163 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec  4, 1999 (19:56) * 1 lines 
 
Maybe I could even order one through eCommerce. Thanks. Trying to discern the stones you have in that ring...is the one at the 8-9 o'clock position a garnet? It is a gorgeous color!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 164 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Dec  4, 1999 (19:59) * 3 lines 
 
no, that's the amber!! i did the acetone test and it didn't get sticky! it also has a spangle in it (which is not a natural occurance but comes from heating amber in rapseed oil--a little something i learned from doug lungren's site)

i gotta go, the AM wants to surf awhile. g'night and *hugs*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 165 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec  4, 1999 (20:27) * 2 lines 
 
Fascinating - a beautiful color, and I know amber comes in everything from pale yellow opaque to deep burgundy clear and everything inbetween. The test I have heard for it (and I have not the courage to do it to my pieces) is to press a hot needle against it and smell the vapors - it should smell like pine trees not plastic melting. Interesting about the rapeseed oil (what we squeemish Americans know as Canola oil). I wonder what happens to cause that interesting phenomenon.(I know - look in Lundgren's
site...!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 166 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec  4, 1999 (20:29) * 1 lines 
 
g'night Wolfie. Be safe in that weather *hugs*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 167 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Dec 25, 1999 (22:10) * 3 lines 
 
i've finally found the right combo of words to put into the search engine: interchangeable stone rings. and viola, here's a link with pics and everything!

http://www.signaturejewelers.com/sphere2.html


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 168 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec 25, 1999 (22:52) * 1 lines 
 
Thank you Wolfie!!! That is the best christmas present I have had all day - asnd the only one, for that matter. Going to look...reporting back asap


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 169 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec 25, 1999 (22:58) * 2 lines 
 
Ok, there are all sorts including faceted stones. Love the choice. Any questions on the appearance or hardness of any of them and I will be able to describe to you what it looks like and and how hard or durable it will be.
I am gonna get me one for Christmas after I send Terry a check and balance my check book and pay bills so I can stay online.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 170 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec 25, 1999 (22:59) * 1 lines 
 
Best news of all is that they also use 10K gold which is more durable and more affordable. That is what I will try for but I do like the silver...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 171 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec 25, 1999 (23:21) * 1 lines 
 
Oh boy - the $18.99 was a steal even if it was the simplest design (did not see the style in their inventory) but I like the gold filagree one. $249 is a little steep - I like your styles better and they do not have them, either!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 172 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec 25, 1999 (23:54) * 2 lines 
 
http://listings.ebay.com/aw/listings/list/all/category282/page4.html
Is a remarkable collection of jewelry and unset stones at eBay. Check them out - lots of those laser (which they call lab) rubies like the one I have and lots of Alexandrites which are listed as corondum - they are NOT alexandrites and will only change from purple to blue-grey. I have one and it is lovely - but not as interesting as my real one!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 173 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec 25, 1999 (23:58) * 2 lines 
 
http://www.galleryone.cc/galleryone-sandiego/injew.html
has them the most reasonable of all but more limited choice of styles.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 174 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Dec 26, 1999 (11:08) * 7 lines 
 
according to my gem book, alexandrites are listed under chrysoberyl. isn't that what sapphires ball under, the beryls?

nevermind, going a few pages back, the corundums are the rubies, sapphire, and padparadscha (wait, that's a sapphire too).

and while i'm here, what's the difference between precious and semi-precious?

(thanks for the links and i'm glad you got at least one christmas present!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 175 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec 26, 1999 (11:38) * 7 lines 
 
Sapphires are Corundum and Alexandrites are in the same family as Emeralds and aquamarines - little softer than Corundum, but I have worn my Alexandrite without taking it off for any reason for a long time and there are no scratches on it.

Precious gems and semi-precious. Most stones can be both as in inferior and inky sapphires, way-too-pale rubies, and grit-filled diamondsn are semi-precious
whereas the vibrant clear stones in these same categories without flaws as precious because they are so rare and so difficult to mine.

The best Christmas present was a Remember Button *grin* But since O'O is paying for the changeable stone ring I'm gonna get a "good" one, the one I really want. He has not given me presents for 2 birthdays and Christmases...



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 176 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec 26, 1999 (13:06) * 3 lines 
 
Oops - you did note that about the sapphires...*grin*

If you can find one of those antique kalidoscopes they are full of semiprecious slices and that is an additional bonus to having one of them other than their beauty - and huge price. They used citrine for yellow, peridot for green, amethyst for purple, carnellian for orange, rose quartz for pink and garnet for red...plus all sorts of elegant imported hand-made glass. I'd love to have one but it would probably mildew here...*sigh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 177 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Dec 26, 1999 (15:10) * 1 lines 
 
think i've seen the antique kalidoscopes before. i like the cheapy ones with the plastic beads and stuff inside too.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 178 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec 26, 1999 (15:22) * 1 lines 
 
Me too... I like Kalidoscopes. Period. I used to lie on my back when I was supposed to be taking my naps and use my sister's which I had smuggled into my room to entertain me for the hour or so my mother made me lie down in the afternoon. I still remember it! And I have my son's right here beside me!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 179 of 845: Gi  (patas) * Tue, Dec 28, 1999 (14:37) * 1 lines 
 
I like kaleidoscopes too! I bought one (a cheap card and plastic bead thing) a few years ago. Never ceases to amaze me.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 180 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Dec 28, 1999 (14:44) * 1 lines 
 
Like they said in the old days, all the magic is done with mirrors, but few magic acts can match the beauty of a simple kalidoscope and its bilateral symetry repeated over and over again.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 181 of 845: Gi  (patas) * Tue, Dec 28, 1999 (14:55) * 1 lines 
 
You can probably use it for a sort of Rorshach test as well (sorry... prosaic me attacks again)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 182 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Dec 28, 1999 (15:08) * 1 lines 
 
what's the rorshach test?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 183 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Dec 28, 1999 (15:50) * 1 lines 
 
Ink blots are made by using a folded paper and dropping ink into the fold. It is pressed flat and opened to dry. What you think you see in the images formed is what some psychologists used to use to decide what was really going on in your mind.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 184 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Dec 29, 1999 (09:53) * 1 lines 
 
i thought that but wanted to make sure. boy, they'd have fun with me!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 185 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 29, 1999 (16:13) * 1 lines 
 
I'd have fun with them. It is amazing what you can say just to be naughty and elicit the most amazing reactions. They start writing like mad in their little notebooks *grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 186 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Dec 29, 1999 (16:43) * 3 lines 
 
and you know this from personal exerience? *laugh* (couldn't help myself)...

ok, on the subject of flourescence (yeah, it wasn't brought up here but it was on my mind)....i picked up a true blacklite bulb. put the thing in my lamp, stuck my stones under it and didn't notice anything. am i supposed to wrap a blanket around the stone, lamp and all to make it as dark as possible?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 187 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 29, 1999 (17:48) * 3 lines 
 
Sssssshhhh.....you'll give my little secret away. (Good one, dear!)

Just make it as dark as possible around the rocks. In fact it is a good idea to have it in a dark room - using a flashlight to find your way. Shield all eyes from the bare bulb, remember!!! A matt-finish box painted with black paint works especially well. Gotta get rid of most of the ambient light. Some of the fluorescence is very faint but beautiful!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 188 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Dec 29, 1999 (21:17) * 1 lines 
 
well that would explain why my amber bead didn't do anything (and i wear sunglasses) so i did the acetone test. am gonna have to try the light again.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 189 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 29, 1999 (21:24) * 1 lines 
 
Let us know of your success. Try polyester under it to see how bright the fluorescence is (or how bright the background light is)...Should be screamingly bright by fluorescent standards. BTW, one of those sites I posted for the interchangeable stone rings had loads of choices for stones - but nothing in amber. How sad! Orbis must be the only one carrying them.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 190 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Dec 29, 1999 (22:04) * 4 lines 
 
i don't think orbis is a brand, just a name for the ring. will have to look for
the name of the folks i purchased the beads from.

will let you know of my adventure with the blacklite!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 191 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 29, 1999 (22:55) * 1 lines 
 
I wonder if fish scales fluoresce. Lots of stuff does...!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 192 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Sun, Feb 20, 2000 (16:48) * 3 lines 
 
Have you ever heard of blue amethyst? Blue of the color usually seen with blue topazes? very medium to light in color

Little sister was given for her birthday a pair of earrings. I said they were lovely blue topaz and was told they were blue amethyst. Never heard of the stuff. Purple amethyst, yes. Yellow citrine, yes. Purple/yellow ametrine, yes. But no to blue.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 193 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Sun, Feb 20, 2000 (16:54) * 1 lines 
 
BTW, the metal alloy used in some gold that bothers people is Nickel!! In fact, it cannot be used in European gold.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 194 of 845: World Builder  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 20, 2000 (17:14) * 2 lines 
 
Never heard of blue amethyst. It is an oxymoron, no? I looked it up in my books. Amethyst is anything from inky deep purple to almost clear colorless pale violet. They are growing the crystals for the technology market and, as in my laser ruby, the culls and extra material goes into the gem market in third world countries to make into jewelry. However, Yes! I found one book which says:
Blue quartz: caused by tiny rutile, tourmaline or zoizite inclusions. Fairly common in metamorphic rock Get out that jewelers loupe and look for the inclusions. If they are not there, it is bogus or a died spinel. How hard is it? How easily does it cut window glass? Spinel with cut very easily and deeply. Quartz is almost the same hardness. Check it out!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 195 of 845: World Builder  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 20, 2000 (17:16) * 1 lines 
 
Nickel is what bothers people with pierced ears...see the discussion between Wolf and William beginning around response 100.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 196 of 845: World Builder  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 20, 2000 (17:20) * 1 lines 
 
Spinel WILL cut window glass very easily and deeply. Of course, it could be a doublet (two pieces glued together to give it the color...or a sapphire... Hardness and close scrutiny will tell.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 197 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Sun, Feb 20, 2000 (18:55) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks, Marcia. Sounds like a piece of crap. Am LMHO. What a turkey! ;-)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 198 of 845: World Builder  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 20, 2000 (19:04) * 1 lines 
 
Yup! I hope whomever purchased it did not pay a lot for it...!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 199 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Sun, Feb 20, 2000 (19:18) * 1 lines 
 
Who knows? The guy is positively clueless, but seemed to think that he'd really gotten her something valuable. Of course, I still think it's blue topaz.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 200 of 845: World Builder  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 20, 2000 (19:40) * 1 lines 
 
Either blue topaz (hope it is very light blue so her brain is not affected by the radiation those things emit!!!) or blue spinel. I have a lovely medium blue spinel...I love it! Geez...blue amethyst?! She's lucky if it is not glass with that sort of bogus name! Oh, from a guy?! Of course he is clueless!!! *lol*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 201 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Sun, Feb 20, 2000 (19:41) * 1 lines 
 
Her fiancee, no less. OK, am getting off for a while now. Have won my little auction. ;-)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 202 of 845: World Builder  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 20, 2000 (19:47) * 1 lines 
 
Aloha - thanks for sharing the "eye candy" with me today!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 203 of 845: Gi  (patas) * Wed, Feb 23, 2000 (10:49) * 1 lines 
 
Topaz emits radiation? Oh the things one learns in this comference!:-) My Mom has a ring which I think is topaz. Will ask her. Haven't seen it in a long time.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 204 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 23, 2000 (11:55) * 1 lines 
 
There is almost no natural blue topaz left. There is loads of colorless toopas, however. By bombarding it with radiation it makes them turn blue. The more radiation, the deeper the color!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 205 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 23, 2000 (11:56) * 1 lines 
 
If your mother's ring is older than about 8 years, it is most likely naturally blue.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 206 of 845: Gi  (patas) * Wed, Feb 23, 2000 (22:10) * 1 lines 
 
It is probably around 30 years old.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 207 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 23, 2000 (22:15) * 1 lines 
 
Then it is a natural blue topaz and worth considerably more than irradiated stones. Be sure she takes care of it (and leaves it to you *smile*)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 208 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (15:55) * 3 lines 
 
oh wow! about the topaz (my oma has one that's huge! it's rectangluar and all by itself)....

yup, that amethyst is bogus. got my eyewitness handbook on gem stones out and it says nothing about amethyst coming in blue. it does refer to a bluish tinge when viewed from an angle and that amethyst from the urals has a reddish tinge. whomever sold that guy that stone is probably related to the guy who tried to tell me that aquamarine was real (from the pawn shop, it's in here somewhere)...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 209 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (17:12) * 1 lines 
 
I remember, Wolfie, about that Aquarmarine...and if Cheryl ever finds her way here, beryls include both the Emerald and the Aquamarine. I do not much care for Emeralds, my birthstone, so I wear an Alexandrite for someone very special to me, and I have an aquamarine for my other hand.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 210 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (18:17) * 3 lines 
 
still don't have that alexandrite. have a light amethyst that i got through avon (it's simulated) but it's very pretty and delicate. for being simulated, it has a lot of fire and the color darkens outside.

the emeralds i've seen are too cloudy. they look dirty or something.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 211 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (18:35) * 5 lines 
 
I found it! Sorry I asked about tanzanite on the wrong topic. Thanks for answering the query though.

Marcia you have a really expensive birthstone. Emeralds of good quality and color can command nosebleed prices. They don't even have to be that large. I think that they're beryl cousins, aquamarines, are very beautiful. I love the delicate blue-green clarity of the stone. It's aptly named, they are like water.

My birthstone is garnet. Its really common, but I do like the dark red wine-like color. I found out that garnets make up some of the bedrock upon which New York City sits.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 212 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (18:41) * 3 lines 
 
I adore garnets! (not a problem about off-topic...we do that all the time *lol*) They just set them in such ugly settings. They are getting better, though! I have, in my mineral collection, a hunk of massive garnet from Gort Mt, New York transported to New Rochelle by the last ice age and left there for me to dig up as a child. There are so many industrial-grade garnets in that original area that it is mined for use on Garnet Paper - an abrasive like sand paper!!!

Indeed, Even the lab grown Chatham® emeralds are expensive - but are too flawless to be pretty.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 213 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (18:44) * 1 lines 
 
Wolf's complaint about dirty emeralds is because the good ones are so rare that they are cutting and mounting material they would have thrown away years ago. We sell clearer green Jade here than some of those emeralds!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 214 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (18:49) * 1 lines 
 
Wolfie, I got to go into Zales and finger and eyeball in my hand one of their "Alexandrite" rings. They only turn purplish-blue - they are the Mexican type which is simply a purple spinel. I have one and it is lovely, but it is NOT and Alexandrite!!! They should not be able to sell it as such, but so does at least one of the tv shopping channels. I know a lady who has one - it is just like the Zales one - a pretty stone but...!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 215 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (18:55) * 5 lines 
 
I've seen some really bad looking emeralds, washed out color and worst of all a flaw which can be seen at a distance of 5 feet.

I'm an admirer of vintage jewelery. Some not all, some of it is just tacky. There are some nice Victorian and Art Noveau garnet jewelery. I've seen some nice garnet and marcasite pieces, although marcasite was more common with amethyst or clear quartz. I also saw a really lovely Victorian ring with an oval faceted garnet surrounded by seed pearls. But overall for a long time garnets were set really unattractive settings.

Were do you keep that great big garnet? I remember going to the Museum of Natural History to see this HUGE yellow topaz -- it was the size of a Volkswagen.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 216 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (19:08) * 12 lines 
 
Ok, here's a new one for me -




"The Heart of Australia" Black Lightning Ridge Solid Opal.
9.9ct peacock green broad flash, exceptionally bright.


My "massive" (mineralogy term for lump of translucent gem-colored but not in defined crystals and not cryptocrystalline) garnet is 2" x 1" x 3" . It sitting on a jewellry display stand lighted from above which I got from Lance when it the place he worked decided to redo their interiors. It had many little shelves on two poles which rotate and dislplay all of my pretties.





 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 217 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (19:35) * 5 lines 
 
i adore that heartshaped opal! it would go well with my heart-shaped amber piece! *grin*

i thought the alexandrite at zales (as we discussed before) was advertized as simulated. it is a lovely shade of purple. perhaps it was a good thing i didn't throw $200 down the tube just for a fake rock mounted on 14K......i still want one, simulated or not. simulated would be all i could afford though, unless i wanted one you had to use an atomic microscope to view! *laugh*

almost bought an iolite ring from qvc but because of my big barbie purchase, decided to let it go and wait until she is paid for (and at least in my hot little hands)!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 218 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (19:35) * 1 lines 
 
i prefer garnets over rubies anyday. may be because, like emeralds, the quality around here is awful.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 219 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (19:47) * 5 lines 
 
Me too - Garnets over Rubies anyday!!! Iolite is lovely but a little soft so be sure to wear it for special occasions, not when you will be overhauling engines or whatever you do (*grinning stupidly*).

I thought they said the Zales stone was Man-made which means it should be exactly like natural ones. Not simulated which means pretend. Way too much money for a lab grown spinel...oh well...I was so disappointed! I agree about having a stone you don't have to carry an atomic Microscope around to see - the one here at UHHilo uses up a whole room!

Yeah...I like that green opal, too...lovely! Maybe I could use it for an emerald and call it my birthstone?! No price was mentioned so I suspect that it is too costly, unavailable or both!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 220 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (19:57) * 1 lines 
 
for that color and cut, yeah, it would cost way more than the usual opals found in a jewelry store. a lady i work with got a ring with a sliver of blue opal in it (along with onyx and a couple of other gems). she was excited. it was in that asymetrical look on a little under 1/2" wide gold band. i think it had a necklace too.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 221 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (20:04) * 4 lines 
 
Sounds lovely!

This is a pretty one, as well:



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 222 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (20:49) * 1 lines 
 
woweee!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 223 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (20:56) * 7 lines 
 
ok, bare with me while i try to load a couple of pics!

the light amethyst ring from avon:



*fingers crossed*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 224 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (20:57) * 3 lines 
 
i wanted you guys to see the fire in it!

ok, and a couple more of mine to show but let me fix the pics first!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 225 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:04) * 1 lines 
 
It is really pretty! I love amethysts set in silver. In fact, my whopping big Mexican Alexandrite (spinel)is set in a huge amount of silver which is a very classic crown-shaped setting. Lovely wolfie, and great work with the scanner!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 226 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:04) * 3 lines 
 
here's a few others:




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 227 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:06) * 1 lines 
 
wow, you really can't see anything in there, can you? ok, will have to do some more editing. these rings are very pretty on and this picture does no justice.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 228 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:09) * 1 lines 
 
Wolfie, try something for me. Try to scratch the corner of your window eith one of the facetd and tell me how easily it scrqatched the glass. It will not hurt your stone!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 229 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:10) * 1 lines 
 
Roll up a piece of white paper and string them on it like a finger.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 230 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:14) * 1 lines 
 
I just enlarged your image and it came out really well...send it to you or post it???


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 231 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:18) * 1 lines 
 
go ahead and post it, marcia. i used a piece of green cloth hoping the richness would help with the pics. which one you want me to do the scratching with?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 232 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:22) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 233 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:29) * 1 lines 
 
Your Avon Amethyst


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 234 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:31) * 1 lines 
 
that one? ok, what should i report?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 235 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:32) * 1 lines 
 
would a small mirror work?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 236 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:41) * 1 lines 
 
Too reflective. I think neutral color or white would be the best.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 237 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:42) * 1 lines 
 
Report how easily or deeply it scratched the glass.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 238 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:43) * 1 lines 
 
no, i mean for scratching! and i did and though it felt like i was tearing the dickens out of the ring and the mirror, not a scratch on either. what does that mean?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 239 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:49) * 1 lines 
 
it is softer than amethyst. Window glass is 5 1/2 on Moh's scale and Quartz (which is purple as amethyst) is 7 on Moh's scale.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 240 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:50) * 1 lines 
 
i used mirror glass, is there a difference? so this simulated amethyst is what?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 241 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:50) * 1 lines 
 
But it is WAY softer than spinel which it resembles - or zircon. It is most likely an amethyst!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 242 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:51) * 1 lines 
 
i used mirror glass, is there a difference? so this simulated amethyst is what?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 243 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:52) * 2 lines 
 
Nope! If you see mirrors being made you would see that they use the same glass.
You have an amethyst! Most don't have any 'fire' in them!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 244 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:56) * 1 lines 
 
maybe the fire shows up when the color is lighter...hmmmmm.....interesting!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 245 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:57) * 1 lines 
 
how would i know if it's synthetic corundum? (reading from my book)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 246 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (21:59) * 3 lines 
 
oh, and cheryl's question about ruby and emerald being in the same family:

ruby and sapphire are corundums, emerald is a beryl as is aquamarine.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 247 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (22:37) * 1 lines 
 
emerald is much softer than Sapphire/Ruby so is Spinel. You would have dug a groove in your window glass with a spinel.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 248 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (23:20) * 1 lines 
 
Spinel is harder by a bunch from Emeralds. Zircons are hard also and both make beautiful bi-colored (pleiochromic) stones. Both will dig trenches in your windows.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 249 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (23:35) * 10 lines 
 
Getting back into my fav topic.........Gems and Jewelry!

Read way back (about 40 messages ago) your comment (Wolf) about the blue amethyst. Like I could tell that guy anything! He thinks he knows it all.

Marcia, about that Lightening Ridge Opal, looks awfully gaudy to me. Some of the stuff Downunder looks real trashy in person and they photograph so poorly. I picked up a pair of neat earrings with Boulder Opals, a gorgeous dark blue-green, but in order for the color to really pop, they always put a dark backing on them. Usually the designation doublet or triplet means cheap, but with the intensely colored ones, it's unfortunately necessary. If you see a dark backing on the white, milky type opal, then its of very poor quality.

I like the color of iolite.

My prettiest amethyst is from Brazil. The color is incredible. But I have another ring, which is marcasite with amethyst and peridot. It's a killer. Believe it or not marcasite does go well with more than just garnet. I also have a marcasite and citrine ring, which I wear all the time.



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 250 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (23:45) * 1 lines 
 
Your taste in jewellry is lovely...my kinda lady! (was wondering when you'd show up...we were posting goodies all day. I know about doublets and triplets. The dark colors need the black backing doublet and it is still considered precious. Listen to Auntie Karen. She know all about Jewels (as we have discussed earlier...*sigh*)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 251 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Mon, Feb 28, 2000 (23:53) * 1 lines 
 
You know how I like to end the day with visions of baubles dancing in my head. :-) (hey, if you don't have anything else, y'gotta make do)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 252 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 29, 2000 (11:02) * 1 lines 
 
*giggle* I know! Happy to oblige...!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 253 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Feb 29, 2000 (14:51) * 3 lines 
 
karen, i know exactly what you mean about not being able to talk to the guy. that's the way this dude was with the pawn shop display at a local craft's show. he wouldn't hear of anything i was saying!

marcia, sorry about leaving so abruptly last night, nearly fell asleep at the keyboard! *hugs*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 254 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Feb 29, 2000 (14:53) * 1 lines 
 
i've heard the word doublet but still don't know what it means. and how do you know if they covered up the back of the opal? if they're gonna cover it up, wouldn't they put it in a closed setting?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 255 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 29, 2000 (15:23) * 3 lines 
 
About the only way you can see if it is a doublet for sure is to look at the table of the stone...that place on a faceted stone which is usually frosted and where the prongs hold it. Get out that magnifier! I guess if the mounting hides all of that, use your own judgement on the ethics of the jeweler and how much you want the piece of jewelry vs how much it costs.
Yup! That guy needs to buy one of my lava flows!
(That's ok, Wolfie...it happens to me, too!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 256 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Tue, Feb 29, 2000 (23:11) * 1 lines 
 
With most settings, the backs are open to view. Gold is too expensive a way to cover it up. Doublets and triplets (slices of opal with a black backing) are all over Australia and it isn't hidden at all. However, if it's used with the white kind of opal, then you can be sure that the stone itself lacks sufficient fire.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 257 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 29, 2000 (23:38) * 1 lines 
 
That is also what my jewel-buyer's guide says.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 258 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (12:20) * 1 lines 
 
interesting. so is it a fabric backing of some sort? (my gem book doesn't mention this at all)....where can i find a jewel-buyer's guide?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 259 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (13:47) * 3 lines 
 
Plastic about 1/8" thick.

Mine is "Simon and Schuster's Guide to Gems and Precious stones." It is full of information and color prints and includes synthetic and artificial stones.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 260 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (13:49) * 1 lines 
 
make that 1/16" or 1/32" - thick enough for you to see it easily! My S&S guide is a paperback I bought at Waldenbooks.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 261 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (14:58) * 3 lines 
 
oh, it's kinda like the taylor guides and such for plants and animals, right? cool, will definitely look it up! thanks!!

i own no opals. could be because i've never cared for the plain milky ones. but i've also heard that one should never purchase an opal for themself as it is considered bad luck. it should always be a gift.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 262 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (15:07) * 1 lines 
 
Right - like field guides and such. It won't give you specific prices, but it will tell you what you need to know and what is out on the market masquerading as the stone in question. Great photos, too!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 263 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (15:09) * 3 lines 
 
do the pictures show the difference between good stones and bad stones and such?

kinda like with my plants, i like to see pictures of what diseases look like (not drawings, either).....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 264 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (15:12) * 1 lines 
 
How could a stone be bad luck? I've even heard that if you are not born in October you are not supposed to wear them. What if you don't know you're not supposed to wear them? Is it like people who take lava specimens home and terrible things start to happen to them??? Yikes! The only opal I have is a tiny floating one and a fire agate set as pendants and I have specimens in my collection of common and fire opals. Is THAT why....! Gonna get rid of those suckers right away!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 265 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (15:17) * 1 lines 
 
um...checking...No, they don't show you bad stones, but they tell you what a bad one is. It is somehting you learn from looking at stones and prices and getting an eye for a stone incorrectly cut - they do show you that!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 266 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (15:24) * 3 lines 
 
i don't know about the extent of opal bad luck, can't be the only one to hear this (have also heard that if you're not an oct. baby, don't wear opals)....will have to do some searching now!

i'm glad they do tell you what to look for.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 267 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (15:29) * 10 lines 
 
straight from http://www.jewelrymall.com/birthstones.html

Some people think the opal is bad luck when worn if it is not your birthstone. This is not true. The story was started by Sir Walter Scott in his novel Anne of Gierstein, in which the heroine of the novel has her life force caught in the beautiful opal she wears and she dies when the fire in the opal is extinguished.

and another:

Black opal is regarded as an extremely lucky stone

well, looks like we cleared that one up straightaway! so wear your opals to your delight!!



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 268 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (15:30) * 1 lines 
 
hey, and opal is considered an "other birthstone" for june babies. waddaya know, i could've been wearing them all along *grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 269 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (15:31) * 1 lines 
 
Alright Wolfie!!! You saved the day - again! Might just have to add a few to my wearable collection! I'd love to have a black one...!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 270 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (15:36) * 1 lines 
 
...and now I can wear my opals with my Alexandrite! *grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 271 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (15:40) * 1 lines 
 
well, beware that black opals are used by witches! (don't know if it's for good or bad)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 272 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (15:50) * 1 lines 
 
but...but...you just said they were good luck...! Sheesh! I would make a miserable witch. I'd have to cuddle with my victim first and I don't think that would be according to their rules...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 273 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (15:52) * 1 lines 
 
Not gonna chance anything bad for that Alexandrite. Only goodness and light may be associated with that ring. It is surrounded by pure gold and so it shall stay.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 274 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (15:55) * 2 lines 
 
(Wolfie)beware that black opals are used by witches
I could say something here - but you know what that would be...so I think I will leave it unsaid. Just rest assured that nothing a witch could use will get near my Alexandrite!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 275 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (15:56) * 1 lines 
 
no, i don't know how witches use the stone, for good or bad. but all opals are good (according to that website)!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 276 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (15:57) * 1 lines 
 
Can't be used to flay?! I don't trust witches of any sort...! Not in this case.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 277 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (16:05) * 1 lines 
 
i don't trust anybody who proclaims themself a witch (wiccan or otherwise). i believe in not messing with the dark stuff because i do not have the power to control whatever i might accidently unleash!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 278 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (16:16) * 1 lines 
 
Amen!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 279 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (16:52) * 5 lines 
 
Wolf, nothing mysterious about being able to tell a good opal from a bad. If it has good colors emanating from within = good opal. I thought I didn't like opals either because of the poor quality of the ones usually seen in this country, i.e., dull, boring and milky white.

In Australia, they are amazing. You'd have to go to a really high-end jewelry store here to see anything remotely similar. And here, you never seen black opals (which are really green) or any of the other varieties. u

And btw, opals are not cut/faceted; only polished.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 280 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (17:24) * 7 lines 
 
I thought I posted that rubies were chemically the same as sapphires, but that I didn't know for certain if emeralds and aquamarines had chemical similarities. Thanks to this board I now know that they are both forms of beryl.

Actually Karen in the vintage jewelery I've seen amethyst and clear quartz were paired more often with marcasite than was garnet. I've also seen vintage marcasite pieces which incorporate jet and some with pearls. I really beautiful 19th century pendant was an aquamarine in a marcasite and silver setting. But you definitely know more about jewelery than I.

Wolf, I too have an amethyst from Avon. It's mounted in a sterling silver pendant. Like yours it is pale, but I don't think it has as much fire as yours. Mine is a bit shy, content to be pastel and delicate of hue.

I have one of those pale opals. I dutifully put a drop of mineral oil on it every year. I was told that opals require a level of natural moisture and that they can crack or flake if they dry out too much. Well, the mineral oil hasn't hurt it. Should I still keep doing that?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 281 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (17:40) * 5 lines 
 
Actually, let's clarify once again. Sapphires and Rubies are Corundum and the next-to-hardest thing on earth - diamond being the hardest. Diamonds are a 10 and corundum gems are 9 on Moh's scale of hardness

Emeralds and Aquamarines are both Beryls and are 7.5-8 on Moh's Scale.

You are right to oil your opals. They are simple silicates (like quartz and 7 on Moh's scale) which have trapped water in the fractures internally. To keep them from cracking further, do not store them in the refrigerator (to keep them from buring if your house does) because the abrupt change in temperature can make them fracture more than you'd like. They toughen a little on the exterior if you oil them. It couldn't hurt!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 282 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (17:45) * 1 lines 
 
Btw, Kilauea, the resident volcano on this island, makes opals but they are not pretty. Stillm, they Are opals...but I do not have any in my collection. Way too close to the vent for collecting and She could be watching... Not that I am superstitious. I like to err on the side of caution when I am traversing hot lava fields!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 283 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (18:03) * 7 lines 
 
Cheryl, I wasn't referring to vintage marcasite pieces. And jet and marcasite were often used for mourning brooches during Victorian times.

If you wear your opals, then your natural oils are sufficient. Another thing I've heard recommended is rose water and glycerine.

Pearls also benefit from your skin's natural oils while wearing them. Keeps the lustre. So twirl away.




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 284 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (18:11) * 1 lines 
 
What you want to do it keep your opals from evaporating the water which makes the rainbows from the interior of the stone. Oil on the outside seals it in. Glycerine attracts atmospheric water to whatever it is placed upon. However, in dry climates, it can draw the water out of the opal if there is insufficient water in the air. I'd stick to the oil or wear them - as Karen suggests.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 285 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (18:15) * 1 lines 
 
The worst thing you can do with pearls is to NOT wear them. Your own personal skin is the best moisturizer and conditioner you can give your pearls. As Karen, our own Poily Queen says, twirl away!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 286 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (19:04) * 3 lines 
 
even on your wrists? (wearing pearls) i've also heard to buff them with flannel cloth to keep them clean.

your amber pieces can dry out as well, so only wear them on humid days (not dry hot summer ones). i guess that means i can wear them all year here!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 287 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (19:15) * 10 lines 
 
Yes, the volatiles will evaporate from your amber. Dob't want that! Send all of your fine amber Jewelry to Hilo, Hawaii where I will keep it well exercised. Pearls too and opals...*smile* ...or to Looziana...

For Cheryl, John said regarding where you wear the flower in your hair:

http://www.moon.com/exhibits/tahiti/tahiti_overview2.html
It is the same a wedding ring. Behind the left ear means you're happily
taken. Behind the right ear means you're available.

I asked, what if you're unhappily...but told him I already knew what he'd say...!



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 288 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (19:17) * 1 lines 
 
what if you wear them behind both ears? *grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 289 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (19:44) * 1 lines 
 
...or on top of your head... I think that means caveat emptor. The lady is looking but not buying!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 290 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  1, 2000 (19:45) * 1 lines 
 
The funny thing about flowers behind both ears is that I've never seen a female that way but frequently have seen men that way. They like to have it both ways?! *grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 291 of 845: lance8  (lance8) * Thu, Mar  2, 2000 (23:53) * 1 lines 
 
Means "follow me, sailor". Not to be forward, but may I change topic? I've heard of a new man-made diamond substitute called moissonite or something close to that spelling. Does anyone know anything about it?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 292 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar  2, 2000 (23:58) * 1 lines 
 
*lol* Thanks for getting us back on-topic. Have not heard of it but I shall look for it tomorrow. Promise to post what I find!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 293 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (11:01) * 3 lines 
 
*LOL*

ok, i've just come across something called reconstituted turquoise. what, it was chewed up, spit out, and water added? what does that mean?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 294 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (12:41) * 1 lines 
 
A bunch of chips glued together?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 295 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (14:37) * 1 lines 
 
Sometimes it is ground to a powder and resin added then shaped. Depends on whether you can see actual clevage planes or if it has a waxy finish (which real stones should not have!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 296 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (14:41) * 1 lines 
 
it's in an avon catalog and it does state it's been reconstituted but wasn't sure what that meant (heard of reconstituted juice and stuff). it looks like turquoise to me (from the picture) but i don't own any to compare...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 297 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (14:46) * 30 lines 
 
Re: Moissonite http://www.moissketeer.com/ This website is THE website for the stones and tells all about them. This is the introduction:

"Moissanite is the registered trademark name of a diamond simulant that is very close to diamond in
both hardness and thermal conductivity, and higher in refractive index. Although the material exists
in nature, this simulant is produced synthetically in mass volume. Moissanite is near colorless and
doubly refractive. The Moissketeer 2000 SD tests the electrical and electronic properties of the
stone to separate it from natural diamond.
What is a synthetic diamond?
Synthetic diamond is grown in the lab and has nearly all the qualities of natural diamond.
Commercially available large sized near colorless and colorless synthetic diamond grown by the
preferred nickel catalyst method have an electronic property that is detected by the Moissketeer
2000 SD. This detection method is only for use on the colorless and near colorless synthetic
diamond grown with the preferred nickel catalyst method. This tester will not test most forms of
colored (such as red, brown, yellow, and most probably green), synthetic diamonds. Type IIB, a
very rare form of naturally occurring blue diamond will be detected by this tester. Blue diamonds
created by radiation and heat treatment of yellow synthetic diamond will not be detected. With
colored diamonds, it is always important to have them verified by a professional gemologist with the
proper equipment, preferably an SA2000 spectrometer from Adamas Labs.
As seen in the December 9,1998 Jewelers Security Alliance "Crime Prevention
Bulletin"
*In September the Tallahassee(FL) Police Department arrested two men for Grand Theft and
Organized Fraud after they visited a local pawn shop and sold a pair of "diamonds" for $1,600.00.
The pawn shop owner tested the diamonds on his regular diamond tester and they seemed
genuine. After the men left, he tested them on a MOISSKETEER, a special moissanite tester, and
learned that the stones were not diamonds. The shop owner called other local pawn shops and
warned them about the two men. A short time later the men were captured at another pawn shop
as they tried to sell more of the items. Police located a computer print-out in their car with a listing of several pawn shops in Alabama."





 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 298 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (14:48) * 1 lines 
 
The turquise reconstitutes can be very pretty and very difficult to tell from the real stuff (which has become very expensive - I inherited some!). If you like the color and the price is reasonable, it is a good buy. Just not an investment...!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 299 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (14:56) * 3 lines 
 
here's a pic of a pendant that i believe is turquoise (got it from my oma in germany a long time ago)




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 300 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (14:56) * 1 lines 
 
oh my, that's way huge (the measurement is in cm)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 301 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (15:47) * 1 lines 
 
v. interesting about the Moissonite. If it's lab grown and has same properties, should be flawless as well. What you gotta look out for these days.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 302 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (15:48) * 1 lines 
 
I shall look up the variety of turquoise for you. It appears to have gold findings. Does it? It is a lovely piece. Tap on it with your fingernail. It should have a vitreous sound or like you are tapping on hard polished rock rather than on plastic. I am pretty sure it is the real thing.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 303 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (15:50) * 1 lines 
 
due to gardening and such, i have no nails left to tap....the only gold on it is the piece that goes right down the middle. (at least that's all i can see)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 304 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (15:54) * 3 lines 
 
Thanks for the flower info. I thought one behind each ear might mean a "definite maybe."

I got a turquiose necklace for my birthday. It's relatively large beads, interspersed with small gold spacers. The gold clasp has a Chinese design, and the largest bead is a carved "chou" bead, for good fortune. The stones aren't exact color matches to one another, some are a bit more blue than others, and some are a little more green than others. The color variations aren't jarring, just a little variation, like they're individuals. Quite pleasing actually. All the turquiose beads have marked black veining. I really like it, but when I first put it on it felt like rocks hanging around my neck. Which is what it is.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 305 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (15:57) * 1 lines 
 
Karen..LOL...has that guy offered your sister a diamond ring? Do that test they suggest on the Moissanite website.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 306 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (15:58) * 1 lines 
 
*haha*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 307 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (16:00) * 3 lines 
 
My nugget necklace has pretty large graduated nuggets and it is HEAVY! It is strung on braided silver cable with long silver finials at the ends. The lady whose it was had been an Arizona native before coming to Hilo.

Turquoise is pretty stuff, but heavy if not full of resin. It is one way to tell. It is, after all, copper ore!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 308 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (16:02) * 1 lines 
 
Offer? He gave her a ring (substance unsubstantiated) last year. They are getting married next month. Bought her a marquis cut; was so proud of himself. I was underwhelmed. Sister didn't want marquis either. ;-)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 309 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (20:14) * 3 lines 
 
here's a neato website i found while researching alexandrite (again)....

http://www.houseofonyx.com/gemstonelist.html


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 310 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (20:19) * 3 lines 
 
black opal:

http://www.houseofonyx.com/gem15.html


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 311 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (20:26) * 3 lines 
 
and another great gemsite:

http://www.gemhut.com/gemidx.htm


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 312 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (20:31) * 3 lines 
 
and another:

http://www.galleries.com/minerals/gemstone/class.htm


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 313 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:03) * 7 lines 
 
This is the ultimate mineral text online. The photos are superb and the text easy to read.
http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/gemstones/sp14-95/

The cover image of Watermelon Tourmaline from California:


(the remember buttons on porch 38 are gone and I did not touch them)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 314 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:06) * 1 lines 
 
Wolfie, you have posted some superb sites. Loads of links and information and photos. Excellent. The one I just posted is more like a field guide and I would like to have that chunk on my specimen-go-round. Whew!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 315 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:08) * 1 lines 
 
yes, i saw that piece while reviewing that website from your earlier post!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 316 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:08) * 1 lines 
 
oh, i went into springcam right after you did and the remember button was there. very strange!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 317 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:11) * 1 lines 
 
My wedding set in white gold consisted of 1/3 carat marquise diamond with a baguette on either side. I had two wedding rings with had a V for the stone and baguettes either side. One ring went on top and one on the bottom and it looks lovely and as impressive as my little hands can manage. (My wedding ring is a 4)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 318 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:12) * 1 lines 
 
empty your cache - it is reloading the the old stuff and seeing a button no long er there.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 319 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:16) * 1 lines 
 
I went back there and poked the forget button - the first time I have ever done so ...they are there now, but this time I put them there....who knows?!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 320 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:16) * 1 lines 
 
did that, it's still there....hmmmm....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 321 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:18) * 1 lines 
 
did you poke them and they are still there?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 322 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:22) * 1 lines 
 
did i poke what? i emptied my cache and temp files, clicked on your response in springcam twice (before and after) and the button is still there. i didn't press remember or anything.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 323 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:22) * 1 lines 
 
Do you think this man has any clue how much those little buttons are doing to us? Probably not, as he is a man...but he does know other things I would not have thought he would. *lol* *Hugs* Wolfie, enjoy!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 324 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:23) * 1 lines 
 
After mine disappeared, I poked the forget button and the remember ones showed up again and will stay there until we poke them again....Just like any other conference.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 325 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:25) * 1 lines 
 
maybe, he hasn't been doing anything and somebody keeps hitting the forget button and messing with our heads!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 326 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:29) * 1 lines 
 
This is possible....! I shall take that wisdom to heart. It is too difficult to deal with otherwise....but I know how I will react when next I see it...*sigh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 327 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:30) * 1 lines 
 
Speaking of which, did you see my remember button - just made it with transparent frame and installed it. Yay!!! I think all possible buttons are here, finally!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 328 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:33) * 3 lines 
 
no, i've not looked for a remember button here (only when you tell me it's here).....

i still won't touch one of those darned things.....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 329 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:34) * 1 lines 
 
the darned things--forgot where i was, the ouija board (from paraspring) *lol*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 330 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  3, 2000 (21:40) * 1 lines 
 
Me too - it has been since I climbed trees and had long braids since I touched an Ouija board. Never mind! Damned thing is probably appropriate!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 331 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Sat, Mar  4, 2000 (17:25) * 3 lines 
 
I realized after I posted that comment about the marquis engagement ring that I might inadvertently offend someone...and I now see that you, Marcia, had one such ring. What I was trying to get across is that the dunderhead (i.e., future brother-in-law) who knows nothing about diamonds could have bought more and better quality gem for the money he spent. The marquis cut wastes a tremendous amount of the stone and you pay for all of the waste. Better IMO to buy a beautifully cut round stone of decent carat size than spend the same for a much smaller marquis. And to compound things, he had the little sliver set in yellow gold, which she wasn't too pleased about either.

Enough of my carping.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 332 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar  4, 2000 (17:46) * 2 lines 
 
Mine was not my choice and I was not offended. it does waste a lot and costs more as a result. My Alexandrite is also a marquise because he loved the cut! I don't like to be poked by the points, but the wwedding-ring-guards do make it a lovely single ring as I had them soldered together as a unit. Yellow Gold?!
He is a twit! It will make the diamond look yellowish!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 333 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Mar  4, 2000 (21:55) * 1 lines 
 
that's exactly the problem with the marquis, my tanzanite is constantly getting caught and poking me.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 334 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Mar  4, 2000 (21:56) * 1 lines 
 
what's this with yellow gold? i have a cute half-karat round on yellow gold (but it's mounted in silver-aren't they all?) and it doesn't look yellow. or is that what you mean, the mount itself is yellow gold? (oh, and the AM gave me that on our 4th anniversary).....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 335 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar  4, 2000 (22:15) * 1 lines 
 
Mounted in White Gold. Wow! Diamonds after the fact?! Not bad, Wolfie!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 336 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar  4, 2000 (22:17) * 1 lines 
 
My Mother's original engagement diamond was set in white gold on a yellow gold band, but I have seen some which are set in yellow gold prongs. The effect is not pleasing - at least, to me!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 337 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Mar  4, 2000 (22:23) * 1 lines 
 
really? i thought they were all like that and because i like gold over silver, was actually disappointed! don't wear that solitaire though because it's too high. feel like it gets in the way. now i have a marquis sapphire with diamonds surrounding it (my engagement ring)...that sits a bit higher than the tanzanite and never poked me. it has a nice gallery with filagree on the top part of the band. very simple and different from the 1/4K and less other girls were wearing. and it cost way less too. but it's pretty. now that i have the anniversary band, i haven't worn that particular sapphire. don't want to wear it on the right hand either. makes me wonder if the anniversary band is supposed to be worn on the right hand and i still should wear my original ring...oh, the style of the sapphire is such that i'd have to have a wrap custome made, the wedding band doesn't fit with it.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 338 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar  4, 2000 (22:32) * 1 lines 
 
Hmmm...I have seen anniversary rings replace wedding sets of modest means and also worn on the right hand. The effect of my two wedding bands around the solitaire is of a wrap. I am very fond of wraps and they are so comfortable to wear. My first engagement ring was a star sapphire with little side diamonds set in white gold. I still love it but seldom wear it since I have taken to wearing the Alexandrite...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 339 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Mar  4, 2000 (22:40) * 1 lines 
 
well, when i go on my summer vacations, i wear my wedding band and don't take any of my gems. i guess it doesn't matter which hand you wear it on as long as you know what it's for and the meaning behind it. which is why i wear mine on my left hand...it's for 10 years and counting! (and we're on #12 this year, can you believe it?)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 340 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar  4, 2000 (22:44) * 1 lines 
 
..and you being just 25 and all... Hard to believe! Isn't it amazing how the kids get older and we just stay the same?!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 341 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Mar  4, 2000 (22:51) * 1 lines 
 
yup! *wink*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 342 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Sun, Mar  5, 2000 (23:36) * 20 lines 
 
Since wolf brought up turquoise and we've been yakking about opals, I ran across some realllllllly pretty inlaid stuff:



OK, so that one didn't have turquoise, but those are opals in the center, with lapis. A wow piece or two...







And a killer cuff that I couldn't wear...









 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 343 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar  5, 2000 (23:54) * 1 lines 
 
I'll Wow to them all! Thanks, Karen. Never saw opals set with inlay. They are stunning! I have my mom's bearclaw necklace set in silver inlay. It is stunning and I need a scanner to show it to you unless I can photo it with the new digital camera. Yeah, I'd be willing to model any of them any time...!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 344 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar  5, 2000 (23:57) * 1 lines 
 
Um...I have a long neck....I'll wear it for you! Love those colors!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 345 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (00:10) * 3 lines 
 
Yeah, I'm always drawn to colors like those. When I was in Tucson, I looked all over for an inlaid cuff, but they're too big for me. It would have to be custom made. Argh!

Says the designer works with the following: purple sugilite from Africa, royal blue Afghani lapis, Australian opal, red and pink corals from the Mediterranean and South Pacific, turquoise from America and China, and black jade from Edwards, Wyoming. Some designs include accents of diamonds, rubies, tourmalines, garnets, or amethysts.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 346 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (00:17) * 2 lines 
 
Sugilite is incredible stuff - such pretty dusty rosy-lilac-cum-lavender colors.
I noted the precious and semi accents. Great designs and such incredible colors. It would look great out here!!! I have all of my Mon's and my own turquoise stuff as well as a neighbor whose kids did not like it. I can weigh twice my weight just by stacking my lovlies on me. It is gorgeous stuff! I have a bunch in oxblood coral - and exquisite red. My squash blossom necklace is inlaid with oxblod coral...!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 347 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (00:23) * 1 lines 
 
A squash blossom necklace! To adorn that swan-like neck? ;-) Most pieces do tend to be heavy. Nature of the materials used. I've got a lovely pair of earrings that I can only wear for a half hour a night, but they're beauts.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 348 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (00:26) * 2 lines 
 
Ah Yes!!! Or you'll be able to carry newspapers home in the pukas if you leave them in too long. I know the kind! My squas blossom necklace is about 2/3 size because I am tiny (albeit long-legged) so I am not dwarfed by it. Some are
H U G E !!! With your shiny raven tresses you should look stunning in any of this jewelry. I am surprised someone has not asked you to model it!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 349 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (00:30) * 1 lines 
 
One needs a neck to do that type of thing. ;-) Nighty night


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 350 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (00:35) * 1 lines 
 
g'night Karen! Me too +)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 351 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (13:18) * 3 lines 
 
wow, that's some retro looking stuff! way too extravagant for me!! i have an inlaid cuff bracelet made of pau (or however it's spelled) the inside of shells. it's pretty but too little for my wrist now (got it as a teenager at a souviner shop)....

perhaps i'll scan it for you to see....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 352 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (14:24) * 3 lines 
 
Shuckins...your daughter will grow into it...or someone with a tiny wrist (mine!) is always handy. My ring-finger is a size 4...! (You will have grandchildren who will love and appreciate it, Wolfie!!!_

Please do scan it - I love inlayed pieces.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 353 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (15:29) * 1 lines 
 
i've got to clean it first, the silver is all tarnished. (been in a jewelry box for years)....my daughter has already asked for it!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 354 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (16:27) * 2 lines 
 
Be sure she is old enough to take proper care of it or the inlays will fall out.
I am delighted she likes it!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 355 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (17:58) * 1 lines 
 
Did I note the mention of lapus lazuli. Has that been discussed before? I love the color, almost a true ultramarine.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 356 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (18:07) * 1 lines 
 
Have not discussed Lapiz except in passing as inlay material. That mountain full of it in Russia must be amazing. I love the color - I thought it more like indigo shot with gold!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 357 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (18:11) * 2 lines 
 
I think the best quality would be indigo, a kind of violet-blue.
Very beautiful. The lesser grades might tend to ultramarine, the absolute bluest blue. Although all would be shot with gold.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 358 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (18:21) * 3 lines 
 
as promised, the inlay cuff bracelet:




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 359 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (18:22) * 1 lines 
 
and some pieces of the shell have started falling out due to age.....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 360 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (18:26) * 1 lines 
 
Is that what used to be called "mother of pearl"?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 361 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (18:37) * 1 lines 
 
Mother of Pearl is the white pearly inlay and Paua shell is the colored ones. How lovely, Wolfie! Thank you!!! You can epoxy them back into place very carefully so you don't get glue between the pieces or on top. It'll be there forever!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 362 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (18:40) * 1 lines 
 
thanks!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 363 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (18:43) * 1 lines 
 
Got some scale for that? Your pink tape measure is no where to be seen! Looks over an inch wide. I have a similar pattern on a brass belt buckle. It is really pretty, Wolfie. Can't they flex it enough to fit you...uh...uh...uh...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 364 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (18:46) * 3 lines 
 
Lovely cuff, wolf. You said it was "too small" for you? ;-) *cough cough* [little wrist]

Mountains in Russia? Thought I'd read that the best lapis came from Afghanistan. I know, same mountain chain! ;-)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 365 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (18:47) * 1 lines 
 
No, can't flex a cuff if there's inlay. That's always the problem for me. A basic silver cuff can be flexed, but the inlays will pop out.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 366 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (18:48) * 2 lines 
 
(that is me trying to stretch it to fit you...)*hugs*
That stuff is still called Mother of Pearl, no?!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 367 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (18:52) * 1 lines 
 
The Mountains containing the choicest Lapiz are in Afghanistan. Catherine the Great had a whole room made out of the stuff and another of Malachite and another of amber....Incredible stuff!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 368 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (18:54) * 1 lines 
 
Karen can hear a jewelry discussion even inside the closely guarded Firthian tower doors known to the rest of the world as Drool....*grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 369 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (18:58) * 1 lines 
 
Karen may well be able to discern a jewelery discussion on all sensory and extra sensory levels. She does have wide ranging knowlege on the subject and really good taste though.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 370 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (19:05) * 3 lines 
 
yupper. i guess it's mother of pearl, got it because i liked the pattern and the inlay work...

gotta do some mom stuff so be back later *hugs*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 371 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (19:06) * 1 lines 
 
She is a most welcome addition to Geo. I was just kidding her - I can sniff out a good rock at 20 paces, as well. Um, it is part of the second X chromosome, is it not, to discern fine jewelry at great distances? And sales?!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 372 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (19:08) * 1 lines 
 
we'll miss you Wolfie! *hugs*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 373 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (19:09) * 1 lines 
 
I love what Karen posts about jewelery.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 374 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (19:17) * 1 lines 
 
I love the pictures she posts, as well. Karen, please tell Cheryl I am not picking on you!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 375 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (20:53) * 5 lines 
 
Um, it is part of the second X chromosome, is it not, to discern fine jewelry at great distances? And sales?!
LOL! I've found that it pays to know what you're talking about with jewelry. Costly mistakes otherwise. ;-)

Also, being the shallow person that I am, what you dig out of Planet Earth or pry out of/off its creatures and fashion into pretty things is what interests me. I am so un-PC. ;-)



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 376 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (20:57) * 3 lines 
 
Hey, that is why I created this topic. I love it, as well, and I also do my homework on jewelry - it certainly is in one's best interest to do so!

*lol* I hope you get permission before prying goodies off creatures. I would probably give you a pretty good fight...*grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 377 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (20:58) * 1 lines 
 
Costly mistakes as in BLUE amethysts???!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 378 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (21:29) * 1 lines 
 
wasn't her mistake though! *grin* she'da known better!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 379 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (21:55) * 1 lines 
 
Yup, but the guy without that special second X didn't have a clue! *laugh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 380 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (21:56) * 1 lines 
 
My Dad always said about me that a guy'd have to be crazy to buy me jewelry without having me along. I chose my Mom's diamond anniversary ring for him to give her (and my eldest sister ended up inheriting it!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 381 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (22:11) * 1 lines 
 
haha!! then i'll need you if i should decide to buy more jewelry (not if, when!) *hugs* i have expensive taste but it's innocent, i don't choose things because they look expensive so i can parade around with it and say look at this expensive thing i have, nope, just like quality, i guess, and mayhaps, recognize it....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 382 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (22:23) * 1 lines 
 
Gotcha on the *when*...*grin* I'll be only too happy to aid and abet your ventures into material investing! Wolfie, you have class and your taste shows it...just as Karen's does. That's why I enjoy you so much *hugs*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 383 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Mon, Mar  6, 2000 (23:39) * 2 lines 
 
I hope you get permission before prying goodies off creatures.
Have no fear, I draw the line at endangered species. ;-)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 384 of 845: MarkG  (MarkG) * Tue, Mar  7, 2000 (04:37) * 2 lines 
 
This second X chromosome carries a lot of stuff. Have to admit I feel some sympathy for Karen's sister's guy, who thought he did a Good Thing. Poor sap!
For the record, men have no clue what jewellery looks expensive, and precious little idea of what looks nice.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 385 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Tue, Mar  7, 2000 (07:49) * 1 lines 
 
...and approach it the same as driving, refusing to look at a map or ask for directions. I like consistency of approach. ;-)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 386 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Mar  7, 2000 (09:19) * 1 lines 
 
mine thinks every piece of jewelry costs and arm and a leg and frowns when i purchase a gift for myself (and if i did not do this, do you think he would? no way!) (alexandrite, case and point)....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 387 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Mar  8, 2000 (17:00) * 3 lines 
 
I'm sorry Marcia, I never meant to imply you were picking on Karen.

As for the Karen's sister's guy, have pity on him. He is estrogen impaired.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 388 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  8, 2000 (17:04) * 3 lines 
 
*LOL* Cheryl...I am delighted to see you again - and I know you weren't implying any such thing...I was just hoping to attract Karen's attention so she would post more goodies for us to admire...*hugs*

Yup! Estrogen Deprivation can atrophy the social graces and the sense of the esthetic in the human male. They need daily interaction of the most feminine kind if they hope to overcome the problem. It is not impossible, but...The prognosis is not good! *grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 389 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sat, Mar 11, 2000 (15:44) * 6 lines 
 
Yes, it still is called mother of pearl, although some people tried to avoid the term by simply calling it shell. Maybe mother of pearl got a bad name due to some tacky jewelry somewhere. But mother of pearl and paua shell might be better discussed on the organic gems topic. Silly of me.

Allow me to mention diamonds. There not my favorite, but I wouldn't turn one down. Unless were a yellow diamond. Yuk. I saw a canary (yellow) diamond once; it was vile. It had brilliance, clarity, and a really putrid color. Colored diamonds can be downright strange looking. The most famous colored diamond is of course the Hope Diamond, which is probably the most acceptable color for a colored diamond -- blue. It really is very blue. Priceless and complete with a curse, one might say the Hope is one serious piece of carbon. I've also seen pink diamonds, unsual but pretty.





 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 390 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Mar 11, 2000 (20:59) * 1 lines 
 
i've never seen a colored diamond in life (and the line to see the Hope was longer than i had time for)....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 391 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 11, 2000 (22:23) * 1 lines 
 
In the British Museum of Natural History on Cromwell Road, you will see a display of the most indredible colored diamonds round cut. Emerald greem, brilliant red, aquamarine, deep blue, pink, apricot...just about every color imaginable. I would have loved an aqua diamond....or the green one...or the red one...*grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 392 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Mar 12, 2000 (10:06) * 1 lines 
 
must've been hard to believe they were real!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 393 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 12, 2000 (16:17) * 1 lines 
 
I wanted to check them out closer but the guards regarded me with a cold eye until I smiled at them charmingly and told them I really did not mean it...but they were stunning - tiny - most of the deep colored ones were well under a carat, but they were stunning and lit so you could see the fire in them.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 394 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Mar 13, 2000 (15:33) * 1 lines 
 
They really do sound stunning. The Hope is really an eyeful, when you finally get up to see it. I still think the yellow diamond was a really putrid color.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 395 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 13, 2000 (16:36) * 1 lines 
 
I have seen the Hope when it was on display at the American Museum and still owned by Harry Winston. It is not only the most incredible "sapphire blue," but it is a Diamond! With all of the fire and brilliance. The smaller white diamonds around it are pretty large as solitaires go, as well! Unless Yellow diamonds do not have even the slightest tinge of grey in them, they are beautiful - like pale topazes. But, most of them have that pewter cast which renders them 'dirty-looking' in my opinion. Perhaps they would benefit from being set in all-yellow-gold mountings!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 396 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 13, 2000 (16:38) * 1 lines 
 
Oh, Btw, the Hope is only about a half of what was a HUGE blue diamond in the hands of the French aristocracy. It was cut in half sometime after the Revolution and no one is sure where the other part is.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 397 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Mar 13, 2000 (16:46) * 3 lines 
 
Colored diamonds are very rare and all tend to be very expensive. The Hope by it's noteriety, color, and even present size is truly priceless. Okay, maybe it has a price but would it be in this dimension. It's hard to imagine the original diamond, the sheer size of it. It was reputed to be a more or less heart shaped stone, wasn't it? That is an interesting question -- where's the other half?

You are no doubt right about yellow diamonds, I probably saw one with a pewter cast, not attractive. Although, yellow gold would be flattering to it, bringing out a more golden color.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 398 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 13, 2000 (17:26) * 1 lines 
 
Yes, it was more or less heart-shaped and was the hanger for The Louis Kings' Order of the Golden Fleece. It must have been incredible! There is a painting of him in one of my books (Louis XV I believe) wearing it. I'll see if I can find it on the net (or buy myself a scanner..!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 399 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 13, 2000 (18:25) * 1 lines 
 
Ok..Got out the book and the original big blue diamond's likeness exists only in an engraving of the Golden Fleece Made for Louis XV in 1749. A huge ruby carved into the shape of a dragon, the large blue diamond, plus other large colored stones surrounded by topazes and colored diamonds (according to the account of the day.) The rage for colored diamonds was so great that many were set in colored foil to create the effect of naturally colored diamonds! The whole ensemble was broken up in 1792 and the whereabouts of many of the stones is unknown.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 400 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 19, 2000 (16:37) * 1 lines 
 
Lance, what guidelines can you give us on Jade?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 401 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 19, 2000 (16:50) * 1 lines 
 
The jade I have is a dark ugly green with black inclusions. The Jade the house male has is a lovely apple green. It does not even look like the same mineral!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 402 of 845: lance8  (lance8) * Sun, Mar 19, 2000 (17:12) * 1 lines 
 
Not much. Good jade has a clarity of color without fuzziness is the best way I can put it. You can see into it, and see inclusions. Colors are wide ranging. White, black, greens, purples, red, oranges even.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 403 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 19, 2000 (17:25) * 1 lines 
 
Translucent and tough would about sum it up, then? Nephrite and Jadeite.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 404 of 845: Karen  (KarenR) * Sun, Mar 19, 2000 (17:42) * 1 lines 
 
Apple green? That's good. Imperial jade is that color. (I'm a jade lover too.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 405 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 19, 2000 (18:17) * 2 lines 
 
Never met a gem I could not love...Jade, too
Off to hunt up pix of incredible Jade...Lance has a ring whose stone is a dead-ringer for Imperial Jade but is not...I'll let him tell you about it when he returns.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 406 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 24, 2000 (17:34) * 12 lines 
 
While I continue to look for pretty jade pix to post, here's one for Dolphin lovers and fluorite, as well:


http://www.tir.com/~jadegift/spendant.html
Fluorite Ball & Flipper

The a rototable fluorite ball embraced by a sterling silver flipper.
Color: Light brown, transparent with hairy texture inside the ball.
Size : 1/2" (12mm) Diameter without flipper, 18" (45cm) Sterling
silver flipper and chain.

Price : $20


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 407 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 24, 2000 (19:04) * 1 lines 
 
I'd love to have one exactly that size!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 408 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (08:57) * 1 lines 
 
And it's extremely reasonably priced, too.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 409 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (12:40) * 1 lines 
 
Yes! But it is pretty small. I want one the size they show...but would not turn down the one they have there. I am seriously thinking of getting it! It is about the only way to have fluorite and keep it pretty. It is very soft - just above gypsum on Moh's scale - a 3.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 410 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (12:47) * 1 lines 
 
i'm thinking about getting it too. that's so pretty and similar to the ball rings we've been talking about. thanks for that, it's pretty!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 411 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (13:50) * 1 lines 
 
I thought you needed it...=) The price was right and it has a dolphin on it. How could we miss?! I was hunting for Jade pictures when I found it and then forgot all about the jade when I saw the price. It's really pretty! Wolfie, I'm gonna send you an email....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 412 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (16:06) * 1 lines 
 
Never mind about the email. I just ordered mine - will let you know what I get and when I get it. (Was gonna get you one too...which I should have done but it would have taken longer to get to you...*sigh*)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 413 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (18:28) * 1 lines 
 
Many of the bigger more beautiful and numerous and less expensive diamonds which graced the courts of the Louis Kings of France came from the mines in Golconda, Ohio. And, lest we forget, Mrs Clinton wore the Star of Arkansas, a large diamond mined in the state and loaned to her, to their first Inaugural Ball.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 414 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (18:37) * 5 lines 
 
The American Diamond connection: Diamonds have been found in the sands and gravels of present and former stream beds in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, Alabama, West Virginia, Texas, Idaho, Montana, California and Oregon; many of these discoveries having been made in conjunction with placer gold mining operations.

Glacial deposits of diamonds from Canada are found around the Great Lakes region. Specifically, in Wisconsin, michigan, Indiana and Ohio. Diamonds, possibly from the same source have been found in Tennessee and Kentucky.

From The Rockhound's Manual by Gordon S. Fay


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 415 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (18:43) * 1 lines 
 
Rubies have been mined commercially in North Carolina, and have been found in Colorado, Montana, and Wyoming. Sapphires have been mined commercially in Montana and habve been found in California, Colorado, Idaho, Indiana, andNorth Carolina. I need to find a friend in North Carolina and go grubbing in the gravels...one of my favorite passtimes.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 416 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (19:14) * 1 lines 
 
i'm gonna get that dolphin....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 417 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (19:16) * 1 lines 
 
well, gonna have to wait, it's sold (and i wonder to whom? *SMILE*) so glad you got it. please tell me about it when it comes in....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 418 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (19:19) * 1 lines 
 
They asked me how many I wanted...It is yours and I'll order the next one.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 419 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (19:20) * 1 lines 
 
I was afraid it would be gone if we waited any longer...so I grabbed it!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 420 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (19:29) * 1 lines 
 
no, you keep it, marcia, i can wait sweetheart, thanks though!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 421 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (19:31) * 1 lines 
 
Well, if they run out, this one is yours!!! I insist!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 422 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (19:35) * 3 lines 
 
i'm sure they'll get more in stock. perhaps, i'll email the dealer and ask!

oh, and qvc is having gem week and tonight (9pm CST) is lapis. i'm gonna watch out of curiosity. maybe i'll pick up something small just to add to my collection. this is the right topic for lapis, right?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 423 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (20:14) * 1 lines 
 
You bet! Let us know how you fare!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 424 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Mar 25, 2000 (20:23) * 1 lines 
 
will do.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 425 of 845: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Mon, Mar 27, 2000 (04:29) * 1 lines 
 
Where's the picture of David Marcia - am i in the right place?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 426 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Mar 27, 2000 (13:15) * 3 lines 
 
Thanks for the information on American precious gemstones. I never think of the United States or even North America in connection with gems. Although, I do remember coming across something last year about Montana, I think, concerning bogos, (not certain if that's the correct spelling), which are intensely blue sapphires.




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 427 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 27, 2000 (14:56) * 6 lines 
 
According to my rockhounding book, over $30 million in Sapphires have been mined in the Yogo Gulch of Montana. Might that be what you were thinking of? They are excellent in quality. Emeralds are not as abundant in the US as other gem stones (and I never think of the US and Gem stones in the same sentence, either!) They have been found in Massachusetts and the Carolinas (there it goes again - gotta get to North Carolina!) Aquamarine, the emerald's semi-precious cousin, is much more abundant. It is comercially mined in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Maine, Montana, New Hampshire and North Carolina.
Aquamarines have also been found in Alabama, Idaho, Maryland, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota and Utah.

Golden Beryls have been found in California, Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, New York and North Carolina.

Morganite which is pink-to-rose-red beryl is found only in California, Maine, and Utah.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 428 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 27, 2000 (14:58) * 1 lines 
 
David is in Geo 2, Maggie


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 429 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Mar 27, 2000 (15:08) * 1 lines 
 
Yes, that was it. Yogos! They're supposed to be very intensely blue sapphires. Now I know how they got that awful name. It's from the Yogo Gulch.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 430 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 27, 2000 (15:25) * 2 lines 
 
Yup - and probably means "splendid Sapphires" in some native American language.



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 431 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Mar 27, 2000 (17:08) * 1 lines 
 
and don't forget diamonds in arkansas. forgot the name of the place, but you can go out in the dirt and dig to your heart's content. haven't done it yet. but it's on my list!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 432 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 27, 2000 (17:16) * 1 lines 
 
Yup - it's back a few posts. The exact place is near Murfreesboro, Arkansas, from whence came the large diamond Mrs Clinton wore.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 433 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 27, 2000 (17:20) * 1 lines 
 
I am a gravel grubber from way back. Have bottles of perfect dodecahedron garnets from an arroyo on Arizona, bottles and more bottles of peridots (olivines, actually) from Hilo and environs...and so on. I'll join you in Arkansas! They'll have to pull me away at the end of the day kicking and screaming if it is like the other places I have been...especially if I find something *grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 434 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Mar 27, 2000 (18:41) * 1 lines 
 
i would love to find something!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 435 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 27, 2000 (19:03) * 1 lines 
 
Yeah, me too...and I am just the sort who'll stay there till I do...and then some!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 436 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Mar 29, 2000 (18:03) * 5 lines 
 
So when are you two off to Murfreesboro, Arkansas to dig up some diamonds?

Peridot. That's my cousin's birthstone,August, and she hates it. Actually, she loathes it. She thinks it such a pale, washed out green, which looks bad with everything.

The people I know who hate their birthstones, were either born in August, peridot, or November, yellow topaz.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 437 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar 29, 2000 (19:08) * 1 lines 
 
And May - I cannot stand the Emeralds available today - far too gaudy (Chatham created ones) or milky (the ones I can afford). I was allowed to wear a tall swirl of diamonds and emeralds set in white gold ring. I guess letting him live in my house and eat my food and let my ex pay his bills was not good enough. His son now has it....for whatever reason. (Yeah...the hairy chest-beater)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 438 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar 29, 2000 (19:18) * 1 lines 
 
Not sure when I will make it to Arkansas - do not know anyone even slightly near there. Was talking to my son today about visiting him - he's a geologist (in case my constant mentioning of that fact eluded you); diamonds and gold were found in California. Hmmm...!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 439 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Mar 29, 2000 (20:21) * 1 lines 
 
hey, you know me! AND you have my address....of course, murfreesboro is several hours away....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 440 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar 29, 2000 (20:25) * 3 lines 
 
This is true - and two heads are better than one (watch it!!!) and two Geminis are even better...*grin* Hey, what's a few hours among friends?!

Gotta go...later!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 441 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Mar 29, 2000 (20:27) * 1 lines 
 
k, see ya!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 442 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Thu, Mar 30, 2000 (15:33) * 6 lines 
 
marcia! how'd your dinner meeting go? hope the food was good along with the company....

i've got a serious question to ask our gem experts, namely, marcia *grin* today, the AM and i went browsing through service merchandise, who is, btw, having a 70% clearance sale, the reason we went in. well, i can never go into SM without perusing the jewelry counter (sometimes their sales are real good). came across two rings. both set with diamonds in 10K gold. one was a trillion, the other a marquis. having remembered our discussion on the amount of money one pays for marquis and the amount of stone that is lost, i chose to look at the trillion cut. these two rings were exsquisite (ok, so i forgot how to spell, see what gemstones do to me?)....both showed remarkable pleochroism with shades of pink, green, and blue. i asked the sales lady to please pull one out for me to handle. looked at the tag and it said color-treated topaz. now this gem changed it's colors in the light and angle (like my tanzanite). i asked her if it was really a topaz and she said yup (ok, she said yes) and i was shocked and chokin
on a grain of salt. she said it was heat treated topaz. both of these rings sell for $99. the AM saw it and said my b-day was coming. i've never seen a topaz like that in my life. told her it was behaving like alexandrite or tanzanite and thanked her. decided i would do some homework before the AM is set on buying that ring, although, the the thought of the AM buying me jewelry is most exciting no matter what it is!

so marcia, have you ever heard of this? i looked on SM's website and they only show the radiated blue topaz both real and simulated. the saleslady assured me the piece i was agog over was real. you and i both fell for the simulated alexandrite from zales, so please give me some advice, i'm begging you! (do you see how excited i am?) the gemstone book is wide open and i'm waiting impatiently!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 443 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Thu, Mar 30, 2000 (15:35) * 1 lines 
 
now i remember what they said they did to it...called it color-enhanced (????)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 444 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar 30, 2000 (16:08) * 1 lines 
 
Checking in the book...Heat treating pink topazes is an old (several centuries worth) way of intensifying color and does not emit irradiation. Blue is still intensified by irradiation. Actually, pink and other pale topazes form with shades of many colors in them and they are visible only under certain light or at certain angles. Not true pleichroism, but just as lovely. I'd say go for it. I'd love to have one like that! Email me if it is on the web so I can see it, Please!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 445 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Thu, Mar 30, 2000 (16:17) * 1 lines 
 
am trying to find a picture. it turns gray at an angle and you can see the pinks, greens, and blues when you look directly down on it under indoor lights.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 446 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar 30, 2000 (16:48) * 2 lines 
 
Sounds just like they describe in the book



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 447 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar 30, 2000 (16:58) * 1 lines 
 
(The dinner meeting went very well, thanks for asking!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 448 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Thu, Mar 30, 2000 (22:05) * 1 lines 
 
am still gonna do a search and see if i can find a pic of these color-enhanced topazes....the AM asked me which one i wanted again (the marquis or trillion, you know which one i said!) told him to buy it now and hold it *grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 449 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (09:40) * 5 lines 
 
found one!

http://www.scotgem.demon.co.uk/topdia.html

am working on the photo (it's humongous) and when i get it down to a manageable size, will post the one i'm talking about....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 450 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (09:45) * 3 lines 
 
got it.....




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 451 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (09:45) * 1 lines 
 
isn't it lovely?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 452 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (09:47) * 3 lines 
 
well, while i'm here, i'm gonna add the main index to the above site for your pleasure....

http://www.scotgem.demon.co.uk/index.html


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 453 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (10:44) * 1 lines 
 
Oooh! I am still waking up and this is the first place I went on the Spring. I had no idea it was so wonderful. I thought it might be like an ametrine...very faint distictions of color. This is magnificent. I'd get it just on that basis alone. It is most attractive and amazing. Lovely, Wolfie!!! Probably better in real life, too. My Alexandrite photographs the color of whatever the flash excites.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 454 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (11:33) * 3 lines 
 
that picture came from the website i posted. i just clipped it to show the stone most like the one we have been talking about. how they got all the colors to show is beyond me. so now we know it is real and they can do it!

(you sound better today, sweetie)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 455 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (12:29) * 1 lines 
 
(Thanks, I feel better - inside my heart, that is - the rest mostly takes care of itself). Is this little gem on its way to you yet..or at least, reserved? I'd love an oval one like that... Incredibly gorgeous! Let us know (like we could stop such great news) when you get it in hand and examine it. My fav way is with with a mini-maglight then outdoors in bright sunlight. I am so excited for you! What did you hear about the dolphin pendant, if anything?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 456 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (13:16) * 1 lines 
 
i forgot about the pendant....will go back and see if they have any more in stock. the AM is out fishing today so.....he did tell me not to worry about it and said he'd get me the ring.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 457 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (13:37) * 3 lines 
 
How is the ring setting done? Yellow gold? Your Trilliant will be magnificent.
(did I guess right =)?)



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 458 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (13:39) * 5 lines 
 
ok, the dolphin pendant we've been drooling over isn't going to be available for awhile. the sales people told me they weren't expecting any in. so i went running around the net looking for something similar and here's what i've found:

http://www.webcrystals.com/webcrystals/dolsphernec.html




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 459 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (13:39) * 1 lines 
 
the crystal is called aqua aura (similar to a stone in my ball ring)....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 460 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (13:48) * 3 lines 
 
the trillion is set in yellow 10K gold with diamonds (1 pt or less) sorta swirling up to the stone.

and the above dolphin pendant can be made with your choice of bead. it's not interchangeable, much to my disappointment.....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 461 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (13:48) * 1 lines 
 
oh, and i'll be more than happy to scan the ring (but you'll have to wait until June) if he does present me with it *smile*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 462 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (14:33) * 5 lines 
 
*sigh*...I'll wait and he has a problem with me if you don't get it then 7^/

Oooh...sparkly things along with the topaz? I think I am in love!!! Sounds really lovely...*sigh*

That is a darling dolphin pendant. Is is sterling?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 463 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (14:39) * 3 lines 
 
Did you check this one at the same site?




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 464 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (15:52) * 3 lines 
 
didn't see that one! oh, and it is sterling.

found another site when i found the double dolphin pendant. the woman who designs the jewelry is a gemologist and some of the pieces have fiery opal beads with the dolphins. will find the site and show you!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 465 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (15:54) * 3 lines 
 
http://www.seadesigns.com/

just click on the side menu.....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 466 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (16:02) * 1 lines 
 
Ok...going to check. The above is a humpback whale - about the same price and with all kinds of lovely spheres available in real stone!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 467 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (16:04) * 1 lines 
 
Yikes!!! Way outta my range on that new place! But, pretty stuff. I found the above whale on dolphin Jewelry on the left hand column of links.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 468 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (16:05) * 1 lines 
 
yup, i went back and found the whale too. you're right about that seaside place. very expensive!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 469 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (16:11) * 3 lines 
 
Men do sometimes notice jewelry. One of of my male co-workers noticed a necklace I was wearing and said, "That's really pretty. Are those stones blue topaz." To which I replied, "No, they're aquamarines."

It was nice of him to notice.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 470 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (16:14) * 1 lines 
 
I am surprised men are allowing themselves to say anything about anything a woman is wearing. My son says the workplace sexual harassment rules have just about ruled out any comments. They sound lovely!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 471 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (16:18) * 1 lines 
 
Actually, it was outside during our lunch hour.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 472 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (16:35) * 1 lines 
 
How nice of him to notice, and to share the good thought with you!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 473 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (17:31) * 1 lines 
 
and the necklace is still in your possession? *grin* i'm glad he noticed. can't say that i've ever had the pleasure of male company saying anything about my jewelry. too busy looking elsewhere? (like away from me *grin*)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 474 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (17:32) * 1 lines 
 
i'm the sexual harrassment officer at work. how am i supposed to monitor those things? people are all the time saying lewd things that can be taken anyway you like. but this isn't the topic to discuss that *smile*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 475 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 31, 2000 (17:38) * 1 lines 
 
Wow! Really, Wolfie? Is that because you were so hit upon they decided to empower you? Yup!!! We know you cannot hide behind the fangs and hairy pelt forever. You got that right about them looking elsewhere...Nothing like having your chest talked to...*sigh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 476 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr  1, 2000 (16:16) * 95 lines 
 
http://www.gemhut.com/topaz.htm

Hardness
8.0.
Occurrence
Brazil, U.S., Sri Lanka (Ceylon), Myanmar (Burma), former USSR, Australia, Pakistan, Mexico, Tasmania, Japan,
Africa. Topaz and citrine are the birthstones of the month of November.

Appearance
Yellow topaz is sometimes called "precious topaz" to distinguish it from the names "gold" and "madeiria topaz",
which are in fact citrine (quartz). Yellow topaz is sometimes heat treated to make it look pink. The term "imperial
topaz" is used by ethical jewelers to refer to topaz that is reddish orange of medium tone and higher saturation.

Enhancements
Yellow/Orange topaz is occasionally irradiated to intensify color. Pink/Red topaz is usually heat treated chromium
bearing pinkish-brown to orange stones. Brown topaz is not enhanced. Green and blue topaz are usually
irradiated to produce the desired color.

Gemstone Enhancements
The term "enhancement" is defined to be any treatment process other than cutting and polishing that improves the
appearance (color/clarity/phenomena), durability, or availability of a gemstone.
Some gemstone enhancements are less stable than others, meaning that some treatments are temporary. It is the
policy of Gem Hut to sell only those gemstones whose enhancements (if any) have good to excellent stability.

All gemstones can be divided into three basic categories.
Not Enhanced, (symbol N)
The "N" symbol appears by gemstones that are not currently known to be enhanced (Alexandrite, Garnet, etc.),
however the "N" symbol can also be used for other stones in the event that a stone has received no
enhancement. We will provide a guarantee that there has been none and that fact will be noted on the invoice
which accompanies the gemstone.

Normally Enhanced, (symbol E).
The "E" symbol appears by gemstones that are routinely enhanced. Since many enhancements are difficult or
impractical to prove definitively, the approach taken is, unless otherwise indicated, to assume that such
enhancement has been applied to that particular gemstone. This assumption is made to protect both the buyer
and seller. If a more specific method of enhancement is known, then the specific enhancement code will be used.

Non-Traditional Enhancements
For those gemstones not covered by the "N" and "E" symbols, the specific code which covers the gemstone
enhancement will be listed.

Symbols For Specific Form of Enhancement
B
Bleaching: The use of chemicals or other agents to lighten or remove a gemstone's color.

C
Coating: The use of such surface enhancements as lacquering, enameling, inking, foiling, or sputtering of films
to improve appearance, provide color or add other special effects.

D
Dyeing :The introduction of coloring matter into a gemstone to give it new color, intensify present color or
improve color uniformity.

F
Filling: As a by-product of heat enhancement, the presence of solidified borax or simliar colorless substances
which are visible under properly illuminated 10X magnification.

G
Gamma/Electron Irradiation: The use of gamma and/or electron bombardment to alter a gemstone's color;
may be followed by a heating process.

H
Heating: The use of heat to effect desired alteration of color, clarity, and/or phenomena. (Residue of foreign
substances is not visible under properly illuminated 10X magnification.)

I
Infilling: The intentional filling of surface breaking cavities or fractures usually with glass, plastic, opticon with
hardeners and/or other hardened foreign substances to improve durability, appearance and/or add weight.

L
Lasering: The use of a laser and chemicals to reach and alter inclusions in diamonds.

O
Oiling/Resin Infusion: The intentional filling of surface cavities of a colorless oil, wax, natural resin, or
unhardened man-made material into fissured transparent/translucent gemstones to improve appearance. (i.e.,
oil, man-made resin, cedar wood oil, Canada balsam, paraffin, etc.)

R
Irradiation: The use of neutron, requiring an environmental safety release from the Nuclear Regulatory
Commision (NRC), with the combination of any other bombardment and/or heat treatment to alter a gemstone's
color.

S
Bonding: The use of a colorless bonding agent (commonly plastic) within a porous gemstone to give it durability
and improve appearance.

U
Diffusion: The use of chemicals in conjunction with high temperatures to produce color and/or
asterism-producing inclusions.

W
Waxing/Oiling: The impregnation of a colorless wax, paraffin and oil in porous opaque gemstones to improve
appearance.




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 477 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr  1, 2000 (16:21) * 2 lines 
 
The above was about (((( P R E C I O U S - T O P A Z ))))



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 478 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr  1, 2000 (16:25) * 17 lines 
 
*=*=*=*=*=* A L E X A N D R I T E *=*=*=*=*=*
Hardness
8.5.

Occurrence
United States, Russia (Ural Mountains), Sri Lanka (Ceylon), Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Brazil, Madagascar, Italy.

Appearance
Named after the Russian Czar, Alexander II, alexandrite is the gemstone most noted for it's color changing
abilities. Colors are greenish outdoors, and reddish to violet under artificial light. Alexandrite is extremely rare.
Look out for alexandrite which is too clean, or at a price which seems too low, it's probably synthetic. Natural
alexandrite rarely exceeds 2 carats. Can be confused with synthetic alexandrite, or synthetic color change
corundum. Pearl, moonstone and alexandrite are the birthstones of the month of June. Photographs have been
retouched to show the approximate color change from indoors to outdoors.

Enhancements
Alexandrite is not enhanced.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 479 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr  1, 2000 (16:31) * 3 lines 
 
Back to Jade for a moment...this is Chrysoprase Chalcedony. It makes lovely rings which are less costly than Jade of this quality, and I think this is far prettier. Have we any comments from anyone owning a ring containing this stone (I happen to know one, actually...and have seen it on his hand)




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 480 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Apr  1, 2000 (20:49) * 7 lines 
 
thanks for the gemhut stuff....

i've not seen too many jade rings but the jade disc pendant is popular....

sears has a jade necklace and earrings set (8 mm with 14K gold beads). the set is normally priced at $229.99 but is on sale for $89.99 the picture shows a paler green than depicted above....

speaking of alexandrite, i went to gemhut or someplace like that to price out a simulated stone and a setting of my choice. still toying with it though....but they had a topaz like stone as i'm hoping to get for the b-day and it was called something else, ta--- (will go back and look)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 481 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Apr  1, 2000 (21:03) * 1 lines 
 
it's http://www.gemstones.com


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 482 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Apr  1, 2000 (21:10) * 3 lines 
 
the stone i'm thinking of is tavalite and here's a pic (it's from gemstones.com)




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 483 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Apr  1, 2000 (21:11) * 4 lines 
 
here's what gemstones.com has to say about this stone....

The metallic luster and unusual peacock coloring that emerges from these exciting new gems is what makes Tavalite® so truly unique! This futuristic look comes from from a permant process of adding a thin layer of metallic oxide onto a natural, colorless, Silver Topaz. Amulet is proud to offer Blue Enchantment®, the most popular color of Tavalite®, which is a metallic medium blue color, accented by subtle combinations of hues that actually change with the viewing angle! Each stone is eye clean and expertly cut. Tavalite® jewelry is easily cleaned with any standard jewelry cleaner or mild soap and water but avoid abrasive powders. With a little care your new jewelry will be enjoyed through the 21st century and beyond!



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 484 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr  1, 2000 (22:22) * 2 lines 
 
I have seen Tavelite. I just wonder how scratch resistent that coating is. It is similar to the coated lenses cameras have. You must be careful. In a pendant it would be less likely to scratch. I am still going for a red-green Alexandrite - no kids to put through college anymore =)) Very good information available at the gemhut url. Also interesting is how the enhancement is done.
Check out the Tavelite on HSC or QVC on the telly - they have it pretty often.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 485 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (10:42) * 3 lines 
 
gemstones also has a list of unusual stones. they had a rather large alexandrite for $4 grand with a very nice color change. for $1400, they have a smaller stone mounted on a 14K ring. it has a nice color change as well.

i hope the stone at SM isn't tavelite then, because i'm really hard on my jewelry. am surprised my 18K bracelet is still hanging on my wrist! (never take it off except to clean it)....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 486 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (11:25) * 1 lines 
 
Wolfie, they have to say if it is. The stone you posted from SM is definitely the color enhanced one and not all rainbow-y like Tavelite is. Tavelite is like motor oil leaks on asphalt roadways. Not really pretty but interesting.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 487 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (11:26) * 1 lines 
 
Hmmm....Guess I really do not need a quality 1 Alexandrite, after all! Yikes!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 488 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (13:56) * 1 lines 
 
oh, i don't know what the grade of that stone was but it was well over 1K. they still have it on their site....i'll go back and check...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 489 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (14:02) * 6 lines 
 
and here she is....

1.01 carat, 5.7x5.7mm 90% color change and $4040





 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 490 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (14:04) * 1 lines 
 
There is Will Power (I Will get it because it is that important to me). There is Won't power (I won't get it because there are too many other important things which need the money and I have more than enough jewelry). Then there is Shouldn't power (I shouldn't get it - don't need it - but I am still looking.) I fall into the last two. There are always things other people need more than I need for me to spend my money on myself....*sigh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 491 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (14:05) * 1 lines 
 
Those are the colors mine change. Lovely size, though...Wow! Thanks. The only other one I would "Need" would be an Emerald-to-Ruby change.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 492 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (14:06) * 6 lines 
 
here is the mounted one, class AA natural alexandrite....

0.51 carat, 5.1x4.1x3mm, $1428





 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 493 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (14:06) * 1 lines 
 
nice emerald to ruby change, huh, marcia? *grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 494 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (14:08) * 2 lines 
 
You would have to post one like that...*grin* Yes indeedy....lovely!
*BIG SIGH*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 495 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (14:10) * 1 lines 
 
tell me about it!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 496 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (14:11) * 1 lines 
 
Now, my decision is do I go another year without seeing my son and his fiancee and my fur-grandson and get that ring...it has only been two years since I have seen him....*sob*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 497 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (14:16) * 1 lines 
 
Lest anyone wonder if I really have a problem making a decision between those two options, let me assure you that my son wins over almost anything including an Alexandrite, no matter the lovliness of the latter.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 498 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (14:17) * 1 lines 
 
i know but temptation is strong, huh? go see your family and i promise not to buy the stone *grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 499 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (14:22) * 1 lines 
 
super-strong, Wolfie...! You may buy the stone...Those guys in the lab are making more of them every day. Maybe one of the chips they usually throw away will one day will be mine...I promised David I would see him before fall. Probablly in June when all of the games are over. Anyone else wanna see Marcia?! (Never mind!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 500 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (16:21) * 1 lines 
 
haha!! of course but my leave time is limited....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 501 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (16:28) * 3 lines 
 
Not this time...but we gotta do the IRL bonding thing. Also have to have time to scrounge the beaches around Aransas and get down and dirty in Arkansas (who said the Prez was the only one who is allowed?!)...*grin* Of course, there is always the scenario of meeting in Austin and scaring the place out of its wits.
Or, remember, John and I have promised you the grand tour of the Island here. If you tell us in time we can try to schedule and earthquake with your eruption.
...so much to do and only one life time...*sigh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 502 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (16:29) * 1 lines 
 
*sigh* here too.....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 503 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr  2, 2000 (16:32) * 1 lines 
 
*Hugs*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 504 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Apr  3, 2000 (15:52) * 5 lines 
 
Wonderful gem information. Marcia, I hope you do get to see your son this year, and get an alexandrite, too. Well, if you don't get the alexandrite maybe you'll find that Arkansas diamond.

I have a question on birthstones, their folklore particularly. Are they intende to ward off evil spirits away from the wearer? Or do they enable the wearer the ability to control and overcome the negetive spirits in the vacinity?

In the Middle Ages it was believed that different gemstones had specific influences, over health and such. Does anybody know anything about this?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 505 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Apr  3, 2000 (16:06) * 7 lines 
 
stones are still held to that belief, they will enhance the wearer's ability to ward off bad-luck.

this site (posted way back when) goes into the different stones for each month.

http://www.jewelrymall.com/birthstones.html

some stones require the wearer to have it close to their skin, like jade and amber. crystals are said to house the same supernatural properties.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 506 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Apr  3, 2000 (18:05) * 1 lines 
 
Thank you, thank you, Wolf.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 507 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr  3, 2000 (18:19) * 74 lines 
 


Stones, Lore and Energy
http://www.spiritone.com/~cbdv/stones.htm

Agate: Named after the Achates River in Sicily (now known as the Drillo River), agates have been valued by people
since 3000 BC. They have even been found on fossilized remains of Stone Age humans dating from 20,000 - 16,000
BC. They come in a variety of colors.

Amber: Amber is not literally a stone, although we often treat it as one. It is actually fossilized resin or tree sap, and
often contains visible fragments of insects. To test if amber is real and not a plastic imitation, pour salt into warm water
until it will hold no more salt. If the beads float, they are most likely amber. Amber floats in salt water, while plastic sinks.

Amethyst: Named by the ancient Greeks, this is one of the best known gemstones. Ancient Greeks believed that
Bacchus (the god of wine) gave it its name after pouring wine over a woman the goddess Diane had turn to stone. Its
name originally meant "not drunk" and the ancients believed that anyone wearing this stone was unable to become
drunk.

Aventurine: In its green form, aventurine looks similar to jade. In fact, ancient Chinese held it in higher esteem than
green jade (which also comes in many colors) and carved bowls, vases and other ornamental objects from this stone. In
ancient times, even the imperial seal was carved from aventurine.

Bloodstone: Bloodstone varies from green to red and brown. It is named bloodstone because the color of the stone
resembles blood drops.

Carnelian: For centuries, carnelian was used for insignia seals because it does not stick to wax. It is said to bring the
wearer good luck. "Favoured by the Arabic peoples, the Carnelian is one of the stones of Kings. The rich, warm colour
of the stone has often linked it to the energies associated with fire. Projective, proactive energy, the beast of fire being
the Lion, the King. It is also a stone to lend courage to those in need, and very helpful to wear whilst speaking publicly
(roaring)" (Baird "Gem Lore 2").

Citrine: This stone is close relative of amethyst, and in fact, citrine can be created by heating amethyst. The ancient
Greeks and Romans wore citrine as a talisman and thought that it aided in digestion and cleansed the body of toxins. It
also symbolized lightheartedness and joy.

Garnet: When worn on the body, garnets are believed to protect from skin disease. Garnets are also an important
symbol of fidelity, faithfulness and protection. Supposedly, they lose their brilliance when danger approaches. These
stones were considered so powerful that armies often imbedded them in their arrows so they would fly straight into their
enemies’ hearts.

Hematite: Hematite is said the keep the wearer grounded, so it is a good stone for people who tend to be
absentminded.

Jasper: Jasper comes in numerous colors and with a variety of markings. It is mostly commonly recognized in its red
form, although it can be black, brown, or even green. This stone is said to help ward off bad dreams, to help control
bleeding, and to help with pregnancy.

Jet Glass: This coal derivative and its cousin, faux jet, were originally formed into beads during Queen Victoria’s
mourning. When their husbands were away working or fighting, Irish women burned jet to protect bring them home.

Labradorite: This stone is related to opals and moonstones, as evidenced by its iridescence. It is believed to help the
wearer find their true self, and to make them feel at home, whatever the situation.

Lapis Lazuli: This stone has so much lore associated with it, it is impossible to describe in a few sentences.
Egyptians wore ground lapis as eyeshadow. Kings believed that sharpening their weapons with Lapis would make
them invincible. People believe that the wearer of lapis carries God in them and that this stone gives the wearer an
uncanny ability to see truth.

Malachite: Ancient peoples believed this stone was alive and fed it water and iron filings once a week. Later people
took it to Mass, believing it drove the devil out. It is also believed to ease sadness, help improve memory, and to relieve
arthritis pain in the extremities.

Moonstone: This is the lowest grade of opal. When worn on the neck, moonstone is thought to protect from epilepsy
and sunstroke, and is used to cure headaches and nosebleeds. In India, the moonstone is still a sacred gem. It is the
symbol of the "third eye," or our higher consciousness.

Peridot: Peridot has been believed to cure liver disease. It also is said the free the mind from envious thoughts. Its
magical power is best released when used with gold. Tiger Eye: This stone is often associated with courage and
persistence. Topaz: Its name comes from Sanskrit "tapas", to glow.

Turquoise: Turquoise is generally blue or green and may or may not contain dark lines or sections known as matrix.
Turquoise is believed to protect from poison, and reptiles. People have adorned their horses with turquoise to protect
them from falling. The Navajos believe turquoise protects from evil and embed the stones in their Hogans.



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 508 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr  3, 2000 (18:27) * 4 lines 
 
also check out the encyclopaedic site at http://home1.gte.net/mskelly/2library.htm

This new age place covers downloads from things Arthurian through Zircons.
http://www.alternatives.com/libs/relnewa.htm


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 509 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Apr  3, 2000 (20:38) * 3 lines 
 
thanks for all of that marcia!

(btw, how do you know if the water won't hold anymore salt?)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 510 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr  3, 2000 (21:02) * 1 lines 
 
It sits on the bottom and will not go into solution. Decant the clear liquid off if you want no sediment.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 511 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr  3, 2000 (23:05) * 1 lines 
 
Wolfie - it is here! It is a pretty little thing. The sphere is about the side of a small marble and is a pale pinkish tan. It has the fibrous inclusions which are very attractive but it is heavy for fluorite...more the weight of glass. It is lovely and even the resident male liked it. The porpoise is tiny and a little hard to see, though...but for $20...I love it!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 512 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr  3, 2000 (23:07) * 1 lines 
 
Actually, the sphere is very like the marble wallpaper in here. *smile*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 513 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Apr  4, 2000 (16:40) * 1 lines 
 
ooo, sounds pretty!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 514 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr  4, 2000 (17:26) * 1 lines 
 
It is...but if you are abundantly endowed and on the zaftig side, it will be lost on you...I am modest in all things so I think it'll be ok *smile*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 515 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr  4, 2000 (17:28) * 1 lines 
 
It is almost flesh-toned, so it would probably look best on a white sweater or T-shirt.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 516 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Apr  4, 2000 (19:01) * 1 lines 
 
or up against your upper chest. since i'm not heavenly endowed in that area (it all sank, *laugh*, not that you needed a visual!!), i could wear something small, but even my most delicate jewelry seems lost. mayhaps that's the point, like perfume, you don't want to get poked in the eye with something when we're a room apart!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 517 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Apr 22, 2000 (21:42) * 1 lines 
 
QVC Tanzanite show, 23 Apr (that's tomorrow) at 2PM Eastern (1PM CST)......


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 518 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr 22, 2000 (21:52) * 1 lines 
 
8am for Hawaii. I will try to catch it, but we are scheduled to hide Easter Eggs for the pre-softball game festivities.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 519 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Apr 22, 2000 (21:54) * 3 lines 
 
that's early for you (not the easter eggs). i will let you know if i purchase anything!

and you know QVC does specials for birthstones each month but i'll be they use pearls instead of alexandrite for june!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 520 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Apr 22, 2000 (21:55) * 1 lines 
 
(should be "bet" not "be")


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 521 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr 22, 2000 (22:06) * 1 lines 
 
I am modestly endowed so things do not get lost but neither do they poke eyes out unless you are closer than I usually let people get...*grin* I would look pretty (my little Dolphin) on bare skin...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 522 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr 22, 2000 (22:12) * 2 lines 
 
The double header starts at 11am and all of the eggs have to be found by then.
Walmart has a nice selection of Tanzanite as does Liberty House (like Neiman Marcus Hawaiian style) and some at Sears. Betcha Zales does, too. Their fliers have lovely pieces in pale lavender.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 523 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr 22, 2000 (22:12) * 1 lines 
 
I am usually up by 6 am or before. Have gotten online as early as 5am...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 524 of 845: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Sun, Apr 23, 2000 (16:51) * 1 lines 
 
Clue me in - what's tanzanite?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 525 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Apr 23, 2000 (17:08) * 3 lines 
 
it's a gem that's mined in Tanzania Africa. it has a nice purply-blue color and is often mistaken for a sapphire or amethyst. but it has nice color changes when you move the stone around.

marcia, i gave in to temptation but am fighting with the thought to cancel the order. (fear of the AM). i ordered a band ring with two rows of pear-shaped tanzanites. it's two months of $91. 14K and over 1K in stone weight. it also has diamond accents. lemme get that pic out for you.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 526 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Apr 23, 2000 (17:14) * 3 lines 
 
here's the ring in all it's glory:




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 527 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Apr 23, 2000 (17:15) * 1 lines 
 
do you see why i was tempted? it's beautiful. and it has a low gallery so it won't stick up to much on my hand (good thing since tanzanite is a 6 on the mohs scale)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 528 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr 23, 2000 (18:21) * 1 lines 
 
Oh Wolfie, you are worth it!!! Shall I send you a contribution?! Get it - it is your earnings and you may do so - (tell AM to come talk to me if there is a problem...*grinning menacingly*)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 529 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Apr 23, 2000 (21:36) * 1 lines 
 
i told him i was bad (he was napping) and he asked me what i did. i gave him the "you know what i did" look and he grinned. so wolfie is in the clear until the bill comes in!! (but you're right, marcia, i bring in half the pay check and after my rough week at work, i deserve a reward *grin*) i'm so glad you like it.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 530 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr 23, 2000 (21:40) * 1 lines 
 
Excellent news, My Dear Wolfie! I like that sort of ring because it does not swivel around on your finger like solitaires are prone to do. That color will go with just about anything. Next, you NEED stud earrings to go with it *grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 531 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Apr 23, 2000 (21:44) * 3 lines 
 
Yup!! (1.5 carats of tanzanite and .05 of diamond mounted in rhodium)...

the studs sold out. in fact, this ring and a pendant were the only things left of a 3 hour show, which, for obvious reasons, lasted maybe 1 1/2 hours!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 532 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr 23, 2000 (23:16) * 1 lines 
 
Oooh...lovely! What color are your eyes?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 533 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr 23, 2000 (23:18) * 1 lines 
 
(If they are blue the Tanzanite will sparkle more but if they are brown it will make them more intense...)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 534 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr 23, 2000 (23:18) * 1 lines 
 
If your eyes are green or hazel you have to send them to me *grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 535 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Apr 24, 2000 (11:23) * 1 lines 
 
they're brown with green and gold streaks....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 536 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr 24, 2000 (12:13) * 1 lines 
 
Guess you won't clash with your tanzanite, then. It was the middle of the night when i wrote that from the Living room laptop, and I was feeling a little weirder than usual *grin* Mine are sort of an amber brown (reddish) like my hair was when I was little.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 537 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Apr 24, 2000 (16:58) * 1 lines 
 
i've seen a couple of people with reddish eyes. they're not quite brown. reminds me of cats.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 538 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr 24, 2000 (17:05) * 1 lines 
 
Mine are more like chestnuts than reddish, but I know what you mean. I am a hybrid. My oldest sister had blue eyes, the middle one had hazel and I got the brown...*sigh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 539 of 845:  (sprin5) * Tue, Apr 25, 2000 (08:09) * 1 lines 
 
Mine are blue.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 540 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 25, 2000 (12:40) * 2 lines 
 
I know....beautifully clear blue...I noted that. Very becoming...*sigh*
(It is So good to have you posting in here. I am a happy girl today *yippee!!*)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 541 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Apr 25, 2000 (17:54) * 1 lines 
 
me too! tanzanite would enhance and be enhanced by the color of your eyes. do you wear an earring?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 542 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 25, 2000 (18:15) * 1 lines 
 
*lol* bet he might have in his younger bell-bottom days...! His eyes are the color of the sky in Hawaii at midday - blue like my dad's


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 543 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Apr 25, 2000 (18:16) * 1 lines 
 
how pretty!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 544 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 25, 2000 (18:55) * 1 lines 
 
If there were any way to get the shot of him off that video he'd occupy all of drool as close as I can tell. Pretty and unforgettable


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 545 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Apr 26, 2000 (17:20) * 3 lines 
 
The ring is beautiful Wolf. Are you going to get those earrings?

As to eye color, I always wished I blue eyes. I have eyes like a white tail deer -- wide, dark brown, and myopic. Did you know deer are nearsighted? Anyway, the advantage of having dark hair and eyes is no color ever clashes with them. I also look pretty much the same in black and white photos as I do in color.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 546 of 845: Alexandrite  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 26, 2000 (19:23) * 1 lines 
 
*sigh* I always wanted to be a green-eyes geologist. Instead, I gave birth to one and fell in love with another...and another... I really like green eyes!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 547 of 845: Alexandrite  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 26, 2000 (19:24) * 1 lines 
 
Hazel-green, actually... *big sigh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 548 of 845: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Apr 26, 2000 (19:42) * 3 lines 
 
no earrings this time, cheryl, they all sold out!

have always been told that my eyes are pretty (despite the shitty brown color). you can't see the gold unless i'm in the light. certain colors bring out the green in them. but they're predominately brown.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 549 of 845: Alexandrite  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 26, 2000 (20:00) * 1 lines 
 
Even though I have hybrid brown eyes, they are my best feature...and I can get into trouble with them...*sigh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 550 of 845: Alexandrite  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 26, 2000 (20:01) * 1 lines 
 
Lance could tell you better about my eyes, but he did not remember the color!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 551 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Apr 26, 2000 (20:14) * 1 lines 
 
oh no!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 552 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Apr 26, 2000 (20:15) * 1 lines 
 
my daughter and husband have even brown eyes. chestnut color and they have such depth. but my eyes give me away. couldn't play poker!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 553 of 845: Alexandrite  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 26, 2000 (20:42) * 1 lines 
 
Mine are chestnut (or did I say that already), too. Some think I am good with my fingers. My eyes are right in the same league. I cannot get away with anything either, so I avoid those games which make me be secretive unless I am involved in real stuff in which case I can do it.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 554 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Apr 26, 2000 (20:45) * 1 lines 
 
me too!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 555 of 845: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Thu, Apr 27, 2000 (13:58) * 1 lines 
 
would you like my green eyes???? Sorry, but they're getting to longsighted these days to manage without glases all the time.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 556 of 845: Alexandrite  (MarciaH) * Thu, Apr 27, 2000 (17:02) * 2 lines 
 
Ah yes, Presbyopia...lots of us have it, including me. I guess my coloring is best for my chestnut eyes so I think I'll let you wear the green ones =)
You can always get violet contacts and look like Liz Taylor! I had a friend who had a whole range of colors from turquoise to indigo.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 557 of 845: Alexandrite  (MarciaH) * Thu, Apr 27, 2000 (17:09) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 558 of 845: Alexandrite  (MarciaH) * Thu, Apr 27, 2000 (17:12) * 2 lines 
 
Well, that is a local phone number and it IS 15% off during Merrie Monarch...
Talk about wishful thinking...!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 559 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Apr 27, 2000 (17:30) * 1 lines 
 
those are pretty but too big for me!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 560 of 845: Alexandrite  (MarciaH) * Thu, Apr 27, 2000 (18:09) * 3 lines 
 
How did I manage to get them over here on the inorganice gems?! Auwe. Should I scribble and move them?! Sheesh!

I have a swan neck and need stuff to use up some of the length (nibbling room is not compromised in any way *grin*)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 561 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Apr 27, 2000 (21:18) * 1 lines 
 
no, don't move them!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 562 of 845: Curious GeoLady  (MarciaH) * Thu, Apr 27, 2000 (21:22) * 1 lines 
 
I did - mostly because Lance does not come in here much yet and he goes immediately to 18 where the pearls are. *sigh* It has been a weird day on Spring. Are your gifs back? All I can see is those boxes "where an image should be."


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 563 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Apr 27, 2000 (21:23) * 1 lines 
 
i've not had a problem seeing the gifs. in fact, right before i logged on over here, i took a gander and they're there.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 564 of 845: GeoLady  (MarciaH) * Thu, Apr 27, 2000 (22:06) * 1 lines 
 
And, you can see them on the front page of spring, as well? I can only see them on the W 3.1 laptop which uses the most rudimentary of programs...but I did see the globe! And the Jaguar! And terry's buttons at the top of the page. Must be my Netscape. You use IE?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 565 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Apr 28, 2000 (12:04) * 1 lines 
 
i'm using IE right now. a friend of mine at work can't see my gifs either. hmmmm.....will check the spring frontpage.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 566 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Apr 28, 2000 (12:05) * 1 lines 
 
yup, i can see them.....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 567 of 845: GeoLady  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 28, 2000 (12:18) * 1 lines 
 
I can't except with IE in the living room...*sigh* It is distressing since Netscape works better for me in most applications, and I was not told to change. For years the ladies in Drool have been having terrible posting problems using IE. They are exclusively now using Netscape. I wish one of the magicians would let me know if I should change... (but, how do I do the Vulcan web page then?!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 568 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Apr 28, 2000 (15:44) * 1 lines 
 
Oh, Marcia, you poor thing, suffering with that swan neck. It makes me think of the story of Consuelo Vanderbilt, whose father, Cornelius, had an extraordinary multi-strand pearl choker made to show off her swanlike neck. All Consuelo could do was complain about how uncomfortable it was.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 569 of 845: GeoLady  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 28, 2000 (15:46) * 1 lines 
 
What can you expect from women not skilled in the social graces. I would not have complained...not in a million years! Nouveau riches! (spelling?!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 570 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Apr 28, 2000 (16:06) * 1 lines 
 
long necks are an attribute in at least one tribe in africa and girl children wear rings around their necks from day one. a new ring is added periodically to allow the look of a long neck. (however, it does significant damage to the clavicles, which, IMHO, are much sexier than a grotesquely long neck).


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 571 of 845: GeoLady  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 28, 2000 (16:30) * 1 lines 
 
My clavicles are intact, and except for my ex who claimed I looked like a harpy in one of his less generous moments, I am not out of proportion and more than one has nibbled his way to glory - one way or another.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 572 of 845: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Fri, Apr 28, 2000 (17:05) * 1 lines 
 
*giggle*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 573 of 845: GeoLady  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 28, 2000 (19:16) * 1 lines 
 
You're gonna have to take my word for it unless Lance enters the discussion. He's seen me! For a while, he was the escort of choice for me by O'O...*sigh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 574 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Apr 28, 2000 (20:00) * 1 lines 
 
well, i'm definately out of proportion but we won't go there. *laugh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 575 of 845: GeoLady  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 28, 2000 (20:19) * 1 lines 
 
Well, Liz thinks her legs are too short...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 576 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Apr 28, 2000 (20:20) * 1 lines 
 
it's always something, huh?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 577 of 845: GeoLady  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 28, 2000 (20:28) * 1 lines 
 
like we were saying...in another life *=)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 578 of 845: Dissappointed Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, May  1, 2000 (11:28) * 1 lines 
 
well, the ring from qvc came in this weekend and i didn't like it. it's really square and i didn't care for the setting. for some reason, the stones aren't set evenly (as far as height) and it's not on purpose (i.e., graduated heighth). it's really pretty, as far as the sparkle factor goes but not impressive to me and didn't look that great on my hand.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 579 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May  1, 2000 (15:51) * 1 lines 
 
Send it back! It seemed to be set by small children in a 5th world country (which it probably was) and that is unfortunate. They showed a real tight shot of it and I caught it on our BIG tv screen. I was hoping my eyes were deceiving me.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 580 of 845: geospring (sprin5) * Mon, May  1, 2000 (19:13) * 1 lines 
 
Will they let you send it back?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 581 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, May  1, 2000 (19:34) * 1 lines 
 
yes for any reason. and it's repackaged and going out tomorrow.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 582 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, May 14, 2000 (14:38) * 1 lines 
 
marcia, i got the color enhanced mystic fire topaz today. it's the trillion and it's absolutely gorgeous! (what a surprise. he actually told me to pick something out)....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 583 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, May 14, 2000 (14:39) * 3 lines 
 
here's a website offering the stone:

http://www.dalmar.net/Mystic.htm


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 584 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 14, 2000 (14:47) * 1 lines 
 
How lovely! I am delighted for you. How is the stone set and what shape and size is it - in other words, can you scan the new jewel in your crown? I know Topaz is 8 in hardness, but the Mystic Fire is a coating put onto a clear white topaz. This coating is much softer and will abrade, so do not plan to do the gardening while you are wearing it. Want to see it!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 585 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 14, 2000 (14:55) * 1 lines 
 
My Precious Gem, David, sent me a book on everything there is to know about Yosemite...rocks, newts, fishes, trees, birds and everything else. As the cover says, Yosemite: A Visitor's Companion. History, plants, ecology, Geology, Wildllife and Road Guide...I want to go back to see Yosemite!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 586 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 14, 2000 (15:01) * 5 lines 
 
He inscribed it "For Mom, Who lives rocks." He knows his Mom!

The second best thing today was when John was reading the Mother'sDay dedications for a song, he included his mom and "my friend, Marcia" I am all warm and fuzzy now!

House male gave me a handblown glass rose - it is very lovely!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 587 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, May 14, 2000 (18:26) * 3 lines 
 
It is trillion set with 3 diamonds on two sides (6 total). it is draped looking and i will scan it tomorrow night.

glad you had a good Mother's Day, Marcia!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 588 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 14, 2000 (18:29) * 1 lines 
 
Well, it has been very quiet, but I saw what I needed to see and was appreciated in places I did not expect to hear from *grin* Hope yours is good, as well!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 589 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 14, 2000 (18:30) * 1 lines 
 
Your ring sounds LOVELY!!! I love the trillion cut. Bet it sparkles like mad! Wear dark glasses when you take it out into the sunlight!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 590 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, May 14, 2000 (18:33) * 3 lines 
 
already viewed it outside and it turns dark. and it changes colors when i move the stone around. very pretty and unusual.

also, the salesman i spoke with knows his gems and we were talking at length and i made sure this stone was not a tavalite. it's not (thank goodness). and he invited me to a used tanzanite jewelry sale this coming friday and saturday. because the mine in tanzania is flooded, these gems are sure to rise in value due to their rarity. amazing that only one area has these beautiful stems.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 591 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, May 14, 2000 (18:34) * 1 lines 
 
he also said he was at an estate sale and saw an alexandrite in an antique setting for $100. not being familiar at the time with alexandrite, he passed it up and could kick himself for it.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 592 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 14, 2000 (18:42) * 1 lines 
 
Yikes! Alexandrite for $100?! Kick him for me, too! Get the Tanzanite you want now. They are gonna be gone soon! I am delighted to hear it is not Tavalite!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 593 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, May 14, 2000 (18:47) * 1 lines 
 
they didn't have any dark ones. just the paler varieties without much color change.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 594 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 14, 2000 (19:03) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 595 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, May 15, 2000 (20:26) * 3 lines 
 
and here's my mystic fire topaz ring. left large so you can see the colors:




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 596 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, May 15, 2000 (20:26) * 3 lines 
 
ok, let's try again...




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 597 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 15, 2000 (20:39) * 1 lines 
 
OOOOoooooooooooooooooooooooooooohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh That is stunning! The color is much prettier than the one on the website!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 598 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, May 16, 2000 (17:23) * 2 lines 
 
*grin* knew you'd love it!!



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 599 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May 16, 2000 (20:50) * 1 lines 
 
If it belonged to anyone else, I'd be tempted to be petty and mean-spirited about it, but since it is yours, I am just happily envious!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 600 of 845: Lucille Oftedahl  (alyeska) * Sun, May 28, 2000 (20:37) * 2 lines 
 
I read an article in the Smithsonion Magazine yesterday about a couple in N. Carolina who bought the land around an abandoned emerald mine because he felt that there was more there. The rented the equipment to do the digging and the last week before the lease was up they found a cave filled with crystals and emeralds. Hanging from the ceiling and sticking out of the walls.
The emeralds are of as high quality as Central Americam emeralds and many of them are even better.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 601 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 28, 2000 (21:01) * 1 lines 
 
Ooooh!!! There is North Carolina again. Lance??!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 602 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 28, 2000 (21:06) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks, Lucie...just in time for my Birthday - wonder if they would spare a modest sample...!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 603 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, May 29, 2000 (11:17) * 1 lines 
 
uh oh, when's your b-day again?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 604 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 29, 2000 (11:20) * 1 lines 
 
I'll tell you way after June 8th...Ok??? *grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 605 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, May 29, 2000 (11:22) * 1 lines 
 
ok!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 606 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, May 29, 2000 (11:22) * 1 lines 
 
(did i miss it?)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 607 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 29, 2000 (11:41) * 1 lines 
 
Nope


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 608 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 29, 2000 (11:42) * 1 lines 
 
(May 31st)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 609 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, May 29, 2000 (11:49) * 2 lines 
 
thanks!!



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 610 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 29, 2000 (11:54) * 1 lines 
 
Behave ! (force yourself!) Except for tomorrow...*grin*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 611 of 845: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Tue, May 30, 2000 (02:16) * 1 lines 
 
Why tomorrow Oops - today!)???


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 612 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May 30, 2000 (13:38) * 5 lines 
 
*smile* Just being silly....

HOW MUCH SILVER MUST AN ITEM CONTAIN TO BE CONSIDERED STERLING?
92.5 percent.



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 613 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, May 30, 2000 (17:19) * 3 lines 
 
*grin*

um, where does black opal occur the most?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 614 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, May 30, 2000 (17:41) * 3 lines 
 
So Marcia, have you gone to North Carolina to get that emerald. These are supposed to be high quality, right? The price will astronomical. Good quality emeralds are rare. Even small ones with good clarity and color command nosebleed prices.

Curious Wolfie, is the black opal question a trick question?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 615 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, May 30, 2000 (17:48) * 1 lines 
 
cheryl, no, it's not. a friend of mine told me her mother was told that germany was the only place to find black opals. never heard anything about that.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 616 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, May 30, 2000 (17:50) * 1 lines 
 
Honestly, I didn't know. I would have said Australia, which a place very associated with opals. So black opals occur only in Germany. That's interesting.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 617 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, May 30, 2000 (18:05) * 2 lines 
 
yes, australia is what my books say but it doesn't indicate that they are exclusive to that region. it includes czechoslovakia, usa, brazil, mexico, and south africa.



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 618 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, May 30, 2000 (19:07) * 1 lines 
 
I have a small opal mined in the United States. It's really quite pretty, albeit, pale and delicate, rather than firey as opals are supposed to be.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 619 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May 30, 2000 (19:20) * 1 lines 
 
According precious black opals come from Lightning Ridge, New South Wales, Australia and lesser ones from Tintenbar, also in NSW. Very small quantites also come from from Indonesia.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 620 of 845: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Fri, Jun  2, 2000 (15:40) * 1 lines 
 
(My black pearls have arrived, but I'm not supposed to know.)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 621 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun  2, 2000 (16:17) * 1 lines 
 
OoooooooooooooooooooOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooooooooooooooooooooo....I had forgotten. Yikes!!! How can you stand to wait??! Almost a whole month!!! I got dinner out. Usual place.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 622 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun  2, 2000 (16:18) * 1 lines 
 
he gave me the bill for his $400 silver belt buckle..........


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 623 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Jun  2, 2000 (16:27) * 1 lines 
 
*frown*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 624 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun  2, 2000 (18:57) * 1 lines 
 
That's ok, I am plotting my revenge. I am custonian of all his credit cards and they will put you in hock forever if I load them. He'd better play straight with me or I'll put his sorry butt in hock and you'd better believe I am getting that angry.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 625 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jun  7, 2000 (21:14) * 3 lines 
 
WHAT FAMOUS WOMAN, USING A DIAMOND, SCRATCHED THE FOLLOWING MESSAGE ON HER PRISON WINDOW: MUCH SUSPECTED OF ME, NOTHING PROVED CAN BE?

England's Queen Elizabeth I, while she was confined at Woodstock in the mid-sixteenth century before she attained the throne.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 626 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun 19, 2000 (17:04) * 4 lines 
 
HOW MANY DIAMONDS ARE THERE ON BRITAIN'S IMPERIAL STATE CROWN, WHICH IS WORN BY THE REIGNING MONARCH ON STATE OCCASIONS?

There are 1,783 - including the 309-carat Star of Africa.
The crown also has 277 pearls, 17 sapphires, 11 emeralds, and 5 rubies.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 627 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jun 20, 2000 (17:39) * 5 lines 
 
WHAT GEM WAS ONCE CONSIDERED A CHARM AGAINST DRUNKENESS?

The amethyst - which gets its name from the Greek amethystos
- which means "remedy for drunkeness."



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 628 of 845: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Wed, Oct 11, 2000 (03:31) * 5 lines 
 
Oh dear, just came in here to post my 27th anniversary gift (it's on friday 13th this year)....an amethyst/gold tear drop pendant and earrings ...and look what I find posted above it ...amethyst a remedy for drunkeness!!! oh well ..back to the guiness I guess.

Anyway, I was pleased with the pendant and earrings ..nice deep colour amethyst set in a 9 ct gold surround, not huge but looks nice, and stud earrings also set in gold. Bought on the liner to Spain.

Oh yeah, I saw I Humungeous emerald ring in Petersfield, Sussex the other day ...couldn't believe the price tag in this sleepy little town shop ..£18,000 ..it was a rather ugly setting though and I can't see them ever selling it. Lots of other emerald rings of varying hues and sizes. For a provincial shop they had some very strange things in the window ...several very large (like 1 1/2") chunks of amber set in brooches, a couple of other very large stones (1" plus) I'd never seen before set in rings ...a sort of watery brownish stone. All with biggish price tags.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 629 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct 11, 2000 (13:54) * 5 lines 
 
Oh, Maggie, how nice your amethysts sound beautiful. Okole Maluna!!!

as to those pricey watery-brown stones - not cairngorms? (In which case they should not be all that pricey...) or cannot imagine what else? Notmuch call for dirty sapphires, trashy diamonds or topazes. Next time, go in and ask!!!

As to that Emerald, my unfortunate birthstone, never mind! I shall never own one in any case so I have decided I do not like them.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 630 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct 11, 2000 (13:56) * 1 lines 
 
Ooh, Happy Anniversary...and many Many more. Hug T for me and to both of you my love!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 631 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Oct 11, 2000 (21:04) * 3 lines 
 
Happy Anniversary Maggie!

could the watery brown stone be smoky quartz?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 632 of 845: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Thu, Oct 12, 2000 (01:06) * 3 lines 
 
From the price tags ..£650 I wasn't sure what they were ...except huge!!! I certainly wouldn't like to wear a stone as big as that! Topaz is quite popular here ..I have a brown topaz ring ..but it is cheap, not in this price bracket ..these stones were 1 1/2" It didn't look like the kind of shop you go in an ask what stones they were ...I'm really not very good at that sort of thing! One of my earlier 'jobs' was in a jewellers in Hatton Garden (the jewellery centre of London) ..so I have seen most precious stones ..this was completely new to me. They had huge hunks of amber too, some in settings.




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 633 of 845: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Thu, Oct 12, 2000 (01:08) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks for the anniversary greetings ..we are now trying to decide what to do for it ...after the whale cruise it seems a little like an anticlimax!!! I still can't believe 27 years!!!! And I really married young of course ...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 634 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct 12, 2000 (01:24) * 3 lines 
 
Married and had your children before grade school, yes?! Talk about child brides!!!

Brown "topazes" (called 'smoky topaz' here) are really brown varieties of quartz just as amethyst is purple and citrine is orange/yellow quartz. They should be relatively inexpensive and that is what cairngorms are!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 635 of 845: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Thu, Oct 12, 2000 (01:33) * 1 lines 
 
?Then this must have been something else! I'm really curious now ...and I won't be back that way for months ...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 636 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Oct 12, 2000 (20:57) * 1 lines 
 
never be afraid to talk about jewelry with a jeweler. if they are worth they're salt, and you know what you're talking about, you can talk jewelry at tiffany's!i walked into a classy establishment and asked them if they could tighten the setting on my tanzanite. they took one look at my stone and went to the back and tightened it. no questions asked and no strange looks. (it needs it again, unfortunately)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 637 of 845:  (sprin5) * Fri, Oct 13, 2000 (07:22) * 6 lines 
 
The Tates in Austin make some pretty incredible jewelry, they don't have their own website.



from http://www.well.com/user/bratwood/tates.jpg



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 638 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct 13, 2000 (14:07) * 2 lines 
 
Oooh....YES!!! I am too tiny for some of that - but tall enough to carry long pendants off well. I discovererd that I do have some emeralds, but they look like jade they are so mily. Ah well, I did not choose them and they are symbloic of my birthstone... Love the pearls in the bottom one... Thanks for the great images. Waiting for the ladies from Drool to find it. Karen??!!
Is silver mined in Texas or is it from Mexico? I love silver most especially.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 639 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Oct 13, 2000 (18:05) * 1 lines 
 
those are some unusual and creative pieces (esp. the bracelet at the bottom). i'm a gold kinda gal!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 640 of 845: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Sat, Oct 14, 2000 (06:52) * 1 lines 
 
I'm looking for some silver and amber drop earrings to go with the silver and amber pendant my mum gave me for my birthday ...so far no luck!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 641 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Oct 14, 2000 (12:44) * 1 lines 
 
Have you looked on the web? I like amber set in gold but you can usually just find it in silver in the USA or on the web. Wolfoe, when you get some silver in your hair you'll start liking silver better - it sparkles amazingly....so I hear...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 642 of 845: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Sat, Oct 14, 2000 (16:31) * 1 lines 
 
Never looked on the web for jewellery ...haven't got time to get any now ...going in four days time ...maybe when we return ...I can't afford gold usually


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 643 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Oct 17, 2000 (18:14) * 1 lines 
 
What are those watery dirty-brown stones? Are any diamonds really trashy?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 644 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 17, 2000 (18:43) * 1 lines 
 
I have seen diamonds on a huge earth drill which makes tunnel-sized holes. They are pretty miserable-looking but no natural stones are trashy. Mountings? The Wearer? Oh yes, but not the stones!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 645 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 17, 2000 (18:46) * 1 lines 
 
Mayhap I need to take a field trip to Britain to check out those stones?? About those watery-brown stones...go in and ask? You better believe I would and with my patrician nose elevated just enough that they would assume I could afford to purchase one!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 646 of 845: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Wed, Oct 18, 2000 (03:41) * 1 lines 
 
Come over when I get back next Spring ..and we'll go in together!!!! GRIN


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 647 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Oct 19, 2000 (18:51) * 1 lines 
 
That should be great. I'm sure between the two of you, it will be determined exactly what that stone is.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 648 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct 19, 2000 (20:07) * 2 lines 
 
Oh yes! I know of no jeweler worth the name who would deny a prospective customer a closer look at a piece of jewelry and a try-on of same. What an excuse to visit that green and fertile land (been listening to Jerusalem.) *sigh*
Maggie should be in Africa now. I talked to her by fingers on IM just as she was leaving for Heathrow. I can't wait to hear the bug stories she comes back with this time. Yeesh!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 649 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct 19, 2000 (20:23) * 2 lines 
 
Of course, all of you Aglophiles know it was England's green and pleasant land.
Oh my, is it ever! In the Poetry conference I have posted the entire poem by William Blake in his very own topic. I was going to post the one about Stonehenge but could not find a copy. Can anyone help me with the title of that poem of Blake's?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 650 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Oct 19, 2000 (21:07) * 1 lines 
 
lemme do some checking!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 651 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct 20, 2000 (18:00) * 3 lines 
 
Ok!!

Remember my idly thinking of all the gems fund in North Carolina and wondering how I could get there to look for some examples for my collection?? Things have been happening - I will be moving to North Carolina permanently in the near future - as soon as possible. I have met something better than the volcano...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 652 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov  1, 2000 (20:21) * 18 lines 
 
I have found what I need instead of an emerald for my birthstone:



Dresden Green Diamond
Click for larger image
From India, the 41-carat Dresden Green Diamond is the
world's largest and finest natural green diamond, noted for
its exceptional color and clarity. White diamonds (both
large and small) in gold and silver settings surround the
central gem and sweep up to a bow. The Dresden Green
is a fitting exhibit partner for the Hope Diamond; both are
similar in size, setting, and natural history, and are fabled
in their cultural history. October 13, 2000 through January
10, 2001, Second floor, Winston Gallery, Smithsonian.


Larger image http://www.mnh.si.edu/images/exhibits/dresden_big.jpg


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 653 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov  1, 2000 (20:24) * 1 lines 
 
Actually, the British Museum of Natural History has an emerald green diamond but it is only about half carat in size. That's ok...I'll be modest about it. They also have a ruby-red one, and all sorts of other wondrously coloured diamonds, any of which I would not turn away.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 654 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Nov  7, 2000 (15:59) * 5 lines 
 
How rare are colored diamonds? I know that they can be very valuable.

Marcia, you really shouldn't turn down a emerald either. As they tend to be rare, at least the good color and clarity ones are. I've seen some emeralds of beautiful green color in estate jewelery, but some of the newer pieces seem to have stones which are a bit pale.

The Dresden Green Diamond. Now that is a stone with class.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 655 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov  8, 2000 (17:29) * 3 lines 
 
Apparently, from those I have seen on home shopping jewelry-thons, not all that uncommon in Russia, where all of theirs seem to have come from. I almost wish I had gotten a clear medium turquoise one I saw. Mounted in a most unattractive way, it must have been lovely in person. Deep clear rich colors are rare in any stone. I imagine diamonds are much the same. I would imagine that is why the greatly esteemed British Museum's and the Smithsonian's Gem collections (not to mention the American Museum's) have such tiny examples on display. I rather liked the Dresden Green. I have a tourmaline that exact color set in heavy silver as well as a deep green one set in gold.

No, I shall not turn down an emerald. Perhaps, rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind, but this lady hangs onto her specimens.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 656 of 845: Rob Glennie  (AotearoaKiwi) * Sat, Jun  2, 2001 (03:08) * 6 lines 
 
Hi all

Another precious rock is greenstone. It is very highly valued by Maori and used in stone works often to stunning effect. A scale replica of the America's Cup has been done in greenstone and I personally think it is more beautiful than the Auld Mug itself. It can be found for the most part only in New Zealand and
I am not sure how readily available it is.

Rob


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 657 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Jun  2, 2001 (10:08) * 1 lines 
 
hi rob, know where we can see a picture?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 658 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun  2, 2001 (21:16) * 1 lines 
 
I was just going to look for one! I like the greenstone better than Jade actually. It is stunning. As an emerald baby, I like it especially well. Off I go to hunt down some greenstone on the web. Thanks Rob! *Hugs*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 659 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun  2, 2001 (21:21) * 1 lines 
 
http://www.aotearoa.co.nz/greenstone/gallery/vine.htm But will not post image since it is a Wyoming Nephrite stone he used. For amlost $14,000 I want teh real stuff from New Zealand!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 660 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun  2, 2001 (21:26) * 9 lines 
 
for a mere $47,000+ you can have some stunning work - modern Maori renderings:

These unique carvings are the first and only rendering of the Taurapa and Tauihu in pounamu (jade).

Price: US$47,520.00
includes packaging, posting, insurance

http://www.aotearoa.co.nz/greenstone/gallery/waka.htm
Still looking for the Auld Mug in Greenstone. Wolfie, I think I have found my birthstone! (Don't care for emeralds I can afford!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 661 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun  2, 2001 (21:29) * 33 lines 
 



TIKI GREENSTONE CARVING

On his first visit to New Zealand Captain Cook
displayed considerable interest in the hei-tiki.

They were not common at this time, but when he and
others came to New Zealand on later visits hei-tiki
were plentiful and freely offered for barter.

Obviously the Maori appreciated the wants of the
European and were quick to develop the market, for
from this time on hei-tiki were manufactured by he
Maori as trading commodities to exchange for metal
tools and other articles that the visiting sealers and
whalers could supply. The demand was high but fresh
supplies of raw stone were not easily obtained, and
so with the promise of iron tools many faithful adzes
were converted to hei-tiki.

Of course not all were intended for trading, and many
treasured heirloom hei-tiki have accumulated much
prestige and have passed through several generations
of Maori families to the present day.


Aotearoa Special
Greenstone tiki
US$1,375.00




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 662 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun  2, 2001 (21:39) * 3 lines 
 
http://www.themulcher.co.nz/interviews-helen-out.html

Still looking for that photo - fobidden to take same. Very odd story at the above website. Rob, are these off-the-wall guys for real? I can't wait to hear this story!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 663 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun  2, 2001 (21:42) * 5 lines 
 
Rob's right - it IS spectacular! http://www.mountainjade.co.nz/americas%20cup.htm






 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 664 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Jun  2, 2001 (22:49) * 1 lines 
 
what is the hardness and stuff? it does remind me of jade! thanks for the pics, marcia *hugs*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 665 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun  2, 2001 (22:53) * 35 lines 
 
It is actually Nephrite Jade - about 7 but VERY tough!!!

POUNAMU
(GREENSTONE) & (NEPHRITE JADE)

The scientific name is Nephrite Jade, commonly
known as Greenstone in New Zealand, but its
native name given by the Maori people is
‘Pounamu’.

Pounamu is found only on the South Islands
Westcoast within New Zealand, in two main areas -
Hokitika (the Pounamu Jade Capital) in North
Westland and in the inaccessible bush below
Jacksons Bay - South Westland.

Pounamu, although predominately green shades
also has many other colours in new Zealand,
ranging from white to the blueish/greys of
‘Inangha’ to many shades of brown as seen in the
‘kokopu’ Pounamu.

Nephrite Jade is found in many countries around
the world. But only the Nephrite Jade of New
Zealand can be called Pounamu as this is its native
name for its own native stone.

This guarantees the purchaser that they are buying
only genuine New Zealand made products from
native stone as opposed to the many foreign jades,
imported and sold in New Zealand under the
pretence that it is New Zealand Jade/Greenstone.






 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 666 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun  2, 2001 (22:55) * 14 lines 
 
Since you asked:
http://www.canadianrockhound.com/2000/02/cr0004201_nephrite.html


Nephrite is a tremolitic amphibole with the formula
Ca2(MgFe)5Si8O22(OH)2 – calcium iron magnesium silicate. The essential
feature is fibrous tremolite. Although nephrite is a tremolitic amphibole, not
all such material is necessarily nephrite, which by definition is
characterized by randomly oriented bundles and sheaf-like groups of
twisted fibers. Tremolite and ferro-actinolite form a series for the calcic
iron-magnesium amphiboles, tremolite being the Mg end member and
ferro-actinolite the Fe end member with actinolite in between. According to
F.C. Hawthorne, if the composition is not known, the term tremolitic
amphibole should be used.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 667 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun  2, 2001 (23:15) * 5 lines 
 
Yes!!! I need this little Botryoidal Jade specimen for my collection - this guy has way more than his share!



(Just kidding, for those who might think I am that material-minded!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 668 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun  2, 2001 (23:16) * 2 lines 
 
the above image comes to us from the Great White North -
http://www.canadianrockhound.com/2000/02/cr0004203_botryoidal_jade.html


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 669 of 845: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Tue, Jun  5, 2001 (13:27) * 12 lines 
 
Finally I found a pic of an African Malachite and copper bracelet I was given in Gambia. See last pic on this page .....

http://gifts24.com/g/k/key.html?keywords=birthstones

Here's some more malachite items
http://www.crystallica.co.za/mall/malachite1.asp

Malachite is said to strengthen the heart and circulatory systems of the body.
It has been used to treat cholera, asthmatic diseases, and thyroid gland diseases. It is said to balance the body and mind.

It is a copper ore by product. The green color comes from the copper. It forms
in a botryoidal or stalactitic form which when cut, gives the agate-like banding or swirling patterns. The hardness is 3.5 - 4.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 670 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jun  5, 2001 (13:46) * 3 lines 
 
I have a big chunk of Malachite and a small polished egg-shaped piece. It is beautiful stuff but don't go eating it. There are a lot of toxic metals in there. Copper is the New-Age wonder drug. I guess it works as well as you believe it will. Like magnets... Your bracelet is Lovely!

Rob! Is that Greenstone mug about the way it looks? Scroll back to see the image.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 671 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Jun  5, 2001 (19:15) * 3 lines 
 
Didn't the ancient Egyptian use powdered malachite as eye make-up. Okay, it did have a practical purpose in keeping down the glare.

Maggie, the bracelet is beautiful.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 672 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jun  5, 2001 (21:34) * 1 lines 
 
They also used powdered azurite and lapiz for blue. Green has always been a very difficult pigment to obtain...blue even more costly. Next time you check the Old Masters out, notice that all blue you see is powdered Lapiz Lazuli. Those Old masters were painted using finly powdered stone for their color with egg white or some other glue medium added to make it stick to the wall/paper/wood.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 673 of 845: Rob Glennie  (AotearoaKiwi) * Wed, Jun  6, 2001 (00:57) * 5 lines 
 
Hi

That is the one. I want it!!!!!!!!!!!! LOL.

Rob


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 674 of 845: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Wed, Jun  6, 2001 (10:06) * 1 lines 
 
(Marcia, gotta go out tonight ...E's birthday pressie ... going to the play of the Hobbit ..so won't be on IM ..got your message OK)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 675 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jun  6, 2001 (14:11) * 3 lines 
 
Enjoy, Maggie!

Rob, like asking how to get to Carnegie Hall, they said "practice!" Either you have to learn how to sail (I can crew pretty well!) or learn how to carve. Neither one sounds all that easy. I am delighted you finally got here to see the results of my feverish web searching. I want you to have it, too!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 676 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Jun  8, 2001 (15:55) * 1 lines 
 
Marcia, about those Old Masters and the egg tempera. The pigment was mixed with egg yolk in some cases. I once took an art class in which we were going to try to mix our own egg tempera. It stinks, literally, the rotten egg smell, sulfur. What a wonderful advance linseed oil was. Although, the bright, jewel-like colors attained with egg tempera were and are remarkable.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 677 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun  8, 2001 (17:04) * 1 lines 
 
The trouble with egg-tempera was the bugs liked it too. The Last Supper was done in that medium and it has survived in pretty bad condition as a result. Cutting a doorway through the middle of it did not help!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 678 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sat, Jun  9, 2001 (10:53) * 1 lines 
 
Not to mention humidity and air polution.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 679 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun  9, 2001 (15:43) * 1 lines 
 
Oh heavens, you cannot believe what traffic emissions are doing to marble and limestone buildings and statues. Acid rain is sloughing off grain by grain of the stone till nothing but a rounded blob exists where once was lovely carving.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 680 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sat, Jun  9, 2001 (16:03) * 1 lines 
 
That's a big problem in Athens, especially. Yet another in long line of indignities heaped upon the Parthenon.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 681 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun  9, 2001 (17:49) * 1 lines 
 
Yes, sadly. And no matter what one may think of the eventual disposition of the Elgin Marbles, they in fact would not exist if they had not been taken to the British Museum! Athens needs to build a climate controlled building such as the BM has done to house them before they disappear into a crumble upon their return to the place of origin.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 682 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sun, Jun 10, 2001 (13:10) * 1 lines 
 
Very true.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 683 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Jun 24, 2001 (14:47) * 1 lines 
 
gem day on qvv is today!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 684 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun 24, 2001 (19:39) * 1 lines 
 
OOOOOOH Wolfie!!! Find anything you NEEDED??? I am sure there is a spot in your jewelry box that needs filling. Mine is bare!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 685 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jun 25, 2001 (17:49) * 1 lines 
 
definitely!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 686 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun 25, 2001 (23:15) * 1 lines 
 
*pacing and waiting for that UPS delivery* (or do they use something else these dats) just in case your definitely was too irresistible to refuse *;)))


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 687 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jun 26, 2001 (17:39) * 1 lines 
 
no, it should be UPS and it was supposed to be here today *frown* but it will be here this week.....waiting as patiently as possible!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 688 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jun 26, 2001 (18:50) * 1 lines 
 
*sigh* Hugs, Wolfie!!! Pace along with me! I am IM'ing an elusive English archaeologist while I tend Geo... Yup, but not B.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 689 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jun 26, 2001 (20:40) * 1 lines 
 
oooooooooh...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 690 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jun 26, 2001 (22:14) * 2 lines 
 
Oh yes! Most fascinating. Now, if only he would talk about archaeology once in a while...! Wolfie, we have the most important Inner Birthday to celebrate
tomorrow. Pull out all the stops! Tiramisu made by US for the celebration!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 691 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Jun 29, 2001 (19:09) * 1 lines 
 
my ring is here!! it is a beautiful (humongous-is that spelled right, it looks weird) london blue topaz. i mean, this ring is screaming "i look fake" because of its size. will get a pic out as soon as i hear from terry about my ftp file. it is way bigger than i was expecting but doesn't look too bad. and the stone is positively a deep sky blue and appears flawless to the naked eye! i'm so excited!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 692 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun 30, 2001 (19:08) * 1 lines 
 
Gianormous, is it??!! Oooh Wolfie send it to me and I will ftp it to my site for you !!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 693 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Jun 30, 2001 (20:11) * 1 lines 
 
marcia, i'm talking a big oval stone! i'll scan it for you!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 694 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun 30, 2001 (22:00) * 1 lines 
 
Yay!!! *drooling copiously* *pacing, too*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 695 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun 30, 2001 (22:01) * 3 lines 
 
Wolfie!! Where did it go? I went to grab dinner and you have nipped off to bed leaving me whipping my email download button so it gives me your image. Waaaaaa

Is it in my ftp files??? Gonna go look!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 696 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Jul  1, 2001 (13:25) * 1 lines 
 
no sweetie, i fought and fought with it and couldn't get the pic to come out right. am gonna try again (and in the meantime, i'll see what images i got and select one for you)......


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 697 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul  1, 2001 (13:35) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks! I posted a few photos I took on my birthday visit to Kilauea instead. So I remember how to do it. I gather you are gonna keep it? It sounds incredible!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 698 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Jul  1, 2001 (13:50) * 2 lines 
 
the pic is on the way and it does not justice!



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 699 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul  1, 2001 (17:46) * 1 lines 
 
It is stunning and very classy (just as are you!) I would have chosen that, too. It is indeed lovely. Post it in Geo 8.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 700 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Jul  1, 2001 (18:46) * 3 lines 
 
dunno if this is gonna work but here goes nothing!

London Blue Topaz


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 701 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Jul  1, 2001 (18:46) * 2 lines 
 
so it didn't work *waaaaaaahhhh*



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 702 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Jul  1, 2001 (18:52) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 703 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Jul  1, 2001 (18:52) * 2 lines 
 
ok, the big fat red x!



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 704 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul  1, 2001 (19:48) * 5 lines 
 
Here you are - your magnificent ring:






 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 705 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul  1, 2001 (21:11) * 1 lines 
 
All we need is a Wolfie in there for scale...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 706 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul  1, 2001 (21:13) * 1 lines 
 
hmmmm...she DID say it was a VERY LARGE stone... maybe Wolfie is hiding in there!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 707 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Jul  1, 2001 (21:33) * 1 lines 
 
*laugh* thanks marcia, the stone is roughly 1/2" long and a little over 1/4" wide. should've put a ruler next to it, huh?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 708 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul  1, 2001 (22:00) * 3 lines 
 
...or a penny or a dime for size. Most people are aware of US currency sizes.

sounds like a 6mm by 8mm stone! Lovely size! I have a deep steel teal blue spinel in that size and it is a knock-out. Set in a many-pronged setting in sterling silver (I set it.) Yours is prettier!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 709 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jul  2, 2001 (17:59) * 1 lines 
 
it has sky blue enameling on the sides which really brings out the color of the stone. AND it looks different inside than outside.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 710 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jul  2, 2001 (17:59) * 1 lines 
 
i'll have to remember the currency scale!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 711 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jul  2, 2001 (18:05) * 1 lines 
 
marcia, have you heard of dying stones? i'm really curious as to how they got this stone such a stunning blue! the shop says they don't knowingly buy stones that have been enhanced this way (!!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 712 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Jul  2, 2001 (18:16) * 1 lines 
 
You're ring is beautiful, Wolfie.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 713 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jul  3, 2001 (21:30) * 1 lines 
 
thanks cheryl! i still can't believe it's mine and have to look at my hand a lot. but the picture does it no justice, you just have to see it IRL! i feel like a queen wearing it!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 714 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul  5, 2001 (14:40) * 1 lines 
 
They IRRADIATE it to get the color. They begin with colorless topazes and nuke them. The more intensive the color the more radio-active they are. And will remain. We discussed this some time ago when you were buying your magic (was it called that?) stone ring of the mult-hues of purple/green. Please do not buy matching ear studs and wear them continuously, or you could end up with a very unlesasant result. I need to look at your ring more closely - I did not see the enamelling.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 715 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Jul  5, 2001 (16:52) * 3 lines 
 
my ring is radio-active? like in nuclear fallout? euw!!!!!

(the other one is Mystic Fire)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 716 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul  6, 2001 (00:29) * 1 lines 
 
Ok, we have done some trouble-shooting on your Mystic Fire and it is heat treated to create that effect. Your Tpoaz...Yup! You are probably not going to be harmed by it, but the deeper the color the more radiation it was subjected to. Walk it past your friendly neighborhood Geiger counter and see if it responds.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 717 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Jul  6, 2001 (09:17) * 3 lines 
 
euw!!!!!

ok, can we talk about opals for a sec? a friend was given one that has the black background glued to the bottom. is there anything special she needs to do (as in cleaning her stone)? also, does it mean she received a cheap stone? (unbeknownst to her gift-giver, i'm sure)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 718 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Jul  6, 2001 (16:18) * 1 lines 
 
I have a small opal on a pendant. I put a little mineral oil on it every year, which is supposed to keep the stone from drying out. It doesn't seem to have harmed it.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 719 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Jul  6, 2001 (16:46) * 1 lines 
 
i've heard of oil enhancing a stone but not actually for keeping it "healthy"....i checked out her stone but couldn't tell what was used as the backing. did some reading and found that black onyx is used as a backing. hmmmm....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 720 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul  6, 2001 (19:38) * 1 lines 
 
Mineral oil is also good for Emeralds. You must not let your opal dry out. It is trapped water that gives it the iridescence. Fire opals often use black onyx for the doublet back.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 721 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Jul  6, 2001 (20:02) * 3 lines 
 
well, this was a white stone (like the common opals in jewelry stores) but the black backing brought out more of the fire. the patterns appear geometric but i don't think it's an imitation.

marcia, i'm worried about my topaz now! *yikes* i thought it was just heat-treated (though i remember our earlier discussion if irradiation). i've read that these treatments can be reversed naturally (time) or synthetically (more heat).


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 722 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sat, Jul  7, 2001 (15:23) * 1 lines 
 
Does heat treating result in giving clear topazes a pink color? I'm just about due to give my opal its "drink".


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 723 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Jul  7, 2001 (16:15) * 1 lines 
 
i think the heat treatment and irradiation is to turn clear stones blue. the pink topaz is rare but i did read that most pink topaz is heat-treated yellow topaz. but, yellow topaz is valuable too. marcia, what do you think?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 724 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul  7, 2001 (23:58) * 1 lines 
 
Let me check and get back to you - pink topazes are really rare - they are usually sapphires and tourmalines. Be back as soon as I can round up the information.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 725 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sun, Jul  8, 2001 (14:49) * 5 lines 
 
Thanks Wolfie and Marcia.

I was wondering about aquamarines. It seems that blue topazes have replaced them in recent years. I know that they are chemically very similar to emeralds, although the emerald is precious stone and the aquamarine semi-precious. Have aquamarines increased in value, becoming if not precious, atleast pricier semi-precious stones than they were?

About those pink sapphires, aren't they rubies that didn't quite make it?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 726 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jul  9, 2001 (21:15) * 24 lines 
 
Everything corundum of gem quality is a sapphire... unless it is RED. Then and only then, if it is clear intense red (not pink,) it becomes a ruby. The price also will tell you the difference!

Auqamarines of good quality and color are becoming rarer and rarer. What they are selling now is barely colored compared with my childhood aquamarine. The are beryls just as are emeralds. I prefer the aquamarine!

Orange and Pink Topaz

Deep orange, yellow and pink topazes are true rarities Gentle heat can
intensify – or even change – the color provided by nature

There was a time when orange, yellow and pink were the only colors that
came to mind when we thought about topaz. It wasn't until we learned to
harness irradiation that we could create the bright blues that most people
associate with topaz today. But the warm colors – orange, yellow, pink – are
still available and are now often called Imperial or precious topaz, a
description some feel adds value.

Even these warm colors are usually enhanced, but with heating, not irradiation.
Heating to about 450° F transforms a brown component in topaz that contains
chromium into orange, pink or, less often, subtle violet. Topaz from Ouro
Preto in Brazil is routinely heated to achieve pink in a process called "pinking."
In his book Gemstone Enhancement, Kurt Nassau says the colors resulting
from heating are considered stable.

More... http://www.professionaljeweler.com/archives/articles/1999/may99/0599fys2.html


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 727 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jul  9, 2001 (21:30) * 3 lines 
 
*laugh* so we could throw in our colorless topaz into the oven and bake at 450 we'd get a pink or orange topaz!! *laugh* you know someone must've tried this....

thanks for the info marcia!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 728 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 10, 2001 (19:04) * 15 lines 
 
I'll hang mine over a lava flow next time I get close to one. Mine is pretty small and it is set in gold which will have vaporized by then... What I won't do for science!




Picture represents a range of 19th
century pink topazes, the sizes range
from 2 to 7 carats and priced from
£80 (US$135) to £200 (US$340) per
carat.

These stones are from Ouro Preto in
Brazil.

http://www.ukgems.freeserve.co.uk/pg000028.htm


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 729 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jul 10, 2001 (21:31) * 1 lines 
 
i've also read that some pink topazes are so pink that they are almost rubies. how do they tell them apart then? do they use a color refractor or whatever that thing is called?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 730 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jul 10, 2001 (21:32) * 2 lines 
 
closed that center tag!



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 731 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jul 10, 2001 (21:32) * 1 lines 
 
well, i thought i did



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 732 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 10, 2001 (21:36) * 3 lines 
 
Topaz is softer than corundum on Moh's scale!

Thanks, Wolfie, for closing my center tag. Oddly enough I think I am getting *help* from way up there. When I create the center command I also create the close center command lest I forget it. I also know I closed the bold on another post elsewhere in Geo but had to repeat it twice more to get back to normal. Either Yapp is having problems or Geo is being *blessed* by her creator!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 733 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Jul 11, 2001 (17:57) * 1 lines 
 
i meant to say that pink sapphires can be so pink that they're like rubies! that changes the answer, huh?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 734 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 11, 2001 (19:07) * 1 lines 
 
To be classified Rubies rather than Pink Sapphires, they must be of a Pigeon Blood red. Even cloudy and chips mounted as side stones are this deep red color. Pink sapphires usually contain a differing mix of metallic salts to create their rosy color. But, Let me check on that. Stay tuned while I consult the experts for a definitive answer.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 735 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Jul 11, 2001 (21:05) * 5 lines 
 
my gem book didn't say anything about how a pink/red corundum gets classified as a ruby or sapphire.

i have white sapphires but they get dirty awfully quick. they surround a dark blue oval sapphire (like Di's engagement ring). the blue sapphire has an inclusion in it that is really dark and i think that's just fine! at least i know it's real! *laugh*

though i buy most of my gems from QVC, i'm disappointed that they cannot offer anything in alexandrite. even a beautiful simulated stone, i'd be happy with that and they buy in such quantity that the savings are really passed on to you. (unless i'm brainwashed *grin*) ah well, guess i'm gonna have to wait for those millions to roll in! *laugh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 736 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 12, 2001 (00:36) * 6 lines 
 
I am opting for a lab-grown ruby-to-emerald Alexandrite. If I am not changing my *status in life* then I shall stoop saving up for the eventuality that was never seriously intended.

This may help you - tons of pictures. Technically, if it is not Deep red corundum, it is NOT a ruby. I suspect many are buying pink sapphires sold as rubies, but the red hue is all wrong. I can tell one a mile away. They have a pinkishness even in the deepest colors which tinges on the purple side rather than the deep red with slight brown overtones if any at all. NO pink in my Ruby and I have my mother's baby ring to prove it! I also have a lab grown lazer ruby cut as a gemstone. Only beautiful red in that one. So clear and big...and gaudy!!! It is set all wrong!

Click on picture for what the stone really is and how it got that coloring. Their heat treated rubies are ghastly! I love the oblong cut tourmaline!
http://www.simplysapphires.com/red.html


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 737 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Jul 12, 2001 (17:32) * 1 lines 
 
well between rubies and emeralds, i'm not pleased with how they look. all the stones i've seen are cloudy (and dirty looking) and the clearest stones are simulated.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 738 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 12, 2001 (20:24) * 1 lines 
 
The lab-grown alexandrites? Look at last year's ~*~*~celebrations~*~*~ you-know -where and see the one I posted as a gift for the Birthday present. It is brilliantly clear and changes to those two colors!!! A single stone!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 739 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Jul 12, 2001 (21:29) * 1 lines 
 
no, i mean the real rubies and emeralds. i would gladly take a lab-grown alexandrite!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 740 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 12, 2001 (22:45) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 741 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 12, 2001 (22:47) * 18 lines 
 



These photographs show the remarkable color change exhibited by fine Alexandrite. The photo on the left represents
an
Alexandrite indoors under an incandescent light, while the one on the right shows a color change when viewed in
sunlight.

Alexandrite, birthstone for June, has long been sought after for its incredible ability to actually change color
depending on
the light source! In daylight Alexandrite will be a green to blue/green color; yet indoors under an incandescent light it
will
become a violet/red to purple. We are offering two qualities of Natural Alexandrite. Our highest quality AAA
Alexandrite
will have very good and distinctive color change and will be only lightly included. Our more affordable AA quality
will still
have good color change but the colors won't be quite as pure or the gem will be more included.



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 742 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 12, 2001 (23:04) * 1 lines 
 
I want that one ! It doesn't have to be that big...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 743 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Jul 13, 2001 (22:54) * 1 lines 
 
went to a jeweler's today to have a couple of stones' settings tightened and they had a large simulated alexandrite. the lady took it out and i put it on and stared at it and then saw the price tag and gulped then gave the ring back. it was nearly $4000. had a nice colorplay--could see raspberry and emerald colors in it but because of the indoor lights, did not see the actual color change. i was surprised she even entertained me. i wasn't dressed for a ritzy jewelry store! but, i was wearing that big topaz and flashing it around! *laugh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 744 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 14, 2001 (00:39) * 1 lines 
 
Harry Winston never turned away people because the least assuming people dress that way on purpose - they do not with to be kidnapped nor robbed. The jeweler is wise and for $4000, I would want to see blood red to total green with no mixing except for situations of mixed lighting!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 745 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Jul 14, 2001 (09:05) * 1 lines 
 
exactly!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 746 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 18, 2001 (15:51) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 747 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 18, 2001 (15:53) * 6 lines 
 
Earthquakes Reveal Diamonds' Origins

The seismic rumblings could provide key clues about where miners should look for diamonds, according to recent research. Matt Fouch, assistant professor of geological sciences at ASU, studies vibrations caused by earthquakes to visualize the earth at depths of hundreds of kilometers, where diamonds are formed. His maps of the earth below South Africa provide new information about
Earth's structure in regions where many diamonds are found.

More in Geo 9


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 748 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sun, Jul 29, 2001 (13:59) * 1 lines 
 
Are there any diamonds there in Mme. Pele's abode below Hawaii?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 749 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul 29, 2001 (17:42) * 1 lines 
 
There is nothing worth anything in our volcanoes. Even our peridots are too small to be considered gems so they are called olivines. We are too fluid so we cool down really fast. It takes slow cooling to make large crystals of anything. We do have a large silica content so it makes wonderful art glass for artisans with furnaces hot enough to remelt the cooled cinders.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 750 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 30, 2001 (19:08) * 4 lines 
 
Wolfie, where are you? I just turned down a cholcolate and white diamond ring!
I'd have had to pay for it, of course, and I just paid for an expensive tolerance gift he was greedy enough to demand. Now he thinks I could stoop being pushed around by "everyone" (he should have included himself at the top of the list) and that I would buy myself ANYTHING I want.

Do you get Http://www.ShopNBC.com??? Look at the offerings currently on "Dreams of India."


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 751 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Nov 30, 2001 (19:12) * 1 lines 
 
never heard of a chocolate and white diamond ring! i'll go there now (how DARE he!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 752 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Nov 30, 2001 (19:26) * 3 lines 
 
well, i've just come from there and they were showing the cognac/white diamond ring. 18K white gold for $1999 (over 3 carats)........wow!!

found a black and white diamond ring at QVC in 14K white gold (3/8th carat, though) for $400.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 753 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 30, 2001 (19:27) * 3 lines 
 
That what John Burnett said when he told me to get him one three years ago. He didn't get it. Our Holidays are a standoff-off of hostility. But, this I will get for him. A parting shot, perhaps. I hate being beholden to him for even the smallest morsel of food.

Do you get shopNBC on your television? They are showing it now. Not really my style ring. my fingers are way too small for that. I still want those teal ones. *Sigh* Too bad probate lasted so long.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 754 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Nov 30, 2001 (19:29) * 1 lines 
 
i saw shopNBC on the computer (it actually worked) so i had to go to iqvc to see if they had anything similar. the ring is really big. did you see the blue topaz with floating diamonds? how they did that, i just can't figure out!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 755 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 30, 2001 (19:30) * 1 lines 
 
I don't like the black ones, particularly. I am holding out for a colored diamond with sparkle... and an RED-GREEN Alexandrite !!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 756 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Nov 30, 2001 (19:30) * 1 lines 
 
me too!! when i saw the picture of the classic black/white, i kept thinking about saw blades and bits!! *laugh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 757 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 30, 2001 (19:31) * 1 lines 
 
I'm looking at the topaz with the foating diamonds right now! Amazing!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 758 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 30, 2001 (19:33) * 1 lines 
 
They hollowed out the part below the stone's table on the side where the mounting will hide the little hole.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 759 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 30, 2001 (19:35) * 1 lines 
 
but it is too much for me... I am more classic in style. Don't need diamonds inside my topazes! But, did you see the really bad-loooking $17,000 watch they had on the other night - by Harry Winston?! Shudder!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 760 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Nov 30, 2001 (19:50) * 1 lines 
 
no, sure didn't. this is the first time i've ever seen shopNBC, didn't know it existed!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 761 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 30, 2001 (21:48) * 2 lines 
 
If you want to watch the truly huge and unusual stones and settings, watch it. I do it during ads in football games. The Black diamonds were pretty....a very glossy black. They do not LOOK like diamonds, though. The ring and earrings were pretty. I hated the pin. It would have looked lovely with my long silk tunic and slim pants formal pajamas. Now, if only I had a place to wear them.
Wolfie, I need to take a run over to your side of the Specific Ocean (as my son used to call it) and we can flash our goodies at the commoners in the City of the Angeles.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 762 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 30, 2001 (21:50) * 1 lines 
 
They also have wonderful colors of Sapphires. I just might get a green on for my birthstone. And, my daugther-in-law's birthstone is a Sapphire. Will just any color do?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 763 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Dec  1, 2001 (13:55) * 1 lines 
 
a sapphire is a sapphire.....the ones other than blue or white are a little more unusual so maybe any color will do....


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 764 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec  1, 2001 (14:45) * 1 lines 
 
True!!! I suspect she is like any of us. Even a stray velvety Tanzanite would please her. She loves purple! I am an equal opportunity jewel-fancier. Different items for different days. Now, if only I had someplace to wear them.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 765 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Dec  1, 2001 (19:17) * 1 lines 
 
don't have to....wear them because you can!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 766 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec  2, 2001 (14:24) * 1 lines 
 
YES!!! That's my Wolfie! Ever ready to aid and abet the satisfication of my cravings. I do the same for her! *HUGS* Wolfie, remember! We are getting these for out progeny, not out of selfish gratification. A-hunting I shall go!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 767 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Dec  2, 2001 (19:46) * 1 lines 
 
that's exactly right! besides, who else is gonna spoil us rotten? and it's to further our studies of the earth!! *laugh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 768 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec  2, 2001 (20:49) * 1 lines 
 
Yes!!! Geology is what it's all about! Did you doubt it?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 769 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Dec  3, 2001 (20:35) * 1 lines 
 
not for a second!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 770 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (15:52) * 1 lines 
 
A sapphire is a sapphire, unless said sapphire is red. In which case it is a ruby and worth more (monitarily) that it's other colored cousins. The reason I'm bringing up rubies is because Valentine's Day is almost here. Although, most jewelry stores advertise that they are selling laboratory created rubies. So perhaps I should have mentioned this at the man-made stones topic.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 771 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (16:54) * 5 lines 
 
Ah yes! Good thinking! Absolutely right about the sapphires being sapphires unless they are rubies.

Cheryl, it is SO good to see you posting again. *HUGS* you amuse, educate and make me think all at the same time. Painlessly!

Every girl need a ruby in her collection. Mine is my mother's "little girl" ring (too large to be a baby ring.) Then there is my inexpensive but flawless laser ruby cull ring set in Mexican silver. I think there is a family jinx on garnets, though they are a special favorite with me.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 772 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (17:03) * 1 lines 
 
I have several garnets, they are my birthstone. Fortunately, I love garnets. This girl is still working on getting that ruby, however.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 773 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (17:12) * 1 lines 
 
My Birthstone is an emerald. What I can afford I don't like (I've seen better jade!) And, the clear ones made in a laboratory are so bright green that I am certain I have nothing to go with them. If only my mother had held out for 18 hours longer...


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 774 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (17:34) * 7 lines 
 
You could have had the alexandrite or the pearl! Both very beautiful, although pearls are delicate. You're right the only emeralds which seem to have good color and clarity command nosebleed prices. The best emeralds seem to be in vintage jewelery. They have the famous emerald color, deep green with the slightest hint of blue.








 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 775 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (17:53) * 3 lines 
 
Ah yes.. you said the magic word. Alexandrite. I want one which turns from emerald to ruby. I already have a grade B set in white gold whihc turns from troumaline green to amethyst.

YES!! the hint of blue and depth of color is what sets truly precious emeralds apart fom all the rest. Most are in museums or the crown jewels of somewhere. I remember a National Geographic which showed the fantastic specimens in the Shah of Iran's collection. Staggering!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 776 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (18:50) * 3 lines 
 
oh, we are talking alexandrite again! i found a nice sim. one in a catalog--will have to check that again...

both rubies and emeralds have turned me away because of their cloudiness. and the clear ones look fake to me. maybe because they are so bright. don't think i've ever seen a precious emerald before.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 777 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (20:52) * 5 lines 
 
The bright gaudiness of the lab-created ruby and emerald also give me squinges. I'd rather not wear jewelry than to wear such things. I am also not big on inky sapphires which look like bad onyx than real blue stones.

I'll see if I can find the Shah's emeralds. he had a "cigarette" box made out of single slabs of emerald of incredible color and clarity. Absolutley amazing.

Alexandrites still rule my heart. How majestic and amazing even my humble stone is! (The other one is still waiting unset for the June baby who really earned it. *hugs*)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 778 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (21:11) * 7 lines 
 
i have several sapphires and only one that has a large inclusion in it. makes the stone very dark. it is surrounded by white sapphires (ala princess diana)and let me tell you, that ring gets dirty looking really quick. a friend thought it was a $9 ring you see at wal-mart outside the jewelry department! at least the inclusion reminds me that it is indeed a "real" stone.

now, let's clarify for others--simulated can have different meanings. lab-created means that the stone was grown under controlled conditions so a lab-created gem will have very few inclusions (flaws). simulated can mean glass or any number of things to represent a precious gem (colored australian crystals come to mind). though crystals are real, when they are colored and treated as a gem, they are not the gem they represent, just a colored crystal. and though i like crystals, i'd rather it be labeled as such and not play upon the ignorance of innocents who want a real stone but don't know what to look for.

lab-created does not mean fake-just grown under ideal conditions and not in the natural environment-thus very clear sapphires, rubies, and emeralds (and all sorts of other gems). since these clear pure colored stones are very rare and expensive, those who want a stone without inclusions who cannot afford the price may enjoy the lab-created beauties (i would not snub a lab-grown alexandrite if the color change was good).

marcia, anything to add or to correct? *HUGS*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 779 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (21:25) * 8 lines 
 
Excellent idea, Wolfie! By Lab created I mean they actually crystallize the same components of natural gemstones and control both the color and size and coditions so they turn out flawless. What makes precious emeralds so exquisite is the internal flaws inherent in the stone natually. Chemically, lab-created gemstones and natural ones are identical. Only the price tells the difference.

However... Lab created can also mean entirely invented stones which never existed in nature. Cubic Zirconia comes to mind. Beautiful and flawless and able to be made in almost any color, the best ones blaze like diamonds.
Hmmm.... suggestions for how we differentiate between the lab invented and lab grown stones? Perhaps by using the terms "invented" and "grown" The above discussion of alexandrites and my laser ruby are lab-grown specimens.

Wolfie, somewhere in here is the same alexandrite - grown in a lab - in natural light (green) and under incandescent light (red). I can't find it this evening but love this little gif of an alexandrite:




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 780 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (21:26) * 2 lines 
 
*sigh* please see the color change on the above stone:
http://www.gemstone.org/gem-by-gem/english/alex.html


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 781 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (21:30) * 4 lines 
 
another natural color change http://www.indygem.com/alexandrite.htm

Chatham created Alexandrite and more information:
http://www.gemstones.com/amulet_bin/menu/gems/cralex.html?0Py9qr7Vi2E


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 782 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (21:32) * 2 lines 
 
The alexandrite like mine is simulated on Chatham's website:
http://www.chatham.com/offers.html


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 783 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (21:37) * 5 lines 
 
i've always thought of cubic zirconia and diamonique as lab-created diamonds--that they were grown in a lab as stated and are natural just not naturally made (i.e., in the ground). maybe gemographers need to set up a new system of labelling now that we are technically far more advanced than many of the gem books out there...

gibson's opal is a good example of a fake opal (not a lab created one). but talking about opal brings up the question of dubelets and triplets---what exactly does that mean? i know that a triplet opal has a more brilliant color display but my book doesn't really explain how they do it.

oh, and it is important to mention that a gem of a type mined in different locations are different. don't let anyone tell you that there is no difference between stones mined in one area versus another. yes, they are the same stone but different areas have different factors that affect their gem growth--marcia, we talked about garnets from different areas and their colors but now i can't remember the names of them. but not all garnets are deep red and that has to do with their chemical make-up and what they were exposed to (different for different regions though their chemical properties remain the same).


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 784 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (21:39) * 1 lines 
 
(am sleepy but will be back tomorrow--nighty night! *HUGS*)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 785 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (21:50) * 5 lines 
 
Diamonds are pure carbon. Pure crystals of organic carbon - the building block element of all life.

CZs are zirconium crystallized. Hard and brilliant but not a 10 on Moh's scale and are twice as heavy. get a large stone set in a ring and it rotates around your finger annoyingly. They do create pure diamonds but they are much more expensive than natural diamonds are.

Nighty-night, Wolfie! *HUGS* it's been fun. Look back around post 48 or so. Oh my!!! I wonder if he had it done!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 786 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (21:55) * 3 lines 
 
Doublets are flat dark layers on which a slice of opal is set then polished. It brings out the color. Usually done with black backing and fire opals. This is standard practice for opals and it is both legal and it stabilizes the stone.

Triplets are a worry. Some clear stones are just a slice of top faceting, a table of clear stone (as in white sapphire) then a bottom faceting of lesser quality of the top stone. This is to simulate the higher-valued top slice. This is highly illegal. The setting hides the joins around the "table." Beware and know your jeweller!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 787 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Feb 11, 2002 (16:31) * 1 lines 
 
The image of the alexandrite you posted is beautiful, Marcia. Yes, I can see the color change.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 788 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 11, 2002 (19:07) * 3 lines 
 
It took longer than I expected it to take when I first posted it. It was not until I entered the url for it that I realized it did work. I think I will actually never get anything more to adorn myself. Simplicity seems much more appealing when I live in a very chaotic house. Want some "Stuff?" Have I ever got tons of it and it doesnot even belong to me! Never mind...

Still, the Alexandrite is beautiful. We'll see; there are many new things in my life taking priority.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 789 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 11, 2002 (19:25) * 1 lines 
 
just start carrying bits and pieces to the curb and/or the goodwill store.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 790 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 11, 2002 (20:01) * 1 lines 
 
He carries them back as quickly as I do unless it is MY things I am throwing out.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 791 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 11, 2002 (20:06) * 1 lines 
 
doesn't he have a job? *laugh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 792 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 11, 2002 (20:25) * 1 lines 
 
NO!!! He is in his 70's. He is just under foot.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 793 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 11, 2002 (20:25) * 1 lines 
 
oh!! *laugh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 794 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 11, 2002 (21:51) * 1 lines 
 
I'll not go into details, but many of us are prisoners of sorts in our own homes. I free my soul here. Or in the minute picking and sorting of stones which have great beauty and clarity. I have not noticed this beofre, but some of these olivines are quite green and some are more chartreuse. I love the Green ones!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 795 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Feb 12, 2002 (16:47) * 1 lines 
 
(isn't chartreuse a bright green?) *HUGS* sweetie!!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 796 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 12, 2002 (18:08) * 3 lines 
 
Yup, it is a light olive green.
I'll borrow this image until I can ftp it to Spring.



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 797 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 12, 2002 (18:12) * 4 lines 
 
We have two whole beaches made of olivine crystals. This is not a good picture but it does show that it is green!


http://www.mauibound.com/photos_greensandbeach1.html


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 798 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 12, 2002 (18:14) * 3 lines 
 
Olivines on the beach close up




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 799 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 12, 2002 (18:15) * 2 lines 
 
Actually that is exactly like what my little collection looks like!
http://www.paccd.cc.ca.us/instadmn/physcidv/geol_dp/dndougla/SAND/SandPile/GrnSand.htm


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 800 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Feb 13, 2002 (17:08) * 1 lines 
 
Green sand! I knew that there was a very famous black sand beach on the island of Hawaii, but the green sand is new to me. I know that Bermuda has its famous pink sand. So the green sand beaches are actually comprised of tiny gems. Has anyone ever considered using the green sand in glass making?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 801 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 13, 2002 (18:36) * 1 lines 
 
Good question about making Olivine glass. I didnot know but I found several websites offering what they call olivine glass. From the appearance, it seems to be oliving-colored glass and not actually made of them. I suspect the melt temperatures would be extrememly high compared with glass.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 802 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Feb 13, 2002 (18:40) * 1 lines 
 
i would think of glass on the beach too because of the heat and sand (silica)....are olivines peridots? (thanks for the pics)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 803 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 13, 2002 (18:44) * 21 lines 
 
all Peridots are olivines, but not all Olivines are peridots. Peridots are the flawless gem-quality stones. A bit of really boring chemistry follows:

Abstract: From 1994 through 1998, the eruption of Klauea, in Hawai'i, was dominated by steady-state effusion at Pu'u 'O'o that was
briefly disrupted by an eruption 4 km uprift at Napau Crater on January 30, 1997. In this paper, I describe the systematic relations of
whole-rock, glass, olivine, and olivine-inclusion compositions of lava samples collected throughout this interval. This suite comprises
vent samples and tube-contained flows collected at variable distances from the vent. The glass composition of tube lava varies
systematically with distance and allows for the "vent-correction" of glass thermometry and olivine–liquid KD as a function of
tube-transport distance. Combined olivine–liquid data for vent samples and "vent-corrected" lava-tube samples are used to document
pre-eruptive magmatic conditions. KD values determined for matrix glasses and forsterite cores define three types of olivine
phenocrysts: type A (in equilibrium with host glass), type B (Mg-rich relative to host glass) and type C (Mg-poor relative to host glass).
All three types of olivine have a cognate association with melts that are present within the shallow magmatic plumbing system during this
interval. During steady-state eruptive activity, the compositions of whole-rock, glass and most olivine phenocrysts (type A) all vary
sympathetically over time and as influenced by changes of magmatic pressure within the summit-rift-zone plumbing system. Type-A
olivine is interpreted as having grown during passage from the summit magma-chamber along the east-rift-zone conduit. Type-B olivine
(high Fo) is consistent with equilibrium crystallization from bulk-rock compositions and is likely to have grown within the summit
magma-chamber. Lower-temperature, fractionated lava was erupted during non-steady-state activity of the Napau Crater eruption.
Type-A and type-B olivine-liquid relations indicate that this lava is a mixture of rift-stored and summit-derived magmas. Post-Napau
lava (at Pu'u 'O'o) gradually increases in temperature and MgO content, and contains type-C olivine with complex zoning, indicating
magma hybridization associated with the flushing of rift-stored components through the eruption conduit.

http://www.nrc.ca/cisti/journals/mineral/tcm-23939-2.html


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 804 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 20, 2002 (18:03) * 26 lines 
 
Lab Created Diamonds is a process involving Great pressure and ver high temperatures. John understands this far better than I do, but I found an intersting little discussion about it here:

Diamonds have been grown using high-pressure & high-temperatures using
an appropriate but proprietary flux (the first successful technique)
and by low temperature, low pressure methods where the diamond is
grown by decomposition of a gas and epitaxy crystal growth on an
appropriate substrate. I suppose either process could be classified as
growth by diffusion.

The first method is generally used to produce the crystals used in
grinding, cutting, polishing, etc. The latter method in general is
used to produce substrates for the semiconductor industry.

Neither method is used for the commercial production of gemstones
although gemstones can be produced by either method.. The reason that
gemstones are not produced by either process is a matter of economics
not as some would have you believe some sinister plot on the part of
large corporations to use devious methods to make a profit. I have
held in my hand synthetic diamonds over a carat unfortunately such
gems are too costly to make and probably never will appear as a
marketable item. The money is in industrial diamonds, "the little
thingies" are indeed quite profitable.

http://yarchive.net/chem/diamond.html




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 805 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 20, 2002 (18:06) * 76 lines 
 
For John who will never need to come here and read our comments on jewels:

A team in Sweden made the first artificial diamonds on Feburary 16, 1953. They subjected graphite to 83,000 atmospheres and
unspecified heat generated by a thermite shell (barium peroxide & magnesium). They repeated their work on May 24 & Nov 25, and
had the Nov 25 diamonds verified by an independent diamond expert. Strangely, they made no announcement until 1955, after the GE
team's announcement, and provided no process details until Lundberg published a 1960 retrospective, so nobody had a chance to
duplicate their efforts. They only produced a fraction of a carat of tiny diamonds, and their secret efforts to perfect the process were
scooped by GE's public announcement in 1955, so they abandoned the project (well, actually, they sold out to deBeers). As a result of
these misjudgements, they get no credit for the discovery but are "relegated ... to little more than a historical footnote."

At GE, a six-man team worked on the project for several years. GE's Herb Strong thought he had made diamonds on Dec 8-9, 1954.
He started with carbon powder, iron foil & seed crystals, cooking them overnight at 50,000 atm and 1250 deg C (with some mysterious
temperature excursions due to a faulty controller). The team found 2 crystals of dubious origin (could've been the seed crystals)
embedded in the iron foil. One of the other team members said that they then "wasted weeks" trying unsuccessfully to repeat the
experiment.

Only a week after Strong's run, GE's Tracy Hall made diamonds on Dec 16, 1954. He started with graphite, iron sulfide & seed
crystals, but he needn't have bothered with the seed crystals. Cooking his sample at 100,000 atm, 1600 deg C for only 38 minutes, in a
press different in design from Strong's, he made a mass of tiny diamonds. The experiment was successfully repeated by Hall and by
independent GE researchers -- and by Percy Bridgman, who'd been trying unsuccessfully for years to make diamonds at Harvard. GE
patented Hall's process, the Dept. of Commerce slapped a secrecy order on it, and so although they could announce the discovery in
1955, they couldn't disclose any details.

Hazen suspects that the GE team had made diamonds before then, but hadn't really known what to look for. The GE samples that
would confirm this have been lost through carelessness, and so the world will never know.

(Here's an interesting tie-in to the "glass flows" thread: metallic hydrogen. Hazen talks for a chapter about the search for metallic
hydrogen. He discusses how the research team of Mao and Hemley got tantalizingly close in September 1989, detecting a phase
change at 2.5 million atmospheres and room temperature, where the hydrogen turned dark, a predicted first step towards metallization.
They repeated the experiment several times and published an article, but they called it "dark hydrogen" because they weren't ready to
go all the way and call it metallic hydrogen.

The Internet is a wonderful thing. At http://www.llnl.gov/PAO/NewslineStories/Hmetallization.html is a story of how Lawrence
Livermore researchers were able to make metallic hydrogen at 1.4 million atmospheres and 3000 deg K. The pressure was lower than
expected, probably because the temperature was higher. The researchers also reported that hydrogen at 3000 deg K is a liquid metal.
So we're still looking for solid, metallic hydrogen.)

An intriguing paragraph in the closing pages of the book hints at something that could indeed "bankrupt deBeers"! In 1991, in the midst
of the buckyball craze, a French trio headed by Manuel Nun~ez Regueiro quietly reported that they had made diamonds from
buckminsterfullerene. The process is so simple and cheap that, if/when it is commercialized, anybody with a good banker can make
diamonds.

Here's the recipe:
1. Buy some C60 buckminsterfullerene. A few dollars per pound. If you

can't buy it cheap, then make it:

1.Generate soot from graphite or other carbon sources
2.Wash soot in benzene to extract the C60 - it turns the benzene red
3.Evaporate the benzene to get hexagonal C60 crystals 2. Squeeze the C60 to 200,000 atmospheres at room temperature. No iron

needed, no heating. 3. Wash the product in concentrated nitric and other acids. RINSE WELL. 4. Et voila`.

Hazen says:

Many chemists predict that buckeyballs will soon be available for
a few dollars per pound. If so, it may well usher in a enw era
of diamond making. As the French team wrote in their Nature
article, "The high efficiency and fast kinetics at room
temperature suggest the possibility of using this transformation
for fabrication of industrial diamonds." Fast, cheap, no
complicated heating requirements, just a simple squeezer to
synthesize pounds of diamonds - buckeyballs could become a
diamond maker's dream.

Suppose that buckydiamonds could be made of a size and quality to rival natural gemstones. (Nun~ez's first one was clear and yellow,
not black, so it's possible.) Then suppose that these buckydiamonds could be subjected to the computer-aided cutting and polishing
currently under development at Cambridge. I can see how deBeers would be either worried ("now anybody can make diamonds!") or
excited ("lower manufacturing costs means more profits!"). It all depends on how people more important than me play their cards.

Regards | "It does not do to
Ray Depew rrd@fc.hp.com | leave a live dragon out of
Integrated Circuits Business Division | your calculations."
Hewlett Packard Co, Fort Collins, CO | -- Tolkien

http://www.urbanlegends.com/science/diamonds_are_a_scientists_best_friend.html


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 806 of 845: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Feb 27, 2002 (12:38) * 10 lines 
 
I am late but present. Some experiments need time and preparations...
I followed the above recipe and the instructions today.
It was not so easy. I became three times black and two times orange after equal number of explosions. (You see, I am too obstinate by nature). Finally, products of last explosion are...


They are devoted (without additional comments) to those of you who love jewels and diamonds.
(Do not imagine that I was smoking during this experiment. Do not try it anyway). *Hugs*

John



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 807 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 27, 2002 (13:01) * 1 lines 
 
Oooh John, You did a splendid work in creating raspberry diamonds. Hmm, I would mount them for you if you wished to wear them or bestow them on a treasured individual. The color is amazing. I KNOW you understand the physics and difficulties in achieving such great pressures and temperatures. Next you will assure your place in history by growing your diamonds and jewels already faceted and polished. *Hugs* Absolutely beautiful.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 808 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 27, 2002 (21:50) * 1 lines 
 
Obstinate? Oh No John! You are Determined to succed. You are wonderful but I worry about you and those explosions. When I first talked to you, your refractory ovens had done the same thing to you! No diamonds or anything else would be worth this. The price is simply too high and you are irreplaceable!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 809 of 845: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Mar  5, 2002 (05:10) * 10 lines 
 
Hello,
A combination for those of you, which they love Jewels and Archaeology.


Gold jewellery from a grave at Homolion (3rd century B.C.).


From

John



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 810 of 845: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Mar  5, 2002 (05:12) * 5 lines 
 
I am sorry,
The above is from The Athanassakeion Archaeological Museum of Volos.

John



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 811 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar  5, 2002 (16:24) * 3 lines 
 
I noted that Volos has several museums worthy of time to spend studying their treasures. Thank you for sharing these with us. These are Absoutely magnificent and ageless in their appeal. Both the container and the ornaments are perfect in every detail. *Sigh*

Thank you for the link! I will "walk" the halls to see what the centaurs of Pelion left behind when they all disappeared into the mists of time.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 812 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Mar  5, 2002 (18:29) * 1 lines 
 
what a beautiful thought--thanks john, those pieces stood up well to the sands of time (note the pun *giggle*)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 813 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar  5, 2002 (20:56) * 1 lines 
 
I'd be happy to model them if they need volunteers!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 814 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Mar  5, 2002 (21:41) * 1 lines 
 
i know, me too!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 815 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Mar 14, 2002 (17:36) * 1 lines 
 
They are exquisite, John. I love the detail on the golden ram's head.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 816 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar 14, 2002 (19:09) * 1 lines 
 
You are also volunteering if they need someone to model them?! It's hard to improve on perfection.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 817 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 30, 2002 (18:03) * 5 lines 
 
A bit of beauty from the Athanassakeion Archaeological Museum in Volos, Greece. I never cease to be astonished at what intricate chainwork and granulation such early jewelry had. Enjoy!



http://www.culture.gr/2/21/211/21113m/e211mm01.html


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 818 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 30, 2002 (18:04) * 4 lines 
 
NONONONo..... that is not the jewelry - that is of the ladies who wear it





 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 819 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Mar 30, 2002 (18:31) * 1 lines 
 
very nice example--it looks huge! (to go with the women, eh? *grin*)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 820 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 30, 2002 (19:44) * 1 lines 
 
*laugh* I guess! That's why Queen Victoria had such large....Jewels... My mother told me she needed something to wear there!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 821 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Mar 30, 2002 (23:42) * 1 lines 
 
*laugh*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 822 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Sep  9, 2002 (17:59) * 1 lines 
 
picked up a peridot and it's gorgeous. bigger than i thought it would be so it will be saved for special events. mounted in 14K and has accent diamonds. interesting--it looks like a ring guard. will find the pic and send it on! (it came from QVC and is certified)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 823 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Sep  9, 2002 (18:00) * 1 lines 
 
the link: http://www.qvc.com/asp/frameset.asp?nest=%2Fasp%2FIsItemNumberRedirect.asp&search=SQ&frames=y&referrer=QVC&txtDesc=J44523


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 824 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep  9, 2002 (18:36) * 1 lines 
 
OOOH, Don's birthstone. I'm glad you are treating yourself to something pretty. See Ventage. I am about to fall into little broken pieces.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 825 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep  9, 2002 (18:38) * 1 lines 
 
I REALLY like the setting, Wolfie. It is beautiful!!!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 826 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Sep  9, 2002 (22:01) * 1 lines 
 
read ventage, you just hold on sweetie and know that we've got your back!! *HUGS*


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 827 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 10, 2002 (19:07) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks, Wolfie!!! I know I am in good hands!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 828 of 845: Conf admin  (cfadm) * Wed, Mar  2, 2005 (15:39) * 3 lines 
 
http://www.semiprecious.com/Physical_chemical_properties.htm




 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 829 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  9, 2005 (17:24) * 1 lines 
 
This is the website I have been looking for, for ages. Fantastic and so easy to use. Many thanks for posting it. I have it bookmarked on my personal tool bar because I just got a whole bunch of semi-gemstones in matrix and need complete labels for them.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 830 of 845: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Mar 10, 2005 (07:00) * 1 lines 
 
in matrix?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 831 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar 10, 2005 (22:15) * 1 lines 
 
Yes, in matrix. The emeralds are especially beautiful and if not in the native rock of whence they came, they'd cost way too much to put in a collection such as mine. I have a generous and ardent admirer. Thank you, Lance. May we laong share this collection.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 832 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar 10, 2005 (22:17) * 3 lines 
 
Speaking of Lance, he says Geo 16 is not visible on his computer. Please check why that might be. This has happened before to other links. I wonder what else is missing...

He says that is why he has not posted anything in recent months (years !)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 833 of 845: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, Mar 11, 2005 (08:37) * 3 lines 
 
Have him try this link

http://spring.net/yapp-bin/public/read/Geo/16


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 834 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 11, 2005 (21:01) * 3 lines 
 
I should have suggested he try it. I'll even send him my favorite way to check for new posts:

http://spring.net/yapp-bin/public/read/Geo/16/new


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 835 of 845: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sat, Mar 12, 2005 (06:31) * 3 lines 
 
Both should work, keep us posted on the progress of this.

Did you ever answer my question about your connection speed?


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 836 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 12, 2005 (15:05) * 1 lines 
 
Sorry, I overlooked it in shame that I am the sluggard logging in at less that 56KB/sec Usually, here AOL (NOT my fault !!) logs us in somewhere in the 49KB range.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 837 of 845: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Mar 12, 2005 (21:10) * 1 lines 
 
terry, i've noticed some intermittant slowing when posting responses (on cable).


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 838 of 845: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Mar 14, 2005 (12:20) * 2 lines 
 
It may be our log files. I'
m on the case.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 839 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct  4, 2005 (23:50) * 3 lines 
 
We should carry on the rest of the Alexandrite discussion here or there won't be room for archaeology there !

Your ring is stunning. Even the created Alexandrites and expensive. I should just be happy and pretend the ones I can't afford do not exist. I'll keep watching though. After Christmas they might get a bit less expensive (no they won't!)


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 840 of 845: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (13:34) * 1 lines 
 
Hope springs eternal, maybe alexandrites will get a bit less expensive.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 841 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct  5, 2005 (14:01) * 1 lines 
 
I am hoping I live long enough for the Chatham patent to expire.


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 842 of 845: geomancer (cfadm) * Fri, Jul 14, 2006 (13:33) * 4 lines 
 
http://www.test.org.uk/archives/002503.html

Archives are imagined as dusty places; serried rows of boxes, books or film canisters shrouded in a fine, grey-white cloak. Like a physical manifestation of forgetting, dust settles on the obsolete, and its removal is symbolic of re-use – the archivist pulls a dusty tome from the shelf, blows across the cover, and as the cloud of dust disperses, the obscure knowledge within is alive once more. Dust is a metaphor for rejection, for failure or dismissal – we ‘eat the dust’, ‘dust off’ unwanted attention and ultimately ‘bite the dust’ . Vast amounts of the knowledge and creative output of the last century is fated to turn to dust; forgotten, unwanted and unknown.



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 843 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 22, 2006 (15:30) * 1 lines 
 
I just returned from the East stacks on floor 1 1/2 (Really!) at University of Kansas while a friend worked in the archives of a building nearby. Scholars know of archives. They tend to be low key and very protective of the priceless contents in their care. White gloves, no food or drink, and one item at a time are tne norm. You can consider yourself lucky if they allow you to make copies of them so be prepared to do a lot of typing. They are Awesome!


 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 844 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 22, 2006 (15:31) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 8 of 99 [Geo]: Precious Stones and Metals: Physical and Chemical Properties
 Response 845 of 845: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 22, 2006 (15:32) * 1 lines 
 
Oops hit the wrong button... not a first for me but the first in a very long time. The more people to whom archives are made available the better. I applaud the BBC project.

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