Prev topicNext topicHelp

Topic 9 of 99: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity

Sat, Jul 10, 1999 (23:39) | Marcia (MarciaH)
Earthquakes are monitored world wide. When the earth moves under you feet and you do not know why, look here for your local update.
639 responses total.

 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 1 of 639: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Jul 11, 1999 (17:31) * 1 lines 
 
Is there a site where we can find current faultlines?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 2 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul 11, 1999 (19:03) * 5 lines 
 
The quick answer is there is no good one that I know of but have sent the request to my family expert. Usually they appear as a line of earthquakes as in
http://www.geophys.washington.edu/CNSS/us.epi.gif

I will search it further. At this URL you will find links to your area which is about as stable as it is possible to get. Water is your enemy, not the earth beneath it! http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/QUAKES/CURRENT/current.html



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 3 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul 11, 1999 (19:15) * 19 lines 
 
For my current seismic activity for my location Check out the zoomable map at the bottom of the page.
http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/cgi-bin/quake/tako.wr.usgs.gov/db=usa/river=1/fed.=1

YY MM DD HH MM SS Lat Long Depth Mag Q Point of Reference
|| || || || || || ||.|| |||.|| ||.| |.| |

99/07/08 02:55:54 19.32N 155.09W 5.1 2.6MGN B* 5 mi. S of Puu O'O
99/07/08 03:04:16 19.33N 155.09W 2.3 2.6MGN B* 4 mi. S of Puu O'O
99/07/08 07:49:36 19.19N 155.45W 18.3 2.0MGN C* 2 mi. ESE of Pahala
99/07/08 16:38:48 19.73N 155.80W 0.9 2.4MLG B* 15 mi. ENE of Kailua-Kona
99/07/10 09:27:57 19.34N 155.13W 0.3 2.3MGN A* 4 mi. SSW of Puu O'O
99/07/10 12:53:58 19.33N 155.12W 3.3 2.2MGN C* 4 mi. SSW of Puu O'O
99/07/10 13:09:45 19.70N 155.82W 31.3 2.2MLG B* 13 mi. ENE of Kailua-Kona
99/07/10 15:52:23 19.36N 155.08W 1.4 2.3MGN B* 2 mi. SE of Puu O'O
99/07/10 22:44:05 19.49N 155.35W 14.7 2.0MGN A* 18 mi. WNW of Puu O'O
99/07/10 23:09:06 19.35N 155.07W 1.8 2.5MGN B* 3 mi. SE of Puu O'O
----------------------------------------------
<> Last update was on 10-JUL-1999 23:11 HST
------------------------------------------------


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 4 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul 11, 1999 (21:48) * 17 lines 
 
David has come through for me and here are his suggestions for fault maps:

There are several related sources. You may like the ABAG site with
forecast damage estimate maps:

http://www.abag.ca.gov/bayarea/eqmaps/eqmaps.html
and
http://www.geophys.washington.edu/seismosurfing.html

The best simple fault map is on the CA quake pages at:

http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/recenteqs/

Be sure to check the Bay Area version cause it has lots of what folks will
want to see.




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 5 of 639: lidya maccarthy  (livamago) * Tue, Jul 13, 1999 (22:08) * 1 lines 
 
Marcia, there was some seismic activity in Central America this weekend. Can you find the particulars? I had conflicting reports.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 6 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 13, 1999 (23:21) * 7 lines 
 
There were two Earthquakes in Honduras:

99/07/11 20:09:21 15.71N 88.51W 10.0 4.4Mb B HONDURAS
99/07/11 20:17:25 15.29N 88.38W 10.0 4.3Mb B HONDURAS

Maps and more information is available at
http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/cgi-bin/quake/


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 7 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 13, 1999 (23:21) * 7 lines 
 
There were two Earthquakes in Honduras:

99/07/11 20:09:21 15.71N 88.51W 10.0 4.4Mb B HONDURAS
99/07/11 20:17:25 15.29N 88.38W 10.0 4.3Mb B HONDURAS

Maps and more information is available at
http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/cgi-bin/quake/


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 8 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (08:35) * 3 lines 
 
Lisbon is in a seysmic zone, and after the "big one" in 1755 that was followed by a tidal wave and fires that dertroyed most of the city, we have never felt quite safe again.
There was a reasonably strong earthquake in 1968 (I'm writing from memory and haven't checked the particulars so cannot give you any numbers)but people say it "wasn't it", they still fear a bigger one!
I was very young and living in Madeira in 68, but woke up in the night and felt the quake.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 9 of 639: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (09:59) * 1 lines 
 
when my father was stationed in san francisco, we had an earth tremor. just a baby at the time, so i remember nothing about it.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 10 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (13:02) * 1 lines 
 
You need to move to a more active place than you are now...You have just about no chance of feeling a really fun Earth quake in La Belle Lousiana


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 11 of 639: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (17:31) * 1 lines 
 
no thanks, that's one experience i think i'll pass on (i mean, no guarantees, right?)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 12 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (18:32) * 1 lines 
 
The only guarantee is No Guarantees!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 13 of 639: wer  (KitchenManager) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (20:09) * 1 lines 
 
kind of like posting on the Spring...


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 14 of 639: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (20:13) * 1 lines 
 
so true, we're lucky to stay on topic!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 15 of 639: wer  (KitchenManager) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (20:49) * 3 lines 
 
we're lucky if we can still keep
it in sight while we're straying
away!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 16 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (20:56) * 1 lines 
 
That's odd. I thought we were posting on the Spring (as I drag my seismograph and stand along behind me...)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 17 of 639: wer  (KitchenManager) * Tue, Jul 27, 1999 (22:50) * 1 lines 
 
any conclusions yet?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 18 of 639: Karen  (KarenR) * Wed, Jul 28, 1999 (00:18) * 2 lines 
 
You have just about no chance of feeling a really fun Earth quake in La Belle Lousiana
Now hold your beignets! They could probably feel something from that New Madras fault. A long, long time ago, when I was visiting older sis in college down at U ofI, I got woken up by earth tremors coming from that region. Chicago can get them, so they probably head south as well.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 19 of 639: Karen  (KarenR) * Wed, Jul 28, 1999 (00:23) * 1 lines 
 
...unless it's too soggy down there


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 20 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 28, 1999 (10:55) * 3 lines 
 
(Karen)...unless it's too soggy down there
That's my guess. It mostly depends on your substrate. If you are on the same plate and the same portion of the bedrock, you will be able to feel a strong one from quite far away. It is on this principle that seismographs work. The ones at the epicenter are knocked off-line almost instantaneously with a local earthquake, so the magnitude and epicenter have to be extrapolated from the data obtained from the network of Seismic stations around the world. At the Hawaii Volcanoes Observatory, where ours are
located, the Good Friday quake in Alaska some years ago made a very impressive readout. I think it is still on display. However, that said, the New Madrid Fault quakes have changed the course of the Mississippi, so it just might have been felt in Lousiana, despite the dampening effect of the bog on which it sits.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 21 of 639: Karen  (KarenR) * Wed, Jul 28, 1999 (12:25) * 5 lines 
 
New Madrid, well, I knew it started with an M!! Strange though that I did a search on Yahoo! and an article there talked about the New Madras Fault as well. According to these two site, the fault cuts across 5 states, but none mentioned affecting Louisiana, excepting as you said Marcia the course of the Mississippi!!

http://www.ceri.memphis.edu/www/public_info/faultfacts.html

http://quake.ualr.edu/public/nmfz.htm


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 22 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 28, 1999 (15:48) * 1 lines 
 
Oh Karen..thanks for the links. For those not knowing, Madrid in Spain is not the way they pronounce it for the New Madrid Fault. This case is pronounced MAA-drid (accent on the first syllable.)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 23 of 639: Karen  (KarenR) * Wed, Jul 28, 1999 (16:22) * 3 lines 
 
I was going to mention the difference in pronunciation (as all foreign place names in the Midwest), but didn't think Geo was the place. ;-D Although, I would add another D in there. MAAD-drid.

My fav is upriver in Cairo, Il. You know how that's pronounced? BTW, we're relevant here as Cairo is along the fault line.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 24 of 639: Karen  (KarenR) * Wed, Jul 28, 1999 (16:24) * 1 lines 
 
Wolf could add the La. versions of French words, like the street names in Nawlins.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 25 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 28, 1999 (19:40) * 2 lines 
 
KAY row we all have our regional peculiarities. In Maine Calais is pronounced
Callous (like on the bottom of your foot!)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 26 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (03:16) * 1 lines 
 
WoW! I like to learn these things to. To talk of such places with the right pronunciation makes one sound *very* cool! (Like one has been there) ;-)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 27 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (11:47) * 1 lines 
 
(Fun, is it not!!) In Pennsylvania they are very capricious with their French place-names. Charleroi (Charles-le-Roi) is pronounced the French way (excepting the roi part which is pronounced roy), but DuBois is DOO bose. Amazing!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 28 of 639: Karen  (KarenR) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (14:01) * 1 lines 
 
In Wisconsin (or is it Michigan or maybe it's Illi-NWA), there is a Charlesvoix, pronounced: SHAR-le-voy. A little bit of both.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 29 of 639: Karen  (KarenR) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (14:08) * 1 lines 
 
Another: in Illi-NWA, we have a lot of French place names because of Joliet and Champlain--one of them was a Pere, forget which). South of Chicago, is Bourbonnais. Have heard it pronounced: Bur-BON-is and Bur-bon-aze.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 30 of 639: Karen  (KarenR) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (14:10) * 1 lines 
 
and Marseilles, which is of course: Mar-SAILS


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 31 of 639: Wolf  (wolf) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (17:51) * 1 lines 
 
well, and then there's nacogdotches and nacodetches (or something like that). in LA, it's nack-ah-dish and in texas, it's nack-ah-doe-chez. i think they're even spelled the same way!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 32 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (18:37) * 1 lines 
 
Ok, people, admit it. When you wear the cloth of kings (whether wide wale or narrow) you call it Cor-doo-roy or Cor-der-roy ...not Cord-Du-Roi


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 33 of 639: Wolf  (wolf) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (18:42) * 1 lines 
 
i call it yucky! *smile*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 34 of 639: Karen  (KarenR) * Thu, Jul 29, 1999 (19:25) * 4 lines 
 
oops, and it was Pere Marquette in that little canoe...

you call it Cor-doo-roy or Cor-der-roy ...not Cord-Du-Roi
depends on if it's been good or bad and if it's going to get any supper that night! ;-p


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 35 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 30, 1999 (00:03) * 1 lines 
 
*lol* how do you think up these comments! Especially after a ziooion hours a day doing this - like me - but I am almost brain-dead at this point.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 36 of 639: Karen  (KarenR) * Sun, Aug  8, 1999 (17:59) * 1 lines 
 
Being brain-dead is a requirement. ;-p


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 37 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Aug  8, 1999 (18:45) * 1 lines 
 
You know, I wondered about those electrodes they afixed to my scalp before turning this Conference over to my care. No business going on in here - I think I'll go up to the observatory and jump up and down on their seiso-cables. You see tourist and little kids doing that all the time. Very funny! And quite undetectable.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 38 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug 13, 1999 (14:14) * 3 lines 
 
Here is an excellent source of information for teachers (which also means parents) This particular issue is about Natural Disasters and overcoming
science myths (that is what they said!)
http://www.earthsky.com/Teachers/Booklet/natural_disasters.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 39 of 639: wer  (KitchenManager) * Fri, Aug 13, 1999 (23:34) * 2 lines 
 
I wonder if ratthing heard that...and what he'd
have to say on the topic of "science myths"...?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 40 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug 13, 1999 (23:41) * 1 lines 
 
I wondered about that, too. I was busy today so I did not check out the URL as thoroughly as I usually do...shall report tomorrow...stayed tuned!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 41 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug 16, 1999 (19:49) * 1 lines 
 
We have just experienced a 4.5 Earthquake. I thought a hurricane would be about all I needed to make my day complete...until now!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 42 of 639: Karen  (KarenR) * Tue, Aug 17, 1999 (18:12) * 1 lines 
 
Nothing on the 7.1 earthquake in Turkey? Get out of the Bath, Marcia! ;-o


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 43 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Aug 17, 1999 (20:42) * 2 lines 
 
I was waiting to see if anyone else was aware of it while I waited for Cal Tech to update their stuff and give me something more substantial to post. Willl check in again and post what I can find.



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 44 of 639: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Aug 17, 1999 (21:15) * 1 lines 
 
msn on line is reporting 1000 dead but the news says 2000 and thousands missing. they're having aftershocks and fear an even bigger quake during the night. let's pray not.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 45 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Aug 17, 1999 (21:31) * 158 lines 
 
Since the Earthquake resources are still not reporting anything, I went to The Times of London for information:
http://www.sunday-times.co.uk:80/news/pages/Times/frontpage.html?1319194

bul toll rises to more than 2,000

©
A young girl is carried out of the wreckage of her demolished
home in Istanbul after the quake yesterday
Photograph: AP


Turks call for
earthquake aid

BY ANDREW FINKEL IN IZMIT
TURKEY was counting its dead yesterday after a
major earthquake devastated western parts of the
country. More than 2,000 people are believed to
have been killed over a wide area from the
extreme western Istanbul suburb of Halkali to Asia
and the industrial city of Izmit about 60 miles to the
east. At least 11,000 are thought to have been
injured.

Survivors tore at mangled steel and concrete to
free loved ones, and officials asked the
international community to send sniffer dogs and
lifting equipment to help in the rescue.

The whole region shook for 45 seconds at 3.02 am
local time (1.02 BST) yesterday, driving millions of
people from their beds out into the street. Turkish
seismologists calculated the initial tremor at 6.7 on
the Richter scale. But the British Geological
Survey, Harvard University and other centres
around the world later calculated the magnitude as
at least 7.5.

The tremor was felt with violent intensity in the
capital Ankara, some 270 miles from the epicentre
in a fault segment running from Izmit to Lake
Sapanca.

Bulent Ecevit, the Turkish Prime Minister,
appeared close to tears during a visit to
devastated towns. "The loss is huge," he said in a
trembling voice."It is the biggest natural disaster I
have witnessed. May Allah help our state and our
people."

Most of the
those who died
were killed as
they slept when
substandard
buildings
collapsed. The
Istanbul
neighbourhood
of Avcilar, far
from the
epicentre, was
badly hit.

The stricken region also includes Yalova, Bursa,
Adapazari, Bolu and Eskisehir - an area which
defines the industrial and commercial heartland of
Turkey and to emphasise the point smoke billowed
from the country's main oil refinery at Izmet.

The naval base at Golcuk across Izmit Bay was
also badly hit. A handover of command ceremony
had taken place on Monday and many high-ranking
officers had decided to stay overnight. Twenty
bodies were recovered and more than 200 were
missing feared dead.

While most of the structural damage was to blocks
of flats, the early 16th-century Beyazid Mosque in
Istanbul was one of the few historical buildings to
suffer substantial damage.

Along the highway approach to Izmit, some
apartment blocks looked as if someone had taken
an axe to split them in two, and the force of the
quake turned one five-storey block in the town of
Korfez on to its side. Other buildings simply
collapsed one floor on top of the other with
mattresses and carpets sticking out at the end to
define the layers. The minaret on the town's
mosque lay draped over the building like a limp
sock.

Many of those trapped under the rubble were taken
to Izmit state hospital, which presented a scene
reminiscent of the Inferno. A car park littered with
bandages and surgical gloves was converted into
an emergency ward with relatives holding up
pieces of cardboard to shade loved ones as their
wounds were being stitched. Inside, three of the
four operating theatres were in constant use, even
although there was no city water and the
emergency electrical generator was not working.

The corridors of the hospital were filled with the
injured, while those not in a critical condition were
taken to the park across the street.

"I don't know if I should be thinking of myself or my
family," said a dazed 20-year-old sitting outside, a
saline drip suspended from a railing and his face
still caked in blood. He was one of the lucky ones
who had been rescued within the first hour and
brought in to have his arm, broken in three places,
mended. He had no knowledge of the fate of his
parents or younger brother, still missing in the
rubble.

Turkey has in the past been unwilling to accept
international assistance after an earthquake, but
Mr Ecevit, who was manning a special crisis
centre, made clear that there would be no such
reluctance this time. He urged international
organisations to be patient as there might be
logistical problems in getting aid to where it was
needed most.

He also urged Turks to refrain from using
bulldozers to clear the wreckage, warning them
that such powerful intervention might kill those
trapped in air pockets. "Some of our citizens who
lost their loved ones under wreckage demand
heavy machinery to clear it and save their relatives.
But if we do this we can lose more people than we
save. So we have to be patient and wait," he said.

Britain sent a team of 42 experts including
firefighters and those trained in search-and-rescue
operations, and other countries - including some
that have been at odds with Turkey - promised
help. Greece offered crews experienced in
recovering survivors from ruined buildings.

Bill Richardson, the US Energy Secretary, who
was in Istanbul, consulted his Turkish counterpart
about American assistance, and President Clinton
said: "Turkey has been our friend and our ally for a
long time now. We must stand with them and do
whatever we can to help them get through this
terrible crisis."

Two Britons were among the wounded, neither of
them with life-threatening injuries. A schoolboy who
had been listed as missing was found safe.

Next page: Andrew Finkel reflects on the tremor
aftermath



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 46 of 639: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Aug 17, 1999 (21:40) * 1 lines 
 
i believe we're sending in search and rescue troops out of virginia. the best in the country (not military). i can only imagine what contracting must be like over there right now (i.e., the military bases etc.) and i have a friend who will be moving there with his family next week. :(


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 47 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Aug 17, 1999 (21:44) * 1 lines 
 
You don't want to know...Those search and rescue teams with the sniffer dogs are veterans of the Mexico City quake and numerous others. They are the best in the world at that unhappy task. We can all be grateful that they are willing to do it.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 48 of 639: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Aug 17, 1999 (21:50) * 1 lines 
 
indeed, so!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 49 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Aug 18, 1999 (00:28) * 7 lines 
 
My son reports that a rode out a 5.0 earthquake in central California
MAG DATE LOCAL-TIME LAT LON DEPTH LOCATION
y/m/d h:m:s deg deg km
5.0 99/08/17 18:06:18 37.91N 122.69W 6.9 0 mi SSW of BOLINAS

More information is available at this URL:
http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/recenteqs/Quakes/quakes.big.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 50 of 639: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Aug 18, 1999 (10:31) * 1 lines 
 
the numbers in turkey are over 3500 dead and still 10's of thousands missing. from what i understand, none of the us military bases were hit.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 51 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Aug 18, 1999 (12:56) * 1 lines 
 
That is my understanding at this hour. Two sniffer-dog rescue units are there from the US...one from Virginia and one from Florida - to be joined by units from Japan and other countries, including Greece, its arch-enemy. In times like this, national disputes seem very petty, indeed!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 52 of 639: Karen  (KarenR) * Wed, Aug 18, 1999 (14:29) * 5 lines 
 
eh, eh, eh. Last night on the news, they said the largest contingent to come over was from Israel.

Having been to Turkey fairly recently (less than 2 yrs ago) I think the US AF bases are northeast from this area, along the Black Sea--as close as they dared to the former Soviet Union.

Am amazed that those historic buildings in Istanbul are still standing. 7.4 on the scale, they say.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 53 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Aug 18, 1999 (15:35) * 15 lines 
 
http://wwwneic.cr.usgs.gov/neis/bulletin/990817000138.HTML

99/08/17 00:01:38 40.69N 29.82E 10.0 7.4Mw
TURKEY

The following is a release by the United States Geological Survey, National Earthquake Information Center: A major
earthquake occurred about 55 miles (90 km) east-southeast of Istanbul or about 165 miles (270 km) west-northwest of
Ankara at 6:02 PM MDT, Aug 16, 1999 (Aug 17 at 3:02 AM local time in Turkey). A PRELIMINARY MAGNITUDE OF
7.8 WAS COMPUTED FOR THIS EARTHQUAKE. The magnitude and location may change slightly as additional data
are received from other seismograph stations.

At least 2,000 people killed, 10,000 injured, many missing and extensive damage in the Istanbul-Adapazari area.
Much of the damage and casualties occured in the provinces of Kocaeli and Sakarya. Felt as far east as Ankara.

There is discussion that the California quake David felt was the compression wave travelling around the earth (see diagram in above url.) Turkey is on a plate boundary, and any movement on a plate boundary makes all of the other plates move. The San Andreas fault quake yesterday in California is the result.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 54 of 639: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Aug 18, 1999 (18:00) * 1 lines 
 
amazing when you look at the mileage! turkey being so far away from california.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 55 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Aug 18, 1999 (18:41) * 1 lines 
 
I guess this big blue marble is not all that big. I have heard Earthquakes described as striking a bell or a gong. It reverberates for a long while before all of the oscillations fade into the background.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 56 of 639: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Aug 18, 1999 (20:51) * 1 lines 
 
i'm sure it does, just like ripples in the water...


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 57 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug 20, 1999 (20:48) * 1 lines 
 
Exactly analagous...


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 58 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Sun, Aug 22, 1999 (04:23) * 2 lines 
 
Do you have anything on Lisbon's fault and seismic history, Marcia? Apart from the 1755 earthquake.



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 59 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Aug 22, 1999 (12:13) * 1 lines 
 
I shall look it up - I am sure data is available, and with luck a plot of mapping of the faulting. Gives me something to do besides wring my hands over this hurricane about to assault Texas. Thank you for asking.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 60 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Sun, Aug 22, 1999 (12:44) * 4 lines 
 
You won't believe this but I give you my word it's true.
Earlier today there was a warning issued by the Maritime Authority that a giant ocean wave about 40 metres high was going to hit the Algarve (southern Portugal) coast. The beaches were evacuated, as were some restaurants and private homes. People gathered at high points to watch it appear.
I didn't hear of it until about an hour ago, found it peculiar (but exciting, I admit) and asked my DH to call the "Civilian Protection Service" to find out more.
Here's what we learned: the CPS had told the Maritime Authority to issue a warning that a heat wave of about 40ºcelsius would hit the Algarve this afternoon. Someone must have drunk a little to much at lunch and the warning came out as it did...


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 61 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Aug 22, 1999 (12:48) * 1 lines 
 
Too scary but funny! That is like the 40' lava wave that was going to sweep over Hilo as reported in mainland US newspapers. That is impossible. Lava moves pretty rapidly down slopes fresh from the vest, but not at 40' high and not sweeping...more like creeping. We did get a lot of phone calls, though. That is highly irresponsible reporting!!! Thanks for sharing, and stay cool!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 62 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep  7, 1999 (13:15) * 3 lines 
 
The current information on the Greek Earthquake has not hit The Times of London yet, and am waiting for more information from Geological sources. Updates as soon as I can find them.

99/09/07 11:56:50 38.13N 23.55E 10.0 5.8Mb A GREECE


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 63 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep  7, 1999 (16:10) * 27 lines 
 
From the BBC:

Tuesday, September 7, 1999 Published at 19:29 GMT 20:29 UK
Earthquake rocks Athens
An earthquake has shaken the Greek capital Athens, killing at least 20 people and leaving more than 100
trapped inside collapsed buildings. Three children are said to be among those who died in the tremor, which
struck around 1500 local time (1200 GMT) and was followed by a series of strong aftershocks.

Thousands of Athenians who were taking an afternoon siesta, fled into streets when the tremor occurred.
People were hit by falling glass, concrete and marble slabs. At least three were killed when a building
collapsed in the northern working-class surburb of Menidi.

Emergency services are trying to free 70 people trapped under a collapsed detergent factory in the northern
Tatoi suburb, one of the worst hit areas. A further 20 people were reported trapped in the ruins of a flattened
apartment building.

Reports say up to 100 buildings have been destroyed in the tremor. A government spokesman said many
people were trapped inside buildings and several dozen had been transported to hospital.

Cracks appeared in buildings in the historic Plaka district, but there was no apparent damage to ancient
sites, including the Acropolis and the Temple of Zeus.

The Athens Seismological Institute said the quake registered 5.9 on the Richter scale, and its epicentre was
20km (12.4 miles) north of the capital. Experts said the seismic shift occurred 5 to 10km below the ground.





 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 64 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Thu, Sep  9, 1999 (07:31) * 1 lines 
 
Is there a site where I can find a sort of map of the earth's seismic faults, Marcia?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 65 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Sep  9, 1999 (14:07) * 1 lines 
 
Still looking for that map. There are several with local locations - like around San Francisco, or California in general. Will check for one for Lisbon for you (Portugal? Elsewhere?)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 66 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Thu, Sep  9, 1999 (14:20) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks! What I really want to know is the relationship between Lisbon's fault and others. If there is such a thing.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 67 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Sep 10, 1999 (22:17) * 1 lines 
 
I will keep checking for the world-wide system, but All of the European coastline on the Atlantic is along the plate boundaries of the European Plate and the Atlantic Plate. By their very nature they grind and slide past one another as the earth fluctuates with celestial tugging by moon and sun. That is what caused the great quake in Turkey, recently.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 68 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Sun, Sep 12, 1999 (03:59) * 2 lines 
 
...And in Greece? And two years ago in Italy? why one place and not another? Shall we be next?
Stupid questions, I know, but we are worried. I guess only the events in East Timor have taken our collective mind away from that worry.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 69 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Sep 12, 1999 (14:13) * 2 lines 
 
I could answer your question better if I knew if they had strain meters along your part of the plate boundary, and whether or not there was evidence of strain building up in the rock beneath. I trust it is being monitored and you will hear far before it becomes life-or-death time. The problem with that is the panic factor. The powers that be in places like New York City, have said that fewer people would die from the earthquake they did not know was coming than from the panic ensuing trying to leave the
city if they did know one was imminent. Terrible though it might seem, that may be the only viable option with the populations centered as they are. Alas, anything bordering the Mediterranean is a natural for earth upheavals. Your only sure bet would be to move to the less populated outskirts of the city, and away from the coast.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 70 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Sep 12, 1999 (14:23) * 2 lines 
 
Ah, and your question, why in one place and not in another: Some places the rock is more fragile and fractures more easily...in others it is just a case of
when one large piece of something past another, each with great inertia. It hops rather than slides along, resulting in a big quake at the point of the hop. Sometimes this is entirely arbitrary where it occurs, but others have had the way paved by smaller ones which tend to lubricate the slide and make that area more prone to quakes. It is an imprecise science at best.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 71 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Sep 12, 1999 (16:35) * 2 lines 
 
There has been an EarthQuake swarm on Kilauea today so I am hoping to get up there to look around and see what is happening: From Quake Map:



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 72 of 639: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Sep 12, 1999 (18:32) * 1 lines 
 
that's a first for me, what's an earth quake swarm?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 73 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Sep 12, 1999 (20:03) * 2 lines 
 
They occur when magma is moving down the rift zone (a network of cracks in the volcano's structure)under the surface. It usually precedes an eruption by a little while (hours to days), and the park service closes off access to the public for their protection. As soon as the eruption takes place and stabilizes itself in a specific area, they open it to the public for viewing. It is one of the most exciting things I can think of doing - anywhere, any time.



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 74 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Mon, Sep 13, 1999 (13:52) * 3 lines 
 
Must be!
Thank you, Marcia, for looking for my "fault information".
There has been a new earthquake in Turkey this afternoon - have you heard?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 75 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep 13, 1999 (14:04) * 1 lines 
 
I had not. Thanks for the update. I just posted information about the ongoing activity at Kilauea volcano on Geo 2. Will post updates on both sites as the day progresses.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 76 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep 20, 1999 (15:20) * 1 lines 
 
A 7.6 EarthQuake has been reported in Taiwan. A tusnami Alert has been issued. More news as it becomes available.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 77 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep 20, 1999 (18:00) * 10 lines 
 
From http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/cgi-bin/finger?quake@gldfs.cr.usgs.gov
99/09/20 17:47:19 23.78N 121.09E 33.0 7.6Ms A TAIWAN
99/09/20 17:57:16 23.80N 121.34E 33.0 6.0Mb B TAIWAN
99/09/20 18:03:44 23.65N 121.36E 33.0 5.9Mb B TAIWAN
99/09/20 18:11:53 23.75N 121.19E 33.0 6.1Mb B TAIWAN
99/09/20 18:16:18 23.69N 121.31E 33.0 6.1Mb B TAIWAN
99/09/20 20:40:08 24.09N 121.95E 33.0 5.1Mb C TAIWAN
99/09/20 21:46:44 23.56N 121.10E 33.0 5.8Mb B TAIWAN

Looks like they have had a bad couple of hours...all of the earthquakes have been over 5.0 which is pretty lively.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 78 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep 20, 1999 (18:32) * 42 lines 
 
From the BBC ONline news:

A powerful earthquake has hit Taiwan, killing at least 20 people and causing
the partial collapse of a 12-storey hotel in the capital, Taipei.
Most northern parts of the island felt the effects of the quake, which has
been estimated at 7.6 on the Richter Scale.

But it struck in the early hours of the morning, so the full
extent of the damage and casualties is still unknown.
An official from the Ministry of the Interior told the AFP
news agency: "I'm afraid [there will be] more casualties
as many people are trapped in collapsed buildings."
Taiwan's weather centre says it is the strongest earthquake ever to have hit
the island.

In Taipei, rescuers are working at the 78-room
Sungshan Hotel, trying to pull survivors from the rubble.
At least two other buildings in the capital are reported to
have collapsed.

The US Geological Survey gave the preliminary
magnitude of the quake as 7.6 on the Richter scale.
Its epicentre is believed to be Nantou, an active earthquake zone in central Taiwan.

The earthquake which devastated Turkey last month,
killing more than 15,000 people, was measured at 7.4.
Warnings of tsunamis - tidal waves which often follow
earthquakes - have gone out for Taiwan, Japan and other
islands in the region, the Geological Survey said.

The quake, which struck at 1.47am on Tuesday (1747 GMT on Monday) caused
severe damage to infrastructure and buildings in several cities.
Power has been lost in large parts of northern and central Taiwan.
But the extent of the damage, especially in remote and mountainous areas, is
not yet known. Witnesses in Taipei spoke of continuing aftershocks,
buildings collapsing, objects falling off apartment blocks and people fleeing their homes.

Radio reports said the central city of Taichung might be the worst hit.
The city's mayor said: "This is one of the strongest earthquakes I have felt
in my life. Many buildings collapsed and there is damage to roads and
other infrastructure". The authorities have warned that, because of the
magnitude of the earthquake, aftershocks and tremors may be felt for the next two weeks.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 79 of 639: MarkG  (MarkG) * Tue, Sep 21, 1999 (04:36) * 3 lines 
 
The picture from the air of the collapsed hotel on the news was terrifying. I am hoping this was the only multi-storey building that collapsed, because if the hotel was just symptomatic, the Taiwan situation would look worse than Turkey. Amazingly, only 100 people were apparently in a 12-storey hotel overnight - seems strange?

In terms of comparisons with Turkey, if the numbers given so far as dead and injured are correct, I guess the buildings are constructed with quakes in mind.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 80 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 21, 1999 (15:30) * 2 lines 
 
Mark, thanks for posting! Those who know about these thing - structural engineers - say the difference between Turkey and Taiwan damage is due almost entirely to buildings on Taiwan being built to stricter codes. That hotel bent and torqued as seen from the air is an amazing and terrifying sight. I can imagine how terrible, having ridden a 7.2 quake here which lasted more than 30 seconds. It was like walking on the heaving deck of a ship as the ground undulated beneath my feet. It is an incredible f
eling, and one I do not need to have repeated in my lifetime, thank you!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 81 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 21, 1999 (15:35) * 1 lines 
 
According to the news, teams from Fairfax, Virginia complete with sniffer dogs and fiber-optics cameras are on their way to help search for victims. Teams are also in Taiwan from Japan and mainland China and other parts of the US. Karen, has Israel sent their top-notch team there, too? Have not heard as yet. Again, what a terrible job, and I am very thankful such competent people are willing to go and do it.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 82 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 21, 1999 (21:05) * 10 lines 
 
Earthquakes and aftershocks continue for Taiwan, and another for Turkey plus one in Portugal just after Gi has gone on holiday, and one for my son in Calidfornia
99/09/20 21:46:43 23.49N 120.93E 33.0 6.5Ms B TAIWAN
99/09/20 21:54:32 38.61N 9.34W 10.0 3.7Lg A PORTUGAL
99/09/20 21:54:49 23.64N 120.94E 33.0 5.4Mb C TAIWAN
99/09/21 07:06:06 23.85N 121.63E 33.0 4.8Mb C TAIWAN
99/09/21 11:49:46 44.84N 149.74E 33.0 5.6Mb A KURIL ISLANDS
99/09/21 14:11:36 13.80N 90.68W 33.0 4.5Mb A NEAR COAST OF GUATEMALA
99/09/21 14:21:03 33.16N 141.42E 33.0 4.6Mb B OFF E COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
99/09/21 15:42:48 35.80N 121.26W 5.6 3.6Ml CENTRAL CALIFORNIA
99/09/21 17:38:39 23.90N 121.29E 33.0 5.1Mb A TAIWAN


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 83 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 21, 1999 (22:21) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 84 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 21, 1999 (22:24) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 85 of 639: MarkG  (MarkG) * Wed, Sep 22, 1999 (02:55) * 4 lines 
 
Wonderful plate boundaries map, Marcia!
Does your previous list of today's shocks show Richter measures (Ms, Mb, Lg) or are the A, B or C for seriousness)?
How come Hawaii gets shocks - is it not safe in the middle of the Pacific plate?
What happens to the faultline in the Mediterranean, and the one that heads into Northern Siberia and stops there, do you think?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 86 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Sep 22, 1999 (12:04) * 12 lines 
 
The right-hand column is magnitude of the earthquakes on the Richter Scale.
According to the source page of those statistics:
DEPDepth in kilometers
MAG Magnitude, with method used to calculate it:
Ml local, the original Richter magnitude
Lg mblg or Mn, local or regional magnitude for the area east of the Rocky Mountains
Md duration
Mb body wave
Ms surface wave
Mwmoment
Q Earthquake Location Quality: A is good, B is fair, C is poor, D is bad



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 87 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Sep 22, 1999 (12:23) * 7 lines 
 
Since they remove the plate boundary EQ map when they update it, I am posting another one which is static, but still shows all of the boundaries:



As to why Hawaii has Earthquakes in the middle of a plate...we are unique in the world for that fact and that we have volcanoes. It seems to be a "hot spot" (as the technicians call it) and as the plate moves across it to the northwest, new islands are formed. Another is forming off of our southeastern flank, but don't contact your real estate agents just yet. It will be several thousand years before it shows above the suface of the sea. The earthquakes we feel are just from the settling of the rock m
sses after magma has left a void, or new magma is forcing its way to the surface. Having said that, the strongest EQ that I have been through - 7.2 mag - was from the plate movement across the hot spot.
I truly think a lot of the dynamics of the Hawaiian situation is not yet known and GPS, laser measured inflation rates (the mountains actually swell when fresh magma enters the upper levels), and other new techinques may shed new light on the causes. We KNOW all about the effects!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 88 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Sep 22, 1999 (12:24) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 89 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Sep 22, 1999 (12:31) * 1 lines 
 
Checking other sources about what happens to the Mediterranean plate boundary, it is there, but dives under other strata which have been forced onto it. I think it is the same for the Siberian boundary, as well. Close inspection of the map reveals the continuation of the boundary a few miles in front of the obstruction. (...at least, so it appears!)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 90 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Sep 29, 1999 (13:20) * 1 lines 
 
For a comparison of plate boundaries map above and global vulcanism, please check http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/read/Geo/2.58


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 91 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Thu, Sep 30, 1999 (04:53) * 1 lines 
 
Marcia, wonderful maps. I'm saving this one as well as the vulcanism one.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 92 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Sep 30, 1999 (12:36) * 1 lines 
 
I think they compliment each other...It would be great to have a wall-sized on for reference, I think...


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 93 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Sep 30, 1999 (16:58) * 48 lines 
 
TSUNAMI BULLETIN NUMBER 001
PACIFIC TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER/NOAA/NWS
ISSUED 30 SEP, 1659 UTC

THIS BULLETIN IS FOR ALL AREAS OF THE PACIFIC BASIN EXCEPT
CALIFORNIA, OREGON, WASHINGTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, AND ALASKA.

. . . A TSUNAMI WARNING AND WATCH ARE IN EFFECT . . .

A TSUNAMI WARNING IS IN EFFECT FOR:
MEXICO, EL SALVADOR, ECUADOR

A TSUNAMI WATCH IS IN EFFECT FOR:
PANAMA, PERU

FOR OTHER AREAS IN THE PACIFIC, THIS MESSAGE IS FOR INFORMATION ONLY.

AN EARTHQUAKE, PRELIMINARY MAGNITUDE 7.6, OCCURRED 30 SEP, 1631 UTC.
COORDINATES: LATITUDE 16.0 NORTH, LONGITUDE 96.8 WEST
VICINITY: OAXACA, MEXICO.

EVALUATION: IT IS NOT KNOWN THAT A TSUNAMI WAS GENERATED.
THIS WARNING AND WATCH ARE BASED ONLY ON EARTHQUAKE
EVALUATION.

ESTIMATED TIMES OF INITIAL WAVE ARRIVAL AT LOCATIONS WITHIN THE
WARNING AND WATCH AREAS ARE:
ACAPULCO,MEXICO 1703Z 30 SEP
MANZANILLO,MEXICO 1801Z 30 SEP
ACAJUTLA,EL SALVADOR 1828Z 30 SEP
SOCORRO,MEXICO 1849Z 30 SEP
BALTRA IS,ECUADOR 1949Z 30 SEP
BALBOA HTS,PANAMA 2150Z 30 SEP
LA PUNTA,PERU 2233Z 30 SEP

BULLETINS WILL BE ISSUED HOURLY OR SOONER IF CONDITIONS WARRANT.
THE TSUNAMI WARNING WILL REMAIN IN EFFECT UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.

RECIPIENTS OF THIS MESSAGE LOCATED IN CALIFORNIA, OREGON,
WASHINGTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, AND ALASKA SHOULD REFER ONLY
TO ALASKA TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER MESSAGES FOR INFORMATION
ABOUT ANY TSUNAMI THREAT IN THOSE AREAS.

David N. Little
Geologist
IT Corporation
Martinez, California



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 94 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Sep 30, 1999 (17:23) * 33 lines 
 
TSUNAMI BULLETIN NUMBER 3
WEST COAST AND ALASKA TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER/NOAA/NWS
ISSUED SEP 30 AT 1836 UTC

...THIS IS THE FINAL TSUNAMI ADVISORY BULLETIN FOR ALASKA,
BRITISH COLUMBIA, WASHINGTON, OREGON, AND CALIFORNIA ONLY...

NO, REPEAT NO, WATCH OR WARNING IS IN EFFECT.

AN EARTHQUAKE, PRELIMINARY MAGNITUDE 7.6, OCCURRED AT
0831 ADT ON SEP 30, OR 0931 PDT ON SEP 30, OR 1631 UTC ON SEP 30.
THE EARTHQUAKE WAS LOCATED IN THE GENERAL AREA OF:
SOUTHERN MEXICO NEAR 16.1N, 96.8W.

EVALUATION: NO DESTRUCTIVE TSUNAMI HAS OCCURRED.
NO TSUNAMI WAS RECORDED AT MANZANILLO, MEXICO.

NO TSUNAMI DANGER EXISTS FOR ALASKA, BRITISH COLUMBIA,
WASHINGTON, OREGON, OR CALIFORNIA. HOWEVER, SOME AREAS MAY
EXPERIENCE SMALL SEA LEVEL FLUCTUATIONS.
THE PACIFIC TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER IS CLOSING ITS INVESTIGATION
AND WILL ISSUE A FINAL BULLETIN.

THIS WILL BE THE LAST WEST COAST AND ALASKA TSUNAMI WARNING
CENTER ADVISORY BULLETIN ISSUED FOR THIS EVENT.
THIS INFORMATION IS ALSO POSTED AT HTTP://WWW.WCATWC.GOV.

David N. Little
Geologist
IT Corporation
Martinez, California




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 95 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Sep 30, 1999 (18:39) * 3 lines 
 
In Hilo, we do not take Tsunami warnings lightly. This is what Hilo looked like the day after the 1960 Tsunami. Information and more pictures from Hilo's very own Tsunami Museum: http://planet-hawaii.com/tsunami/

Suddenly I heard a shout, ‘Big wave!’ The streetlights around us exploded almost in the same instant. I looked up and saw a locally well known fishing boat coming up over the Wailoa Bridge" -- Susan Maeda Veriato on the 1960 tsunami in Hilo, as told to her son Travis [PTM Photo: Polhemus collection]


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 96 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Fri, Oct  1, 1999 (03:09) * 1 lines 
 
Wow! So this is what we would have had if our Giant Wave had been real... As it was, it didn't even fill the pool ;-)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 97 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct  1, 1999 (12:55) * 2 lines 
 
Indeed! What you cannot see is the human toll. People were washed out to sea, rescued and told terrifying stories to me. Others lost realtives. Our roofs were mostly sheet iron in those days, and the sheets slashed through the water slicing up houses, animals and people. Parking meters on sturdy metal posts were laid flat against the concrete in which they were set. That whole area in the picture has been made into parkland and soccer fields along the bay front and looks lovely. There is a memorial
set in the middle background to those whose lives were lost that April 1, 1960. Many more could have been saved had they not thought the warning sirens were an April Fool's Day joke!!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 98 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct  1, 1999 (13:01) * 1 lines 
 
It is never just one huge wave. Like the pebble dropped into a pond creates a series of wavelets around its impact zone, so does an Earthquake. It was the third or fourth wave that did the most damage in Hilo. The surging water does more damage as it moves inland, only to suck back out to sea whatever is loose and movable. The next wave deposits it far inland from whence it came. They are terrible waves, indeed!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 99 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Sat, Oct  2, 1999 (12:56) * 3 lines 
 
Indeed they must be. It is like those aftershocks in Taiwan, almost as ugly as the first quake.
I had no idea there had been a quake in Portugal just after I left for Tunisia... Read it here and then had it confirmed...
After so much earth motion this year I admit I am a bit worried.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 100 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Oct  2, 1999 (13:12) * 1 lines 
 
It is difficult to live in a place with a history of Earthquakes and NOT be concerned... That one in Portugal was minor and north of Lisbon, if I recall correctly...Was there much damage reported? I have seen no follow-up information.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 101 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Sun, Oct  3, 1999 (02:28) * 1 lines 
 
I think not much. It was felt in Sintra and thereabouts. Since I am now in the south I don't really have access to people from that area, but will check when I go back to Lisbon.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 102 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct  3, 1999 (18:56) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks - it would be interesting to know what the cause might have been, or was it just settling and creaking of the mantle or crust...?!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 103 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Oct 16, 1999 (12:40) * 27 lines 
 
***** UPDATE OF PREVIOUSLY REPORTED EVENT *****
== PRELIMINARY EVENT REPORT ==
Southern California Seismic Network operated by USGS and Caltech

Version 8: This report supersedes any earlier reports about this event.
This solution has been reviewed by KNK

Magnitude : 7.0 ME

Time : 16 Oct 1999 02:46:44 AM PDT
: 16 Oct 1999 09:46:44 UTC

Location : 32 mi. N of Joshua Tree, CA
: 47 mi. ESE of Barstow, CA
: 14 mi. SE of HECTOR (quarry)
: 4 mi. NE of the Pisgah Fault


Coordinates : 34 deg. 35.73 min. N, 116 deg. 16.09 min. W
Depth : 3.7 miles ( 6.0 km)
Quality : Fair
Event ID : 9108645

More information is available on the Worldwide Web at:
http://www.trinet.org/scsn/scsn.html




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 104 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Oct 16, 1999 (19:33) * 110 lines 
 
Recommended reading this site has three maps and a brief description of the earthquake early this morning in Southern CAlifornia: http://wwwneic.cr.usgs.gov/neis/bulletin/991016094644.HTML
*************************
From http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/recenteqs/Quakes/quakes.big.html

Below is a list of earthquakes recorded by the California and Nevada
Seismic Networks during the last week. Times are local (PST or PDT).

Most recent earthquakes are at the top of the list...
Click on the word "map" or "MAP" to see a map view.
Click on a "DATE" to get additional text information.
Magnitude 3 and greater earthquakes are printed in bold type.
The top three magnitudes greater than or equal to 3 are in red.

MAG DATE LOCAL-TIME LAT LON DEPTH LOCATION
y/m/d h:m:s deg deg km
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MAP 3.1 99/10/16 16:52:10 34.67N 116.34W 5.9 37 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.0 99/10/16 16:51:40 34.81N 116.33W 6.0 35 mi SSW of BAKER
MAP 3.0 99/10/16 15:55:38 34.67N 116.33W 0.0 37 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 4.6 99/10/16 15:53:41 34.71N 116.36W 6.0 39 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.1 99/10/16 15:25:28 34.44N 116.26W 2.0 21 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.5 99/10/16 14:55:44 34.70N 116.29W 5.8 39 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.1 99/10/16 14:53:57 34.41N 116.20W 2.7 20 mi NNE of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.0 99/10/16 14:46:15 34.85N 116.36W 2.7 34 mi SSW of BAKER
MAP 4.1 99/10/16 14:10:50 34.67N 116.34W 6.0 37 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.3 99/10/16 13:22:30 34.60N 116.32W 6.0 32 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 4.7 99/10/16 13:13:37 34.69N 116.28W 6.0 38 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.0 99/10/16 13:08:07 34.48N 116.27W 6.3 24 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.6 99/10/16 12:39:55 34.68N 116.31W 2.3 37 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.5 99/10/16 11:13:09 34.54N 116.28W 6.0 28 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.6 99/10/16 11:10:20 34.79N 116.34W 0.0 37 mi SSW of BAKER
MAP 3.8 99/10/16 11:05:22 34.57N 116.26W 0.0 30 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 4.3 99/10/16 11:01:52 34.65N 116.41W 9.2 36 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.1 99/10/16 10:55:16 34.53N 116.25W 0.9 28 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.5 99/10/16 10:48:31 33.27N 115.72W 0.7 6 mi S of BOMBAY BEACH
MAP 5.0 99/10/16 10:38:48 34.44N 116.24W 0.1 21 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.1 99/10/16 10:37:04 33.21N 115.65W 1.7 3 mi NNW of OBSIDIAN BUTTE
MAP 3.0 99/10/16 10:21:56 34.55N 116.27W 0.0 29 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.5 99/10/16 10:02:46 34.64N 116.37W 6.0 35 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.1 99/10/16 09:57:29 34.59N 116.26W 5.9 32 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.7 99/10/16 09:55:58 33.79N 116.11W 13.5 8 mi NE of INDIO
MAP 3.6 99/10/16 09:55:21 34.40N 116.29W 0.0 18 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.6 99/10/16 09:54:27 34.50N 116.36W 5.8 26 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.2 99/10/16 09:48:39 34.70N 116.30W 6.0 39 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.1 99/10/16 09:38:59 34.57N 116.26W 0.0 30 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.6 99/10/16 09:22:58 34.68N 116.30W 0.0 37 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.8 99/10/16 09:12:09 34.52N 116.27W 5.8 26 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.4 99/10/16 09:12:09 34.52N 116.26W 6.0 27 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.0 99/10/16 09:05:02 34.35N 116.24W 0.2 15 mi NNE of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.0 99/10/16 08:54:20 34.60N 116.31W 6.0 32 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.1 99/10/16 08:42:29 34.48N 116.27W 2.3 23 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.2 99/10/16 08:41:41 34.59N 116.28W 6.0 31 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.8 99/10/16 08:38:33 34.38N 116.14W 0.5 17 mi NNW of TWENTYNINE PALMS
MAP 3.6 99/10/16 08:31:47 34.55N 116.34W 6.0 29 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.0 99/10/16 08:18:55 34.40N 116.27W 0.4 18 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.8 99/10/16 07:52:35 34.45N 116.27W 0.6 22 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.0 99/10/16 07:48:45 34.47N 116.28W 2.5 23 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.7 99/10/16 07:44:25 34.56N 116.36W 6.0 29 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.8 99/10/16 07:43:44 34.45N 116.24W 0.0 22 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.8 99/10/16 07:43:11 34.44N 116.24W 5.8 21 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.5 99/10/16 07:20:45 34.70N 116.32W 6.0 39 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.7 99/10/16 07:07:05 34.37N 116.14W 0.0 17 mi NNW of TWENTYNINE PALMS
MAP 4.2 99/10/16 06:59:16 34.84N 116.34W 0.1 33 mi SSW of BAKER
MAP 3.6 99/10/16 06:56:43 34.68N 116.35W 6.1 38 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.5 99/10/16 06:55:23 33.23N 115.69W 0.2 6 mi NW of OBSIDIAN BUTTE
MAP 4.2 99/10/16 06:51:17 34.45N 116.23W 1.5 22 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.6 99/10/16 06:42:49 33.79N 116.12W 10.8 7 mi NE of INDIO
MAP 3.2 99/10/16 06:37:02 33.79N 116.12W 6.0 8 mi NE of INDIO
MAP 3.7 99/10/16 06:34:57 34.54N 116.31W 6.0 28 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.7 99/10/16 06:32:22 34.35N 116.22W 0.0 15 mi NNE of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.6 99/10/16 06:23:55 34.59N 116.30W 6.0 31 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.0 99/10/16 06:23:09 34.36N 116.14W 0.0 16 mi NNW of TWENTYNINE PALMS
MAP 4.0 99/10/16 06:22:10 34.55N 116.28W 0.0 29 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.0 99/10/16 06:14:56 34.45N 116.23W 0.6 22 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.1 99/10/16 06:09:09 34.42N 116.26W 4.0 20 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.9 99/10/16 06:05:20 34.69N 116.31W 6.0 38 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.9 99/10/16 06:01:08 34.77N 116.33W 6.0 37 mi SSW of BAKER
MAP 5.8 99/10/16 05:57:21 34.44N 116.25W 1.0 21 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 4.5 99/10/16 05:55:09 34.49N 116.26W 2.4 24 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.8 99/10/16 05:51:50 34.37N 116.13W 0.3 17 mi NNW of TWENTYNINE PALMS
MAP 3.9 99/10/16 05:37:22 34.43N 116.35W 6.0 21 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.8 99/10/16 05:15:09 34.61N 116.33W 6.0 33 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 4.4 99/10/16 05:03:19 34.72N 116.32W 6.0 40 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.6 99/10/16 04:52:24 34.68N 116.39W 16.0 38 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 4.1 99/10/16 04:49:59 34.72N 116.35W 6.0 40 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 4.0 99/10/16 04:47:44 34.69N 116.35W 6.0 38 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.8 99/10/16 04:38:49 34.53N 116.30W 6.0 27 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 4.4 99/10/16 04:27:39 34.68N 116.22W 12.0 38 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.9 99/10/16 04:21:40 34.40N 116.29W 6.1 18 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 4.0 99/10/16 04:04:33 34.37N 116.21W 6.0 17 mi NNE of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 4.0 99/10/16 03:49:50 33.23N 115.67W 0.1 5 mi NNW of OBSIDIAN BUTTE
MAP 4.6 99/10/16 03:20:52 34.38N 116.13W 6.0 17 mi NNW of TWENTYNINE PALMS
MAP 4.5 99/10/16 03:09:54 34.65N 116.29W 0.2 35 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 4.3 99/10/16 03:04:52 34.58N 116.18W 3.9 31 mi NNE of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 4.7 99/10/16 03:02:41 34.58N 116.37W 6.0 31 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.7 99/10/16 02:59:51 34.19N 117.26W 8.1 6 mi NNE of SAN BERNARDINO
MAP 5.3 99/10/16 02:51:52 34.41N 116.56W 6.2 22 mi NNW of YUCCA VALLEY
MAP 7.0 99/10/16 02:46:44 34.60N 116.27W 6.0 32 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.8 99/10/15 19:41:04 34.59N 116.27W 0.0 32 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.4 99/10/15 17:17:38 39.02N 123.07W 1.8 8 mi W of LAKEPORT
MAP 3.0 99/10/15 08:00:56 36.63N 121.23W 1.7 8 mi NW of PINNACLES
MAP 3.1 99/10/15 08:00:16 36.62N 121.23W 6.2 8 mi NW of PINNACLES
MAP 3.0 99/10/15 07:22:43 34.59N 116.27W 0.0 31 mi N of JOSHUA TREE
MAP 3.3 99/10/13 12:35:56 36.00N 120.56W 4.3 10 mi NW of PARKFIELD
MAP 3.0 99/10/12 21:56:10 33.21N 115.98W 9.1 5 mi SSW of SALTON CITY
MAP 3.0 99/10/10 09:44:04 38.53N 122.29W 5.3 9 mi ESE of ANGWIN
MAP 3.3 99/10/10 08:46:14 37.40N 117.08W 6.0 55 mi N of STOVEPIPE WELLS





 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 105 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Oct 16, 1999 (19:37) * 4 lines 
 
The above statistics are easier to read on the web page...and the maps are hot linked for those who are really interested in it. They have had a bumpy ride today! Some of the aftershocks have been pretty strong, as well.

http://wwwneic.cr.usgs.gov/neis/bulletin/bulletin.html
Gives the statistics of earthquakes world wide for this date.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 106 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct 24, 1999 (01:54) * 24 lines 
 
The continuing strong earthquakes beneath Taiwan has spawned a group of interesting theories recently published in the journals of record for the science. Here is one such which explains the quakes as being the result of the zone of subduction (where the Pacific Plate it being dragged beneath the Asian Plate) activity.

AUTHOR: Lin, C. H.; Roecker, S. W.
TITLE: Deep earthquakes beneath central Taiwan; mantle shearing in an
arc-continent collision
AUTH AFFIL: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Earth and
Environmental Sciences; Troy, NY; United States
PUBLISHER: American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC, United States
SOURCE: Tectonics, v.12, n.3, p.745-755
REFERENCES: 10
YEAR: 1993
LANGUAGE: English
PUB TYPE: Serial, Analytic
FORMAT: illus., 2 tables, sketch maps
ISSN: 0278-7407
CODEN: TCTNDM
DESCRIPTOR: arrival time; Asia; body waves; central Taiwan; compression
tectonics; deep-focus earthquakes; displacements; earthquakes;
elastic waves; Eurasian Plate; Far East; faults; focal
mechanism; focus; island arcs; mantle; models; P-waves;
Philippine Sea Plate; S-waves; seismicity; seismology; shear;
Taiwan; tectonics; tomography
LATITUDES: N220000; N251000
LONGITUDES: E0122000; E0120000


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 107 of 639: JanaJH  (Jana2) * Wed, Oct 27, 1999 (22:02) * 1 lines 
 
Marcia, I finally had time to stop by and visit. Wow! Fascinating stuff, particularly for a California native like myself. I was sitting here writing up some of my earthquake experiences for you, and after a few loooong paragraphs my finger accidentally brushed the Escape key. Poof! It all disappeared. I took that as an omen that I was being long winded and boring and gave up :-). But I did want you to know that I enjoyed your site!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 108 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct 28, 1999 (01:22) * 1 lines 
 
Pleeeeeeeease try again on a page like wordPad and paste it here. I am delighted to see you *big smile* Check our updating weather maps in Geo 14.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 109 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct 28, 1999 (22:15) * 1 lines 
 
It was reported to me that Wales had a 3.5 earthquake...would the person who sent me the information please email me again...I cannot find your original letter. Thanks! Wales has a base of very old rock - Precambrian, which is odd for Cambria to have since it implied the rocks were there before the country was there - and that is probably correct.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 110 of 639: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Fri, Oct 29, 1999 (12:33) * 1 lines 
 
Hi Marcia, I sent in the Wales report, it was on the BBC news, I think that's the second or third this year.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 111 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct 29, 1999 (12:54) * 1 lines 
 
I thought you had, but going through your emails yeaterday I could not find it. And, I am most happy to credit my reporters. Thank you Maggie! I will check with the Beeb today since the Cal Tech equipment is not reporting it and none of the other world-wide reporting is, either. I shall go directly to BBC for Wales and get the scoop! Thanks, again!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 112 of 639: JanaJH  (Jana2) * Sat, Nov  6, 1999 (02:56) * 2 lines 
 
Hi Marcia,
I have to head over to Taipei for business next week. Do you know if they're still having lots of aftershocks there? Ever since the fright of 1994 I'm a nervous nellie about earthquakes so am not looking forward to it!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 113 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Sat, Nov  6, 1999 (02:59) * 18 lines 
 
I got this one from an online newssheet:
"At Police Headquarters of a developing country a telegramm arrives
from the Geophysics and Meteorology National Institute. It says:

URGENT STOP
Possible seismic activity in the capital in the next two days STOP
Very dangerous Richter 7 STOP
Epicenter 3 km from town center STOP
Take precautionary measures STOP
Urgently report back STOP

Three months later the Institute receives the following telegramm:

This is Police Headquarters STOP
Seismic activity completely under control STOP
Richter 7 tried to escape was shot dead STOP
Epicenter and three gang members arrested STOP
Could not answer earlier because an earthquake destroyed everything here STOP"


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 114 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Nov  6, 1999 (15:29) * 3 lines 
 
Jana, They have been having incredibly strong and frequent aftershocks on Taiwan. The most recent stron one was 6.1 a few days ago. Check this URL frequently and scroll to the bottom for previous quakes. Good Luck!!!
http://wwwneic.cr.usgs.gov/neis/bulletin/bulletin.html



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 115 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Nov  6, 1999 (15:31) * 1 lines 
 
Gi, *LOL* Thanks for the "update"...


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 116 of 639: JanaJH  (Jana2) * Mon, Nov  8, 1999 (02:13) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks for the website, Marcia!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 117 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Nov  8, 1999 (14:04) * 2 lines 
 
You are most welcome. This is my "thing" and digging up information and sharing it is most interesting and rewarding to me. Thanks for your interest. Take notes and report back when you return from your Taiwan trip...and, Good Luck!
(Most EQ's happen in the dark of the moon or at full moon...!)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 118 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Tue, Nov  9, 1999 (10:27) * 1 lines 
 
Do they now? A tidal thing?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 119 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov  9, 1999 (11:40) * 1 lines 
 
David came up with a theory (about the same time others did) that having both the sun AND the moon on the same side of Earth caused abnormal gravitational tugging on the crust, thereby causing more frequent volcanic eruptions. It sure seems to work that way It turns out that Earthquakes happen at that same time more frequently. The thing which confounds me is that it also happens at full moon when those forces should cancel out each other. I think we do not know all there is to this...


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 120 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov  9, 1999 (15:11) * 12 lines 
 
This news from Maggie:

A strong earthquake shook Northern Pakistan,
including the capital islamabad, last night. the
quake measured about 6 on the Richter sclae and was
centred aboout 220 miles north of the northwestern
city of Peshawar in the Hindu Kush mountains on the
Afghan border. There were no immediate reports of
casualties. (Reuters, Islamabad, in The Guardian
9.11.99)

I checked the near-real-time recorders at USGS and they reported it as 6.5. It is in a very remote ares (caused by the Himalayas being shoved up even higher) and any resulting damage or loss of life will be a long time filtering out. Many aftershocks noted, as well.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 121 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Nov 11, 1999 (15:08) * 4 lines 
 
There are still strong aftershocks from the EQ on the Afghan border

This just happened in Turkey...
99/11/11 14:41:24 40.80N 30.26E 10.0 5.6Ms A TURKEY


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 122 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Nov 11, 1999 (15:10) * 1 lines 
 
88 people reposted injured from the Western Turkey Earthquake


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 123 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 12, 1999 (23:06) * 101 lines 
 
Turks rush to help quake survivors
By Amberin Zaman in Ankara
RESCUE workers were last night struggling to help survivors of an
earthquake measuring 7.2 on the Richter scale that shook western
Turkey yesterday, three months after the devastating tremor that left
17,000 people dead.

The quake centered on the town of Duzce, in a hilly
region of Bolu province, 115 miles east of Istanbul.
Main communication lines with Duzce were cut,
including the main highway linking Istanbul and
Ankara. Yahya Gur, the Governor of Ankara, said:
"A great number of buildings have collapsed in the
town. There are dead, and people are asking for help."

Bolu province was also hit by the quake in August, which measured
7.4 on the Richter scale, but suffered relatively little damage.
President Suleyman Demirel said: "We are face to face with a new
disaster." Turkey's Prime Minister, Bulent Ecevit, said: "The
aftershocks are still continuing. God protect us."

Hundreds of terrified residents poured into the streets as fires
erupted across the town. The local hospital was reported to be
overflowing with injured. They were being treated in the hospital
garden after the hospital was evacuated. Sadettin Cakmakoglu, a
doctor, said the hospital was in urgent need of pain killers and
medicine. He said: "I am calling out an SOS for Duzce."

Television pictures showed men and women weeping and crying out
the names of loved ones trapped under the rubble of collapsed
homes. People were shown tearing away at mounds of rubble as
they frantically tried to uncover buried relatives. One man kept
shouting "Allah, Allah, why, why?" as he pounded his chest in anger.

A television reporter in Duzce said: "There is utter helplessness
here at the moment. Hundreds of buildings have collapsed but there
is no one who can help." The pictures showed shocked residents,
wrapped in blankets, huddling together on the streets. Doctors were
quoted as saying that at least 1,000 people were injured in the
quake.

In the town of Bolu, women stood at the foot of a pile of rubble
weeping. A young man in tears was shown walking around his
collapsed home, shouting for his sister trapped in the rubble to talk
to him, while a woman was shown desperately pouring water on
flames around the rubble of her home.

Bolu province's police chief, Ugur Gur, appealed for help, saying
that Duzce was in desperate need of ambulances and doctors. He
said: "We can hear the moans of people trapped under the rubble,"
he said. "Please tell Ankara to send us doctors and ambulances . . .
please."

One television station broadcast appeals for blood donations. Mr
Ecevit said rescue teams had been rushed to the area and a crisis
management centre formed in Ankara to coordinate relief efforts.
Turkish military helicopters were ferrying the wounded to hospitals in
Ankara. The government's swift response contrasted sharply with its
sluggish reaction to the earthquake on Aug 17, which prompted an
outpouring of national anger.

Hundreds of thousands of victims left homeless in the earthquake
are still sheltering in tents despite government pledges to provide all
weather protection ahead of the harsh Anatolian winter, which is
beginning to set in. Yesterday's earthquake was felt in Ankara,
where terrified residents fled from their homes. It was also felt in
Istanbul and as far south as the Mediterranean resort of Antalya.

President Clinton is scheduled to arrive in Ankara on Monday on a
two-day state visit. He was expected to visit areas affected by the
previous quake.

17 October 1999: 1999: the year that seismic shifts killed 20,000
across the world
22 September 1999: World stunned by third disaster
29 August 1999: Istanbul fails to heed the fearful lesson of tremors
28 August 1999: Turkish quake homeless total rises to 600,000
19 August 1999: Refinery fire threatens earthquake survivors

























 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 124 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Sat, Nov 13, 1999 (12:09) * 1 lines 
 
This has been a terrible year for Turkey.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 125 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Nov 13, 1999 (12:36) * 1 lines 
 
It has been a bad geological epoch. Since Turkey straddles the Eurasian plate boundary Earthquakes have plagued the region as long as history has been written and rock upthrust and deformation could tell the story. It will continue to be one of the most unstable areas on earth.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 126 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Nov 15, 1999 (19:24) * 10 lines 
 
Since the above was written a 7.2 aftershock has occurred and taken many more lives in Turkey. For some idea of what they are experiencing and pictures as well check http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/study/turkey/#Nov12_1999_aftershock

ANATOLIAN FAULT MAP


MOLETRACK IN FIELD - WHERE THE EARTHQUAKE FAULT TORE ACROSS TURKEY


EARTHQUAKE CRACKS IN THE GROUND NEAR THE EPICENTER



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 127 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Wed, Nov 17, 1999 (16:07) * 1 lines 
 
That was very impressive!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 128 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov 17, 1999 (17:16) * 6 lines 
 
There is a part of the roadway in the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park which looks just like the bottom picture. One afternoon, some high school girls had crept under the barriers and were jumping up and down on a piece ready to fall into the crater - a 300 foot (52 M) drop!







 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 129 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Thu, Nov 18, 1999 (03:32) * 1 lines 
 
*shiver*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 130 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Nov 18, 1999 (13:15) * 1 lines 
 
Indeed! The park rangers went out very slowly and casually chatting with the girls and talked them safely back onto more stable ground. Crazy !


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 131 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 15, 1999 (18:31) * 27 lines 
 
Quake Forces Cult Out of Tunnels

TACLOBAN, Philippines (Reuters) - A quake on Wednesday forced out
more than 2,000 followers of a Philippine cult hiding in tunnels for fear of the
sky raining down fire at the start of the new millennium.

The tremor struck at 1:12 p.m. (0512 GMT) and measured 4.8 on the
open-ended Richter scale, the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and
Seismology said.

The institute said it did not expect aftershocks or major damage. The quake
was centered near the coastal town of Ormoc, 570 km (355 miles) southeast
of Manila.

Officials said followers of cult leader Ceferino Qunito were hiding in dozens of
tunnels in the central province of Leyte.

A spokeswoman for the municipal office told reporters police had been
deployed around the tunnels, which were considered unsafe.

The tremor cracked walls and pavements in the town, she said.
Schoolchildren were also sent home early.

The earthquake-prone Philippines was hit by a quake measuring 6.8 on the
Richter scale on Sunday. Officials reported three deaths and 24 injured but
only minor damage.



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 132 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 20, 1999 (19:40) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 133 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 20, 1999 (20:16) * 32 lines 
 
Moderate Earthquake Shakes East Caribbean Islands
CHARLESTOWN, Nevis (Reuters) - A moderate earthquake with its center
about 12 miles east of Antigua jostled residents of the Leeward Islands early
on Monday morning.

On Nevis, people sleeping about 6:45 a.m. when the quake hit were rattled
awake and on Montserrat lamps sitting on dresser tops shook for about 10
seconds, one resident said.
``We haven't had any reports of damage. Strong shaking but nobody's said
anything was damaged,'' said Joan Latchman, a seismologist with the
Seismic Research Unit in Trinidad.
The tremor had a magnitude of between 4.8 and 5.7 on the open-ended
Richter scale, meaning it could have been strong enough to cause heavy
damage in populated areas.
Its epicenter was located at 17.09 degrees north and 61.59 degrees west at a
depth of 11 miles under the sea, according to the Trinidad unit.
It shook Antigua quite strongly and was also felt in Guadeloupe, Martinique,
Montserrat, and St. Kitts and Nevis.
Latchman called the quake moderate.
Different readings have been reported from various seismographic centers.
The 4.8 magnitude was registered in Guadeloupe but the U.S. Geological
Service recorded it as a 5.7. The Trinidad unit, which monitors all seismic
activity for the English-speaking Caribbean islands, listed it at 5.2.
There were no reports of injuries related to the tremor.
Latchman said that quakes of this magnitude occur more than once a year
but one so close to an island happens less often.
Others of similar size in recent years occurred north of Antigua last year and
one off Tobago in 1997. An earthquake of this size in a populated land mass
can be devastating, she said.
The earthquake was not related to nearby Montserrat where the Soufriere
Hills volcano is quiet, said Chelston Lee, spokesman for the Montserrat
Volcano Observatory.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 134 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec 23, 1999 (15:25) * 55 lines 
 
Algeria Quake Death Toll set at 22
AIN TEMOUCHANT, Algeria (Reuters) - Algeria said on Thursday that 22
people were killed when an earthquake flattened several buildings in the
western town of Ain Temouchant.
A government statement carried by state-run radio also said 47 people
remained in hospitals, including seven in critical condition. Scores had been
treated for minor injuries, it said.
Hundreds of people were left homeless when the quake struck on
Wednesday and they, along with others who feared aftershocks, spent the
night in the open.
Scores of women could be seen huddled in corners, covering themselves with
blankets as they waited for relief workers to set up tents in open areas.
Other residents carried mattresses and other household items which they
had salvaged from beneath the debris of mud bricks, all that remained of their
homes.
The government said it would distribute 600 housing units and had set up
tents to accommodate displaced people.
SCHOOLS DEMOLISHED
``I saw several collapsed buildings, including three schools which were
completely demolished,'' said schoolteacher Amina Kali. ``Scores of families
have been left homeless and spent the night outside in freezing
temperatures.''
An earlier official statement put the death toll at 28 with 181 injured in the
quake, which measured 5.8 on the Richter scale and shook several western
provinces of the North African country at 6:37 p.m. on Wednesday.
There was no immediate explanation for the revised figures.
``Fortunately, we don't have tall buildings. Otherwise the death toll would have
been much higher,'' a local official told Reuters.
``It was also relatively easy for rescue workers to reach trapped people
quickly. We don't have any missing people.''
State radio said the earthquake's epicenter was in Tissalat mountains where
Ain Temouchant is located.
But the impact of the quake was still evident in the rubble and on the faces of
many people wandering the streets of Ain Temouchant, a town with a
population of 56,000, some 45 miles west of the Mediterranean city of Oran.
Several expressed anger at what they saw as the government's slow
response to deal with the disaster.
``Many buildings are completely demolished. I've lost my two sisters here,''
Abdelhadi Mohammed, 30, said pointing to the rubble of what used to be his
home.
``But instead of rushing to our help, the authorities appear more concerned
about the prisoners who escaped from jail.''
CONVICTS FLEE AS PARTS OF JAIL COLLAPSE
Residents said many inmates fled after parts of the jail collapsed. At least
three prisoners died under the rubble, they added.
Energy officials have said the quake caused no damage to a major oil and
gas export terminal and refinery at Arzew, just a few miles east of Oran.
There had been no interruption at both facilities, the officials added.
Arzew, one of Algeria's two main export terminals, also has a refinery with a
processing capacity of 60,000 barrels a day.
Algeria's western region has been hit by several earthquakes in the past, the
deadliest of which was in 1980 when at least 2,590 people were killed in an
earthquake measuring 7.3 on the Richter scale.
The quake devastated the Algerian town of El Asnam, leaving 330,000 people
homeless. The town was subsequently rebuilt and renamed Chlef.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 135 of 639: Gi  (patas) * Tue, Dec 28, 1999 (14:44) * 1 lines 
 
Earthquakes are terrifying and people dying or being injured or losing property is not a laughable matter, but Marcia, some of those headlines had me LOLing! Sorry. Had to tell.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 136 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Dec 28, 1999 (14:55) * 1 lines 
 
The made me laugh, as well, and I do know how terrifying earthquakes can be. But some of these stories are amazing...Glad you enjoyed it as much as I did.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 137 of 639: lidya maccarthy  (livamago) * Sat, Jan 15, 2000 (18:31) * 1 lines 
 
My dear Marcia, I know you are enjoying your weekend, so I'll await your report on the quake in China...I heard on the news that fortunately there were not too many casualties.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 138 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jan 16, 2000 (12:02) * 10 lines 
 
Just peeking in here for a second before hitting the road with the relatives. Had no idea there was an EQ in China...More when I get home...and some sleep!
Thanks for posting Lidya - you are a friend extraordinarie. Bless you! *hugs*










 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 139 of 639: lidya maccarthy  (livamago) * Sun, Jan 16, 2000 (20:24) * 1 lines 
 
Apparently there were two tremors; the aftershock being stronger than the eq. I don't in which area it occurred. Perhaps when you have time you can show us a map?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 140 of 639: lidya maccarthy  (livamago) * Sun, Jan 16, 2000 (20:28) * 1 lines 
 
What is wrong with my English tonight? Mayhap the weekend in the paternal home and the language of the cradle are corrupting my understanding of the lingua franca...


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 141 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jan 17, 2000 (00:44) * 5 lines 
 

The earthquakes in Yunnan Province:

00/01/14 22:09:04 25.58N 101.15E 33.0 5.2Mb B YUNNAN, CHINA
00/01/14 23:37:08 25.60N 101.14E 33.0 5.9Ms A YUNNAN, CHINA


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 142 of 639: lidya maccarthy  (livamago) * Mon, Jan 17, 2000 (09:45) * 1 lines 
 
Great work dear!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 143 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jan 17, 2000 (14:23) * 1 lines 
 
Unfortunately I have not yet found an Earthquake map which updates automatically, but I have not given up on it most certainly. The hunt for just the right graphics for Geo is part of the fun!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 144 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  8, 2000 (17:52) * 1 lines 
 
Yes, I did...it is posted on EARTHQUAKE!!! Geo topic 26.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 145 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Apr  6, 2000 (15:45) * 3 lines 
 
Ok, there is a smashing map of the fault lines in San Francisco Bay at this location http://www.sfbayquakes.org/

I would post it but at 178KB, it is far too big and slow. Enjoy! (courtesy of David's surfing for things needed at work.)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 146 of 639: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Sun, Sep 24, 2000 (07:32) * 40 lines 
 
Nothing much happened in here since April --I don't believe it!!!!

Earthquake hits Warwickshire, England
The biggest seismic event in Britain for 10 years ....
SEISMIC ALERT: WARWICK, WARWICKSHIRE 23 SEPTEMBER 2000 04:23 UTC 4.2 ML
http://www.gsrg.nmh.ac.uk/alert_info.htm

BGS have received many reports, from the Police, the media, the Emergency Planning Officer and residents in Cheadle (85 km to the north), Gloucester (65 km to the south), Peterborough (95 km to the east), Birmingham, Coventry, Warwick, Rugby, and Leamington Spa, of a felt event at 04:25 UTC this morning (23 September 2000). Felt reports describe "we were alarmed", "the bed moved", "the whole house shook", "we were woken from sleep" and "the whole building trembled". The BGS rapid-access networks detected an event at 04:23 UTC.

The following preliminary information is available for this earthquake:
DATE : 23 September 2000
ORIGIN TIME : 04:23 45.8sUTC
LAT/LONG : 52.28o North / 1.61o West
GRID REF : 426.5 kmE / 265.0 kmN
DEPTH : 13.1 km
MAGNITUDE : 4.2 ML
INTENSITY : 5+
LOCALITY : Warwick, Warwickshire

Historically, a similar earthquake occurred near Tewksbury, some 50 km to the south west with a magnitude of 4.1 in 1768. More recently, a magnitude 3.0 earthquake was felt at Stratford-upon-Avon in May 1994, 17 km to the south west. The largest earthquake within 100 km occurred at Bishops Castle near the Welsh border in April 1990, with a magnitude of 5.1 (almost 10 times the ground movement and 30 times the energy of the Warwick earthquake). It was felt over the whole of Wales, most of England and into Ireland and Scotland


Here's the list from the British Geological Society of EArthquakes in the UK this month
http://www.gsrg.nmh.ac.uk/recbrit.html
YearMoDy HrMnSecs Lat Lon kmE kmN Dep Mag Locality Int
20000923 042345.8 52.28 -1.61 426.5 265.0 13.1 4.2 WARWICK,WARWICKSHIRE 5+
20000921 073048.3 56.99 -5.47 189.0 794.2 6.4 1.2 LOCH NEVIS,HIGHLAND
20000915 035724.7 52.96 -4.36 241.3 342.6 23.3 0.7 LLEYN PENIN,GWYNEDD
20000914 214946.3 52.96 -4.36 241.3 342.7 22.6 0.7 LLEYN PENINSULA
20000912 014225.6 50.11 -5.18 172.6 28.0 7.2 -0.2 CONSTANTINE,CORNWALL
20000912 001419.5 54.63 -2.43 372.3 525.7 4.8 0.8 APPLEBY,CUMBRIA
20000911 032127.2 54.81 -3.59 297.9 547.6 3.6 1.0 SOLWAY FIRTH
20000910 065255.2 52.97 -4.41 238.3 343.8 22.0 0.4 LLEYN PENINSULA
20000906 002612.3 57.58 -5.49 191.7 860.3 5.2 0.6 TORRIDON,HIGHLAND
20000830 235340.7 56.20 -2.96 340.2 700.8 3.7 1.4 EXPL-LARGO BAY,FIFE 2+
20000824 074921.1 55.39 -5.23 195.2 615.0 19.0 2.1 ARRAN,STRATHCLYDE
20000823 071515.2 53.06 -4.55 229.0 354.5 13.2 0.6 CAERNARVON BAY,GWYNEDD





 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 147 of 639: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Sun, Sep 24, 2000 (07:39) * 6 lines 
 
What to do if you feel an earthquake in the UK
Go to the British Geological Society site and fill in this form ....

http://www.gsrg.nmh.ac.uk/hazard/quest.htm




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 148 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Sep 24, 2000 (22:08) * 1 lines 
 
Maggie, general earthquake lists are posted in Geo 26. This is the place for discussion of other bigger results. I post them regularly in 26 but thanks for posting here!!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 149 of 639: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Mon, Sep 25, 2000 (03:10) * 1 lines 
 
Oops!! sorry, missed that! (I get muddled without enough coffee in me!) Hey, 4.2 is MASSIVE for the UK!!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 150 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Sep 28, 2000 (01:14) * 1 lines 
 
You are very old rock...your plate boundary is pretty far from the 'dry land' and 4.2 for those not used to having the earth move under their feet under usual circumstances, it must have been frightening!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 151 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Dec  8, 2000 (12:10) * 29 lines 
 
The 20th Century had it's share of damaging earth all around the globe
and the Pacific Ring of Fire was no exception Below is an incomplete
list of the DEADLIEST earthquakes experienced.

Location Country Year Deaths

Tangshan China 1976 650,000
Kansu China 1920 200,000
Tokyo Japan 1923 140,000
Kansu China 1932 70,000
* Peru 1970 67,000

* = Location unknown

The next list is of the most POWERFUL earthquakes
to occur during the 20th Century

Location Country Year Magnitude

Puerto Montt Chile 1960 9.5
P.W Sound USA 1964 9.2
* Chile 1906 8.6
Kansu China 1920 8.5
San Fr. USA 1906 8.3

The size of the 1960 and 1964 events are disputed but these figure I
hear most frequently.

Thanks, Rob


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 152 of 639:  (sprin5) * Sat, Dec  9, 2000 (12:16) * 1 lines 
 
The 76 quake in China was devastating, almost a million people! It must have hit in a very heavily populated area. And Kansu China as two megaquakes within 12 years of each other.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 153 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 27, 2000 (14:34) * 12 lines 
 
On January 23 1855 an earthquake measuring 8.2 on the Richter scale ruptured the Wairarapa Fault
east of Wellington causing massive uplift west of the fault across 20,000km2 of the lower North
Island. Only 5 people were killed simply because the 500,000 people living in and around Wellington
now were not there then. The earthquake raised the land that Wellington sits on now and also the
land that the airport is sited on between Cook Strait and the harbour. With more than 3 active faults
in or near Wellington it is a deadly guessing game figuring out which one will rupture next, though the
most likely candidate is the Wellington Fault running a mere 700 metres from Parliament. This fault
has classic sag ponds on it in the hills near Karori and those ponds are now reservoirs for the
Wellington water supply system. Another dangerous faultline is the Ohariu Fault. Although this fault
moves less frequently than the other two it is expected to produce an earthquake up to 7.5 on the
Richter Scale. It crosses Porirua harbour giving it the disjointed look near the highway bridge and the
North-South railway.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 154 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 27, 2000 (15:16) * 1 lines 
 
China never wanted outside help so they just let the people die. All of the mass devastation is just now being discovered. Truly tragic!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 155 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 27, 2000 (17:06) * 69 lines 
 
The explanation on the varying magnitudes given for the greatest
earthquakes is a matter of advancement in the science of calculating quake
magnitudes.

The reason we hear conflicting magnitudes is often because a
seismologist is speaking through the press to the public in the terms they
understand, as they are accustomed to Richter Magnitude, and most are unaware
of the other scales that are now in use. You will often hear the press
ask, "What was the Richter magnitude?" The seismologists simply ignore
the "Richter", will not take the time to explain the various scales
being used, and simply answer with the appropriate magnitude, no matter
which scale was used to measure it.

I understand their reason for doing this, but frequently find this
factor irritating, as for example, when a seismologist had the chairman of
our EPC confused and extremely hyper, as he was about to compare the
1857 Fort Tejon quake, not above Mw 8.0 (formerly given as ML 8.25), to
the 1964 P. W. Sound megaquake of Mw 9.2, that he had seen a video of
the destruction of! We are in no less danger where we live on the San
Andreas Fault Zone, but that is due to a difference in our environment.

For earthquakes up to, let's say, M 5.5, this isn't a problem, because
the magnitudes given for quakes will not differ significantly,
whichever scale is used. The different scales are each most useful within a
given magnitude range. It becomes more significant above M 6.0, and
greatly significant for great earthquakes.

The EQ magnitude scale that was first introduced was the Richter scale
in 1935. It is based on the logarithm of the peak amplitude recorded on
a short period seismometer, corrected for distance. This scale, now
called Local Magnitude (ML) was developed using local recordings of
earthquakes in Southern California.

In order to study earthquakes on a global scale,
with recordings at great distances from the focus, it was necessary to
develop other magnitude scales.

These scales were calibrated to give numbers similar to the Local
Magnitude, but since the
waves being measured differ, the magnitudes may vary slightly.

There are others, but these four are the most
important to remember, as you will see them
being use most frequently:

(ML) Richter (Local) Magnitude - Essentially,
Dr. Richter's scale, still quite useful for smaller local quakes, but
not useful for quakes
classed as "Great".
(Ms) Surface Wave Magnitude - Formulated by Dr. Guttenberg to describe
distant quakes with
surface waves with a 20-second period.
(Mb) Body Wave Magnitude - Formulated by Dr. Guttenberg, for waves that
pass through the interior of the planet, and that have a shorter
period.
(Mw) Moment Magnitude - Formulated by K. Aki and Hiroo Kanamori, among
others. It is the best representation of the largest earthquakes on the
planet, as it takes much more into consideration. It is based on more
than just the logarithm of the peak amplitude, corrected for distance.
It combines a measurement of total energy release with the amplitude of
the waves; and takes into account the surface area of the fault, the
average displacement of the fault plane, and the rigidity of the material
of the fault. This is the Seismic Moment, Mo, from which the Moment
Magnitude is calculated.

[You may also often see (Md) - duration magnitude, used on smaller
events.]

(thanks Yahoo Clubs and Sandi)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 156 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 27, 2000 (17:10) * 40 lines 
 
More from Sandi:

I don't remember the source of this online quote:

"A more systematic problem occurs for large earthquakes. The signals
for earthquakes of different sizes are not simply scaled by some
multiplicative factor. The shape of their frequency spectra changes because
larger earthquakes have larger source dimensions and therefore longer
source durations. If these durations are larger than the period at which
the magnitude determination is made, then the number will be
systematically too low. In the last decades, it has become common practice to
analyze earthquakes by modeling the waveforms over a broad frequency range.
This gives a more accurate number for the size of the earthquake
(seismic moment) and the mechanism."

If the moment tensor solution is not yet available, the magnitude for a
significant quake, as reported by the USGS/NEIS is either a surface
wave magnitude or a body wave magnitude.

The reason the different scales are each most useful within a given
magnitude range, is because they become saturated at a certain magnitude,
and fail to measure any magnitude above the magnitude they become
saturated at. The 1960 Chile and the 1964 Alaska quakes were so enormous
that they saturated the traditional magnitude scale. With the introduction
of the Moment Magnitude Scale, they were revised upward to Mw 9.5 and
Mw 9.2, respectively. These are the appropriate magnitude for these
events.

The 1906 San Francisco quake was also revised downward, from the
traditional M 8.25 - M 8.3 to Mw 7.7. I have formerly seen an Ms 7.9 for this
event, but the Moment Magnitude is the best measurement.

I don't have information on the Moment Magnitude of these other two
quakes you mentioned;
Chile 1906 8.6
Kansu China 1920 8.5

This a good site that discusses the magnitude of the 1906 San Francisco
earthquake.
http://www-socal.wr.usgs.gov/wald/1906/1906.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 157 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec 28, 2000 (15:48) * 24 lines 
 
Thank you, Rob

The Alpine Fault is the largest faultline in New Zealand, running a
distance of 550km from the entrance to Milford Sound in the south to the
Pacific coast north east of Blenheim. Geological records and samples of
fallen vegetation suggest that the last earthquake to occur on it was
in 1720 and prior to that it had moved at least 3 times. Each earthquake
had a magnitude of roughly 8 and a gap of 140-260 years existed between
individual events. Because of its location this fault is a particularly
severe threat to Wellington and Christchurch both of which are less
than 150km away. The time is now due for a damaging event to occur on this
fault which has several branches running north of Kaikoura. The Hope
Fault runs through the Hope river valley near Hanmer which is famous for
it's hotpools supplied by hot springs on the fault. It moved in 1888
and damaged the Cathedral in Christchurch with a magnitude 7.0-7.3 event
(no one has given a definite figure). Further north a fault runs
through the Clarence valley, and although it has not moved in recent times it
is judged as active. Through the Awatere valley you have a fault
crossing farmland and entering the sea just north of the Awatere river mouth.
It is also active.
The northern-most fault is the most dangerous. It is the Alpine Fault
and it runs within 7km of Blenheim (Population 25,000)and dominates the
geology of the Wairau River valley, along whose length it runs almost
the entire distance.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 158 of 639: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Jan  9, 2001 (18:01) * 1 lines 
 
Is New Zealand a fairly recent land mass? What I mean is relation to the age of the continents, such as Iceland is a recent land mass in relation to the ages of the continents. (I hope I got that out right?)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 159 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan 10, 2001 (23:15) * 3 lines 
 
It is more about plate tectonics. New Zealand is astride the Pacific Ring of Fire. The plate is subducting there - It goes BOOM!!!

Iceland is astride the Mid-Atl;antic Ridge where it is expanding, the lavas as very fluid like Hawaii's are, and it just flows with a few fountains. Iceland is much newer since it is new lava.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 160 of 639: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Jan 11, 2001 (17:09) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks Marcia.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 161 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jan 27, 2001 (21:49) * 88 lines 
 
India Fears 15,000 Quake Dead, Fresh Tremors Felt

BHUJ (Reuters) - Thousands of shocked survivors slept in the open
rather than risk entering shelters on Sunday as western India
experienced fresh tremors after an earthquake in which 15,000 were
feared killed.
Officials appealed for calm, as families pushed injured relatives in
handcarts, urgently seeking medical help, between heaps of rubble up
to 25 feet high.
Some survivors lost patience during long waits for fuel, and rescuers
admitted two days after the quake that they were now mostly searching
for bodies.
The quake on Friday, India's Republic Day holiday, measured 7.9 on
the Richter scale and cut a swathe of destruction across the prosperous
agricultural and industrial state of Gujarat, from its commercial capital
Ahmedabad to the coastal marshes of Kutch, near the epicenter.
Officials were unable to give an accurate death toll from the quake, the
most powerful to hit India in half a century, as many people were still
buried under rubble.
Narendra Modi, General Secretary of the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party
(BJP), said he believed 15,000 might have died, including 13,000 in
Kutch.
"I have come to the conclusion that we will cross 13,000 in Kutch alone
and elsewhere maybe 2,000 more," Modi told Reuters in Ahmedabad
on his return from a helicopter tour of the region.
Star TV quoted federal Defense Minister George Fernandes as telling
reporters he also feared 15,000 had died.
If confirmed, the death toll would approach that of a severe
earthquake in Turkey in August 1999, when more than 17,000 people
perished.
Bhuj, only about 12 miles from the epicenter, counted many of the
dead among its 150,000 people. Nearby Anjar, home to 30,000, was
flattened.
Police said some 350 schoolchildren and 50 teachers were feared dead
when they were buried in rubble during a school parade celebrating the
anniversary of India becoming a republic in 1950. Another 50 were
pulled from rubble alive.
"In Anjar, you can't find a single house intact," Modi said.
Much of Bhuj was also reduced to rubble.
SHORTAGE OF WATER, FOOD AND FUEL
There was already a severe shortage of food, water and fuel despite
the air force planes which flew in relief supplies, and then ferried
bandaged and dazed survivors to safety. Electricity came from only a
few emergency generators.
Tempers frayed as survivors desperate to escape Bhuj queued for fuel
for cars, scooters and motorized rickshaws.
An estimated 200 aftershocks had added to the unease.
Residents in Ahmedabad ran scared as fresh tremors shook the city of
five million people early on Sunday.
Most residents had spent the night on the roads, but the tremors
raised the possibility of fresh devastation for those who had returned
to their homes not damaged in the killer quake.
"We were reminded of the day before yesterday and were worried that
the house will come down. We all ran out," said Mitu Phulwani, a
housewife.
There were no immediate reports of new damage.
DEATHLY SILENCE IN BHUJ
There was a deathly silence among the ruins of the older parts of Bhuj
town. Rescue operations, hampered by the lack of electricity, wound
down as night fell on Saturday.
Along the cracked roads leading to Bhuj, collapsed houses, buildings
and temples dotted the landscape.
Gujarat State Minister for Transport and IT Bimal Shah said he
estimated more than 500 were dead in Ahmedabad. Among them were
nearly 30 students trapped in a high school stairwell.
Special trains from India's main cities ferried anxious relatives to
Gujarat. Many waiting at railway stations to board trains had had no
news of their families since the quake.
The Indian army and air force swung into a huge rescue effort, flying in
satellite telecommunications equipment to restore Gujarat's links with
the rest of the country.
Thousands of troops, engineers and doctors joined the relief effort.
The Air Force said it had 40 cargo planes and military aircraft ferrying
engineering equipment, mobile kitchens, food, water, tents, blankets
and power generators.
Officials were also concerned about disease if bodies began
decomposing under the rubble.
"Steps are being taken against the outbreak of epidemic... Public
health teams are on standby and some have been sent to Bhuj and
Ahmedabad," Bhaskar Barua, a senior government official, said.
HELP FROM ABROAD
Many countries offered help.
Neighboring Pakistan, putting aside its differences with nuclear rival
India, said it would provide relief. The quake killed at lest 15 people in
Pakistan.
Rescue teams, sniffer dogs and relief funds from Britain, Germany,
Canada, Italy, the United Nations and Turkey were set to arrive in
India on the weekend.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 162 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jan 28, 2001 (14:39) * 42 lines 
 
Experts Say Recent Worldwide Quakes Not Related

DENVER (Reuters) - Is the earth coming apart at its geological seams?
With thousands feared dead after a powerful earthquake struck India
on Friday, another that earlier devastated El Salvador, a tremor off
Kyushu Island, Japan, and even a minor quake in Ohio late on
Thursday people start wondering.
Relax. "These earthquakes are not related," said Waverly Person,
director of the Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colorado,
which tracks earthquakes worldwide.
"We locate about 50 quakes every day. But you only hear about them
if people are killed or if they're felt very strongly in the United States,"
Person said, rushing from one media interview to another.
The center was established in Washington in 1966 and has been
working out of Golden since 1973. It tracks earthquakes worldwide and
often provides the first news of a tremor.
Phone banks started lighting up at the center, operated by the U.S.
Geological Service, before dawn on Friday with news that the worst
earthquake in 50 years had hit India.
The tremor may have killed more than 1,500 people, but officials in
India said the final toll may be much higher.
The quake was measured at 7.9 on the Richter scale by the
earthquake center.
The most murderous recorded quake in history killed an estimated
830,000 people in Shaanxi, central China, on February 2, 1556.
Events ranking about 4.5 or greater -- of which there may be several
thousand every year -- are strong enough to be recorded by sensitive
instruments all over the world.
Person said there is no reason to believe the quake that rocked El
Salvador on Jan. 13 also triggered events that led to Friday's
earthquake in the Indian sub-continent.
The quakes occurred on separate tectonic plates and a quake on one
does not set up a domino effect in another.
According to records, about 18 major quakes -- measuring between 7.0
and 7.9 on the Richter scale and one great quake, measuring 8.0 and
above -- can be expected each year. Many of these, however, may
strike uninhabited parts of the world.
But does it make life scarier for people living in quake zones?

"What it does is bring forth awareness in places like California and
Alaska. It brings it up in their mind," Person said.
"But they're not more afraid," he added.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 163 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Feb  8, 2001 (18:33) * 34 lines 
 
http://clubs.yahoo.com/clubs/worldseismicity

In the periods before during and after an earthquake there is a number
of different phenomena that can occur depending on soil type,
earthquake strength intensity, and location.

Seiches are suddenly movements involving water bodies that can last
only a few hours or as long as of and on for a few days. Generally when
one begins the water will begin to suddenly retreat at speed, more like a
really fast moving tide. Soon the retreat will stop and with similar
speed the water will return. Seiches in New Zealand have occurred after
several large earthquakes and earthquake swarms in the volcanic zone of
the North Island. Some have taken people by surprise and there have
desperate scrambles to safety on beaches along the shorelines of Blue and
Green Lakes in the volcanic zone.

Liquefaction of sandy soils has occurred in some cities overseas
following major earthquakes and
is possible in Christchurch, where large parts of the eastern and
northern surburbs sit on sandy soils formed either by marine transgressions
or fluvial material being moved from the mountains. In 1964 an
earthquake badly damaged the Japanese city of Niigata where liquefaction sank
many buildings into the ground after muddy groundwater came to the
surface. It blocked and damaged bridge approaches and covered roads in mud.
SEE ALSO Sand boils.

Sand boils occur when motion underground transports sandy material to
the surface and deposits it on and around cracks opened during the
preceeding seismic event. In New Zealand they occurred in the 1987 Bay of
Plenty earthquake and in the big 1855 earthquake on the Wairarapa Fault.

Continued next post




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 164 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Feb  8, 2001 (18:34) * 14 lines 
 
Continued

Tsunami as most here know is a Japanese word for the seismic sea waves
that sometimes accompany earthquakes. Tsunami waves can and do vary
from as little as 3-4 centimetres in height to 100 metres in the more
severe cases. The 1998 Papua New Guinea tsunami killed 3000 people and was
10 metres high. It was generated by a magnitude 7+ earthquake offshore.
An earthquake in Chile (the most powerful on record)in 1960 generated a
tsunami that hit Lyttelton 15 hours later, Hilo about the same time and
Japan about 5 hours later. It badly damaged the Hilo waterfront and
disrupted shipping movements in Lyttelton for 8 hours. Several were killed
in Hilo and nearly 100 in Japan.

Thanks, Rob!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 165 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Feb  8, 2001 (19:23) * 1 lines 
 
Rob, a 1946 Tsunami hit Laupahoehoe just up the coast north of Hilo. It took out a grade school and all the students and teachers. Some few survived, but many were lost. This Quake had come from the Aleutians. We get it from either end, it seems. Hilo is long overdue for another great quake and/or tsunami.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 166 of 639: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Feb 13, 2001 (18:01) * 1 lines 
 
That is an upsetting thought, Marcia.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 167 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 14, 2001 (23:02) * 1 lines 
 
Ah yes, but we have had a quake-generated tsuanmi from each direction, and the places cleansed of human occupation are now open fields for bayfront beautification, soccer fields and canoe-racing sheds for outrigger canoes. Out of tragedy - even as great as a tsunami, comes some good. I think our 7.2 quake was sufficient for another generation. I feel quite secure here!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 168 of 639: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sat, Feb 17, 2001 (13:57) * 1 lines 
 
Glad to hear that you should be safe for another generation.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 169 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 18, 2001 (00:07) * 54 lines 
 
yup... God willing and the lava don't rise...

El Salvador Earthquake Turns Deadly

SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador (AP) - A sharp earthquake rattled El
Salvador's capital Saturday, killing at least one person and fraying
nerves in a nation already stricken by two deadly quakes and
thousands of aftershocks this year.
Crowds of people, some weeping, ran into the streets after the quake
hit with a sudden thud at about 2:25 p.m. local time, sending ominous
clouds of dust rising from the crater of the San Salvador Volcano
overlooking the city.
The government reported one death and three injuries and said the
quake set off scattered landslides. Two people were pulled alive from
the ruins of a house in Apopa, north of San Salvador.
The quake had a magnitude of 5.3 and was centered just south of the
capital, the National Emergency Committee said. It created further
anxiety for San Salvador, where two earlier quakes killed more than
1,200 people.
``If we are going to die, let us die now,'' said taxi driver Daniel Santos,
fed up by the shuddering earth. ``This is torture.''
A 7.6-magnitude earthquake on Jan. 13 killed at least 844 people and
damaged or destroyed 278,000 dwellings. Exactly one month later, a
6.6-magnitude quake killed at least 402, injured 3,153 and destroyed
45,000 homes.
There have been thousands of aftershocks in recent weeks, several of
them with a magnitude of 5 or greater.
``I'm panicked. I feel like we've been afflicted,'' said Esmeralda
Mendoza, 26. She stood almost frozen outside a pharmacy, still
trembling almost an hour after Saturday's quake. ``This is going to
finish off El Salvador.''
With the national government bombarded with complaints of
sluggishness and overwhelmed by red tape, local mayors have been
taking charge - an unusual step in a highly centralized country.
Local officials in Santa Tecla, where hundreds died in a landslide set off
by the January quake, began negotiating with foreign donors and
distributing aid before national leaders were organized.
After a brief squabble, the national government announced aid would
be channeled through mayors - though it complicated the task by
promising aid that had not yet arrived in local hands.
Several mayors were attacked by mobs of desperate disaster victims
who believed they were holding back help.
Mayors who in the past hardly made a move without consulting national
officials now are negotiating directly with foreign governments and aid
groups.
``We're seeing organizations pick a town to rebuild rather than just
sending aid to the country,'' said Cesar Martinez, spokesman for the
Foreign Ministry.
President Francisco Flores heads to Europe in the coming days to plead
a second time for emergency funds. The government says it needs $3
billion dollars to get the country back on its feet.
The main opposition party, the former guerrillas of the Farabundo Marti
National Liberation Front, started its own plan for reconstruction and
has clashed with the government about how aid should be handled.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 170 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Feb 24, 2001 (19:57) * 16 lines 
 
Three Killed As Quake Rocks China's Sichuan
Reuters
Feb 24 2001 8:02PM
BEIJING (Reuters) - Three people were killed and many injured by an
earthquake that struck a remote part of China's Sichuan province,
state media reported on Saturday.
The quake measuring 6.0 on the open-ended Richter scale struck a
mountainous area populated by ethnic Tibetans in the southwestern
province on Friday.
Xinhua news agency reported a large number of houses were damaged
or destroyed by the earthquake, which seriously damaged roads and
services, including water supplies, power and telecommunications.
The official news agency gave no exact figure for injuries.
Earlier, Xinhua reported the quake rocked Yajiang and Kangding
counties at 8:09 a.m. and was felt in 20 towns by around 20,000
people.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 171 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr 15, 2001 (17:36) * 57 lines 
 
EARTHQUAKE MAGNITUDES

MAGNITUDES: Magnitude, a logarithmic measure of the "size" of an
earthquake, is related to the energy released as seismic waves at the focus
of an earthquake. Although the magnitude scale has neither "top" nor
"bottom" values, the highest magnitude known was about 9.5, the lowest
about -3.0. On this logarithmic scale, a magnitude 6.0 shallow-focus
earthquake represents elastic-wave energy about 30 times larger than that
generated by a magnitude 5.0 earthquake, 900 times (30x30) larger than
that of a magnitude 4.0 shock.
Many factors influence the determination of earthquake magnitude,
including focal depth, distance between earthquake focus and observing
station, frequency content of the sampled energy, and earthquake radiation
pattern.
Magnitude values calculated by the USGS with a brief description of
parameters are shown below (see paragraphs under Contributed Magnitudes
for appropriate references):

Surface-wave (Ms): Magnitudes are computed for earthquakes that are
located at distances between 20 and 160 geocentric degrees from the
recording station, seismic-wave period between 18 and 22 seconds, and depth
is less than 50 km (generally Ms magnitudes are not computed for depths
greater than 50 km.

Body-wave (mb): Magnitude values are computed based on the seismic-wave
period greater than or equal to 0.1 and less than or equal to 3.0, and
distance is greater than or equal to 5 degrees.

Moment Magnitude (Mw): The magnitude is computed from a long-period
body- and mantle-wave moment tensor inversion method; it is also related
to the product of the area of the earthquake fault, multiplied by the
average fault slip over that area and by the shear modulus of the fault
rocks. The Mw value is approximately the same as the Ms magnitude value.
Energy Magnitude (Me): These magnitudes are computed from the radiated
energy using the method described in Choy and Boatwright (1995). The
energy radiated by an earthquake is estimated from the energy spectral
density of the broadband P waves (Boatwright and Choy, 1986). The Me can
complement moment magnitudes (Mw) in describing the size of an
earthquake. Me, being derived from velocity power spectra, is a measure of the
amount of damage that could be caused. Mw, being derived from
low-frequency asymptote of displacement spectra, is more physically related to
the final static displacement of an earthquake.

Local Magnitudes:

Local Magnitude (ML): This magnitude is generally referred to as the
true "Richter magnitude" (originally defined for California). The values
are computed for distances less than 600 km with depths less than 70
km. These estimates are computed in the western part of the United States
as well as world-wide, often using different calibrating functions.
Local or Regional Magnitude (Mn or MbLg): This value is calculated for
the area of North America east of the Rocky Mountains. It is computed
from the vertical component 1-second Lg seismic-waves (short-period
surface waves). It has also been used in other parts of the world, using
different calibrating functions.

Mahalo to hardin_r http://clubs.yahoo.com/clubs/worldseismicity


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 172 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr 28, 2001 (11:12) * 26 lines 
 
***********************************
Satellite imagry of the India Quake
***********************************

The earthquake that struck western India this January
brought water to places that had previously been dry. Shaken
by the 7.7 magnitude earthquake, water trapped between tiny
grains of sand and layers of mud beneath salt flats was
squeezed out and forced to the surface. This water is visible
in images from NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer
(MISR) and a perspective image combining data from the Shuttle
Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and Landsat-7.

These images show how different Earth-observing
instruments can provide unique points of view of the same
phenomenon.

They are available online at:

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/pictures/indiaearthquake

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is a division of the
California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.





 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 173 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May 10, 2001 (03:43) * 55 lines 
 
Post-Quake Stress May Cause Quakes

By ANDREW BRIDGES, AP Science Writer

A buildup of stress in the Earth's crust after an earthquake can trigger a
sequence of quakes on neighboring faults - sometimes years later, say
scientists who studied the two largest quakes to hit Southern California
in the last decade.

Seven years and a dozen miles separated the magnitude-7.3 Landers
and magnitude-7.1 Hector Mine earthquakes northeast of Los Angeles.

But the researchers say stress in the Earth's brittle upper crust following
1992 Landers quake likely triggered the second.

The first earthquake, followed hours later by the magnitude-6.5 Big
Bear earthquake, killed one person and caused $100 million in damage.
The 1999 Hector Mine quake resulted in few injuries or damage since it
struck a more remote area.

The report, published in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature, suggests
that careful monitoring of stress levels in the Earth's crust following
earthquakes can help scientists in their quest to predict quakes.

``It's a recognition that earthquakes do occur in clusters and sequences.
And if we can understand those sequences maybe we have a chance at
understanding when the next ones will occur,'' said Andrew Freed, a
geophysicist at the Carnegie Institution in Washington, D.C., and the
paper's co-author.

The estimated magnitude-7.8 earthquake that laid waste to much of San
Francisco in 1906 relieved so much stress that the region experienced
few quakes for decades.

But others, such as 1989's Loma Prieta magnitude-7.1 earthquake near
San Francisco that killed 69, may portend seismic activity to come,
Freed said.

In big earthquakes, Freed said, large amounts of stress are induced on
the Earth's lower crust and upper mantle. Those regions cannot sustain
the stress over time and slowly snap back.

As those regions relax, the stress is taken up by the upper crust,
eventually causing earthquakes that can hit, domino-like, months or
years later, Freed said.

That stress is relayed between faults, often over miles and years, is not
in dispute. Other models point to the movement of groundwater as the
prime relayer of the built-up stress.

``The basic tenets of the theory are pretty sound: When you move a
fault, you increase stress,'' said Susan Hough, a U.S. Geological Survey
seismologist.

http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010509/sc/delayed_quakes_1.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 174 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 13, 2001 (19:18) * 26 lines 
 
From The Oregonian (Portland)
Sensors detect 'silent' quake

A slow-motion movement in 1999 around the Puget Sound area unleashes energy
equivalent to a big earthquake, scientists say

Saturday, April 21, 2001

By Brent Hunsberger of The Oregonian staff

Two summers ago, while the Seattle Mariners tried out their new baseball
stadium, much of Puget Sound moved several millimeters west. The earth
below unleashed as much power as February's 6.8-magnitude earthquake that
cracked Washington's state Capitol dome....

You should be able to get the whole story from:
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/news/oregonian/lc_71shift21.
frame

Note: URL includes word 'frame'.

----- earthquake WARNING research -----
--- animals, people, scientific evidence ---
--- http://www.earthquakewarning.org ---




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 175 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 13, 2001 (19:21) * 3 lines 
 
the above unfelt 6.8 quake is at url

http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/news/oregonian/lc_71shift21.frame


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 176 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 14, 2001 (13:28) * 95 lines 
 
News Release
U.S. Department of the Interior
U.S. Geological Survey
Release Date:
May 14, 2001

Yellowstone Volcano Observatory Established U.S. Geological Survey, Yellowstone National Park and the University of Utah Partnership

May 14, 2001 ? The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), Yellowstone National
Park and the University of Utah have signed an agreement to establish the
Yellowstone Volcano Observatory to strengthen long-term monitoring of
earthquakes and the slumbering volcano beneath Yellowstone National Park.
This agreement provides for improved collaborative study and monitoring of
active geologic processes and hazards of the Yellowstone volcanic field and
caldera, site of the largest and most diverse collection of natural hot
springs, mud pots and steam vents in the world.

"The new observatory will improve our efforts to monitor Yellowstone's
extraordinarily large and long-lived volcanic system," said USGS scientist
Robert L. Christiansen, Scientist-in-Charge of the new observatory.
Christiansen was the Scientist-in-Charge of the Mount St. Helens monitoring
effort during the 1980 eruption. "This agreement is a natural evolution of
our collective work over the years to track and study Yellowstone's unrest.
There is no increased threat of eruptive activity at Yellowstone to cause
concern at this time. We will use YVO to share what we are learning with
the public, Park visitors, and nearby residents, and to be in a better
position to provide warning of any future hazardous activity."

The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO) is the fifth such observatory in
the United States and will be based from existing facilities at the USGS,
the University of Utah and Yellowstone National Park. The new observatory
is modeled after the USGS volcano observatories in Hawaii, Alaska,
California and the Pacific Northwest. The observatories employ a variety
of ground-based instruments and satellite data to monitor active and
restless volcanoes and conduct a variety of studies to understand their
eruptive and seismic histories and potential hazards. Together, the five
observatories monitor 43 of the 70 or so potentially hazardous volcanoes in
the United States. The five observatories are operated under the auspices
of the USGS Volcano Hazards Program.

The Yellowstone National Park and surrounding area encompass the largest
active magmatic system in North America. The spectacular geysers, boiling
hot springs, and mud pots that have made Yellowstone famous owe their
existence to volcanic activity that has affected the region during the past
2 million years.

"The extensive thermal features of Yellowstone National Park are fueled by
heat from a large magma chamber beneath the caldera. The chamber is fed
from a magma source in the Earth's deep interior that collectively form the
Yellowstone hotspot," said Robert B. Smith, University of Utah Coordinating
Scientist of YVO. "In the past decades we've measured the ground across
the youngest caldera rising as much as three feet and falling by a foot.
This active deformation was accompanied by thousands of small earthquakes,
marking the Park as a living geologic system."

Cataclysmic explosive eruptions 2 million, 1.3 million, and 640 thousand
years ago ejected huge volumes of molten rock and formed large overlapping
elliptical depressions called calderas. The youngest caldera in the Park,
about 50 miles long and 30 miles wide, has been buried by the most recent
eruptions of thick lava flows between about 75,000 and 150,000 years ago.
Yellowstone region is seismically active. The 1959 Hebgen Lake earthquake
(surface-wave magnitude 7.5), centered just outside the Park's northwestern
boundary was responsible for 26 of the quake's 28 deaths. This event is
one of the 15 strongest earthquakes ever recorded in the contiguous U.S.

"While the active geologic processes at Yellowstone do impart some risk to
the public, they also make it a unique treasure ? it is the volcanic and
seismic energy that powers the geysers and hot springs, creates the
mountains and canyons, and generates the unique ecosystems that support
Yellowstone's diverse wildlife," notes Paul K. Doss, Yellowstone National
Park Coordinating Scientist of YVO. "YVO will help the Park's interpretive
and education programs with strong outreach efforts to inform the public
about the impact of geological activity on the character of Yellowstone."

Information about Yellowstone and the Volcano Observatory is available
online at:
U.S. Geological Survey Yellowstone Volcano Observatory
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/
University of Utah http://www.seis.utah.edu/yvo
University of Utah http://www.mines.utah.edu/~rbsmith/RESEARCH/UUGPS.html
National Park Service http://www.nps.gov/yell/

Additional contact information:
Carolyn Bell (USGS), 703-648-4463, cbell@usgs.gov
Lee Siegel (Utah), 801-581-8993, leesiegel@ucomm.utah.edu
Cheryl Matthews (NPS), 307-344-2013, Cheryl_Matthews@nps.gov

The USGS serves the nation by providing impartial scientific information to
describe and understand the Earth, its resources and processes; minimize
loss of life and property from natural disasters, manage water, biological,
energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life.

*******USGS*****




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 177 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jun 12, 2001 (16:46) * 26 lines 
 
John Tsatsaragos gave me persmission to post this. Mahalo, John!

Association between EQ’s and Moon Phases
What happens really?
As we are known well, the earth’s upper crust in one place is moving up and down every 6 hours by the combination of the tidal gravity forces and the centrifugal force from the earth’s rotation around its axis. The amplitude of this moving it depends on relative position of the sun and the moon or simply according to moon phase.
This amplitude is high at full or at new moon and low at first quarter or last quarter. Also, this amplitude is higher at earth’s places were applying the resultant gravity force from the sun and the moon.

What happens in place were exists a fault? What happens there when the ground is moving up and down?
When the ground is moving up, each side of the fault feel inclined to draw away from the other side. So, the pressure at the fault sides tends to reduce. As the ground is moving higher, so much lower pressure applied.
When the ground is moving down each side of the fault feel inclined to converge the other side. So, the pressure in the fault sides tends to increase. As the ground is moving lower, so much higher pressure applied.
These alternations in the pressure value are added to the pressure values by the continue movement of tectonic plates. So, is varying the total pressure value.

From the other hand it happens a ground deformation (and an EQ) when the pressure exceeds the pressure-breaking limit in three cases:
When the two sides of the fault, feel inclined to converge each other (collision).
When one side of the fault, feel inclined to deflect from the other side (expanding).
When one side is sliding on the other side.

Conclusions
Having in mind the upper things:
The EQ’s occur not randomly in the time but in specifically moments.
We can to say that the daily max amplitude of tides on the earth’s crust it depends on moon phases.
Does not happen any EQ, if the pressure (from the plates continues moving) on the fault sides is already enough lower than the breaking limit.
Main is the value of this pressure and after that the moon phase.

Criterion for the fact that high pressure on a fault exists or not, can be the piezoelectric voltage (produced on the rocks), which alternate, in the same rhythm with tides on the ground. This is the base for my method to predict respecting near EQ’s. This method it seems finely good.



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 178 of 639: Rob Glennie  (AotearoaKiwi) * Sun, Jun 24, 2001 (03:51) * 7 lines 
 
Hi

A big earthquake hits Peru and all this topic has to say is a deafening silence?? What use is that??

Nah, just joking, though I had expected a few messages of concern here and there and in Peru because an Mw 8.1 is NO mean feat.

Rob


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 179 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun 24, 2001 (19:29) * 1 lines 
 
Rob, this is my little goof. I mamaged to delete this topic, and before I could regain it, I created topic 26 to carry on. This one I try to save for the lengthy stories to augment 26's updates. If they are crucial, they go on Geo 1 where all things of immediate import. Further posts on Peru will go here and the stats and others will continue on 26, but we don't necessarily follow the rules around here. Just get the need for preparedness out!!!!!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 180 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun 24, 2001 (19:34) * 36 lines 
 
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20010624/ts/quake_peru_dc_11.html This url will not only tell you the tale below, it has a video attached!

Peru Scours Hills, Sea for Quake Victims
By Eduardo Orozco
AREQUIPA, Peru (Reuters) - Teams of emergency workers scoured Peru's southern mountains and coast on Sunday to find survivors and ferry blankets, tents, food and medicine to thousands of people left homeless after a quake killed dozens of people and injured hundreds more.
Littering southern Peru with rubble and debris, the 7.9-magnitude earthquake flattened mountain villages, triggered mudslides that blocked highways and wrecked homes, churches and schools in cities.
``Please help us, we've lost everything,'' wailed Maria Luis Arbului, whose house where she lived with her daughter was destroyed. ``The rocks took my bed and my furniture and now I'm left out on the street.''
Authorities initially estimated about 50 people died and emergency workers predicted the toll could rise. By Sunday afternoon, civil defense officials said they had confirmed 38 people dead.
In this devout nation of 26 million, mourners paraded religious figures through the streets of Arequipa, one of the worst-hit urban areas, and asked for protection from powerful aftershocks that rocked Peru's second-largest city.

A DAMAGED CATHEDRAL
In this colonial ``White City,'' the mourners stepped through tumbled masonry on streets lined with damaged historic houses. One of the towers of the cathedral -- founded in 1612 and a now major tourist attraction -- toppled in the quake.
Arequipa sits on a high Andean plain 630 miles south of Lima, beneath the snow-capped volcano ``El Misti.''
Spilling out of overcrowded hospitals, some of the injured lay outside in the streets on beds with intravenous drips.
``We're terrified about aftershocks. Our hotel almost collapsed,'' said Santiago Freitas, 32, a Portuguese tourist.
Red Cross officials said the coastal town of Camana was struck by a tidal wave on Saturday that destroyed houses. Some 36 people were reported missing and Arequipa police said ``cadavers keep washing up from the sea.''
By early on Sunday, there were 26 aftershocks with up to a 6.2 magnitude, Peruvian officials said.

With thousands of survivors throughout the highlands huddling under blankets shivering in the winter cold of the Southern Hemisphere, President Valentin Paniagua directed the massive relief operation. He flew to assess damage in several towns, including Moquegua, 856 miles south of Lima, where he said the situation was ``heart-wrenching.''
The interim leader declared a state of emergency in the entire affected region, promising assistance in transferring the injured to medical centers along with government funding and credit for obliterated homes.
The military scoured isolated rural areas of mainly mud-brick built homes to identify worst-hit villages and take supplies to survivors dotted across hillsides, who had been cut off from their families following the quake.
But scant resources in this impoverished nation impeded rescue efforts. ``We are planning to go out and look for disappeared people but we don't have the money for gas for the journey,'' said Moises Gonzalez of Arequipa's Red Cross.

FATE OF REMOTE VILLAGES UNKNOWN
President-elect Alejandro Toledo arrived in Arequipa after postponing a trip to the United States to ``extend a hand of solidarity.'' He told CPN radio he would seek assistance for the affected when he did make his planned trip.
Maria Colchon, 40, attended a Mass outside a damaged church with teetering columns. ``I've come here to give thanks for my son, who was hit by a falling wall but was saved,'' she said.
The International Committee of the Red Cross feared the official death toll would mount, especially in the many mud-and-brick peasant homes in isolated highland villages in southern Peru.
``We are concentrating on the likelihood that the casualties will increase, particularly in terms of homeless people,'' Ian Logan of the ICRC told CNN in an interview from the committee's headquarters in Geneva.
Local officials said they were communicating by radio with some rural areas, but that severed lines impeded contact.

Peru said the earthquake had a magnitude of 6.0 but the U.S. Geological Survey reported it as magnitude 7.9. It was Peru's strongest quake since 1970, when a quake of the same magnitude killed 70,000 and left some 600,000 homeless.

The quake struck at 3:33 p.m. Its epicenter was 51 miles northwest of the southern town of Ocona, Peru's Geophysical Institute said.
``In this particular area, it's the worst (earthquake) since 1913,'' Waverly Person, geophysicist at the U.S. National Earthquake Information Center, told Reuters.




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 181 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun 25, 2001 (18:50) * 51 lines 
 
Regarding the Great Quake in Peru - From Sandi, the resident Seismologist at http://clubs.yahoo.com/clubs/worldseismicity


This is a good quake to illustrate aspects of the different magnitude
scales.
The different scales were calibrated to give numbers similar to the
Richter ML (Local) magnitude, but since the measurements are carried out
with different kinds of waves there is always some mismatch.
The Ms 8.2 of this quake is the surface wave magnitude, based on the
Raleigh surface waves that follow the earth's surface, in the period
range from 18 to 22 s., with a speed less than S-waves. There is no
correction applied for the depth of the quake since this scale is best used
for shallow quakes.
The preliminary postings of magnitude can be confusing because the
scale used to measure the event is usually not yet indicated. So, yesterday
we first saw a M 7.9, then we saw Peru give a M 6.0, and a short time
later a M 6.9, which blew me away. I knew that the M 6.0 had to be the
Richter magnitude which many countries still use, but that isn't an
accurate measure for quakes above about M 6.0. This quake easily saturated
the Richter magnitude scale. When I saw the M 6.9, I didn't know what
to think except that it was probably a Richter magnitude.
The Mb (body-wave) scale utilizes compressional body P-wave amplitudes
with generally 1 s-period P waves. But, the maximum body-wave
magnitudes are about 6.5 - 6.8. So, I would not tend to think of a M 6.9 as a
body-wave magnitude, but that's what it was! This earthquake saturated
the body-wave magnitude scale. That was a given, since larger
earthquakes, which have larger surface ruptures, radiate more long-period energy.
So, body-wave magnitudes totally underestimate the true size of a great
quake, and are best used for deeper focused quakes.
However, the surface wave magnitude scale also saturates above 8.3 -
8.7. This is because damage to structures is often caused by energy at
shorter periods. Therefore, the 1960 Chile earthquake and 1964 Alaska
quakes were first calculated to be within that range and had to be
recalcuated later.
This quake didn't saturate the surface wave scale, so this scale could
give a good estimation of it's size. The difference between M 8.1 and M
8.2 is fairly insignificant.
If this quake had exceeded the saturation point of the surface wave
magnitude scale, then it could not have been utilized. Therefore, a method
needed to be developed that would accurately measure the largest quakes
on the planet.
The Moment magnitude scale (Mw), now the preferred scale, accounts for
much more than the amplitude of ground motion, the corresponding period
in seconds, and a correction factor for the distance between the
epicenter and stations, and the focal depth of the quake.
The Mw 8.1 and the Mw 8.0 are the moment
magnitudes calculated by the USGS and Harvard, respectively. It's late
here. I'll leave the fault geometry and the seismic moment Mo used to
calculate the Moment magnitude until tomorrow.




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 182 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jun 26, 2001 (19:49) * 15 lines 
 
Quake Victims Rally Around Cathedral
By CRAIG MAURO, Associated Press Writer

AREQUIPA, Peru (AP) - One steeple is toppled and large chunks have fallen from the other. An intricate bell tower lies shattered on the ground. The altar has collapsed, buried under steel beams.
In a city that has been named a world cultural treasure by the United Nations (news - web sites) for its architecture, the damaged 17th-century Cathedral has become a rallying point for Peruvians digging out after a weekend earthquake that killed 102 people.
Since the 8.1-magnitude temblor, thousands of residents of this Andean highland city have flocked to the imposing stone edifice.
``We Arequipans have a lot of courage and strength,'' said Jorge Rosada, a vegetable farmer, watching the effort already under way. ``I think the entire town is going to recoup its strength - and recover our cathedral.''

Church workers wearing smocks and hardhats hauled away debris in wheelbarrows with the help of cadets from Arequipa's police academy.
``It's a top priority for us to restore it,'' said Mayor Juan Manuel Guillen. ``Arequipans are warriors, we don't give up. We're a little beaten up right now, but we will prevail.''
Nestled amid the Andes mountains 465 miles southeast of Lima, Arequipa is nicknamed Peru's colonial ``White City'' because of its brightly colored buildings that sparkle in the sun. Colonial-era mansions line the downtown streets, with Spanish-style courtyards peeking out from behind facades of carved volcanic rock and wooden balconies.
But the city is located in an area prone to earthquakes.
Before Saturday, its residents had suffered through four major quakes - in 1687, 1868, 1858, and 1960. The church, built in 1656 and known simply as the Cathedral, weathered the natural disasters, although suffered extensive damage in 1868. It also survived an 1844 fire.

more... http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010626/wl/peru_earthquake.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 183 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jun 26, 2001 (20:50) * 22 lines 
 
Rob reports New Zealand got a 20 cm tsunami from the recent 8.1 Magnitude quake.

Sandi reports this day in history http://clubs.yahoo.com/clubs/worldseismicity

The M 6.2 Hawaiian Earthquake of 1989

26 Jun 1989 HAWAII 03:27:03.9 19.217 N 155.050 W
Dep: 9 MD 6.2 (HVO). Ms 6.2 (BRK), 6.2 (PAS).

Two events about 5 seconds apart. Five people injured slightly, 5 homes
destroyed and about 100 homes damaged in the Puna District. Landslides
occurred in several places and blocked a road at Honomu. Slight damage
(VI) at Hawaii National Park, Hilo, Honomu and Keaau. Felt (V) at
Honokaa, Kapaau, Kurtistown, Ninole, Ookala, Paauhau and Volcano; (IV) at
Hakalau, Hawi, Holualoa, Honaunau, Laupahoehoe and Pahala. Felt
throughout the island of Hawaii. Also felt on
Maui and Oahu. A small tsunami was generated with maximum wave heights
(peak-to-trough) of 57 cm at Honuapo, 21 cm at Kapoho and 14 cm at
Hilo. The focal mechanism is moderately well controlled and corresponds to
reverse faulting with a moderate strike-slip component.




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 184 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jun 26, 2001 (20:57) * 8 lines 
 
I remember this quake. As I reported, this was quite a strong shove. I was not home. My then husband was at the university watching the tropical metal roofs flap up and down. My son was in school under his desk, and I was on my way home in a car. We pulled over as we are taught to do (not stop dead in the streets as they tell you in the earthquake tests becuase you wills surely cause a pileup of cars if you do!) When I got home I found my large 12 segment candelabra flung across the room and the unlit candles scattered everywhere. I got rid of the candelabra straight away. I needed no further warnings as to the hazard.




http://clubs.yahoo.com/clubs/worldseismicity




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 185 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jun 27, 2001 (18:56) * 31 lines 
 
Liam, what a concept! Thanks for sending this from The Electonic Telegraph:

Is the real Nessie just a case of the shakes?
By Roger Highfield

THE Loch Ness monster stirs from her underwater lair when the earth
shakes, according to a geological explanation unveiled today at an
international scientific meeting.

Decades of argument about whether the lake is inhabited
by a dinosaur-like monster may be ended by the new
theory advanced by Dr Luigi Piccardi of the Centro di
Studio dell' Appennino e delle Catene Perimediterranee in
Florence.

The first record of the monster in the seventh century was inspired by an
earthquake, according to Dr Piccardi, a geologist who specialises in seeking
links between myths and geological phenomena.

He argues that the most convincing of the many thousands of recent sightings
agree on few details except that the "monster" creates a huge splash and
commotion in the loch, similar to the wake of an earth tremor.

Dr Piccardi presented his theory yesterday in Edinburgh at Earth System
Processes, a meeting organised by the Geological Society of London and the
Geological Society of America. The scientist, who believes studies should be
conducted to link seismic activity with unusual water movements in the loch,
has not yet discussed his paper, Seismotectonic origins of the monster of
Loch Ness, with Nessie hunters.

more... http://www.telegraph.co.uk/et?ac=004826292612046&rtmo=wKwejQtb&atmo=rrrrrrrq&pg=/et/01/6/27/ness27.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 186 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun 29, 2001 (23:07) * 51 lines 
 
Sandi the Seismologist in http://clubs.yahoo.com/clubs/worldseismicity

In contrast to the previously discussed magnitude scales, the moment
magnitude scale accounts for much more than the amplitude of ground
motion, the corresponding period in seconds, and a correction factor for the
distance between the epicenter and stations, and the focal depth of the
quake.

The peak amplitude of a wave, which the mentioned magnitude scales use
to determine the size of a quake, can be compared to the strongest gust
of wind in a windstorm, which alone is not a reliable measure of the
overall force of the windstorm. It does not measure the overall
mechanical power of the source.

Seismologists have, therefore, turned to classical mechanics in which
movement results from the application of forces. To illustrate: If you
place both hands on the edge of a heavy table, and push on one while
pulling the other horizontally, the more widely separated your hands,
thereby increasing the leverage, the easier it is to rotate the table. The
two equal and opposite forces are called the force "couple". The size
of the couple is it's "moment," FL, the product of the value of one of
the two forces F and the distance L between them. That concept is
applied to the combination of forces that produce slip on a fault.

The seismic moment of earthquakes, Mo, is a measure of earthquake size
related to the leverage of the forces (couples) across the area of
fault slip, the rigidity of the rock times the area of faulting times the
amount of slip, and is related to the total energy released in the EQ.
The seismic moment can also be estimated using geodetic or field
measurements of the fault source slip.

The size of an earthquake can be described by the fault geometry and
seismic moment. The fault geometry and the wave amplitudes are used to
compute moment. The fault geometry is determined from a waveform analysis
of the seismograms recorded at the various stations at varying
distances and azimuths from the earthquake. The differing shapes and directions
of motion of the recorded waveforms are used to determine the geometry
of the fault that has ruptured.

The overall geometry of the ruptured fault includes the direction of
fault movement, the average displacement (slip) of the fault plane, the
surface area of the fault, the orientation of the fault, and the
rigidity (shear strength) of the material of the fault.

The moment, Mo, is then converted into a number similar to other
earthquake magnitudes by a standard formula. The result is called the moment
magnitude, Mw. The moment magnitude provides an estimate of earthquake
size that is valid over the entire range of magnitudes, the
characteristic that was lacking in other magnitude scales.




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 187 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun 29, 2001 (23:20) * 7 lines 
 
There will be a quiz on this tomorrow !

Fantastic job, Sandi! Thanks for sharing what comes so naturally to you to us who just quake along with the rest of the earth.

She also sent this which I will repost on Geo 49

http://www0.mercurycenter.com/special/homepage/graphics/quake.pdf


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 188 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul  1, 2001 (14:05) * 4 lines 
 
Regarding the above post, I didn't because you need the Adobe Acrobat graphics to see it properly.

For everything you ever wanted to know about earthquakes, and then some:
http://www.mysteries-megasite.com/main/bigsearch/earth-3.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 189 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul  1, 2001 (14:44) * 8 lines 
 
Ropb back to your question on the cause of the Alps, the net is full of scholarly theories all reducing down to the single idea such as this
Causes of Earthquakes
- Two main belts: Pacific Rim and Portugal to S. Asia
1) In the Pacific, earthquakes are related to the giant convection currents moving the ocean floor.

2) The belt of earthquakes passing through the continental mountain ranges of the Alps, Andes, Himalayas could be the result of mountains growing and decaying - this is called orogenesis . Erosion wears down the mountains making them lighter. To reach a state of equilibrium (theory of isostasy ) other areas rise causing earthquakes.

Note the use of the words "probable" and "could be"


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 190 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul  1, 2001 (14:47) * 4 lines 
 
The collision of the African and European plates that started during the Cretaceous resulted in the formation of the Alps. This orogenic event followed a period of extension during which these two plates moved apart. This separation, which began as early as the late Permian, was triggered by the initial formation of the Atlantic Ocean. While the Atlantic formed to the West, the Tethys
Ocean formed between Europe and Africa. The Tethys was a North-Northeast trending ocean that was bound by the European/Iberian margin to the west and the Adriatic promontory of Africa to east. This ocean began closing during the Cretaceous as Africa moved towards the northeast and the opening Atlantic pushed Southern Europe to the east. The oceanic crust of the Tethys then began being subducted beneath the African plate and a series of ophiolite nappes formed along the edge of the subducting oceanic crust. This initial stage of deformation also resulted in the formation of the Pyrenees as the Iberian sub-plate was pushed into the southern part of the European plate. The main alpine deformation, however, ocurred during the Tertiary as the African plate rotated in a counter clockwise direction and moved in an increasingly Northwestern direction relative to a stationary Europe. This motion led to a series of collisional structures that are the Alps.

more... http://love.geology.yale.edu/kgl/Dept_Information/FieldTrips/ALPS96/alps96.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 191 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul  6, 2001 (20:37) * 114 lines 
 
You thought I had run out of places that quake?


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Year Mo Da Hr Min Lat Long Depth Mag Int Number Death Millions
Damage Tsunami Geographic Location Data
Source (Reference)
(km) Deaths Des $ Damage
Des Assoc.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

425 0 0 0 0 31.5 35.1 0 0.0 10 0 0.000
3 ISRAEL: JERUSALEM,PALESTINE,RAMLEH; EGYPT 222
447 0 0 0 0 31.5 35.1 0 0.0 9 0 0.000
3 ISRAEL: JERUSALEM; EGYPT; SYRIA; TURKEY: ANTAKYA 222
551 7 9 0 0 33.9 35.5 0 0.0 10 0 0.000
3 1 LEBANON: BAYRUT (BEIRUT); EGYPT; IRAQ;SAUDI ARABI 57,222
856 12 3 0 0 37.0 10.0 0 0.0 10 45000 3 0.000
4 TUNISIA: TUNIS; SYRIA; EGYPT; YEMEN 98,225
* 859 4 8 0 0 36.2 36.1 0 0.0 0 0 3 0.000
4 TURKEY: ANTIOCH; EGYPT; IRAQ: MESOPOTAMIA; USSR 57
885 0 0 0 0 30.0 31.1 0 0.0 10 0 0.000
EGYPT: AL-QAHIRAH (CAIRO) 222
* 1033 0 0 0 0 31.9 35.2 0 0.0 11 70000 3 0.000
3 ISRAEL: RAMALA,GHAZZAH,NABULUS; EGYPT; SYRIA 222
* 1067 0 0 0 0 31.9 34.9 0 0.0 11 25000 3 0.000
3 ISRAEL: RAMLA; SYRIA: DIMASHQ (DAMASCUS); EGYPT 222
1070 2 25 0 0 30.0 31.1 0 0.0 0 0 0.000
2 EGYPT: AL-QAHIRAH (CAIRO); ISRAEL: JERUSALEM 222,225
* 1138 0 0 0 0 36.1 37.2 0 0.0 0 100000 3 0.000
4 EGYPT-SYRIA 57
* 1138 0 0 0 0 36.1 37.2 0 0.0 0 100000 3 0.000
3 EGYPT-SYRIA 57
* 1201 0 0 0 0 34.3 35.5 0 0.0 10 30000 3 0.000
3 LEBANON: TARABULUS,TYRE;ISRAEL;EGYPT;IRAQ;SYRIA 222
* 1201 7 5 0 0 28.0 33.0 0 0.0 9 30000 3 0.000
3 EGYPT: UPPER; SYRIA 57
* 1201 7 5 0 0 28.0 33.0 0 0.0 9 1100000 3 0.000
4 EGYPT: UPPER; OR SYRIA 57,98
1211 6 15 0 0 30.5 31.3 0 0.0 0 0 3 0.000
EGYPT: AL-QAHIRAH (CAIRO) 98
1303 8 6 0 0 36.3 32.1 0 0.0 0 10000 3 0.000
4 EGYPT: ALEXANDRIA; GREECE: PELOPONNESUS,IRAKLION
51,55,98
1481 0 0 0 0 30.0 31.1 0 0.0 7 30000 3 0.000
EGYPT: AL-QAHIRAH;ISRAEL;SYRIA;SAUDI ARABIA:MAKKA 222
1754 9 0 0 0 30.0 32.0 0 0.0 0 40000 3 0.000
3 EGYPT: AL-QAHIRAH (CAIRO) 55,73
* 1822 8 13 18 0 36.0 36.0 0 0.0 10 2000 3 0.000
3 TURKEY: ANTAKYA; SYRIA: HALAB; EGYPT: ALEXANDRI 99,55
1847 8 7 0 0 29.5 30.5 0 0.0 11 126 3 0.000
3 EGYPT: AL-FAYYUM 99,180
* 1856 10 12 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0.0 0 10 1 0.000
EGYPT: N 180
1926 6 26 0 0 0.0 0.0 0 0.0 0 12 1 0.000
EGYPT: LOWER 180
* 1955 9 12 6 9 32.2 29.6 0 6.3 0 18 1 0.000
EGYPT: NILE DELTA 138
* 1955 9 12 6 9 32.2 29.6 0 6.7 0 22 1 0.000
EGYPT: MEDITERRANEAN SEA: E 40
* 1955 9 12 6 9 32.5 29.6 0 6.5 0 20 1 0.000
3 EGYPT: MEDITERRANEAN SEA: E 14
1969 3 31 7 15 27.7 34.0 33 7.1 0 2 1 0.000
3 EGYPT: BENI-SOUEF, AL-QAHIRAH (CAIRO) 11,53
1981 11 14 9 5 23.8 32.6 25 6.0 8 0 0.000
2 EGYPT: ASWAN 232
1992 10 12 13 9 29.8 31.1 22 5.9 0 552 3 300.000
4 EGYPT: CAIRO 53
1995 11 22 4 15 28.8 34.9 10 7.3 12 1
2 EGYPT: NUWAYBI; SAUDI ARABIA; ISRAEL; JORDAN 53



Information Regarding the Significant Earthquake Database


PLEASE NOTE:

Multiple entries indicated by an asterisk (*) before the Year are given
when references offer substantially
different information.

The Date and Time (Year Mo Da Hr Min) are given in Universal
Coordinated Time (UTC), the same as
Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

When a description instead of an actual number of deaths or dollar
damage was included in the literature,
the description was coded in columns Death Des and Damage Des. The
codes should be interpreted as
described below:

Death Description:
1 = FEW
2 = SOME
3 = MANY

Damage Description:
1 = LIMITED (roughly corresponding to less than $1 million)
2 = MODERATE (roughly corresponding to $1 to $5 million)
3 = SEVERE (roughly corresponding to $5 to $25 million)
4 = EXTREME (roughly corresponding to $25 million or more)

The value in the Millions $ Damage column should be multipled by
1,000,000 to obtain the actual dollar
amount.

A 1 in the Tsunami Assoc. column indicates that a tsunami was generated
by the earthquake.

References are associated with the numbers in the Data Source column.
http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/seg/hazard/sig_ref.html

http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/seg/haz/ffq_result.pl


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 192 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul  8, 2001 (00:02) * 23 lines 
 
More of the Nessis-Causing-earthquakes saga:

The UK Government s geological agency, the British Geological Survey believes it unlikely that the Loch Ness Monster is caused by earthquakes, according to a statement issued last week.


The official report was prompted by the debate over the work of Italian neotectonics expert Dr Luigi Piccardi, who presented his speculative theory at a poster session during the recent Earth System Processes meeting in Edinburgh, hosted jointly by the Geological Society of London and the Geological Society of America.

The theory draws on information which is considerably out of date, and the reporting of it has led to the circulation of erroneous ideas which need to be corrected the Survey statement said. Detailed consideration of Piccardi's hypothesis shows it to be false for a number of reasons.

Dr Piccardi believes that earthquakes on the Great Glen Fault, which runs under the Loch, might be associated with some supposed sightings when the surface water of the Loch is disturbed, possibly by waves or the release of gases from the bottom sediments.

The statement continued: A number of earthquakes that have in the past been attributed to the Great Glen Fault actually occurred elsewhere. Piccardi suggests that an earthquake in 1934 was responsible for sightings of the Loch Ness Monster in 1933 and 1934. This earthquake occurred in Torridon, in the NW of Scotland, about 60 km away from Loch Ness, and was felt over the whole of the north of Scotland.

The BGS pointed out that according to its records, modern monster sightings at Loch Ness have not been accompanied by earthquakes. The seismic monitoring network run by BGS would have recorded any such events down to magnitude 2 since 1970.

BGS experts say that the number of observations of the effects of earthquakes in Scotland, historical and modern, is very large. "None of these make any confusion or comparison with monsters, and there is no reason to suppose that people cannot tell the difference between these two phenomena says the Survey.

The statement ends: We therefore conclude that the hypothesis that earthquakes can explain sightings of the Loch Ness is untenable .

The official report will add weight to the views already expressed by Nessie hunters, most of whom have poured scorn on the Piccardi hypothesis. One was quoted in The Daily Mail as saying that any gasseous emissions from Loch Ness were more likely to be Nessie breaking wind .


Thanks Liam - this is truly amazing!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 193 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jul  9, 2001 (14:19) * 36 lines 
 
1971
Chile
7.5
84 people were killed, 447 injured, and 40,000 made homeless
by this earthquake. The earthquake was centered 75 miles
northwest of Santiago. Thousands were without electricity,
drinking water, or telephones and some communities were isolated
by landslides. The port city of Valparaiso was among the hardest
hit. In Santiago frightened crowds rushed into the streets. Walls
were cracked and water mains ruptured sending water spurting
into the streets. The shock was felt as far away as Buenos Aires,
Argentina, 650 miles to the east. A 1.2-meter tsunami was
observed at Valaparaiso.
1975
Western Minnesota
5.0
The largest historical earthquake in Minnesota.
1997
Near Coast of Venezuela
7.0
At least 81 people killed, 522 injured, extensive damage and
landslides in the Cariaco-Cumana area. At least 3,000 people
were left homeless. Several people injured in the
Barcelona-Puerto La Cruz area. Some damage on Isla de
Margarita. Power, telephone and water services disrupted on Isla
Coche and Isla de Margarita. Felt in much of northeastern
Venezuela and as far west as Maracaibo. Felt (V) on Trinidad.
Also felt on Tobago.
From Significant Earthquakes of the World 1997.
1998
Azores Islands
6.2
Ten people killed, about 100 injured and 1,000 left homeless on
Faial. Some damage on Pico and Terceira. Felt on Corvo and San
Jorge.
From Significant Earthquakes of the World 1998.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 194 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 12, 2001 (00:24) * 25 lines 
 
Scientists Devise Technique That More Accurately Estimates Age of Shallow Faults Near Earth's Surface

ANN ARBOR, Mich., July 11 (AScribe News) -- A new approach developed by scientists at the University of
Michigan and ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company allows direct dating of faults---surfaces along which rocks
break and move---near Earth's surface. A report on the work appears in the July 12 issue of the journal Nature.

Dating shallow faults is essential to understanding the evolution of Earth's crust, the interactions among the plates
that make up Earth's surface, and the processes by which faults are activated and reactivated, explains Ben van der Pluijm, professor of geological sciences at U-M. For some time, scientists have been able to directly determine the
ages of deeper rocks, but until now the age of shallow crustal faults could only be inferred through indirect dating methods---by studying the ages of fossils in associated deposits, for example. Such estimates can suggest only a
broad age range spanning many million years, not a precise age. The technique described in Nature, however, narrows down the age to within a couple of million years---practically pinpoint accuracy in geologic terms.

The researchers used the new method, which combines several approaches, to carefully analyze clays from near-surface faults in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. "That's an extremely well-studied area geologically, but there
have been few reliable absolute ages on the faulting," says van der Pluijm. As a result, "we have not been able to get a firm handle on how fast processes like mountain building occur, when old faults stop being active and when new
ones kick in, and the link between global plate tectonic processes and their surface expression," he says.

That kind of information has more than academic value, says van der Pluijm: "If you remember the stories about earthquakes in California, they often occur along faults we hadn't really seen active before. It's not because they
weren't there; they just hadn't been activated in recent record." While the new method probably never will help scientists predict exactly when earthquakes will strike again at a specific fault, it should provide more general insights
into the fault processes involved.

"If we understand more about the rates of these processes, we'll understand more about recurrence in general, and we'll get a better understanding of the mechanical behavior of the outer part of Earth," says van der Pluijm. "So we might ultimately get a better handle on the activation and reactivation of faults."

Van der Pluijm collaborated on the research with U-M research scientist Chris M. Hall, and Peter J. Vrolijk, David R. Pevear and Michael C. Covey of ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co. in Houston, Texas. The work was supported by the National Science Foundation and Exxon Production Research Co.

Web: http://www.umich.edu/~newsinfo/



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 195 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jul 16, 2001 (15:41) * 17 lines 
 
Large earthquakes also follow the law

For many years, there has been a debate about why large
earthquakes do not appear to fit the scaling laws for smaller
earthquakes. This observation would seem to imply that the
physics of large earthquakes is somehow fundamentally
different from that of smaller events. Shaw and Scholz ["Slip-
length scaling in large earthquakes: Observations and theory and
implications for earthquake physics"] bring together recently
compiled observations of large aspect ratio earthquakes and a new
3-D dynamic earthquake model to show that the larger earthquakes
do, in fact, follow the same scaling laws as the smaller events.
These new results generate renewed confidence in using
observations of more common smaller earthquakes to predict the
effects of the rare and damaging great earthquakes.

The above is from the prolific and fantastic Liam. I wish he had included more of the article and from whence it had come. Liam, luv, are you out there?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 196 of 639: horrible horace  (horrible) * Tue, Jul 17, 2001 (05:31) * 1 lines 
 
The above is a from an embargoed press note!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 197 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 17, 2001 (15:40) * 1 lines 
 
Ah, nothing is more enticing than a bit of controvers. Embargoed by whom? I thought censorship was a thing of the past. Btw, Dear Liam, if you ever send me anything you wish to keep just between us please make note thereof. I honor such requests all the time. I must admit my curiosity is piqued! Can you tell me more either here or elsewhere (Of course you can; what you do know would put MI 5 to shame.) Now, I shall eat my monitor so it does not fall into the wrong hands. *CRUNCH*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 198 of 639: horrible horace  (horrible) * Tue, Jul 17, 2001 (15:52) * 1 lines 
 
Embargoed by the nice people who sometimes send me stuff..Blair,Bush andsome others in the Vatican and Sing-Sing


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 199 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 17, 2001 (19:49) * 1 lines 
 
*laugh* I should know better than to ask your sources. I know you to be a man of great esteem. I trust everything you send to me - you have never given me erroneous information and I never expect that you will. Thanks, Liam! I shall not ask again! *Hugs* of gratitude!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 200 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 18, 2001 (15:50) * 33 lines 
 
Liam brings a lady diamonds for breakfast. Nice touch!

Source: Arizona State University College Of Liberal Arts & Sciences (http://www.asu.edu/)
Date: Posted 7/18/2001

Earthquakes Reveal Diamonds' Origins
The seismic rumblings could provide key clues about where miners should look for diamonds, according to recent research. Matt Fouch, assistant professor of geological sciences at ASU, studies vibrations caused by earthquakes to visualize the earth at depths of hundreds of kilometers, where diamonds are formed. His maps of the earth below South Africa provide new information about Earth s structure in regions where many diamonds are found.

In the July 1, 2001 issue of Geophysical Research Letters, Fouch and his coauthors, David James, John VanDecar (both of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington), and Suzan van der Lee (of the Institute of Geophysics, Zürich, Switzerland), show that some of southern Africa s most profitable diamond mines are located near areas where the earth is exceptionally stable and cool up to 250 kilometers below the surface. The paper will be published in a special section of the journal, with seven other studies on geochemistry, composition, and rock dating of southern Africa.

Many diamonds come from regions, called cratons, that are some of the most geologically stable places in the world. Two cratons, the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons, covering an area roughly the size of the nation of South Africa, are the source of most of southern Africa's diamonds.

"The region we're studying in southern Africa is over 3 billion years old, and in some places it's even 3.6 billion years old," says Fouch. Geologists think diamonds develop up to several hundred kilometers deep within these ancient cratons and are then driven straight up to the surface.

Miners scout the best places to dig for gems by looking for diamonds that have made their way to the surface. Other techniques, such as drilling for samples deeper in the rock or studying anomalies in the gravitational or magnetic properties of the earth in the area, increase the chances of finding diamonds. But none of these approaches guarantee success. "If people knew exactly how it worked all the time, then we'd have a lot more diamond mines," Fouch jokes. "Nearly all diamonds come from cratons, but not all cratons contain diamonds. So the question is, why do some cratons produce diamonds and others don't? Another question is, why do some of those areas have diamonds that are commercially profitable, and others don't? Some regions have diamonds, but they're just too chewed up to be gem quality."

Fouch and his colleagues think they may have found part of the answer deep in the earth's mantle -- the layer of rock that extends several hundred kilometers beneath the crust. By imaging the earth at these depths, they looked at the very source of diamonds, rather than waiting for them to travel to the surface.

Fouch created three-dimensional images of deep layers of the earth by using an array of 82 seismometers, sensors that detect vibrations caused by earthquakes from all around the world. The seismometers, placed at roughly 100-kilometer intervals across South Africa, Zimbabwe and Botswana, recorded data from more than 200 earthquakes occurring over a two-year period, mainly from the Himalayan and Andean mountain ranges. They used seismic tomography, a technique very similar to CAT scans in medical imaging, to produce the images.

"As people, we never want earthquakes to happen, but as seismologists we know they are an inevitability. So our job is to use them in the most productive way possible," says Fouch. "Every time an earthquake happens, it's like shining a flashlight on a particular part of the earth. The seismic waves from each earthquake bounce off of different layers of the earth and illuminate different internal features."

The speed and angle of earthquake waves' motion depends on what kind of material they travel through. For example, the rippling caused by dropping a pebble in a bowl of water will move differently than in water containing ice cubes or in a bowl of jelly. By analyzing the timing and angle of the vibrations' spread past the seismometers, Fouch and coworkers mapped the physical properties of the earth below.

They found that the mantle directly below the most productive diamond mines looks distinctly different than in the surrounding areas. In diamond-producing areas, the mantle is "seismically fast," meaning that it propagates earthquake vibrations quickly because the mantle rock may be cooler or chemically different from the surrounding areas.

"There are a few distinct pockets of the faster seismic velocities," Fouch explains. "One of these regions is beneath the Kaapvaal craton in South Africa, and one -- a little more diffuse -- is beneath the Zimbabwe craton. ... Most of the gem-quality diamond mines in southern Africa lie very close to these regions." By looking for similarly cold, seismically fast parts of the mantle, diamond miners may be able to identify new promising areas for mining.

Industry collaborators in southern Africa are very interested in Fouch's research, and some even allowed the seismologists to install seismometers on their property.

"This is certainly a technique that could be used in conjunction with other methods to possibly determine whether a region might be more prone to having diamonds," Fouch says.




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 201 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Jul 22, 2001 (08:42) * 18 lines 
 
REAL PRE-EARTHQUAKE PREDICTION PROCESS (VLP band)
Yesterday, an EQ happened in Greece (with Ml=4.5 or Ms=5) in a distance of about 130 Km from me. Here are the signals, and our process conclusion.
The signal starts on July 20/18:20 UTC. The signal ends on July 21/ 07:50 UTC. The EQ happened on July 21/12:48 UTC.

On the image below, with red line are measured values from the E-W and N-S dipoles. Without signal, measured values must be follows the yellow line (trend). We sign a random time, with a violet color upright line. After, we calculate for each graph, the potential difference between yellow and red line on the violet color line. So, we have the values of E-W and N-S components. With simple composition of these two components we take the resultant value and the angle from East.


Making the same for all values from the beginning to the end of the signal (with a computer program) it appears on the screen the polar diagram (below). The program plots a red line for each couple of values. So, red area indicates all calculated directions. Finally, the program calculates the mean value and plots the green arrow. This is the azimuth direction of the source of the signal.


Next, the program plots on a map (below), the mean direction (starts from Volos), with a green on and off line. The real epicenter appears as a red asterisk on this map.


I think that is successful.
John (HPSO)





 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 202 of 639: horrible horace  (horrible) * Sun, Jul 22, 2001 (09:32) * 1 lines 
 
Wonderful John,this is not my field but I am getting interested now!!Liam


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 203 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Jul 23, 2001 (16:44) * 4 lines 
 
Warning. Additional bad news.
Two new big (world) signals appears on my real time monitor!!!!!!!
Be safe all.
John (HPSO)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 204 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 24, 2001 (15:12) * 5 lines 
 
TWO???? Oh John, this is most fascinating. It is like the last time you had knowledge of two big ones. I don't remember the first one, but the second one was in Peru and they are still getting aftershocks.

Liam, this work John is doing IS fascinating, and all I know about earthquakes I learned as I rode them out. This is abolutely spellbinding.

John, is the time frame for those two large quakes within 60 days?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 205 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Jul 24, 2001 (18:25) * 4 lines 
 
Oh Marcia,
Unfortunately they are totally 4 (take a look at the topic 26). Yes. The time is about two months.
John (HPSO)



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 206 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Jul 24, 2001 (18:48) * 24 lines 
 
PRE-EARTHQUAKE 24 HOUR ELECTRIC OSCILLATION

(By John Tsatsaragos)


Theoretic approach
A few days before a high magnitude earthquake strikes, an alternating electric current appear in the ground; its oscillation period is approximately 24 hours. This is caused by the combination of immense pressure on the rims of the fault area that is going to be activated with the influence of the gravitational forces of the moon and the sun. These gravitational forces cause our well-known tides.

The gravitational forces also cause the production of piezoelectric forces on the earth’s upper crust.

During one full rotation of the earth around its axis, the resultant gravitational force changes from a major rate to a minor one.

So the piezoelectric rates fluctuate as the gravitational forces fluctuate, in an approximate period of 24 hours. This potential in a period of 24 hours present very little width since the pressure changes are relatively small.

But, along an active fault area, pressure rises dramatically the closer we get to the time of the earthquake’s occurrence. This pressure is extremely large and its peak rate takes place at the moment the earthquake strikes (rock failure).

The moon and sun gravitational forces also affect the fault area where great pressures have been recorded just before the earthquake. Under these circumstances, the piezoelectric voltage, which is caused by the moon and sun gravitational forces, rises dramatically, while the pressure around the rims of the fault rise. Therefore, the piezoelectric voltage produced in a period of 24 hours increases in width, together with an increase in pressure on the rims of the fault area.

As a result, after the earthquake’s occurrence, when the pressure on the rims of the fault area decreases, the width of the piezoelectric voltage decreases dramatically as well.


In this animation, yellow curve is the function of change piezoelectric voltage in connection with pressure. X-axis shows continue pressure increase on the rims of the fault area and its modulation by tidal forces. Y-axis shows the resultant change of the piezoelectric voltage.


Here is an animation of the time change of this piezoelectric voltage, within EQ preparation, the time of the main earthquake, and the restoration of the rates after the its occurrence. In use, my real recordings become just like this.



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 207 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Jul 24, 2001 (19:07) * 4 lines 
 
I apologize. The second picture should be first and the first second.
I apologize again.
John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 208 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 28, 2001 (14:49) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 209 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Aug 15, 2001 (13:16) * 83 lines 
 

Writing by John Tsatsaragos


I think that for first time in the history of earth sciences, we can have a complete picture BEFORE AN IMPORTANT EQ, and also, we can to see the NATURAL PROCESS AT THE EPICENTRE AREA. It concerns the EQ of Skyros area in Aegean Sea, on 26 July 2001 with a magnitude of 6.4R. Pre-earthquake electrical signals of 24-hour oscillation, that were recorded in my station in Volos, describe the events, a few days before they happen. We will see all the development of that phenomenon, from the period of calm, the preparation of the EQ, the foreshocks, the main EQ, the last significant aftershock, and anew calm.

An other important fact, is the successful prediction of that EQ, so much as for the magnitude, as much as the time. Complete localisation of epicentre is not possible with only one station that we have in our disposal. Localized only the azimuth direction from the station of measurements to the epicentre.


THE EARTHQUAKE


Reported by USGS National Earthquake Information Center as

2001 07 26 00:21:36.9 39.054N 24.225E Depth: 10G km 6.0mb 6.6MS AEGEAN SEA

Mw 6.5 (GS), 6.5 (HRV), 6.4 (CSEM). Me 7.0 (GS). ML 5.9 (THE)


The event located by the National Observatory of Athens (Institute of Geodynamics) at the sea area North of Skyros island and in a 130 km distance NNE of Athens and in a 130 km distance of my station in Volos. It is important to note that the event was felt in a wide region about 200 km radius around the epicentre area sending many residents into the streets. Skyros island worst hit, but no injuries have been reported.

Approximately 90 houses, mostly old traditional dwellings in the capital of Skyros were damaged. Amongst them, the almost 1000 years old monastery of St George the Arab which is situated inside the castle was badly damaged. The biggest effect to the Skyros capital population was the cut off the spring, which supplies with water the area.


SHORT- TERM EQ PREDICTION STEP BY STEP


I present to you the graph (the green curve below) of my total signal of the 24-hour oscillation, from July 1 up to August 7, i.e. 12 days after this EQ.



From July 1 up to July 15, it is period of calm.

Next interval up to July 20, appears the beginning of final stage before the main EQ. Localised by the signals, at periods, the azimuth direction of Skyros island.

Follows the period of events up to August 4, and afterwards the period of calm.

Before the main EQ, happened two foreshocks in the same area. The first, on July 21 (M=4.8Ms), and the second on July 25 (M=4.2 Ms). The fact that this EQ was foreshock, appearred to me the next day July 22.
Green curve in the graph, appears that the amplitude of 24-hour oscillation increases dramatically, afterwards July 21. This means that this EQ was not the main.

Thus, we expected the main EQ in the same area i.e. the area of SKYROS island, in a few days.

Watching this graph on July 23, we can say that a big EQ incomes in a few days. Magnitude of this EQ must be higher than 5.7R because the amplitude of 24-hour oscillation is higher now, compared to previous recordings, and because the higher EQ magnitude for these was 5.7R.

Here is one animation graphic, that show the azimuth direction changes, which are calculated during pre-earthquake electrical signals (by VLP and 24-hour period), until the main EQ.



Thus, we know that a big EQ incomes in a few days, approximately in Skyros area (because the foreshock and the calculated azimuth direction that still the same), but WHEN?

Watching the graph of mean daily tidal gravity forces for this area (below), we find that the next high danger days, are July 25 plus or minus one day i.e. FROM JULY 24 TO JULY 26. Actually, it happens in the first 37 minutes on July 26, with a magnitude of 6.4R. (Always, I use UTC time).



This graph come from one scientific prediction computer program of tidal gravity forces. With red arrows appeared high danger dates for the month. They are located at upper or lower picks of the curve. We found that a percentage of about 75%- 80% of the significant EQ's in Greece, happened on these days, plus or minus one day.

ATTENTION: This graph means nothing without signals


Was the main, this big earthquake? YES, because the signal decreased its amplitude the next days.

On July 30, became a strong aftershock of 5.4R. This aftershock, was also predicted, because one day before, appears an increase of signal. This is aftershock, because the signal decreased to normal level after this EQ. (See the signal graph above).


AUTHENTIC PREDICTION


From July 21 to July 27, my co-operator Dr. C. Thanassoulas, was in a seminar in Academy of Sciences in Sofia - Bulgaria. After his lecture on July 23, and for practical implementation, he gives forth that in July 25, plus or minus one day, will become in Greece an EQ with a magnitude of about 6.1R. This information is included, in the authentic proceedings of this seminar. The EQ is affirmed during the works of this seminar.


NATURAL PROCESS

AT THE EPICENTRE AREA


It is already known that, continuous movement of lithosphere tectonic plates, produces pressures in the rims of the fault. When the value of those pressures exceeds some limit, piezoelectric phenomenon becomes observable. In the theoretical animation graph, that follows, appears the curve of piezoelectric voltage, in connection with the pressure (yellow curve).



Tidal gravity forces fluctuate that pressure, in the rhythm of oscillation with period of 24 hours. Thus, piezoelectric voltage should vary as it appears in Y-axis.

Let us to watch again the signal graph of real measurements, but now with the curve of medium signal values (blue curve). This is the form of piezoelectric voltage, from the tectonic plates continual movement, on the fault rims of Skyros area, during this period.



You can see the period of calm (July 1 to July 14) and the gradual increase of the piezoelectric voltage, as the pressure increase respectively, a few days before the fracture of rocks i.e. a few days before the main EQ on July 26.

Immediately after the big EQ, curve of piezoelectric voltage it falls abruptly, in values which it had before begun phenomenon. Increase again before last aftershock, and falls again to calm values. It shows clearly that the pressure in the fault area, was decreased abruptly, immediately afterwards the 6.4R EQ. Thus, we infer that this EQ was the main and it does not exist danger for a new big EQ.

Blue line in last graph, is not nothing more from a successful (perhaps it is the best) confirmation of theory for the genesis of the earthquakes, from the continuous movement and conflict of lithospheric plates.





 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 210 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Aug 15, 2001 (15:31) * 1 lines 
 
This is splendid, John. You might as well tell the good people reading this of your subsequent fame due to the accuracy of this work you have done. Reading the above, I can remember how exciting it was experiencing the events and proving your theories. My gratitude for posting this is very great. And, thank you for explaining it so well that even I can understand it. Your presentation is not only easy to understand, your graphics are splendid. My admiration for your work grows daily.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 211 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Aug 23, 2001 (00:33) * 3 lines 
 
John, you are on much different substrate than I am - how small can the quakes be and you still feel them? On this island we cannot feel them under 4.0 usually (and never for me.) In Southern California I could be shaken out of sleep and still correctly estimate a 4.5 earthquake - my first and only non- Hawaiian earthquake.

We have heard how insensitive Rob is to earthquakes... I wonder what his threshold is for feeling them.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 212 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Sep  9, 2001 (13:15) * 6 lines 
 
Hi,
I have an idea. Perhaps we can do something sensible and useful in GEO. Idea is to we make a table with all pre-earthquake phenomena (precursors) that perhaps we have observed. We will discuss each one observation, in order to we find the explanation. Also, you can call your friends to tell us their experience. If they are not members, they can send their experiences by e-mail. As much friends will participate, so much more good it will be the result. This table will be visible to all. I wanted your opinion.

Marcia, your opinion first.
John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 213 of 639: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Sep  9, 2001 (13:26) * 24 lines 
 

1 million jumpers fail to set off quake
EXPERIMENT USES
CHILDREN TO TEST
SCIENTIFIC THEORY

LONDON (AP) -- What is the impact of a million people jumping?

Not a lot, scientists found.

Seismologists said Saturday that an experiment in which more than 1
million children jumped up and down simultaneously in the hope of
triggering an earthquake had produced scarcely a tremor.
...
Early reports indicated the jump had left ``measurable traces'' on
seismometers at the jump sites, organizers said, while the British
Geological Survey was investigating a ``small trace'' in Cornwall.
Organizers said it would take two weeks to monitor all the data.

``The Giant Jump did not cause an earthquake,'' said a statement
posted on the experiment's Web site (www.scienceyear.com). ``So we can
sleep well at night knowing that, contrary to the popular myth, even if
everyone in China jumps up and down at the same time we won't get
swept away by a tidal wave.''


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 214 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Sep  9, 2001 (18:56) * 3 lines 
 
(Thanks, Terry. I also posted it in Geo 26)

John, My Dear, what a splendid idea for GEO. Now, how do we do this? I will ask my son and his future wife to send their observations even if I have to post them myself. Thinking back, I cannot remember anything which was out of the ordinary with the earthquakes I have experienced. Please, let us do this. You have observed much! I can always tell when it is going to rain. The ants come into the house and the spiders move their web-building activities to under the house eaves.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 215 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Sep  9, 2001 (19:50) * 4 lines 
 
Tables require special programming. Is is possible here (of course it is if only I knew how - time to do more studying!) Did you wish to continue posting an updated table each time something is added, or do you think it is possible to post a table on the front page of GEO?! I would love to have immediately accessable data on both earthquakes and volcanoes.

Perhaps I create a new topic also for satellite hunting and experiences. My son has sent many photos of his successes, and on his camping trip over last weekend, he identified and logged 15 different satellites. He has even gotten iridium flares. I definitely need a new topic. John, do you think your observation and table data need a new topic, too? I am most excited to do this!
*HUGS* for thinking of this!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 216 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Sep  9, 2001 (22:12) * 7 lines 
 
John's scales after Richter and Mercalli:








 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 217 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Sep 10, 2001 (20:58) * 33 lines 
 
I wrote this table, In order to help remember us some EQ precursory phenomena. It comprises some phenomena that they have observed in several cases and they are reported in bibliography.
We wanted any experience or any possible explanation, scientific or not.

1. Foreshocks.
2. Changes in the velocity of P seismic waves.
3. Emissions of radon gas.
4. Level changes in the underground water.
5. Temperature changes in the underground water.
6. Appearance of new water springs or disappearance of existing water springs.
7. Underground low frequency noises.
8. Appearance of crevices in the ground.
9. Elevations or subsidences of ground.
10. Curious behavior of domestic or wild animals.
11. Disappearance of draught faculty of some magnet.
12. Electric currents in the ground.
13. Changes in the earth’s electric field.
14. Changes in the electric conductance of the ground.
15. Changes in the earth’s magnetic field.
16. Changes in the earth’s gravity field.
17. Abrupt and big changes in sea level.
18. Headaches or cardiac arrhythmias in persons.
19. Nervy action in persons.
20. Parasitic noises in radio-emissions.
21. Coloration of horizon before sunrise or after sunset.
22. Mantam’s Pele face.
23. Extraordinary hot weather.
24. Extraordinary ionosphere changes.
25. Extraordinary air moisture.
26. Changes in the air ionization.

Tell to us your experience or that you have heard even if it is not included in the table above. Please tell to your friends for this attempt. You are welcome.
John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 218 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep 10, 2001 (21:38) * 3 lines 
 
I know that for certain that my son did radon gas testing for the Hawaii Volcanoes Observatory. There were many "wells" with round recording graphs in them that he had to collect and log. Guess who got to go along. This list is great, John. But what sort of equipment do we need to sense these changes? Not the usual household kitchen equipment, I think. When I have seen Madame Pele's face it has always been in the fume cloud over an actively erupting crater.

There is also eruption weather here, and times when the lighting is different from ususal that is "Alii weather" which mean a great life is ending. I will gather more information as to local traditions and portents to add to your comments. This is fascinating! Many warm *Hugs* for doing all this work and posting it here.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 219 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep 10, 2001 (21:42) * 1 lines 
 
Thinking about your list, I wonder if you are talking about BEFORE earthquakes hit or AFTER. I have seen many earth cracks, strange lights, sensed changes in the atmosphere and strange tingling sensations, but they were all after the earthquake had occurred.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 220 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep 10, 2001 (23:49) * 3 lines 
 
I know better. It is precursors and I shall ask both my son and my ex, as well as others in Hawaii I know if they have sensed anything out of the ordinary before an earthquake. My quakes have been so memorable that I do not think of before; I am concentrating on the quake and how different waves feel as it plays out its strenght bouncing me around like a little toy in a giant's hands.
How can I remember every moment before things happen? Perhaps normal for Hawaii is an active ionization field and extraneous sounds on radio and all those other things, because we are so near an active volcano that it is continuosly making little adjustments. After many years, it has become routine for us and "normal."



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 221 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Sep 11, 2001 (00:28) * 6 lines 
 
Definitely the above table is referred to phenomena BEFORE THE EQ. If you read more carefully, I wrote “EQ PRECURSORY PHENOMENA”. Anyhow, it exists corresponding phenomena that come before volcano eruptions. I have not any experience with volcanoes but you must have observed enough strange changes. We must make another corresponding table for volcanoes.

The EQ but also volcano explosions, is prepared for many years before. During this preparing stage, it changes slowly the environment around us, and we can observe it. We need scientific instruments in order to observe some of these phenomena. It is enough our perceptiveness to observe the rests. Unfortunately, by our nature we cannot observe very slow changes (or very fast). With a few luck you can observe a precursory phenomenon from the window of your kitchen or inside your kitchen, or in your garden.

Experience of your son must be very interesting. It appears that your help to your son was very important and enough dangerous Marcia. Finally, you have special abilities and many scientific experiences. I am sure that you have observed strange phenomena before some EQ and before an eruption of your volcano.
John


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 222 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 11, 2001 (13:14) * 1 lines 
 
Happily, John, every square cm of our active volcanoes are monitored closely. We have what they call harmonic tremors which are the equivalent of labor pains prior to each volcanic eruption. By the intensity and frequency of these tremors they can predict the area and keep us out until the outbreak of lava happens.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 223 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 11, 2001 (13:21) * 1 lines 
 
Yes, we need a volcanic eruption list as well. Despite not feeling the earthquake we had (4.9R) I am sure there were some precursors.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 224 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Sep 12, 2001 (04:59) * 7 lines 
 
How many times they had send you a caution before an eruption? Works trustworthily this system?
I notice that in some case, earth activity is insectifuge medium, especially on the ground of the garden or… in the kitchen. You can observe your cat also. She wants to go out of the house with mania. This can happen about a half an hour before the event. Maybe you have a sweet cat and perhaps she is more useful than that you imagine.

Also, this is a good start point to begin write the precursors in your table for volcano activity.
4.9R can be a foreshock or not. You need more information to say something. In any case be careful!
John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 225 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Sep 12, 2001 (18:11) * 8 lines 
 
In Hawaii, I have never been warned of an impending earthquake. Neither have I heard of anyone else doing so, unless it was you, John! Unhappily I have many insects to watch. They come automatically with living in the tropics. My cat is an outdoor cat. She dislikes being inside houses and it makes me less allergic to her. She has lately taken to coming to the window beside my chair and talking to me. She seems a little distressed until I talk back to her. I will see if this means anything special, other than she misses me and wants me to pay with her.

The 4.9 earthquake was part of an earthquake swarm on Loihi which remains beneath the sea. This is the report posted by HVO:

0535 September 12, 2001
The earthquake swarm at Lo`ihi ended yesterday morning. Though the earthquakes were large, with several in magnitude range of 3.5 -4.9, the swarm was but a shadow of the one in July 1996. We don't know if there was an eruption or a summit collapse on Lo`ihi accompanying the latest swarm.




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 226 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Sep 30, 2001 (23:11) * 37 lines 
 
Finally an article about John which is in English. Poorly edited and names spelled wrong, but it IS in English, and for that I am grateful.

PROFESSOR OF GEOPHYSICS CLAIMS TO HAVE PREDICTED THE EARTHQUAKE
http://zeus.hri.org/news/greek/mpab/2001/01-07-29.mpab.html
Athens, 29 July 2001 (21:05 UTC+2)

Research according to which he expected an earthquake of 5.7 R to occur in
Greece two days later, when it actually did, was submitted on the 23rd of July
in a seminar in Bulgaria by Geophysics Professor Konstantinos Thanasoulas.

Mr. Thanasoulas has been researching the prediction of earthquakes since
1982, but only just last year did he manage to get any results, after his
cooperation with Giannis Tsaragos, electronic engineer.

As he stated to a local television channel, STAR , before the earthquake there is
a deformation in certain rock formations, which creates an electrical field and by
applying simple mathematics one can find the source of this electrical field.

Mr. Tsatsaragos pointed out in statements to the same channel, that in a length
of time under 15 days from when the widening of the electrical field begins an
earthquake is expected.

The two scientists' station showed indications of an upcoming earthquake from
July 20th up until 20 minutes before the earthquake took place in Skyros.

The scientists point out that they can predict the intensity and time of the
earthquake, but not the exact epicenter because they only have one station at
their disposal.

After the verification of their prediction the Bulgarians showed interest in Mr.
Athanasoula's method. The interest was not shared by the Ministry of the
Environment Physical Planning and Public Works or by the Organization
Antiseismic Protection, who were informed about the research and its results.

In any case, in scientific research that took place in 1993 in the seismological
lab of the University of Athens, the epicenter and the intensity of the earthquake
in Skyros had been predicted, but the exact date had not.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 227 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Sep 30, 2001 (23:35) * 3 lines 
 
John, they could have at least spelled your name right. The above was from a Macedonian newspaper, and I am grateful for their creating the article I could only see in Greek previously. And Dr. Thanassoulas' name they also could have spelled correctly...

I think I might just edit it and repost it in better form...


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 228 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Oct  1, 2001 (14:10) * 7 lines 
 
Thank you Marcia,
I did not know that the this article exists. It appears that this is translation from the reports in Greek TV and it is easy to translate wrong our names. I remind you how we can prove that we made that prediction.

From July 21 to July 27, my co-operator Dr. C. Thanassoulas, was in a seminar in Academy of Sciences in Sofia - Bulgaria. After his lecture on July 23, and for practical implementation, he gave forth that in July 25, plus or minus one day, will become in Greece an EQ with a magnitude of about 6.1R. This information is included, in the authentic proceedings of this seminar. The EQ is affirmed during the works of this seminar. I remind you that the EQ happened in July 26th at 00:20 UTC. You can read a small photo-copy of the authentic proceedings of this seminar below.


John


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 229 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Oct  1, 2001 (21:11) * 7 lines 
 
You are too charitable, John. They spelled you name once correctly and then incorrectly. The same with Dr Thanassoulas. For the paper complete with references and graphs (use Netscape - you have to download a file which resists my computer if you use Internet Explorer)
http://users.otenet.gr/~thandin/tidalreport/tidalweb.htm

There are fascinating links on Dr Thanassoulas' home page, and if you wish to argue with him about this whole system, there is a place for that as well. YOu can even see where the large earthquakes in Greece are
http://users.otenet.gr/~thandin/

Perhpas I am a bit partial, but I like John's discussion of his proven method of detecting future earthquakes. Scroll back to see his post complete with his graphs, or http://users.otenet.gr/~bm-ohexwb/ then you can read it in both English and in Greek if you are as skilled as the gentleman who created the page is.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 230 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Oct  2, 2001 (04:17) * 7 lines 
 
Hi,
I wanted to explain that the earth react slowly in rhythms that are difficult to sense a person. We trade on tidal forces, which modulate more slow phenomena. It is easier to me to receive electrical variations or to translate other type of energy signals to electrical forms. It appears that Nature translate underground pressure variations into electrical signals that they are measurable. As we measure lower frequency variations, background noise is reduced. We need a signal to noise ratio equal or better than 10 in order to make creditable measurements. We work with Ultra Low Frequencies, or signals with Ultra Large Time Period. Our signals are with periods of 24 hours and larger.

Larger period signals are modulated with 24-hour period signals that are produced from the combination of tidal forces with the earth’s rotation. We record those signals and as we believe until now, they are a window with a very good view at the last stage of the EQ preparing process. The EQ (6.4 M) in Greek Skyros Island on July 26th, is a good example as you can see in my complete description in responses 201 and 209.
I will rejoice to answer in your questions.
John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 231 of 639: a  (awia) * Tue, Oct  2, 2001 (06:02) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 232 of 639: aiwa  (awia) * Tue, Oct  2, 2001 (06:05) * 3 lines 
 
JUS BLIAT SUPISTI IDIOTAI, NACHUI JUS. BLIAT IESKOJAU MAZDOS O CIA KOKIE TAI SEISMOLOGAI APIE GAMTA KALBA. EI PADEKIT OLOCHAI MAN RAST MX6 KONFERENCIJA.

SO I'LL EXPLAIN IN ENGLISH. I'M VERY SAD CAUSE I COULDN'T FIND MY CONFERENSION. HELP ME PLEASE. WRITE SOMEBODY ABOUT MX6 CONFERENCE.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 233 of 639: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Oct  2, 2001 (08:47) * 1 lines 
 
mx6 conference? Help, Marci.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 234 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct  2, 2001 (15:24) * 4 lines 
 
MX6 Conference - please check http://www.google.com/search?q=mx6+conference
There are several listed.

John, I suspect if an earthquake can be sensed by a human, then it is too late and it is already occurring. We are a fairly insensitive lot caompared to other animals!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 235 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Thu, Oct  4, 2001 (11:39) * 6 lines 
 
Hi Marcia and Terry,
If an earthquake can be observable, it must remind to us that exist at least this power, which can destroy our extravagant arrogance in a few seconds.

We are so fairly insensitive and stand-offish genus, where we feel safety, even if we live on a bomb. We entrust our faceless high technology and we easily believe indefinite scientific notices. This happens because we easily believe that we hope.
John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 236 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct  4, 2001 (16:32) * 1 lines 
 
*SIGH* I think after what happened on 11 September of this year, we are more aware of how easily our world can be changed and demolished. Things once assumed to be secure are no longer. "Solid as a rock" is only an aphorism. And we are very small on this most powerful earth. We are guests who do not respect the owners well. Believing what we wish were true is living in a fantasy!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 237 of 639: Alice  (MysteryMan) * Thu, Oct  4, 2001 (16:56) * 1 lines 
 
We are bad stewards.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 238 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct  4, 2001 (17:10) * 1 lines 
 
Alas, true! The cockraches and ants will in herit what great things we erect to our own honor. Give me a mountain to anything man-made. I have 5 volcanoes under me! Happiness is exploring the wonders of the universe before anyone dropped their trash there.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 239 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Oct  5, 2001 (13:37) * 7 lines 
 
Hi Alice and Marcia
We must be not stewards in this case. We must be on the qui vive and always ready, Alice. We cannot to administrate the EQ’s or volcano eruptions yet. It is better to predict them and to organize our protection.

On your 5 volcanoes were lived many peoples before you, Marcia. The difference with you is that you know more things about their life than your ancestors. Yes, your volcanoes are too strong but we must use our knowledge and logic to protect us from their anger.
Did you know more than one who works in this object without payment or with hope for payment? Where is our intelligence?
John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 240 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct  5, 2001 (15:15) * 3 lines 
 
John Dear, your altruism and truth shine like pure gold in the sunlight. Only you and my son worked on these mental exercises without pay. If my tagging along to learn and assist counts, you can make that number 3. You, above and beyond all are to be lauded since you work on what will save lives eventually. Our Intelligence, if it can be called that, is out pursuing the material world with little plastic cards and deeply in debt as a result. I am an old-fashioned sort. I have no debts and hope to die that way far in the future.

You need a second monitoring station. How close to the first one does it need to be? I want you to have better data and more complete information to use in your brilliant studies.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 241 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Nov 11, 2001 (05:27) * 25 lines 
 
CAN YOU PREDICT THE NEXT BIG EQ IN GREECE?


Come and make the inquiry with us.


From now on, you will be able to see the graph of the recent signals here. They are recorded in my station at Volos. This graph, titled RECENT 24-HOUR SIGNALS, will be updated almost every day. Thus, each time you will see this response, you will see the updated graph. (The dates appear on the horizontal axis).

In order to understand what exactly you see, I give you first the 40-day graph, which shows the corresponding signals for the big EQ in Skyros Island area in the Aegean Sea (M=6.4R), on 26th July 2001, at a distance 130 Km from my station.


PRE-EARTHQUAKE 24-HOUR SIGNALS OF SKYROS EQ



Note: the importance is the amplitude of the oscillation (yellow line). When the amplitude rises, an EQ is expected. The greater the amplitude, the greater the magnitude of the expected EQ.

RECENT 24-HOUR SIGNALS



The two graphs above have exact the same scale. I will answer any additional questions or give further explanations you may need.


I invite you to predict the next big EQ in Greece with us, a few days before it happens.

(When it is to occur)


John Tsatsaragos





 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 242 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Nov 11, 2001 (05:46) * 3 lines 
 
Thank you Terry and Marcia for your great help.
Regards
John


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 243 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Nov 11, 2001 (14:11) * 1 lines 
 
This is most exciting, John. Imagine being able to predict the earthquake and prepare for its eventuality. I am delighted you have posted this here. Now we can all put on your wizard's hat and see into the future from your detected earth signals. We understand so little of the earth on which we live. Perhaps this allow us to see a little more of the dynamic nature of the crust on which we live.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 244 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Nov 11, 2001 (14:13) * 3 lines 
 
Will your signal graph update or will you post new ones each day? If we must look at the one you posted on Geo 9.241 I should bookmark it for easy access.

Many thanks, Terry and most expecially to John for enabling us to watch the signals change with you. *Special hugs* of appreciation.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 245 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Nov 11, 2001 (21:53) * 1 lines 
 
http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/read/Geo/9.241 is updated. Bookmark it lest it get buried in future posts.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 246 of 639: Rob Glennie  (AotearoaKiwi) * Mon, Nov 12, 2001 (03:35) * 5 lines 
 
Hi all

Great work John, I am impressed by the amplitude chart. Based on the size of the yellow line movement, how easy is it to estimate the size of events, once they have occurred? Presumably earthquake patterns will vary and that there will not always be a build up in the signal variation?

Rob


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 247 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Nov 12, 2001 (12:50) * 10 lines 
 
Hi Rob,
Yellow lines in my graphs are the recorded electric signals that have period roughly 24 hours anyhow. We wait changes only in the amplitude of the 24-hour oscillation. This amplitude is connected directly with the bigness of the pressure between the sides of the fault, as also I have explained already, but also with the size of the imminent EQ. Signal with bigger amplitude means bigger size of EQ.
.
You see already big amplitude signals that preceded the EQ of Skyros, enough small amplitude before and afterwards this EQ and also in the recent signals. It means that do not exists now such big pressure in the faults around my station that can cause powerful EQ.

If and when we realise increasing amplitude in the signals then, we can calculate the azimuth direction of the signal source with simple physics. Usually, the EQ becomes during the next few days. Then we can determine the more dangerous days as already I have described for the EQ of Skyros.

I will inform you here, just as we see any considerable development that you can realise, visiting the response 241, and looking the graph of the recent signals.
John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 248 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Nov 12, 2001 (14:50) * 1 lines 
 
This is my first experience in labor pains not involving me. As surely as mine preceded my son's birth, John's signals tell of earthquakes to come. I find this not only fascinating, but also exciting. It is as though we were privy to some great cosmic secret. I have done this before with John. You will not be disappointed!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 249 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Nov 12, 2001 (17:56) * 1 lines 
 
i don't know what the charts mean (the little oscillating lines and amplitude) but i've bookmarked the graph too!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 250 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Nov 12, 2001 (22:09) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 251 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Nov 12, 2001 (22:24) * 3 lines 
 
John has promised to explain. Perhaps it might be good to explain it when you see a sudden surge in the height of the signals.

Take note of that. An earthquake will surely follow for John.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 252 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Nov 13, 2001 (04:57) * 7 lines 
 

You see the result of twenty years work in response 241. I expended a lot of money and effort on my research as you can imagine. I was disappointed many times during my attempt. I believe too, that now you will not be disappointed.

I have to thanks Marcia for she's trust and help. She is the first hostess that has a live research in the web now.
(Maybe Felix above makes a research too).
John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 253 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov 13, 2001 (13:48) * 5 lines 
 
Felix is adorable, and resembles what you experienced as you worked out the problems of your seismic detecting station. It looks relativly simple to the uninitiated, but YOU had to invent it, first. Then you had to find a way to record the signals. Then you had to have professional recognition - perhaps the most difficult part of the entire enterprise. I merely recognized your brilliance when I saw it. Your willingness to share it with me is one of the greatest delights in my life.

I have had second thoughts about keeping the update on post 241. It will become so deeply buried in posts that it will take much time to download each day. I can repost it here each day that you update it, or we can post it on the front page... We definitly need to talk about this when you have time to do so.

Please consider posting each one separately. Each on the day they are created by you. That way we will have a complete collection to refer to when the singals change. Or, perhaps you have a better way of posting this most valuale data. I can create a topic just for your seismic data - or you can. In any case, I am so happy to have you here, and you honor our humble conference with your presence.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 254 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Nov 13, 2001 (18:27) * 2 lines 
 
can we have a separate topic just for the signal map? should we include all our updating maps or maybe just the updating earthquake maps in one topic?
thanks, john, for entrusting us with your invention. i think it's amazing what one can think up!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 255 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov 13, 2001 (19:08) * 5 lines 
 
I will speak to John as soon as the earth rotates into daytime for Greece and he is awake enough to think. In my humble opinion, John's graphs updates deserve their own special page. Updating maps take too long to load when put all on the same topic. I tried it and gave up on topic 44. I have left it with 4 maps because it was the easiest way to access aurora maps. I also think that we need to watch his data unveil for a while before we can tell what is "normal" and what might signal an imminent earthquake. John has worked hard to get his equipment as refined as it is. He has also learned how to interpret what signals he receives. I will trust him to guide us.


My joy in having his research on Geo is greater than my ability to express it.



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 256 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Nov 13, 2001 (20:01) * 1 lines 
 
me too, and i'm happy to see him here in my twin's conference!! *HUGS*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 257 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov 13, 2001 (20:53) * 4 lines 
 
*grin*


John has updated his graph for today!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 258 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov 14, 2001 (20:10) * 1 lines 
 
There was an earthquake in Athens early today (Hawaiian time). I am most anxious to hear from John, and to see the signal update.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 259 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Nov 14, 2001 (20:19) * 1 lines 
 
oh yes, didn't notice anything yesterday on his chart but....i don't know what to look for but i sure hope john is ok!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 260 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov 14, 2001 (23:01) * 3 lines 
 
John has magnified the part of his graph which shows the earthquakes from yesterday. He is well, thanks. I worried, too. He also assures you, Wolfie, that you are safe for now in Los Angeles. (That "for now" part is a little disconcerting, but he cannot control the forces of nature.)

I wonder when we will hear of the damage the great quake in China caused. They are experiencing many strong aftershocks, too. That really IS frightening!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 261 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov 14, 2001 (23:18) * 4 lines 
 
John's Athens quake graph amplified from his post 241. Note the increasing amplitude. Also note that the usual way for signals to appear is larger just before the quake happens. This has been noted in other detected quake signals.





 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 262 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov 14, 2001 (23:32) * 1 lines 
 
Also note how low the bottom of the wave signal dips before the quake. There is much to see in those little signals from the earth as it squeezes out its electrical impulses. It reminds me of someone preparing for a great jump. To gather momentum, they swing backward first. This is probably incorrect in electrical signals, but it happens each time!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 263 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Thu, Nov 15, 2001 (20:57) * 6 lines 
 
Thank you Marcia for posting,
When yellow line goes up it means that the pressure between the sides of the fault increases and when the yellow line goes down, pressure is decreased. As long as more up go the line (and it returns down as well), so much bigger is the pressure and so much more powerful is the expected EQ. The up down of the pressure is caused by the tidal forces and produces electrical signals by the piezoelectric phenomenon. I remind you that an EQ become when the pressure is so high so that it breaks the rocks.

In the graph of my signals above, you can see the time moment of the EQ in Athens. But the analysis of the individual signals (N-S & E-W) showed that the main source of signals is not in the direction of Athens but EES from my station. This means that does not exist danger to the direction of Athens but exists increasing pressure in some fault to EES direction. Comparing recent signals with them of Skyros EQ, we see that still does not appear danger for some big EQ. In any case we will see the next days.
John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 264 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Nov 15, 2001 (23:04) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 265 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Nov 16, 2001 (04:51) * 4 lines 
 
Indeed, we do not have always the results that we're waiting during an inquire. If it was like this, we will had not object for inquire. In each case we will follow the nuture’s game together. But we must search the WHY in each case. This is a way to learn and the beauty of inquires.

Hollow sound, that accompanies most EQ’s, (not from the materials that are destroyed or fall around us) it is indeed nightmare. I have lived two big EQ’s with strong hollow sound and enough smaller.
John


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 266 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 16, 2001 (17:41) * 3 lines 
 
We will learn together, John! I think we need much data for careful study and comparison. Only in this way can we see both the similarities and the differences. Then, we must sort out what is not relevant. I am patient. I am also a careful observer and an inveterate note-taker. I will join you in this most worthy research. I have much more to learn that you alredy know, but I am more than willing! I hope you need an assistant.

The sounds you heard must have been blood-chlling. Our rock is not nearly as dense as your hard metamorphic rock of marble and quartz. I can only imagine how truely awesome (the true use of the word) it is. Even your smaller quakes had these sounds?! We not only have gentle volcano eruptions in Hawaii, as also have gentle earthquakes, it would seem. Thank Goodness!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 267 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Nov 16, 2001 (20:27) * 3 lines 
 
i think i would've remembered a sound like that. can't say that i've heard one and hope i don't have to experience a major earthquake either. thank you for your explanation on the lines and stuff on your chart, john *HUGS* glad to know you're safe!

*HUGS* marcia!!!!!!!!!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 268 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sat, Nov 17, 2001 (14:38) * 6 lines 
 

The EQ sounds separately of the EQ it is not something so impressive. But if you hear them suddenly with a strong gambol it becomes very awesome. I felt a medium aftershock of our 6.3R in the year 1980 walking in a forest. I will never forget the trees coming up and down to the horizontal position, in parallel with ground surface, under heavy strong sounds. I was feeling that the trees would fight me....

But life has its counter faces. Forget my nightmare experience and continue in Geo. But first PUT ON your computer sound and then Click Here
(I hope that it works).
John


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 269 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Nov 17, 2001 (16:16) * 1 lines 
 
It works, John! Shall we dance? (Some how I expected something more Greek than Latin.) I want to know more about your nightmare experiences. Perhaps not here, but I am fascinated. My three strongest quakes involved incredible luck on my part in not getting hurt or getting killed. You don't want to know about that, either.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 270 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Nov 17, 2001 (21:19) * 1 lines 
 
wow, that is great!! now where's that long stemmed rose!!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 271 of 639: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Sun, Nov 18, 2001 (15:40) * 1 lines 
 
Just checking in here on Geo. I'm glad to hear that John is all right.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 272 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Nov 18, 2001 (20:49) * 4 lines 
 
Hi all
It is better to forget our nightmares. I believed that it would was better for you and for your friends to send this Latin music. OK. Something Greek now. I hope that you like it. ZORBA!
John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 273 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Nov 19, 2001 (04:28) * 6 lines 
 
Hi Cheryl and all
You can follow my real research and monitor the last 40 days pre-earthquake activity in Greece by visiting in response 241 or
CLICK HERE.

(The graph for the recent pre-earthquake signals is updated every day!)
John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 274 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Nov 19, 2001 (19:07) * 1 lines 
 
thanks for the Zorba! it sounds familiar!!!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 275 of 639: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Mon, Nov 19, 2001 (19:20) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks for the links, John, both to your research graphs and for the "Zorba" music.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 276 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Nov 19, 2001 (22:29) * 1 lines 
 
where's my twin??? *howling your name at the moon, marcia!*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 277 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov 20, 2001 (12:41) * 5 lines 
 
*Howling Back to you Like a Lost Soul*

John, Wolfie, Cheryl, Big Hugs for tending Geo while my phone connection was killed at the pole. New pole took two days to erect and hook up again. Unhappily, they did it without warning, so I could tell none of you. I knew you would worry just as I would have done.

One of these days when we can get Spring commands to recognize my files, John and I will change the Title Page for Geo. His new link page is lovely, isn't it!!! Very special Aloha to him for posting the complete package with a very neat little hot link.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 278 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Nov 20, 2001 (14:11) * 1 lines 
 
oh marcia, i'm so happy to see you!!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 279 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov 20, 2001 (17:19) * 1 lines 
 
Whoooopee Wolfie! Now, if only John would have checked in before he went to sleep. A bit of my own medicine? I hope he would never be that unhappy with me. *Big Hugs*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 280 of 639: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Nov 27, 2001 (17:31) * 1 lines 
 
Marcia, glad that you've gotten your connection back. I was visiting with Mom over Thanksgiving. I'm just catching up on the computer today. I hope that you and Wolfie had great holidays. As for John, is St. Basil's Day coming up soon? If it is, Happy St. Basil's Day, John.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 281 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov 27, 2001 (19:59) * 3 lines 
 
*HUGS* Welcome back, Cheryl. I had dinner in elegant surroundings at the summit of Kilauea on the rim of the caldera. Unhappily the erutpion was downrift and I could not see it, and the fumes were unbelievably thick. We all coughed most impressively. In any case, it was a joy to be there surrounded by freshly scrubbed geologists. That alone made it worth the trip.

I'm checking on St Basil's Day, but that sounds more Russian Orthodox than Greek. I obvioulsy need to do some more homework. Cheryl, you're a treasure. What I don't know would fill an ocean of space. Your additions to the information in my cranium are most appreciated! (I wonder if there is a graphic I can post for St Basil's Day....)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 282 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Thu, Nov 29, 2001 (02:26) * 4 lines 
 
Hi all
Our St. Basil's Day is on 1st of January each year. We have holidays in this day also. Thank you Cheryl.
John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 283 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Nov 29, 2001 (13:50) * 1 lines 
 
I need a far better list of Greek holidays than I currently have available to me. Thank you for the verification, John. Cheryl is a splendid source of information that has managed to elude me. I am like most of the rest of the readers of Geo. I am also learning!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 284 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Thu, Nov 29, 2001 (20:56) * 5 lines 
 
Hi
I would like to remind you that you could follow recent pre-earthquake activity for Greece in response 241 or
CLICK HERE.

It is updated every day!
John


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 285 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Nov 29, 2001 (21:53) * 3 lines 
 
I check it every evening - Hawaiian time - to see what the state of Greek seismcity is. It looks good for you. Very low amplitude. That is a great relief to me. Please, may it continue that way!

Thank you, John. Your data is fascinating. You have made Geo very special.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 286 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec 15, 2001 (18:27) * 4 lines 
 
A fascinating documentary on the world's faults and especially the San Andreas Fault in California, USA was on The Discovery Channel today. The blind faults which never surface but deform rocks around them were amazingly visible in road cut rocks. It reminded me of the following folding of a similar faulting and folding half a world away in Greece:





 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 287 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Dec 18, 2001 (10:42) * 7 lines 
 
Impressive picture Marcia.
I don’t know from where exactly in Greece is this picture. It appears to me that these rocks are folded when the under of them ground layers are in semi-liquid state. You can see this icon in many rock quarries in Greece. But does not exist visible faults there. Maybe I can find more for these rocks if I know the place or the area.

I am still without web connection from my house. My telephone line has a strong noise. Weather conditions are very bad in my area with much snow. So, I cannot post my updated graph. I am sorry. Greek area appears seismically enough quiet for the next ten days.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 288 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 19, 2001 (22:23) * 3 lines 
 
*Hugs* John! Be safe in all that slippery white stuff you have all over the ground there.

I "borrowed" the image from an early page I found when I was researching Greek geothermal activity. I will find the source again tomorrow when my head and eyes hurt less than they do now. Folding as in the picture above is usually from sub-surface faults under stress, the rocks fold instead of rupturing at the surface where we usually see upthrust blocks and large offset tracts of land.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 289 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Dec 21, 2001 (05:21) * 13 lines 
 
Hi all.

*Hugs* Marcia! Many peoples have headache here this period. I think that you must protect more your eyes. Put contrast of your monitor in lower level. Maybe you need and a filter on your monitor. They help more than 50%. I am sure that your monitor is the causation.

I bow to your Geo-knowledge Marcia. I wonder if I can go in the area of this picture. But now it is impossible. It appears that our Christmas will be white after many years. Movement on the icy roads is too dangerous.

Recent pre-earthquake activity for Greece remains low.
I would like remind to anyone who is interested, that he could follow recent pre-earthquake activity for Greece in response 241 or
CLICK HERE.

It is updated every day!

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 290 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Dec 21, 2001 (14:22) * 10 lines 
 
Snow returns to northern Greece as weekend approaches
21/12/2001 22:14:18

The cold front returned to Greece with a vengeance on Friday afternoon, with the
country practically cut in two by the extreme weather conditions and snow to the
north from Fthiotida. Traffic police warned motorists that all vehicles required snow chains after Kamena Vourla going north, while the road from Pelasgia to Almyros in Volos was impassable because of deep snow on the road surface.
Fthiotida prefecture and the city of Lamia had also come to a standstill due to
heavy snow, they said. Meanwhile, the General Secretariat for Civilian Protection warned local authorities at all levels on Friday to prepare for the renewed bout of extremely bad weather predicted by the weather service (EMY).

http://www.ana.gr/


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 291 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sat, Dec 29, 2001 (10:43) * 25 lines 
 
Hello all,
As you can see on the updated graph, my signals are higher than the background level. I made the following graph making zoom, on today's updated graph, for 10 days time period and for less amplitude scale.


I will try to update also this graph!


You can see on this graph that the amplitude before the near Patra's EQ was about 5.7mVolts.
During the last 24 hours the signal is a little bit lower but not on the background level. Perhaps, this means that is prepared an EQ in enough distance from my station or that is too soon in order to we extract conclusions.

I remind you that the max amplitude before Skyros EQ (M=6.4R) was about 27mVolts. If you want to see it again,CLICK HERE

Marcia, you have right for the time scale. So, I present you the graph below. It is the daily mean tidal gravity curve (blue line). The days of high seismic danger are minus to plus one day around each red arrow.



As you understand, those days are located at the lower and the higher peaks of the tidal curve. Also, it is true that the EQ near Patras city was occurred about 24 hours after the time of the lower peak of the tidal gravity curve. You see also the next high seismic danger days where are located the red arrows, minus to plus one day around each arrow.

I notice that just now we learn Nature's games. If it is to be occurred an EQ during this period, it must be low magnitude (Less than 5R), except if it is too far of my station.

Intentionally, I have cut out important information in order to be more interesting this presentation. What I have cut out?

(Please feel free and come to discuss with us. Perhaps your opinion is important and you can help by this way. If not, it will be our pleasure to inform you.)

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 292 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Dec 29, 2001 (11:56) * 1 lines 
 
John please be careful! it looks like you guys are in for another one *HUGS*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 293 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Dec 29, 2001 (14:04) * 6 lines 
 
Since I speak with you often, John, I usually make my uneducated guesses about your prediction signals in private. Everyone should know that there are no such things as "stupid" questions, and that we are all in the learning stage. John is far ahead of us. He is my guide for the things I am struggling to understand.
I will study carefully your magnified graphics. What possibly can be missing?!
Other than the positions of the sun vs moon and their collected effect on the earth's crust. Tidal forces must be part of this equation.

(John's math and physics far exceed anything I can begin to understand!)
*Hugs* John. This is wonderful mental exercise for us. I am grateful for your hard work and wonderful graphics!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 294 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Dec 30, 2001 (12:54) * 32 lines 
 
Hello my friends,
First, I will inform you for our current seismisity from:
http://www.emsc-csem.org/

2001/12/30 04:06:58.5 35.7N 25.0E 138 Mb5.0 M+ CSEM CRETE, GREECE
2001/12/30 04:06:45.3 35.5N 27.8E 140 M 4.6 M GSSC DODECANESE ISLANDS, GREECE
2001/12/30 04:06:45.3 35.5N 27.8E 140 A GSSA DODECANESE ISLANDS, GREECE
2001/12/30 04:06:40.0 36.0N 27.0E Mb4.9 A! LED DODECANESE ISLANDS, GREECE
2001/12/30 04:06:33.9 34.2N 28.2E 10 Mb4.9 M GII EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA
2001/12/30 04:06:28.0 34.8N 27.4E Mb5.0 M NEIR EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA
2001/12/30 04:06:24.0 36.3N 29.0E mb4.7 A MAD TURKEY
2001/12/30 04:06:23.7 34.7N 27.5E 10 Mb4.4 A MIX EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA
2001/12/30 04:06:19.4 34.7N 27.9E 10G Ml5.5 A: INGV EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA
2001/12/30 04:05:40.1 32.9N 32.5E Mb5.0 A SED EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA

We had in Greece new seismic activity as you see. Seeing my signals on the updated graph in my previous response, we can say that this new fact was possible. The signals are not on the background level but they have low amplitude. Marcia had predicted this EQ in response 1067/topic 22 on December 28. Congratulations Marcia!

The second graph in my previous response is already updated too (That that is relatively to the most dangerous days). We are already in the middle of the dangerous period today. So, the second part of a complete prediction, about WHEN is possible to occur this EQ, was:
From December 30 to January 1.

I told you that I have cut up important information. I was waiting this question:
WHERE?

Finally, I present you the following time based animation with the azimuth directions that I have calculated during the last 10 days.


Blue arrow represents the azimuth direction each time.


I will leave conclusions to you.
The progress of my signals is very interesting and the responding of the Earth too.
Congratulations to Marcia again.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 295 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec 30, 2001 (22:40) * 5 lines 
 
I see that the signals miss Thessaloniki. For that we are grateful. However, how much do you know about the central point of origin of these signals? Surely some of them are in the direction of north from you where all of the historic great quakes have ravaged Turkey. How can you tell which ones will originate in Volos? I worry about your safety!

I am happy the quake has happened. But, I also suspect you have not had the last of this series. It is not a scientific thought this time, it is more like an apprehensive feeling for your safety! I am not given to "feelings" and other wizardry for determining such things; I hope this feeling is just worry for your well-being.

Thank you, John. This is the most exciting adventure, ever!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 296 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Dec 30, 2001 (22:53) * 1 lines 
 
wow!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 297 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec 30, 2001 (22:58) * 5 lines 
 
Any one who does not study your tidal data and see how accurate it is... they are foolish. I also see tha the 30 January tidal forces will be greater than for this last quake. I will be studying your graphs carefully!

http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/read/Geo/9.291 updating tidal graph

http://www.spring.net/geo/JohnVolos/Public/pages/inviation.htm updating earth signals


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 298 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Jan  2, 2002 (03:22) * 11 lines 
 
Happy New Year to All

We had a new EQ in Greece last night:

2002/01/01 22:15:57.6 37.2N 22.1E 5G Ml4.4 M THE SOUTHERN GREECE

From: http://www.emsc-csem.org/

You can follow the last seismisity in Greece, in responses 291 and 294. Graphs are updated! I notice that the time of these EQ's confirms our theory for the most dangerous days. (Position of red arrows on the graph of the tidal forces in response 291).

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 299 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan  2, 2002 (14:23) * 1 lines 
 
Kudos, John! This is fascinating, especially when the earthqukes did not cause damage. I suspect we have a few more to worry about. May they all be small and in the sea.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 300 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jan 12, 2002 (22:08) * 1 lines 
 
My anticipated earthquake has not happened yet. I will monitor it carefully via the European seismic centers and John's indicators. I hope the amplitude does not continue to build...


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 301 of 639: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Jan 13, 2002 (05:01) * 1 lines 
 
Which quake again? Details?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 302 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Jan 14, 2002 (03:55) * 11 lines 
 
Hello Terry and All,
I suggest that you can see my responses 241, 291 & 294, (if you have time). They are containing everyday updated graphs. You can find (with simple logic) if it is to occur someone event in Greece and WHEN it is possible to occur. Maybe you can estimate the magnitude too.

I will give you any help if you want it. Marcia is very good and observant student. I have to make only one notice. Earth’s procedure is very dilatory and we must be patient. Surely is prepared an event! And Marcia has already one correct prediction (without my help) that was realized!

I am here ready to discuss anything you need.

*Hugs*

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 303 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jan 14, 2002 (13:34) * 3 lines 
 
I can vouch for John's silence on my predictions. I make them on my own and post them in topic 26 before I talk to him about it. He is a true pragmatist and careful scientist, so his opionions are far more guarded than mine are.

This was my second prediction if the 4.5 previous quake counted!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 304 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jan 14, 2002 (13:38) * 1 lines 
 
Terry, my prediction was on Geo 26 - at least 24 hours before it happened.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 305 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Jan 15, 2002 (05:58) * 23 lines 
 
Hello all,
I think that we have toMarcia for she's second correct prediction! From my side, I must tell you that she made she's prediction without any help!

But, what really predicted Marcia this time?

I will present you this EQ on my signals graph. Here is!


It is not magic! It is simply logical conclusion!


Now, I have some additional notices:
1. This EQ occurred inside the most dangerous days window, which you can see in response 291.

2. Having in mind the amplitude of Skyros EQ signals (of about 27mVolts) and seeing that the amplitude of my signals before this EQ was about 6.4 mVolts we can conclude that the magnitude of the expected EQ must be enough less than Skyros EQ if it will happen in the same distance. So my area (where is my station) will be safe.

3. This is a good example about how we can predict EQ's. But I request you to think how we can react if we see big signals. I want to discuss this problem with all of you. I think this is bigger problem than the prediction.

4. I would like to remind you that you could follow recent pre-earthquake activity for Greece in response 241 or
CLICK HERE.

It is updated every day!
Additional updated information you can find in responses 291 and 294.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 306 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 15, 2002 (10:22) * 3 lines 
 
I have discovered several disaster preparedness books on my shelves. One by the American Red Cross and one by the Federal Emergency Managenment Agency (FEMA) with guidelines to help wih this difficulty. I'll continue this discussion both here and more extensively Geo 47. These books, along with the things I have learned from experience, provide only a brief outline for the most obviously basic needs. More extensive preparations need to be discussed, written down and be made a reference for all those who face disasters Please help us formaulate good plans both pre and post event eventuality.

Truthfully, John is an excellent teacher, and I just followed his observation conclusions for a little while. I also noticed there were gathering signal intensities. It is an easy thing to do. He crunches the data and presents the graphs fully grown. Our task is an easy one. Try it! I think you will find in highly satisfying. There really are ways to foresee these disasters, large and small.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 307 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jan 15, 2002 (18:08) * 1 lines 
 
you did a very good job *HUGS*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 308 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 15, 2002 (18:24) * 3 lines 
 
Thanks, Wolfie. I need all the encouragement I can get. I spent a large part of the morning justifying Geo.

This research John is doing deserves not only praise for him but wide dissemination and support. It is frustrating to realize how hard he has worked and for 20 or more years, and we are just now learning about it. Before him, I evaporate and disclose the real hero of this story!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 309 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jan 15, 2002 (21:28) * 3 lines 
 
what? why on earth would you need to justify it (bad pun unintended)

yes, john's mechanism is really really cool even if i don't understand it very well.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 310 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 15, 2002 (23:14) * 1 lines 
 
John is the resident Phyisicist. Are you and I supposed to understand how it works? That it works is impressive enough for me!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 311 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Jan 16, 2002 (14:44) * 13 lines 
 
Hello all
The way to get knowledge from the nature is long and we have to fight the human nature as well. I notice that human believes easier what he hopes to hear and not the visible truth.

Success is something that needs luck and favorable destiny. In any case we have to try for the truth. I believe that absolute truth does not exist or we cannot find it. But we can go close to it.

It appears that I found something correct on EQ prediction and I share it with you. Discussion helps to find us unknown parts of nature laws. Feel comfortable and tell us what you don't understand or what you think. (Wolfie?)

Marcia, I am not something special. I am just like you with human inabilities and passions. I use simple logic as every one of you. I don’t want to teach you but to discuss with you as equal between equals. Maybe someone of you have more useful ideas than these I have. I am ready to learn from you too.

*Hugs*

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 312 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan 16, 2002 (15:14) * 4 lines 
 
We will share what we know. Perhaps I stated my math difficulties incorrectly.
I am following what you are showing in your graphs and studying them carefully before making predictions.

I suggest between you tidal forces and earth signals being at a low point in their cycle and amplitude, that you are safe from EQs in Greece until close to January 30th danger period.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 313 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan 16, 2002 (16:34) * 5 lines 
 
I have erred. Valleys are as important to note as are peaks
http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/read/geo/9.291
http://www.spring.net/geo/JohnVolos/Public/Seismology/GreeceDD1.gif

January 23rd is the next window of danger. I am obviously still learning to be more careful in my studying. Please don't make me do this alone. If I am going to make mistakes, I'd appreciate company. Also, if I am right, I would be happier to share the successful feeling! Too bad Hawaii is so quite, now. I'd better be careful of what I wish for. I just might get it!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 314 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Thu, Jan 17, 2002 (03:17) * 8 lines 
 
I know well your enthusiasm Marcia. It is a strong and strange feeling. Especially when you see that your prediction is correct and it follows the nature law that you have in mind. It is like you are walking on unsearchable paths in a new land. You feel as an explorer.

It is very easy to make some omissions under this enthusiasm. But you have corrected it. I will stay muted on your predictions. I think this is the best way to explain later how we work on it. Maybe our friends they have questions and they want to ask. I am sure that they are interesting but some fear keeps them invisible. I share this knowledge to all of you. Please feel comfortable and ask us.

*Hugs*

John




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 315 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jan 17, 2002 (19:36) * 3 lines 
 
We are like little children who are learning to walk. If we do not make attempts to walk and fall down in the process, we will never learn to walk. Please do not leave me out here making mistakes all by myself. Surely there are others who are interested enough to make these predictions with me. John is already an expert, but if I don't start running now, I'll never catch up with him. *Sigh*

*Hugs*, John, keep us learning. This is fascinating to me. I look forward to seeing your data each day like a small child with a great secret.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 316 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Jan 18, 2002 (19:39) * 1 lines 
 
marcia, i make mine in my head, but i'm with you all the way!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 317 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jan 18, 2002 (20:33) * 1 lines 
 
*Sigh* You are going to let me fall down all by myself? I guess that "honor" goes to the hostess of this conference.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 318 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Jan 18, 2002 (21:35) * 1 lines 
 
i will never let you fall sweetie!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 319 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jan 18, 2002 (23:31) * 1 lines 
 
*Hugs* Sweetie, I know you wouldn't! You're my twin and we'd look pretty silly at this age with scuffed knees!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 320 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jan 19, 2002 (16:36) * 3 lines 
 
Check the cable connections and then we can better judge what the current downward spike indicates. I see it had happened before. If this is not a spurious signal, there is definitly something in the offing for Greece.

(How do you stay warm in such cold weather? I'm freezing!)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 321 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jan 19, 2002 (22:49) * 2 lines 
 
John, Now I am worried for you. The signals have quickly enlarged in amplitude.
This is no anomaly you have tracked. This is the warning of Greek earthquake of more than usual mildness.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 322 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Jan 20, 2002 (10:03) * 12 lines 
 

Hi all,
I worried when I saw this serious jump suddenly in my signals. Finally the cable between my instruments and the electrodes was OK. So, I am sure now that this signal is real...

Let us suppose that this signal is coming from the wide area where live each one of you and you are seeing it first and alone. What you must do? Just think about it and answer to yourself alone. This is a useful self-test. I know how difficult is. We will discuss it later.

Please Marcia, we need self-control and less enthusiasm if it is possible. Surely we are observing a special natural phenomenon. It is better to observe the progress of this phenomenon carefully without comments. We have time to discuss and explain everything later when nature will finish its "song". We will have common data for a clear discussion on them.

Regards

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 323 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Jan 20, 2002 (13:11) * 1 lines 
 
uh oh, i'm going straight to the john's greek earthquake predictor and take a look see for myself!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 324 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Jan 20, 2002 (13:12) * 1 lines 
 
oh no, that doesn't look good at all. john, is it possible that the "little" quakes marcia's been observing are leading up to this? is it also possible that your unusual weather is a contributing factor as well?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 325 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jan 20, 2002 (13:56) * 5 lines 
 
Thank you, John. I need my enthusiasm kept in check. Science and emotional reactions (no matter how sincere) do not go well together. I have accepted that your house is safe - if any house can be safe in a strong EQ. We must wait to see what the succeeding signals tell us. I accept your gentle admonishment as a good student learns from an excellent teacher.

I still think Greece is going to have an earthquake. Where and when and how strong still remain to be seen. The Skyros quake for which you posted signals took several days of increasingly large signals. We will watch carefully.

Wolfie, hang on - we may all be in for a ride if it is strong enough!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 326 of 639: Michael McNeil  (Weatherlawyer) * Sun, Jan 20, 2002 (19:54) * 35 lines 
 
Long period events are the signals Dr Bernard Chouett of the USGS, has
pointed out as the classic signal that a volcano is about to erupt.
Previous research into the same data had looked at short period events.

These latter were the sounds of rock breaking in a tremor. They appear
on the graph at full intensity and rapidly fade. Long term events are
more similar to pipe organ notes. They build up to full intensity and
fade away gradually.

The BBC programme from a few days before the Congolese eruption
concentrated on the prediction of Mt Popocatapetl. When the volcano
erupted it's most violent eruption in a thousand years, those most at
risk had been evacuated a day or so earlier.

Not one human life was lost.

Previously he had informed the Colombian Institute of Geoscience that
when the caldera sealed and the volcano began to pressurise, the
seismographs would show these "Long Period Events." 4 days after the
appearance of these events, the volcano "Galeras" erupted.

Also present at the site were the researchers Stanley Williams and John
Stix. These two scientists were reaching the same conclusions based on
gas levels. They organised a field trip of 12 scientists and 3 tourists
to the caldera.

At 1:30 ish that afternoon the eruption started. It hurled 1 ton
boulders a mile high. It killed 9 of them.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/horizon/2001/volcanohell.shtml

One wonders why the tens of thousands of people at the site of the
recent Congalese eruption were not warned.

You might want to superimpose yor graphs, John, with the seismic data that shows these "B type" signals.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 327 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Jan 21, 2002 (11:55) * 21 lines 
 
Marcia, Wolfie and Mike:
I have spent much time (more than 10 years) and I have made a long list of phenomena that are observed before earthquakes. Then I found the causes, which can also produce each one of them. None was produced from EQ preparing process alone. Weather is between them.

We need to find and observe phenomena that are products of the preparation process of the EQ alone and they cannot be produced by other mechanisms, including human activities. Only in this case we have possibilities to make correct predictions.

I have made a very tired research of the electromagnetic spectrum below 30KHz for years. I found many interesting relationships between specific frequencies and nature’s phenomena like the weather on Earth or like the ionosphere changes, which are depended on the solar wind, etc. I found also relationships between specific frequencies and human activities such are submarine communication emissions, telecommunications, emissions from the electric power lines etc.

Searching always-lower frequencies, I found that below 1 Hz the electromagnetic spectrum is clearer of the above interference. Also there does not exist human activity because are needed special and too expensive instrumentation to use these frequencies. I notice here that if we try to receive lower and lower frequencies, the difficult degree increases for the same reason,. Additionally, the level of the signal that we have to receive must be about 10 times higher than the background noise, for a clear reception. This is the SIGNAL/NOISE ratio factor that is critical in any electromagnetic reception.

But what is the reality under 1 Hz?
At the area around 0.1 Hz of the electromagnetic spectrum that we can receive on the ground, background noise level has about equal level with the part of the electromagnetic emissions during the EQ preparation. Resolving power is enough restricted in this area, as you can easy understand. (SIGNAL/NOISE = 1).
In this area, which is inside the ULF band, they are working many researchers around the world and also VAN GROUP in Greece. In this area is also my first filtering stage.

Notice: frequency = 0.1 Hz is the same with period = 1/frequency = 1/0.1 = 10 seconds.

Going at lower frequencies, SIGNAL/NOISE increases and we have better resolving power. My final filter separates the signals that have period of 24 hours. I have SIGNAL/NOISE = about 8 that is enough good Signal to Noise Ratio factor. This is the first reason for my good results.

Regards

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 328 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jan 21, 2002 (12:42) * 1 lines 
 
John, you amaze me! *HUGS*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 329 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jan 21, 2002 (13:21) * 5 lines 
 
There is much about John that amazes me. I am running as fast as I can and will never catch up with him, alas. All I can hope for is a pause in his forward speed to make up for my slowness.

John, you mentioned nothing humans do makes a difference. This means the suspected removal of oil along faults in California or injection of waste water along other faults there for geothermal purposes does not cause some of the little quakes detected there? I am not challenging your opinions, I am merely asking for more information. In any case, it is morning for me and the world seems to be quiet for the moment - unless you consider the volcano in Zaire.
Thank you for a most considered response. I will read it many times and forward it to my son.



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 330 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jan 21, 2002 (13:26) * 3 lines 
 
I think Hawaii will prove a very different for one of your seismic signal detection installations from the one you have in Greece. I am usually VERY observant, and only the weather causes changes in the activity of insects. I have heard nothing from earthquakes, but I will check other sources.

I hope your press interview went well. Our John is becoming very famous in Greece. I wish one of our "networks" in the US would devote 15 minutes to him.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 331 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jan 21, 2002 (13:35) * 3 lines 
 
john, what marcia brings up stems from a question the AM asked. he wonders whether or not the oil and whatnot in the ground acts as a lubricant in the faultlines.

i can't believe we haven't heard anything about john's work over here.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 332 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jan 21, 2002 (13:38) * 1 lines 
 
you know, the unusual weather question i asked about was concerning what the ground is "used" to. you know? and we know that extreme cold/heat causes contractions and expansion could it also affect the ground? or are the faultlines so far under the ground that what goes on "up here" couldn't possibly affect it. what about as the water and snow drains into the earth?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 333 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jan 21, 2002 (13:54) * 1 lines 
 
john, i just went to your EQ predictor and those signals were from a 4.4 (the peaks marcia and i were wondering about)? wow, amazing how the signals can vary widely and really have nothing to do with the magnitude of the EQ?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 334 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jan 21, 2002 (22:17) * 3 lines 
 
http://www.spring.net/geo/JohnVolos/Public/pages/inviation.htm

Look at the Skyros earthquake graph of signals. I suspect Greece is in for another one of at least that magnitude. SOON! There were two more quakes in the area of Greece and the Aegean, but none in the 5.R range so far.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 335 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jan 21, 2002 (22:41) * 1 lines 
 
that's interesting how they occur at the top and bottom of the signals! but you're right, Skyros signals were off the graph!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 336 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jan 21, 2002 (22:54) * 3 lines 
 
Could the crust of the earth be responding to stress? When it reaches a high enough point in some already-weak part of the world and the sun and moon are aligned just right I suspect this might cause the fault to react just as when you bend a cracker. Perhaps a poor analogy, but I was thinking of ginger snaps!

I am still awaiting John's explanation of how weather also has a causal effect on earthquakes. I have so much to learn. I suspect I will be forever guessing and getting it all wrong. *sigh*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 337 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 22, 2002 (00:02) * 8 lines 
 
2002/01/22 04:54:07.8 37.0N 24.7E Mb7.3 A SED SOUTHERN GREECE
2002/01/22 04:54:00.6 36.7N 25.5E Mb7.5 A SED DODECANESE ISLANDS, GREECE
2002/01/22 04:53:57.1 35.1N 27.2E 10 Mb5.9 M GII DODECANESE ISLANDS, GREECE
2002/01/22 04:53:46.6 35.7N 26.9E mb5.9 A MAD CRETE, GREECE
2002/01/22 04:53:45.8 35.7N 26.8E 33G Mb6.3 A NEIA CRETE, GREECE
2002/01/22 04:53:41.1 35.6N 27.2E mb5.9 A MAD DODECANESE ISLANDS, GREECE
2002/01/22 04:53:40.0 35.0N 27.0E Mb6.4 A LED DODECANESE ISLANDS, GREECE
2002/01/22 04:53:26.0 34.5N 28.2E Ml5.5 A: RNS EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 338 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan 23, 2002 (23:01) * 21 lines 
 
6.6-Richter quake hits southeastern Greece

A powerful earthquake measuring 6.6 on the Richter scale was reported at 6:54
yesterday morning, deep under the seabed west of Karpathos, 380 kilometers
southeast of Athens, the Athens Geodynamic Institute reported. It caused alarm
in many parts of Greece and the eastern Mediterranean but there were no
reports of injuries or significant damage, thanks to the great depth of the
epicenter.
The quake was felt as far away as Corfu off northwestern Greece, Patras in the
Peloponnese, as far east as Israel and in Egypt in the south. The residents of
the Dodecanese, Crete and southwestern Turkey were jolted the most. A man in
Turkey died of a heart attack.
The epicenter was 104 kilometers below the surface.
"If it had been a little further south and closer to the surface, it would have
caused serious damage to the cities of northern Crete," said Akis Tselentis,
professor of seismology at Patras University.
The secretary of the Geotechnical Chamber of Greece, Haralambos Fasoulas,
said, "Crete and the region of Iraklion must be studied further, because of the
nature of the sub-surface."

http://www.ekathimerini.com/news/content.asp?aid=115705


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 339 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Jan 23, 2002 (23:25) * 34 lines 
 

Hello my friends
Congratulations to Marcia again, for her new correct prediction in topic 26, response 1224 on 19th January. Congratulations to Wolfie too. She had seeing that the signal was big and was wondering how big EQ will be occurred. (In topic 26, response 1225 on 20th January).

On 22nd January, in our local morning, we had a big EQ that was 6.3R by NEIC report, or 6.6R Ms as Greek seismologists are saying. The epicentre was in the Sea and in depth of about 100 Km, NW of island Karpathos and Eastern of Island Crete. There is the main fault between African and Eurasian plates. It was a very strong EQ that shakes Egypt, Turkey, Cyprus, Greece and Italy. We had no serious damages in Greece.

Let to make us a flashback. On 21st January you see in my daily updated graph:



It is recorded high amplitude of 17.1 mVolts. That means two things:
First: A big EQ will be occur in a few days
Second: The area around my station will have not sequences, if the signal does not become higher.
This is a conclusion after the EQ in Skyros Island (M=6.3R Ms) when we had signal of about 27 mVolts. Even if that EQ was felt in my area was not destructive. EQ that gives max pre-earthquake signal less than 27mVolts will be without sequences in Volos area.

But WHEN we must expect the EQ?
We must see the tidal graph, in order to find WHEN. The EQ will be occurring within the 3 next most dangerous days on this graph. It was 21st January and as we can see on the graph, the next most dangerous days are 21st, 22nd and 23rd January.



This is absolutely correct as you see in the above graph. One other conclusion is that THIS EQ WAS THE MAIN because the signals degrease.

Next question is WHERE?
On 20th January, mine process and Dr's Thanassoulas process on my signals, it gives the azimuth direction to the East-West of my station, Here is the exactly azimuth direction and where finally occurred the EQ.



Blue arrow on the above map, represents what azimuth direction we had calculated on 20th January.

Unfortunately I have only one station and I cannot find the epicentre on this line. I need two additional stations (at least), in order to calculate the position of the epicentre and the value of the magnitude too.

Regards

John




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 340 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Thu, Jan 24, 2002 (10:51) * 5 lines 
 
I am sorry. I made a small misprint above. Correct is:
On 20th January, mine process and Dr's Thanassoulas process on my signals, it gives the azimuth direction to the Southeast of my station. Here is the exactly azimuth direction and where finally occurred the EQ.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 341 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Jan 24, 2002 (18:55) * 1 lines 
 
*YAAAAAAY*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 342 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jan 26, 2002 (23:01) * 1 lines 
 
If I could figure out a way to throw a party in Geo, I know who would be the guest of honor!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 343 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Jan 27, 2002 (10:37) * 1 lines 
 
we can throw a party in geo--remember all the stuff posted for birthdays? we can do it the same way (and i don't think terry has read my email about ftp yet!)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 344 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jan 27, 2002 (14:39) * 3 lines 
 
I'll email him. It only takes a little time and fiddling. So, I just emailed him.

We'll party! My mind has just kicked up into high gear. =)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 345 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Jan 27, 2002 (20:42) * 1 lines 
 
*woohoo*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 346 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jan 27, 2002 (21:29) * 1 lines 
 
My thought, exactly! Now, since I have been up since 0500 today trying my hardest to keep from missing John again, he is not online. Wolfie, have you heard from him? I feel like a dog chasing its own tail.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 347 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jan 28, 2002 (18:29) * 10 lines 
 
More seismic activity in Ionian reported
28/01/2002 14:15:08

A strong quake measuring 5.2 on the Richter scale was recorded Saturday evening
with an epicentre south of the Ionian island of Zakynthos, some 260 kilometres
southwest of Athens.
 The quake was recorded at 10:05 p.m. No damages were reported.
 On Friday an earthquake measuring 4.6 on the Richter scale was recorded at
7:55 p.m. in a sea region south of another island in the Ionian sea, Cephallonia.
http://www.ana.gr/


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 348 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jan 28, 2002 (18:38) * 6 lines 
 
Zakynthos quake

A strong undersea quake measuring 5.2 on the Richter scale took place south of the Strofades islets
near the Ionian island of Zakynthos just after 10 p.m. on Saturday, the Athens Geodynamic Institute
said. No injuries or damage was reported.
http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100021_28/01/2002_12712


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 349 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jan 28, 2002 (21:05) * 3 lines 
 
marcia, i've not heard from john either. *HUGS*

so the stuff's not over over there huh? i thought the waves were calming down. maybe i oughta take a look-see again.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 350 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Jan 28, 2002 (21:06) * 1 lines 
 
the waves are calm as of yesterday.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 351 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 29, 2002 (09:34) * 1 lines 
 
Greece is pretty calm. John is recalibrating and crunching numbers. I sis talk to him finally. Now I wonder where Rob went. I guess NZ finally dried out. Today is my turn for thunder storms.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 352 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 29, 2002 (18:15) * 1 lines 
 
Not so calm, anymore. John signed off last night my time with a word of concern and to watch today's data. Of course, now he is sleeping and I will pace the floor worrying what he had seen. 10 hours can seem like forever!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 353 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jan 29, 2002 (18:40) * 1 lines 
 
oooo, i'm going to check the waves!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 354 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 29, 2002 (18:53) * 1 lines 
 
Honey, he won't post it till morning, his time. That means at least 8 PM your time. *sigh* It was an interesting three hours last night with my son eager to work with him on one IM and John on the other and me sending each other's messages to the other. It got so amazing that I even got our timezones on the wrong side of the Greenwich Meridian! Son was certain he sensed an earthquake in California, John was crunching data and it was not many minutes after we signed off for the night that the southern Califoria quakes began. It was surreal.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 355 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 29, 2002 (23:17) * 1 lines 
 
*SIGH* All is well for the time being. We are learning much by studying, but each thing we learn makes more puzzles to solve.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 356 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Jan 30, 2002 (06:22) * 23 lines 
 
Hello friends
It is very interesting that the 24-hour period signal rises up before big EQ's. Many smaller EQ's, which will be occurred around, they produce small signals that we must mark as without significance. So, we must put a warning low level on the amplitude values. I appreciate that we must put this level at 10 mVolts of amplitude. Lower levels are marking EQ's without danger.

We cannot estimate the exactly magnitude and the epicenter location because I have only one station. But we can calculate the azimuth direction of the epicenter area with very good accuracy. From the other hand, we can estimate the time of when this EQ will be occurred, during the next three dangerous days, which are centered at the lower or higher peak of the mean daily oscillation of the tidal forces. I notice that this fact realizes about 90% of the big EQ in Greek area since 1952.

Now, let us to see my signals again.
Skyros EQ. Distance of my station 125 Km. Magnitude M=6.4R. Time of occurrence was inside the next most dangerous days window. Azimuth direction was very good. It was perceptible in Volos area as with medium power.



Dodecanese Islands EQ. Distance of my station 545 Km. Magnitude M=6.3R. Time of occurrence was inside the next most dangerous days window. Azimuth direction was very good. It was not perceptible in Volos area.



I am thinking that the amplitude of that signals is a criterion of how much perceptible will be the EQ at my station's area. We will see how much correct is this in the future.



I made this correlation table that shows the max signal amplitude for the past two big EQ's in Greece, the corresponding amplitude now and the warning level as described above. Maybe we must change the warning level in the future. I will be updating this table frequently.

Regards

John


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 357 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan 30, 2002 (12:16) * 3 lines 
 
Thanks you, John. Your new table is must less frighening than your earlier graphs. These strange signals you are now receiving appear to be increasing and have the look of gathering momentum for the next large Greece EQ. This bar chart is more comforting by comparison. I hope this is true. I will bookmark this graph also to watch and coordinate my thoughts concerning the other signals you are receiving.

I still think you are in the danger window for this month...


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 358 of 639: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Jan 30, 2002 (15:00) * 9 lines 
 
Hi Yall

Wanted to jump in and say Hi - sorry for being so infrequent but its been
utter chaos here. Anyway, saw this was where the activity was so a post on this page. Very interesting previous posts BTW. Would like to participate
in a Geo party also if that happens via IM. Stay cool.

peace
Mike AA9IL
-radio cosmo international-


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 359 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Jan 30, 2002 (19:26) * 5 lines 
 
marcia, simmi valley had several tremors today including a 3.5 (i think) and a 3.0.

the bar graph is harder for me to understand but i got the oscillating one down and it's changing again.

let's have a party!!!! mardi gras is upon us *woohoo*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 360 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan 30, 2002 (21:43) * 272 lines 
 
Party time! Olympics start next soon, too!

U.S. Geological Survey
News Release

Release date: January 30, 2002
Contact: John Filson, 703-648-6696
Carolyn Bell, 703-648-4463
Lee Siegel, 801-581-8993


University of Utah to Monitor Olympic Earthquakes - Thanks to USGS

Jan. 30, 2002 ? University of Utah seismologists will be on duty
around-the-clock during the Olympics, armed with a new $1.2 million system
so they can quickly supply public safety information if any disruptive
earthquakes shake the 2002 Winter Games.

"A basic, real-time earthquake information system has just been completed
in Utah's densely populated Wasatch Front region in time for seismologists
to rapidly deliver key information to emergency managers and the public if
an 'Olympics earthquake' visits Utah," said Walter Arabasz, director of the
University of Utah Seismograph Stations.

The improved earthquake-monitoring system of sensors, computers and
telecommunications equipment was made possible with $965,000 in funds and
equipment provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and another
$235,000 in funds and personnel support from the state of Utah.

During the Olympic Winter Games, worldwide attention will focus on the
Wasatch Range, where crowds of people will watch skiers, skaters,
snowboarders and bobsledders compete in steep terrain. The Wasatch Range
appears majestic and serene. But underneath the mountains, rock continues
to grind slowly along the Wasatch fault, lifting the mountains and
producing earthquakes. Although most of these earthquakes are small, there
is the potential for infrequent, large earthquakes, which could have
devastating effects.

Mindful of these facts, and lessons learned from the 1989 "World Series
earthquake" that killed more than five dozen people in northern California,
Arabasz, seismic network manager Sue Nava and other earthquake scientists
at the University of Utah and the U.S. Geological Survey jointly installed
new tools for delivering fast information for public safety if any
disruptive quakes occur during the Olympics.

The new, real-time earthquake system's key information product is a
ShakeMap ? a rapidly generated computer map, available within about 5
minutes of an earthquake, that gives an overview of the location, severity,
and extent of actual ground shaking, just like a Doppler radar image for a
weather disturbance. The information is sent to emergency managers and
appears on the web site www.quake.utah.edu or www.seis.utah.edu

Olympic venues in Wasatch Front valleys are chiefly at risk from damaging
shaking from a moderate to large earthquake of Richter magnitude 5 or
greater. Arabasz estimates there is a 1-in-3,500 probability of "the Big
One" ? a magnitude-7 or stronger quake ? on the Wasatch fault in or near
the Ogden-Salt Lake City-Provo corridor during the time period of the
Olympics and Paralympics.

Estimates indicate a magnitude-7.5 quake on the Salt Lake City segment of
the Wasatch fault could kill up to 7,600 people, injure 44,000 others and
cause about $12 billion in damage.

Moderate quakes are somewhat more likely. Arabasz says the probability of a
magnitude-5 or greater shock within the metropolitan corridor is about 1 in
1,700 during the Olympics or Paralympics.

Even minor to moderate earthquakes of magnitude 4 or more could endanger
alpine venues or their access roads by triggering avalanches or landslides.
The chance of such an earthquake occurring within 9 miles (15 kilometers)
of one of the alpine venues during the Olympic Winter Games is about
1-in-750, Arabasz says.

If the chance of a quake during the Olympics seems remote, consider what
happened during some other sporting events:
n In October 1989, a major quake measuring 6.9 in magnitude (initially
reported at 7.1) rocked the San Francisco Bay region during the third
baseball game of the World Series. A live television audience of millions
witnessed the direct effects of the earthquake shaking Candlestick Park.
That quake killed 63 people, injured more than 3,700 others and caused up
to $10 billion in damage.
n During the 1998 Winter Olympic Games in Nagano, Japan, a magnitude-5
quake rattled alpine skiers at the starting line, shook rooms in multistory
apartment buildings at Olympic Village, delayed bullet trains for two
hours, made floors shudder in the press center in Nagano and triggered a
landslide that blocked traffic.
n Less than two months later, in April 1998, a magnitude-4.5 quake in
Italy made bleachers sway in a soccer stadium in Gualdo Tadino, sending
1,500 panicked fans fleeing. Two were injured.

The usefulness of the new ShakeMap system is illustrated by what happened
in the first few hours following the 1989 World Series quake, which was
centered 60 miles southeast of San Francisco. Emergency responders had poor
information on where the strongest shaking and greatest damage actually
occurred. They depended unduly on news media reports to guide their
response actions, and overlooked for hours some hard-hit areas. ShakeMaps
can identify areas of strong shaking within minutes.
Arabasz and Nava realized in 1998 they might have to deal with a 2002
"Olympics earthquake" on their watch. They set out to find funding to build
a real-time earthquake information system in Utah, patterned after a $20
million state-of-the art system in southern California. Now that the basic
$1 million system is in place, Utah seismologists will be on duty seven
days a week around-the-clock during the Winter Games, just in case they
need to provide quick information on an earthquake.

Although installation of the earthquake monitoring system was accelerated
to be in place for the 2002 Olympic Winter Games, the primary motivation
was to provide for the long-term needs for earthquake safety in Utah's
dramatically growing Wasatch Front area. Similar efforts are underway in
other at-risk U.S. metropolitan areas under a program known as the Advanced
National Seismic System (ANSS). Authorized by Congress in 2000 and led by
the USGS, the ANSS plan calls for installation of over 6,000 sensors to
monitor earthquake shaking in 26 metropolitan areas across the United
States. ANSS is currently only about 5 percent completed, but substantive
progress has been made in a few select regions such as the Salt Lake City
metropolitan area, the Seattle-Tacoma region, and the San Francisco Bay
area.

In addition to the ANSS seed funding from the USGS, the University of Utah
also received help from the Union Pacific Foundation, the Utah Division of
Comprehensive Emergency Management, the Federal Emergency Management
Agency, and the Utah Geological Survey.

*****
The USGS serves the nation by providing reliable scientific information to
describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from
natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources;
and enhance and protect our quality of life.
















U.S. Geological Survey
News Release

Release date: January 30, 2002
Contact: John Filson, 703-648-6696
Carolyn Bell, 703-648-4463
Lee Siegel, 801-581-8993


University of Utah to Monitor Olympic Earthquakes - Thanks to USGS

Jan. 30, 2002 ? University of Utah seismologists will be on duty
around-the-clock during the Olympics, armed with a new $1.2 million system
so they can quickly supply public safety information if any disruptive
earthquakes shake the 2002 Winter Games.

"A basic, real-time earthquake information system has just been completed
in Utah's densely populated Wasatch Front region in time for seismologists
to rapidly deliver key information to emergency managers and the public if
an 'Olympics earthquake' visits Utah," said Walter Arabasz, director of the
University of Utah Seismograph Stations.

The improved earthquake-monitoring system of sensors, computers and
telecommunications equipment was made possible with $965,000 in funds and
equipment provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and another
$235,000 in funds and personnel support from the state of Utah.

During the Olympic Winter Games, worldwide attention will focus on the
Wasatch Range, where crowds of people will watch skiers, skaters,
snowboarders and bobsledders compete in steep terrain. The Wasatch Range
appears majestic and serene. But underneath the mountains, rock continues
to grind slowly along the Wasatch fault, lifting the mountains and
producing earthquakes. Although most of these earthquakes are small, there
is the potential for infrequent, large earthquakes, which could have
devastating effects.

Mindful of these facts, and lessons learned from the 1989 "World Series
earthquake" that killed more than five dozen people in northern California,
Arabasz, seismic network manager Sue Nava and other earthquake scientists
at the University of Utah and the U.S. Geological Survey jointly installed
new tools for delivering fast information for public safety if any
disruptive quakes occur during the Olympics.

The new, real-time earthquake system's key information product is a
ShakeMap ? a rapidly generated computer map, available within about 5
minutes of an earthquake, that gives an overview of the location, severity,
and extent of actual ground shaking, just like a Doppler radar image for a
weather disturbance. The information is sent to emergency managers and
appears on the web site www.quake.utah.edu or www.seis.utah.edu

Olympic venues in Wasatch Front valleys are chiefly at risk from damaging
shaking from a moderate to large earthquake of Richter magnitude 5 or
greater. Arabasz estimates there is a 1-in-3,500 probability of "the Big
One" ? a magnitude-7 or stronger quake ? on the Wasatch fault in or near
the Ogden-Salt Lake City-Provo corridor during the time period of the
Olympics and Paralympics.

Estimates indicate a magnitude-7.5 quake on the Salt Lake City segment of
the Wasatch fault could kill up to 7,600 people, injure 44,000 others and
cause about $12 billion in damage.

Moderate quakes are somewhat more likely. Arabasz says the probability of a
magnitude-5 or greater shock within the metropolitan corridor is about 1 in
1,700 during the Olympics or Paralympics.

Even minor to moderate earthquakes of magnitude 4 or more could endanger
alpine venues or their access roads by triggering avalanches or landslides.
The chance of such an earthquake occurring within 9 miles (15 kilometers)
of one of the alpine venues during the Olympic Winter Games is about
1-in-750, Arabasz says.

If the chance of a quake during the Olympics seems remote, consider what
happened during some other sporting events:
n In October 1989, a major quake measuring 6.9 in magnitude (initially
reported at 7.1) rocked the San Francisco Bay region during the third
baseball game of the World Series. A live television audience of millions
witnessed the direct effects of the earthquake shaking Candlestick Park.
That quake killed 63 people, injured more than 3,700 others and caused up
to $10 billion in damage.
n During the 1998 Winter Olympic Games in Nagano, Japan, a magnitude-5
quake rattled alpine skiers at the starting line, shook rooms in multistory
apartment buildings at Olympic Village, delayed bullet trains for two
hours, made floors shudder in the press center in Nagano and triggered a
landslide that blocked traffic.
n Less than two months later, in April 1998, a magnitude-4.5 quake in
Italy made bleachers sway in a soccer stadium in Gualdo Tadino, sending
1,500 panicked fans fleeing. Two were injured.

The usefulness of the new ShakeMap system is illustrated by what happened
in the first few hours following the 1989 World Series quake, which was
centered 60 miles southeast of San Francisco. Emergency responders had poor
information on where the strongest shaking and greatest damage actually
occurred. They depended unduly on news media reports to guide their
response actions, and overlooked for hours some hard-hit areas. ShakeMaps
can identify areas of strong shaking within minutes.
Arabasz and Nava realized in 1998 they might have to deal with a 2002
"Olympics earthquake" on their watch. They set out to find funding to build
a real-time earthquake information system in Utah, patterned after a $20
million state-of-the art system in southern California. Now that the basic
$1 million system is in place, Utah seismologists will be on duty seven
days a week around-the-clock during the Winter Games, just in case they
need to provide quick information on an earthquake.

Although installation of the earthquake monitoring system was accelerated
to be in place for the 2002 Olympic Winter Games, the primary motivation
was to provide for the long-term needs for earthquake safety in Utah's
dramatically growing Wasatch Front area. Similar efforts are underway in
other at-risk U.S. metropolitan areas under a program known as the Advanced
National Seismic System (ANSS). Authorized by Congress in 2000 and led by
the USGS, the ANSS plan calls for installation of over 6,000 sensors to
monitor earthquake shaking in 26 metropolitan areas across the United
States. ANSS is currently only about 5 percent completed, but substantive
progress has been made in a few select regions such as the Salt Lake City
metropolitan area, the Seattle-Tacoma region, and the San Francisco Bay
area.
In addition to the ANSS seed funding from the USGS, the University of Utah
also received help from the Union Pacific Foundation, the Utah Division of
Comprehensive Emergency Management, the Federal Emergency Management
Agency, and the Utah Geological Survey.
*****
The USGS serves the nation by providing reliable scientific information to
describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from
natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources;
and enhance and protect our quality of life.






 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 361 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan 30, 2002 (21:46) * 3 lines 
 
Several tiny quakes in Simi Valley... but they will make this topic enormous so I only post the batch from USGS lest we get buried.

Hi Cosmo! Welcome back - we missed you but have your place reserved for the party! College guys do that! I remmeber...


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 362 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Jan 30, 2002 (21:55) * 1 lines 
 
perfectly understandable---lot's of little ones all over the world!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 363 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Jan 30, 2002 (22:43) * 6 lines 
 
They must be very proud for that "Billion dollars, high level organization and very fast services of information". This is very useful for a quick estimation just after the event. I wonder if those statistic estimations for the possibilities of a catastrophe and for victims are really useful to peoples. Who can feel safer?

In any case, this a good step for the Emergency Management.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 364 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan 30, 2002 (23:11) * 2 lines 
 
I also had the same reaction - and I AM PAYING FOR THIS USELSS INFORMATION!
I nearly did not post this article from USGS. It is an embarrassment.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 365 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Feb  2, 2002 (16:47) * 1 lines 
 
Geo's back!!! I can breathe again!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 366 of 639: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sat, Feb  2, 2002 (17:00) * 4 lines 
 
Whew! It's a long story. You'll hear all about it.

Stay tuned.



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 367 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Feb  2, 2002 (17:03) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks!!! Thanks to Kaylene, too. I'm certain she has also been busy. Take your time, Terry. We're back in action! Spin your saga when you have relaxed and enjoyed the fruits of your labors!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 368 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Feb  2, 2002 (22:29) * 7 lines 
 
Until we get Geo files so they update John's graphs, please see them at this location:

http://users.otenet.gr/~bm-ohexwb/invite/inviationGB.htm

Or for those of you who need a clickable link:

Graph update



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 369 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb  3, 2002 (13:14) * 3 lines 
 
The graph and bar chart for Greece looks to be quiet and this is comforting.

http://users.otenet.gr/~bm-ohexwb/invite/inviationGB.htm


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 370 of 639: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (21:16) * 7 lines 
 
Yea! Geo is back!
Soon midterms will be over and I'll have a wee bit
more free time! Hi all!

73 de Mike
aa9il



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 371 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (21:20) * 1 lines 
 
hi cosmo!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 372 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  5, 2002 (21:58) * 1 lines 
 
Go Cosmo!!! Kick you-know-what and we'll see you on the other side of midterms.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 373 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Feb  6, 2002 (10:58) * 52 lines 
 
THE STORY OF A DEATHLY EQ


Final report by USGS National Earthquake Information Center is:

Date-Time: 2002 02 03 07:11:29.2 UTC
Location: 38.557N 31.116E
Depth: 10 kilometers
Magnitude: 5.7mb 6.5MS
Region: TURKEY


Result: 46 humans death, big numbers of injured persons while it caused total collapse even in ground floor buildings.

The epicenter was 722Km far of my station.
Precise azimuth direction of the real epicenter is 97 degrees, looking from my station.

Let us to see again the last graph of my signals.



You can see clearly the abrupt increase of the amplitude on January 30, with biggest amplitude of 8.66 mVolts that day.
This means that in a few days,

WILL BECOME A SIGNIFICANT EARTHQUAKE.


But, WHEN we must wait this EQ?

Come to see the mean daily tidal gravity variation graph for February 2002. The next three most dangerous days are the 3rd, 4th and 5th of February (Red bars).



This was proved absolutely precise as you can see on the above bar graph.

Also, we can say that
THIS EARTHQUAKE WAS THE MAIN

because the amplitude of 24-hour oscillation is decreased afterwards the earthquake.

On February 2, Dr. Thanassoulas (member our inquiring team) found the azimuth direction at 93 degrees, after process on my signals. It was about the same result of my process. That is to say almost easterly concerning my station. (The precise azimuth direction of the real epicentre was 97 degrees).



On the above map the blue-red arrow shows the azimuth direction that was calculated on February 2.

I will close this presentation with the following bar graph.



Here is the relationship between signals and EQ's for the last 3 big EQ's around my station. Fourth column indicates the amplitude of my signals during the past 24 hours. This graph is updated every day as well.



John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 374 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb  6, 2002 (13:23) * 5 lines 
 
Splendid work, John! I am full of admiration for you. This Quake happened quite far from your station in Volos. Is this the greatest distace at which you detected signals of which you were later able to prove the origin? Let me rephrase that question..... was this the greatest distance from your monitors for which you were able to redict and Earthquake?

You do need more stations. I know two people ready to turn their substrates into seismic monitoring stations for you!

Get well soon! We're all holding hands with you for strength!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 375 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb  6, 2002 (13:27) * 1 lines 
 
The danger period of tidal effects is very important. Thank you for your new bar chart. I can actually understand this. A rise in Amplitude of both the signals and the bar chart is usually a good reason to be extra vigilant.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 376 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Feb  6, 2002 (19:19) * 1 lines 
 
wow, john!!! *HUGS*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 377 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Feb  8, 2002 (07:24) * 6 lines 
 
You ask me if this is the greatest distance Marcia.
I will explain. As bigger is the magnitude of the oncoming EQ, too bigger is the amplitude of produced signals. Recording signal is that arrives in my station and it is less, as distance is bigger. The signal traveling in the ground reduces its power by the resistance of the rocks. But, if it is to occur an EQ with magnitude 7.0+R, the signal must be perceivable in bigger distance or amplitude of the signal must be higher for the same distance.

It isn’t enough 700Km for one station? It sounds magic and unbelievable, but it is true.
John




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 378 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb  8, 2002 (20:08) * 3 lines 
 
Your research is truly monumental, John. My admiration is boundless. I suspected the wave magnitude would have a factor of distance in it. It does with sound waves. and, I imagine, the entire Electro-magnetic spectrum.

Congratulations!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 379 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Feb 10, 2002 (03:50) * 8 lines 
 
The theory of emission and reception of electromagnetic waves defines that the receiving signal is proportional to Reverse Square of distance. But this is effect for one electric dipole. That is to say for source of point.

However the source of pre-earthquake signals is three dimensional with big volume. For this reason is not precise the theoretical approach. It is as big number of dipoles outspreaded in the area of the fault where they exist high pressures already.

We need an enough number of earthquakes in order to find an empirical formula.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 380 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 10, 2002 (14:50) * 1 lines 
 
Alas, I cannot create earthquakes for you. Have you ever taken any of your sensors to a quarry when they are dynamiting? I notice that some small California EQs are noted as being near quarries and probably are due to blasting in the area. We also need to get those other two stations feeding you data for your calculations. I am excited to share this experience with you, John! My enthusiasm is boundless!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 381 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 11, 2002 (22:05) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 382 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 11, 2002 (22:06) * 4 lines 
 
John's signals are building up again. I suspect an earthquake in the near future.

Terry, we need you to enable us to ftp. Otherwise we need to see his graphs at this url
http://users.otenet.gr/~bm-ohexwb/invite/inviationGB.htm


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 383 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Feb 12, 2002 (16:49) * 1 lines 
 
i'm with you marcia!! hold on john!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 384 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 12, 2002 (16:54) * 1 lines 
 
John assures me that when he built his house, he engineered it to be safe. I know he has the knowledge to do this. I also know he is a good provider for his family and has built them a safe haven. Still, I worry, but that is because I care, as do we all!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 385 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Feb 12, 2002 (16:56) * 1 lines 
 
but one of those on his chart was for an EQ in Turkey. so this next one might just be in the Mediterranean, right? (i cannot spell today)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 386 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 12, 2002 (17:01) * 1 lines 
 
Yes! In Greece. His chart for Greece is particularly important!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 387 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Feb 12, 2002 (17:04) * 1 lines 
 
i thought that's what i looked at...hmmmmmmm........


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 388 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 12, 2002 (17:05) * 3 lines 
 
This one in particular - his Greek signal chart:

Greece EQ


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 389 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Feb 12, 2002 (17:17) * 1 lines 
 
yup, that's the one i looked at--and turkey's on there.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 390 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 12, 2002 (17:52) * 1 lines 
 
Turkey's quake was so much a part of his substrate that even his localized monitors picked it up! Otherwise he monitors world-wide seismic activity on another graph. That on is really just for local Greece earthquakes! We both suspect strongly that it was on the Great Anatolian Fault. I'll find a graphic of this historically important fracture in the earth's crust.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 391 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Feb 13, 2002 (18:40) * 1 lines 
 
well, it was pretty big so i guess so! *laugh* thanks for the clarification!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 392 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 17, 2002 (12:45) * 5 lines 
 
In the interest of keeping topic 67 for John's earthquake predicting research, I hope we will use this topic to welcome his new topic. Topic 67 will be linked to his website and, as soon as we are again able to use FTP, will be updated and kept current.

Welcome John! You honor us with your expertise and time. I am totally captivated by your work and how brilliant you are in creating the electronics necessary to do this most important work. What could be more noble than to work to save lives?!

*HUGS* and thanks for creating this topic.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 393 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 17, 2002 (13:26) * 18 lines 
 
The reason for all those quakes along the southern and eastern borders of Greece

http://www.ipgp.jussieu.fr/~lacassin/WebTecto/rech/tectorecherche/IzmitWEB/Quakes1781999UK.gif

To earth scientists, the Aegean Sea and the surrounding land areas have one of
the most complex and fascinating tectonic stories of any place on Earth. The
movements of the Earth's crust known as plate tectonics are conspiring to
squeeze the Anatolian plate westward. The motion is mostly concentrated along
major faults through the Marmara and the Northern Aegean. At the same time,
the eastern Mediterranean is being subducted along the Hellenic Arc and beneath
the Southern Aegean. The coupling between these two tectonic systems has
produced a complex distribution of crustal faults and surface deformation that has
been responsible for devastating earthquakes throughout the Aegean region. If
we are to make progress in protecting society from earthquake disasters, we
must understand the very basis of tectonic activity in the Aegean, the Marmara,
and the surrounding areas.

http://www.earthinstitute.columbia.edu/news/aboutStory/about8_1_01.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 394 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 17, 2002 (13:38) * 7 lines 
 
Even better is the website of Dr Thanassoulas, colleague and collaborator with John in his research. Dt Thanassoulas is a geophysicist at the Greek Institute of Geology & Mineral Exploration in Athens.
http://users.otenet.gr/~thandin/tectonic_setting.htm

John, Dr Thanassoulas' new webpage is wonderful. I have never seen a menu quite like the one they are using. The data sent by John is analyzed and posted
http://users.otenet.gr/~thandin/fieldcurrentstatus.htm

Check the side menu for individual graphs.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 395 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Feb 18, 2002 (10:42) * 6 lines 
 
You honor me with your acceptation. I cannot find applicable words in order to thank you as I want. I respect all of you and I will be happy if I can add something useful here. I believe that my research is mature and I share it with pleasure. I hope that my attempt will become a chance to save human lives.

Thank you again deeply of my heart.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 396 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 18, 2002 (17:15) * 3 lines 
 
John, Your presence deserves our thanks. I condsider your research VERY important, as do other geologists and world-wide insurers of saftety. *HUGS*

Without other posters, I am left to offering the bits and pieces of my experiences which may or may not be interesting to others.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 397 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 18, 2002 (19:20) * 1 lines 
 
I'm with Marcia on that one, we are glad to have you among us, John! And even though I don't understand half the stuff being talked about, I find it interesting and will ask questions on behalf of the lurkers out there! *HUGS*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 398 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 18, 2002 (19:37) * 1 lines 
 
Wolfie, where would we be without you? Please don't ever think of leaving. *HUGS*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 399 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Feb 18, 2002 (19:50) * 1 lines 
 
no plans to leave spring! (did you get my email?) *HUGS*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 400 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Feb 19, 2002 (01:25) * 3 lines 
 
I will say one more time that none is pundit here. Much more, that none know everything. We simply share what we know. Every thought, every opinion and every question are acceptable here. WE ARE SIMPLE EVERYDAY PEOPLE.
John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 401 of 639: wayne alison  (maggit) * Tue, Feb 19, 2002 (05:07) * 1 lines 
 
+so whats the chat about then-


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 402 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 19, 2002 (12:02) * 3 lines 
 
Wayne, Aloha and welcome! Here we discuss the prediction and problems associated with earthquakes. John's research has moved to Geo 67 so it would not be buried under a lot of posts of other information. I am in Hawaii on the flank of the world's most active volcano. Earthquakes are a fact of life to me. Are you in a seismic area? Please share your experiences with us. I post earthquake data in Geo 26.

Again, Welcome!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 403 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Feb 19, 2002 (12:50) * 7 lines 
 
Welcome Wayne
I try to say that in the discussion they are acceptable all, any knowledge if has each one. Perhaps my reports here resemble very scientific. I am afraid that this fact can avert someone to join our discussion. I would be happy to discuss any query and to hear your opinion. I hope that you will find some interest here.

Welcome again!

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 404 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Feb 19, 2002 (17:50) * 1 lines 
 
hi wayne!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 405 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 19, 2002 (21:44) * 3 lines 
 
John's signals seem to be repeating the activity just before the Skyros earthquake. Greece will have one soon. Pray it is also in the sea.

http://users.otenet.gr/~bm-ohexwb/invite/inviationGB.htm


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 406 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Feb 20, 2002 (03:56) * 5 lines 
 
You can find my signals also in topic 67 Marcia.
My daily updated graphs are there too. I hope that they are easy understandable. If they are not understandable to someone, please let me know. I will explain.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 407 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 20, 2002 (12:06) * 4 lines 
 
Thank you, John! Soon I hope you will be able to use the Spring link again.

I meant the Dodecanese Island quake pre-pattern, and not Skyros.
I am looking at the other data charts which also need to be taken in to consideration. This is so fascinating to watch. I find it like peeking over God's shoulder. It is exciting and more than a little unsettling to know we can see a little into the future - no matter how dimly. Keep up the goood work.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 408 of 639: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Feb 21, 2002 (14:42) * 10 lines 
 
Howdy all

Back again after a couple of weeks of foolishness - anyway, it was nice
to read up on the previous postings and also visit John's web site. Anyway,
getting back into the swing of thing so hopefuly will be able to post something
of interest in the not to distant future.

peace
Mike de AA9I
r-c-i


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 409 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Feb 21, 2002 (17:09) * 5 lines 
 
Aloha Mike and Big Geo *HUGS*

You've got a new poster in Geo 34 I think you will find really interesting. John has been entertaining him. Take a look!

It is so good to have you back, and delighted to hear you had some foolishness to break up the academic grind. Come back any time. Your pipe and easy chair await you beside the fire.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 410 of 639: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (09:10) * 11 lines 
 
Hi Marcia and Geoites

Yep, saw Shawns posting and we will have plenty to blab about - plus I
checked out some of the VLF/ELF/SLF pages and got some design ideas.
Just the kind of stuff to break the ennui and get back to REAL work
with a purpose (of course my silly work does pay the rent...) Off
to go get some ferrite and some low noise operational amplifiers!

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 411 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (09:43) * 9 lines 
 
Hello friends,
You can see on my updated graphs (topic 67) what was seeing Marcia on them. Just like over God's shoulder as she says.

What amazing words Marcia! Who says that you are not a poet too?

I underline the time of occurring these earthquakes. Just inside the most dangerous days window! Its epicenter was on the calculated azimuth direction too. I hope that they are not foreshocks. We will see the next days.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 412 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (10:28) * 8 lines 
 
Welcome again Mike.
It appears that my system works well and has very good sensitivity unexpectedly. Also our methodology is proved successful. We cannot prove any possible theory (it must cooperate more than one sciences for it) but the positive results are something more than hopeful.

Good success for your work
Regards

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 413 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (12:25) * 4 lines 
 
John, You have enabled my being able to see into the future. It is you who are the poet of creation on Earth. First, I watched the dawn of day over a fountaining volcano (picture in Geo 2 - a very early post) which had every bit of being with God at the moment of creation. I watched for many months. A deep pit became a hill, eventually, and new topographic feature was named and placed on new maps made to accommodate this change. Not everyone gets to see these things, and I feel very privileged to have been able to do this.

Now, John has enabled us all to peek over Gaia's shoulder as she rearranges her plates and lets mankind know he is not a s all-powerful as he thinks he is.
*HUGS* John, for enabling us. I am both thrilled and humbled by your genius!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 414 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (19:07) * 1 lines 
 
mike, how'd your tests go?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 415 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Feb 25, 2002 (10:02) * 12 lines 
 
Hi friends
Previous increase of my signals was from this seismic activity.
2002 FEB 21 08 40 41.9 36.76 21.64 34 3.9Ml OR 4.4Ms
2002 FEB 21 09 15 8.3 38.39 21.77 5 3.6 Ml OR 4.1Ms
2002 FEB 21 18 20 44.7 38.36 21.76 5 3.9 Ml OR 4.4Ms

(To convert Ml units to Ms units simply add 0.5).
All of them were in about the same azimuth direction from my station.

Now, you can see a new interesting increase of my signals. I hope that they will not increase more until the next dangerous time window. Azimuth direction of the source is similar to an older one.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 416 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 25, 2002 (11:22) * 1 lines 
 
Welcome back, John! I am with you in your hopes that the increase of signals does not happen until after the next danger period is past. I'd like to wish for never an increase in signal strength, but that is unreasonable on this restless Earth. You and Dr Thanassoulas had the azimuth precisely figured. My congratulations on your continuing predicting skills.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 417 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (20:36) * 1 lines 
 
John, our FTP is working again. Please update your graphs here when you have time. I will fpt your folder of images you created and sent to me yesterday.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 418 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (22:33) * 4 lines 
 


John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 419 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (22:45) * 1 lines 
 
Oh John! How perfect your post is. I adore your graphic and look forward to Greece doing Very Well in gymnastics with the new coach they have instructing them. Please do not lose this. We will need it again!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 420 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 26, 2002 (22:57) * 5 lines 
 
John has been able to update his graphs at geo again.

http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/read/Geo/67.2




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 421 of 639: Mike Kana  (aa9il) * Wed, Feb 27, 2002 (15:09) * 7 lines 
 
Hi all

Cool graphs! Also, to respond to Wolfies question a while back
yep, the test went fine. Only a couple more weeks to go!

73 de AA9IL
Mike


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 422 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 27, 2002 (16:26) * 1 lines 
 
Let us know when, and we will get out the beer and whatever they use worldwide to celebrate such occasions. John, reserve us a seaside Taverna for the occasion. And a place to let Mike recover the next day. Probably a rocking boat is not the best idea though it appeals to me.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 423 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Mar  1, 2002 (10:32) * 9 lines 
 
Hello,
I would like to remind you that you could follow recent pre-earthquake activity for Greece in topic 67 or you can

CLICK HERE.


Both, are updated every day!

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 424 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  1, 2002 (12:55) * 3 lines 
 
This is Magnificent new "invitation to predict" page, John has created. He is absolutely brilliant in the creation graphics. Poetic, too.

*Hugs* I was hoping you would post the march danger window chart. The current signals for Greece are puzzling. The seem to be precursors for a greater quake elsewhere, but I do not have past ones with which to compare them. This being the case, I will keep my predictions to myself, but I do think something near Greece is soon to occur. How soon? That is the difficult part. I suspect it might be within the next week.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 425 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Mar  1, 2002 (21:08) * 23 lines 
 
Hi friends
I think that last increment of my signals it was from the EQ activity at the East of Island Crete. It was reported:

2002/02/24 05:32:50.8 37.4N 22.8E mb4.3 A MAD SOUTHERN GREECE
2002/02/24 05:32:16.7 35.1N 26.9E MD4.5 M NOA CRETE, GREECE
2002/02/24 05:32:07.9 34.9N 26.8E 10G Mb4.4 A MIX CRETE, GREECE
2002/02/24 05:32:04.9 34.8N 27.2E 10 Mb4.6 A LDG EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA
2002/02/24 05:31:48.3 33.3N 27.7E 10G Ml4.8 A INGV EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA
2002/02/24 05:31:33.2 33.6N 29.7E 10G Ml5.0 A INGV EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA
(All of the above reports are for the same EQ by several stations)

By EMSC-CSEM

OR
2002 FEB 24 05 32 21.7 35.40 26.57 37 4.2 Ml or 4.7Ms
2002 FEB 27 23 24 27.4 35.48 25.97 10 4.0 Ml or 4.5Ms

By National Institute of Geodynamics of Athens

Azimuth direction of my signals indicates to this area. Max amplitude of my signals was 7.98 mV on 24th of February. Compared to my signals of the previous EQ at Dodecanesese Islands (M=6.3R, at about the same area) it matches well.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 426 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar  2, 2002 (13:44) * 1 lines 
 
Thank you for the GEIN NOA link. Prior to this, Netscape would not open my bookmark. I appreciate one that does! I have emboldened the Greek quakes on the daily QED posts at Geo 26 and did notice many 3+ and several 4+ magnitude events. Crete and earthquakes and history have gone hand in hand through recorded time. I suspect it will continue to be so.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 427 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Mar  6, 2002 (23:31) * 3 lines 
 
TEST




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 428 of 639: Rob Glennie  (AotearoaKiwi) * Wed, Mar  6, 2002 (23:50) * 6 lines 
 
Hi all

Spooky earthquake sounds.


Rob


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 429 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Thu, Mar  7, 2002 (00:06) * 4 lines 
 
Hi Rob
What is your opinion for it?
Regards
John


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 430 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar  7, 2002 (12:40) * 1 lines 
 
I have been through several very strong earthquakes and this sound is precisely the way I remember it. Thank you, John! Brilliant, as usual. I did not know you could program posts to make sounds when you open them. You are edifying in more than I ever imagined.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 431 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Mar  7, 2002 (16:53) * 1 lines 
 
what sound? am i supposed to hear something???


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 432 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar  7, 2002 (17:10) * 4 lines 
 
Wolfie, turn up your computer sound and boot this link
http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/read/Geo/9.427

THAT is what a real earthquake sounds like!!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 433 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar  7, 2002 (21:18) * 7 lines 
 
4.8 Richter tremor in Thrace

An earthquake registering 4.8 on the Richter scale was felt throughout the northern region of Thrace
yesterday morning after it struck the northern Aegean seabed, 220 kilometers from Thessaloniki. The
quake’s epicenter was just 50 kilometers from the edge of the active Anatolian Fault, which crosses most
of Turkey before ending in the Aegean Sea, but the tremor was considered “an isolated phenomenon,”
incapable of triggering a larger quake in the fault, seismologists said. No injuries or damage were


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 434 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Mar  8, 2002 (13:19) * 1 lines 
 
nope, don't here a thing (or is that the point?)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 435 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  8, 2002 (13:34) * 1 lines 
 
I'll attach the sound file to an email for you. It is quite inmpressive, and YES earthquakes most definitely make a distinctive sound.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 436 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sat, Mar  9, 2002 (14:41) * 2 lines 
 
Can i help Wolfie?
John


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 437 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sat, Mar  9, 2002 (17:16) * 1 lines 
 
marcia sent me the file, john, and i heard it loud and clear--amazing!!! thanks though!! *HUGS*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 438 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (00:03) * 19 lines 
 
Etho-Geological Forecasting:
Unusual Animal Behavior & Earthquake Prediction

by David Jay Brown

There is much anecdotal evidence suggesting that some animals have the ability to detect sensory stimuli which humans can not-- even
with our most sensitive technological instruments. That many animals have access to a perceptual range exceeding those of humans is
scientifically well-established, but it also appears that many animals have sensory abilities not currently explained by traditional science.

For example, British biologist Rupert Sheldrake has documented on videotape how some dogs appear to anticipate the arrival of their
owner. Regardless of the time of day that the owner begins their journey home, some of these dogs appear to sense their human
companion coming without receiving any known physical signals, and wait for them next to the door or window. Homing pigeons also
have remarkable abilities to navigate to their desired location using abilities that are not fully understood.

Many pet owners claim that they have powerful "psychic" bonds with their pets, and often describe their connection with the animal as
"telepathic". Like Dr. Dolittle, a lot of people believe that they can communicate with animals. Some people even claim that their pets
have precognitive abilities, while others notice their animals act in peculiar ways just before an earthquake strikes.

more... http://www.levity.com/mavericks/quake.htm


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 439 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Mar 17, 2002 (08:47) * 8 lines 
 
Imagine that you fly upwards of a place where a strong EQ shakes the ground. What would you see down there? You may see something like this:



This is a simulation based on scientific data of the ground motion. It is a wide view in order to understand earthquakes. Do not think touch down this moment.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 440 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Mar 17, 2002 (10:58) * 1 lines 
 
that's wild!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 441 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 17, 2002 (12:15) * 2 lines 
 
Amazing, John! Thank you ! Now I know why it felt as it did while "riding" out the earthquakes I have felt. You definitly don't want to be on the gound while one of this intensity is occurring. Beautiful. Since this is in the area of the world where Hawaii will get a tsunami from the resulting sea wave, I pray it does not ever happen - but it surely will.



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 442 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Mar 18, 2002 (12:01) * 20 lines 
 
Some main things about earthquakes:

Earthquakes are vibrations in the Earth caused by the sudden rupture of rocks that have been strained beyond their elastic limits.

The intensity of an earthquake is a measure of its destructive power. It depends on the total energy released, the distance from the quake's epicentre, and the nature of the rocks in the crust.

The magnitude of an earthquake is a measure of the total energy released.

The primary effect of earthquakes is ground motion.
Secondary effects include
(a)Landslides,
(b)Tsunamis, and
(c)Regional uplift and subsidence.

The distribution pattern of earthquakes dramatically outlines the plate margins.

In the central parts of the plates there is little differential movement. Few earthquakes occur in these stable areas.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 443 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 18, 2002 (12:51) * 3 lines 
 
Those very same effects are found on our volcanoes as a result of faulting and other stresses in rock comprising the volcanoes. Often the fractures of step faulting in the caldera area at the summits of Hawaii's volcanoes cause earthquakes from the great weight and mass of the fautling blocks. A large enough block fault into the sea created its own tsunami. In 1973 that very thing of land subsidence caused by block faulting caused the one deadly tsunami on this island since I have been in residence here.

If damage is the sole distinction of the scales of magnitude, as we build stronger buildings, will this change?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 444 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Mar 19, 2002 (19:27) * 3 lines 
 
thanks for the simple explanations john!

don't plates moving and stuff affect volcanoes as well--perhaps even birth one?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 445 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar 19, 2002 (21:06) * 6 lines 
 
This brings us to convergent and divergent plate boundariese.
Yes, they directly effect the activities and formation of volcanoes. Where one plate dives under another, inland volcanoes form as in the Cascade Mountains on the west coast of North America. These are convergent plates, colliding with each other and one being pushed down as the other rides up and over the subducting plate. The entire Pacific Ring of Fire is of this type of geological activity.

Divergent plate boundaries are found where plates are pulling away from each other. The Mid Atlantic Ridge over which Iceland sits is this type of plate tectonic activity. More about this when we get to making "How volcanoes Work" with text by me and graphics animation by John.

Feel free to add or correct what I write, John. I knew you were in Athens for a visit so I thought I might discuss your question until you returned.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 446 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 22, 2002 (16:41) * 27 lines 
 
USGS Volcano Watch----Are Earthquakes on the Rise?

Volcano Watch......is a weekly news article written by USGS scientists

A heightened awareness of earthquakes usually follows large and destructive ones, like those occurring in Turkey and El Salvador in 1999 and 2001, respectively. Combined, these earthquakes killed more than 37,000 people. Small earthquakes that would normally never make their way into the news suddenly receive national attention. This often leads to the question, "Are we having more earthquakes these days?"

On a global scale, the U.S. Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) located over 23,000 earthquakes last year, their highest annual total ever. Prior to 1993, the NEIC never catalogued more than 20,000 earthquakes in one year.

Further study of the annual statistics shows that the apparent rise in earthquakes worldwide disappears above the magnitude 5 level. Since 1900, the average number of major and great earthquakes (those with magnitudes 7 or greater) was approximately 19 per year worldwide. In 2001, only 15 such earthquakes were catalogued by the NEIC. Thus, we attribute the rising earthquake totals to an increase in the number of smaller earthquakes that we are able to study because seismological tools have rapidly increased and improved over time.

A major factor allowing us to study more small earthquakes has been a more than ten fold increase in the number of seismographic stations reporting data to the NEIC, from 350 to over 4,000 in the last 70 years. Computerization and automation have further aided NEIC's earthquake cataloging capabilities, allowing for larger volumes of data to be processed faster and with less human intervention.

At the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), our modern earthquake catalog extends back to 1960. From the end of 1960 to 2000, the seismographic network grew from 11 to 50 sites. By the late 1960s, radio telemetry had begun to replace direct cable connections, which facilitated new site installations and broader network coverage. Monitoring earthquakes associated with frequent eruptions also motivated significant expansion of our seismic network.

As at NEIC, HVO's evolving seismic recording and analysis tools, and the growth of our network, have allowed us to catalog greater numbers of small earthquakes. We have complemented the familiar rotating drum recorders with our third generation of computer-based data acquisition and processing systems. In the
1960s, earthquakes below magnitude 1.5 comprised only 2 percent of the catalog. Today, about 30 percent of all earthquakes we locate are below magnitude 1.5.

For geologic reasons, the number of earthquakes in Hawai`i have fluctuated widely. Earthquake swarms related to underground magma movement might occur. Large numbers of aftershocks following large earthquakes, like the November 1975 M7.2 Kalapana event, inflate catalog totals for many months afterward. To this point, the 1970s was the decade with the largest number of earthquakes, averaging 4,100 per year.

Through the 1990s, our numbers suggest that activity has declined. We averaged 3,300 earthquakes per year in the 1980s and 2,300 per year in the 1990s. Since 1989, we have had no large earthquakes above magnitude 6. Possibly, as a result of the extended and continuing Pu`u `O`o eruption, we have also seen fewer earthquake swarms.

With improved technology, we can locate, with greater precision, more of the smaller earthquakes occurring beneath Hawai`i. While we are enjoying a relatively quiet period of late, without large or damaging earthquakes, we hope to utilize the data from small earthquakes to further our understanding of the island's volcanoes and faults.

This article was written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.
Carolyn Bell Acting Public Affairs Officer U.S. Geological Survey Mail Stop 119 National Center Reston, VA 20192




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 447 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sat, Mar 23, 2002 (13:28) * 10 lines 
 
I must explain briefly what exactly Marcia says in response 445. I prefer images as you already know.I constructed this one exactly for you.



Mid-Ocean Ridges are places where the Earth's tectonic plates are gradually moving apart.


Magma continuously wells upwards at the mid-oceanic ridges (arrows) producing currents of magma flowing in opposite directions and thus generating the forces that pull the sea floor apart at the mid-oceanic ridges. As the ocean floor is spread apart cracks appear in the middle of the ridges allowing molten magma to surface through the cracks to form the newest ocean floor. As the ocean floor moves away from the mid-oceanic ridge it will eventually come into contact with a continental plate and will be subducted underneath the continent. Finally, the lithosphere will be driven back into the asthenosphere where it returns to a heated state.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 448 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sat, Mar 23, 2002 (13:32) * 4 lines 
 
Interesting article Marcia. It describes the... elevation of the technology and the increased number of their seismological instruments. But I did not read anything more than fuzzy statistics. They have the bigger number of instruments and the best of them in the world. I wonder if they have made steps to the direction of human protection from an oncoming destructive EQ. They say nothing about it.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 449 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 23, 2002 (18:05) * 1 lines 
 
First, I'll comment on that USGS report. I could speak volumes about this problem of what scientists know that the people in power do not want to be told to the populace. They do not want to be responsible for moving the mass of people who would need to be evacuated. They cannot afford the law suits which would surely follow if it was known that they knew the event would occur. We evacuate when a tsunami-causing earthquake occurs. It takes about 3 hours and several million dollars to evacuate a city as large as Honolulu. Can you imagine the problems of evacuating New York City? Where would they go? Pehaps Athens has open fields in which to house and feed millions of the dispossessed. New York does not. Neither does Tokyo. They are in the greatest peril as is Mexico City. How do you feed them? Sanitation is another problem. There are no easy answers. My question is why they were allowed to grow up to such vast accumulations of people when faulting was known to exist and volcanoes were so obvious.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 450 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 23, 2002 (18:18) * 8 lines 
 
Now, about that Graphic you posted, John. We need a new topic - that one Hiow Volcanoes Work that we discussed. I am currently working on writing up some rather lengthy posts to accompany that graphic.

To the far left are shield volcanoes atop a hot spot in the middle of an oceanic plate - like Hawaii. In the middle is a divergent plate boundary in the sea very much like Iceland is. On the right are continental chain of volcanoes - the result of a convergent plate boundary where the sea plate is being subducted
under the continental plate, heating up the subducted plate and emerging through dikes as stratovolcanoes - just like the Cascades.

Or does no one want to know even more than this about it? I find it fascinating that every element on earth is contained in magma. When it is Obsidian - volcanic glass - not even the gases have escaped. It has cooled so quickly that none of the minerals have had time to separate. All is some form of solidified rock known as Basalt

Hawaiian Lava isn't pretty. Granite is. How granite is made is even more fascinating. The large crystals you see in granite is the result of extrememly slow cooling of magma that never was erupted. Over millions of years, the strong core minerals of mountains were created. Only after the entire volcanic mass above it has eroded can you see the mountains that now are made of granite. Can you imagine how high the Rocky Mountains must have once been?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 451 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Mar 24, 2002 (03:04) * 10 lines 
 
My opinion for the people in power is that they are responsible against the populace anyway. They live from our money and they must become useful to us. They must work for solutions. It is not impracticable a mid solution. But I underline that they are doing nothing about it. Unfortunately they put humans life on the platform scale with cost in money.

It is not needed always the evacuation of an area. How many of us know what they must do now (before any danger), when will we receive an alert message, during the extreme event and afterwards? If it was a military problem they have more than one solution and easy they can spend money and time for it.

I know how difficult is to evacuate a big city. It is much difficult for Athens too. It has only five outputs for about four million habitants or more. I think that the evacuation is the last solution. In this case we can reduce the economical effect if we have ready a complete plan before. It is not impossible today by using computer programs.

I will finish by this Greek adage again "Freedom wants virtue and boldness".

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 452 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Mar 24, 2002 (03:06) * 4 lines 
 
Indeed, we will create some new topics in order to share the knowledge on several natural but destructive phenomena or to share some useful solutions for our everyday life. Maybe some one of you has useful ideas too. Please lets us to know about them.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 453 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 24, 2002 (17:22) * 3 lines 
 
During my three hours of lectures today on Plinean Eruptions they discussed the destruction of St Pierre, Martinique in 1902 eruption of Mt Pelée. The eruption was clearly indicated as early as 40 days before it occurred. There was a hotly-contested election being held and no one was allowed to leave the city desite lahars (mud flows) and strong persistent earthquakes. They used the military to enforce the closeure of ports and other means of evacuations. A week before election day, Mt Pelée blasted it's top into deadly ash and the entire town of St Pierre ceased to exist.

I think it is time to hold our legislators responsible. If we don't, we will pay for our neglect with our lives!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 454 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 24, 2002 (17:30) * 3 lines 
 
Please, Geo-readers, suggest what things you might like to see us explain. We already have topics such as different kinds of earthquakes and how they affect the Earth. Plus How volcanoes work - different types and shapes and the evolution of both rock and the physics involved.

We also need sky charts. I printed out a bunch of them for night study of the comet up there now. I'll post it under the comet post in Geo 1 and in Geo 24.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 455 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 24, 2002 (17:36) * 1 lines 
 
We have the above subjects in mind - and I am preparing the text when I am not here making comments - but we also want to make it more interesting to come here and welcome all suggestions!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 456 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 31, 2002 (13:08) * 26 lines 
 
Do Bombs Cause Earthquakes?

Short answer, no. Long answer below . . .

There was an earthquake in Afghanistan
in March. Coincidentally, there was a lot
of bombing going on. Or was that
coincidence? Did the aerial bombardment
cause the quake?

Scientists immediately say No. First of all,
they don't like the word "cause." An
earthquake is the sudden release of
built-up stress in the Earth's crust, but stress builds up from
several different causes: movement of the crustal plates, the
weight of sediments shifting from erosion or deposition, changes
in the fluids underground, and more obscure factors like mineral
phase changes in the mantle. Since all of those are involved, we
simply can't single out one of them as the cause. Scientists
prefer to talk about what might trigger, or induce, an earthquake.

OK, then, let's ask again. Did the bombing induce the quake?
From a century of experience, we can confidently answer No.
Some human activities do induce earthquakes, but not bombing
like that in Afghanistan.
More... http://geology.about.com/library/weekly/aa033102a.htm


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 457 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Mar 31, 2002 (20:37) * 1 lines 
 
so drilling for oil could induce an EQ?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 458 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 31, 2002 (21:20) * 1 lines 
 
This not so surprising. My son told of California dumping waste water (sewage) into faults and thereby causing quakes inadvetnantly. No reason that might not be the case with any intusion into the stubstrate - especially if they are using persuasion in the form of explosives!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 459 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr  6, 2002 (21:55) * 10 lines 
 
Other reports of this quake were posted in Geo 26.

Zakynthos quake

The intensity of an undersea quake, which occurred off the northeastern coast of the Ionian island of
Zakynthos yesterday morning, remains unknown after seismologists announced different readings.
Experts in Athens and Thessaloniki agreed the quake measured 5 on the Richter scale while their peers
in Patras said it had a 4.7 magnitude. No damage or injuries were reported.

http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/news/politics_1674973KathiLev&xml/&aspKath/politics.asp?fdate=06/04/2002


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 460 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr  7, 2002 (23:00) * 22 lines 
 
John, what sort of seismic studies have been done on the site of this tunnel?
It sounds like a disaster in the making!

Public works minister tours delayed Aktion tunnel project
07/04/2002 22:25:15

Public Works Minister Vasso Papandreou on Saturday toured an undersea
tunnel that connects the city of Preveza with Aktion, northwestern
Greece, part of an ambitious highway running north-to-south along the
mainland's western coast.

The long-delayed project to bypass a narrow strait now awaits the
completion of 100-meter stretch of roadway to become operational.
Besides the bankruptcy of a consortium initially awarded the tunnel's
construction, a series of court challenges -- including local
government entities -- have also impeded progress.

''The undersea tunnel of Preveza-Aktion is a pioneering project, it is
the first of its kind in Greece and it is technologically perfect. We
are confronting, however, problems with access ways to the tunnel,
which will be resolved as soon as possible,'' she said.



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 461 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Apr  8, 2002 (07:08) * 4 lines 
 
This place is almost on the main fault between African and Eurasian plates. My opinion is that this tunnel is very dangerous and has high risk. I don't know about any seismic studies there but you are right Marcia. It sounds like a disaster in the making also for me.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 462 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 10, 2002 (14:50) * 3 lines 
 
John, it is not just in Greece where health and welfare of the populace is endangered by not doing one's homework before creating a convenience in a very unstable place. The bridge you mentioned to me last night is another frightening prospect. Those beautiful little islands in the volcanic arc of the Aegean are remnants of past cataclysms. Life is precarious enough just getting along with one another. Now we cannot even trust our public officials. Nothing has really changed very much despite the progress made in science and physics.

Just look at the urban sprawl that is known as Naples. Mt Vesuvius is long overdue for a catastrophic eruption. Japan has surrounded Mt Fuji with houses. Mexico City is a disaster waiting to happen. And, even in the best of situations where studies are done and core drillings analyzed, the recommendations are seldom heeded if it is contrary to what the desired answer happened to be. It is a great frustration, as you well know, to see the dangers but to be helpless to prevent them.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 463 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 12, 2002 (23:00) * 5 lines 
 
Seismic Map of the United States



http://www.idahogeology.org/Services/GeologicHazards/Earthquakes/images/usa.gif


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 464 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 12, 2002 (23:21) * 17 lines 
 
REELFOOT LAKE, TN



During the Winter of 1811-12,
Mother Nature made one of her more dramatic attempts
to rearrange the landscape of Northwest Tennessee.

It began with a series of earth tremors rumbling along an ancient fault line
centered around the little town of New Madrid, Missouri. The tremors
climaxed on February 7, 1812, with perhaps the most severe earthquake ever
to strike the continental United States. When the earth settled again the
scenery had undergone a considerable change, and a new lake stood in the
place of what had been a swampy forest of cypress trees, cottonwoods and
walnut trees.

http://www.kentuckylaketourism.com/reelfootlake/how.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 465 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 12, 2002 (23:23) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks to DonB for the above suggestion. He has been there. I would like to see it and look for further evidence of unconformity. Perhaps some day...


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 466 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 23, 2002 (22:17) * 40 lines 
 
Forgive me, John. I had to preserve this article about you, even if it Is in Greeklish

KAQHGHTHS GEWFYSIKHS ISXYRIZETAI OTI PROEBLECE TON SEISMO THS SKYROY

Aqhna, 29 Ioylioy 2001 (19:40 UTC+2)

Meleth symfwna me thn opoia perimene seismo sthn Ellada megeqoys 5,7
Rixter se dyo meres, dhladh thn hmera poy egine telika o seismos ths Skyroy,
kateqese stis 23 Ioylioy se seminario sth Boylgaria o kaqhghths Gewfysikhs
Kwnstantinos Qanasoylas.

O k. Qanasoylas kanei ereyna gia thn prognwsh twn seismwn apo to 1982, alla
molis persi katafere na exei kapoia apotelesmata, meta apo th synergasia toy
me ton hlektroniko Giannh Tsatsaragko.

Opws anefere se dhlwseis toy sto thleoptiko kanali STAR prin apo to seismo
yparxei paramorfwsh toy petrwmatos, poy dhmioyrgei hlektrika pedia kai
efarmozontas apla maqhmatika mporei kapoios na brei th qesh paragwghs
aytoy toy hlektrikoy pedioy.

O k. Tsatsaragkos epishmane, se dhlwseis toy sto idio kanali oti se diasthma
katw twn 15 hmerwn apo thn enarjh ths ayjhshs toy platoys toy hlektrikoy
pedioy epikeitai seismos.

O staqmos twn dyo episthmonwn edeixne endeijh gia eperxomeno seismo apo
tis 20 Ioylioy, h opoia epace na yparjei 20 lepta prin apo to seismo sth Skyro.

Oi episthmones ypogrammizoyn oti mporoyn na problecoyn to megeqos kai ton
xrono toy seismoy, alla oxi to akribes epikentro giati exoyn mono ena staqmos
sth diaqesh toys.

Meta thn epalhqeysh ths prognwshs oi Boylgaroi edeijan endiaferon gia th
meqodo toy k. Aqanasoyla. Analogo endiaferon den edeijan to YPEXWDE kai
o OASP, poy enhmerwqhkan gia thn ereyna kai ta apotelesmata ths.

Ejalloy, se episthmonikh meleth toy ekane to 1993 to seismologiko ergasthrio
toy panepisthmioy Aqhnwn entopizontan to epikentro kai to megeqos toy
seismoy ths Skyroy, alla den eixe prosdioristei xronika to pote qa ginei.

http://www.hri.org/news/greek/mpeb/2001/01-07-29.mpeb.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 467 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 23, 2002 (22:19) * 3 lines 
 
He'll neve know I found it by searching for the Volos Astronomy Club and finding his name in Greeklish there. From that I searched for other cases of his name spelled that way. Success was mine!

I am even more humble that ever I was before!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 468 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Apr 25, 2002 (16:04) * 6 lines 
 
John's bridge which is being built on at least one active fault:







 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 469 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 26, 2002 (15:43) * 23 lines 
 
Earthquakes wipe out 10 Iranian villages

AFP Teheran April 26 2002

Ten villages were totally destroyed in the western Iranian province of Kermanshah by a quick succession of earthquakes that struck the area this week, provincial Governor Ahmad Torknejad said on Friday.

Two people died and another 56 were injured in the quakes, which hit early on Thursday and severely damaging around 50 other villages, Torknejad said.

The governor said as many as 2,000 people could have been killed had it not been for the fact that residents were alerted by the first tremor.

"After the first tremor, which registered 4.8 on the Richter scale, people reacted quickly and left their homes," he said.

A previous balance put the death toll at one, and the number injured at 40.

Torknejad said electricity, water and telephone services had been restored in the area.

The moderate earthquakes, measuring 4.8, 4.9 and 3.6 on the Richter scale, struck in the space of 15 minutes soon after midnight on Thursday. They centred on the town of Dinvar in the east of the province.

Iran is located on a number of geological faults and is prone to frequent earthquakes.

"I'm told I live in my own little world, but that's OK, because they know me there."

This email was cleaned by emailStripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 470 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr 27, 2002 (21:57) * 37 lines 
 
The translation of post 466 (in "Greeklish") by the Macedonian Press Agency:

PROFESSOR OF GEOPHYSICS CLAIMS TO HAVE PREDICTED THE EARTHQUAKE

Athens, 29 July 2001 (21:05 UTC+2)

Research according to which he expected an earthquake of 5,7 R to occur in
Greece two days later, when it actually did, was submitted on the 23rd of July
in a seminar in Bulgaria by Geophysics Professor Konstantinos Thanasoulas.

Mr. Thanasoulas has been researching the prediction of earthquakes since
1982, but only just last year did he manage to get any results, after his
cooperation with Giannis Tsaragos, electronic engineer.

As he stated to a local television channel, STAR , before the earthquake there is
a deformation in certain rock formations, which creates an electrical field and by
applying simple mathematics one can find the source of this electrical field.

Mr. Tsatsaragos pointed out in statements to the same channel, that in a length
of time under 15 days from when the widening of the electrical field begins an
earthquake is expected.

The two scientists' station showed indications of an upcoming earthquake from
July 20th up until 20 minutes before the earthquake took place in Skyros.

The scientists point out that they can predict the intensity and time of the
earthquake, but not the exact epicenter because they only have one station at
their disposal.

After the verification of their prediction the Bulgarians showed interest in Mr.
Athanasoula's method. The interest was not shared by the Ministry of the
Environment Physical Planning and Public Works or by the Organization
Antiseismic Protection, who were informed about the research and its results.

In any case, in scientific research that took place in 1993 in the seismological
lab of the University of Athens, the epicenter and the intensity of the earthquake
in Skyros had been predicted, but the exact date had not.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 471 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr 27, 2002 (22:00) * 3 lines 
 
Keep in mind that the differening spelling of the names in the above translation are the result of the difference between the nominative and accusative forms of the nouns.

Now, aren't you happy you only have to deal with English?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 472 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr 27, 2002 (22:55) * 23 lines 
 
John, what is this really about?

«SECRET BREACHES» WORRY SCIENTISTS

Athens, 29 July 2001 (20:25 UTC+2)

Great unrest has been caused among seismologists, by the dozens of "secret
breaches" existing in the Aegean, and that seem to present "secret threats".
Many Greek and foreign specialists seem to be troubled, since after the great
earthquakes of Turkey and Parnitha they have expeditiously arrived to chart the
until recently unknown breaches.

History has shown that most of the catastrophic earthquakes have been caused
by these "secret breaches", and in fact in areas that are considered non
seismogenous, just as it occurred with the Fyli breach that caused the 5,9 R
earthquake in 1999.

"The study and charting of the specific breach is almost near completion. Thus,
for the first time we know all of its characteristics", stated the
seismologist-researcher of the Athens Observatory's Geodynamic Institute,
Gerasimos Papadopoulos.

http://www.hri.org/news/greek/mpab/2001/01-07-29.mpab.html#02


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 473 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr 27, 2002 (22:57) * 1 lines 
 
Do they mean earthquake "faults" instead of "breaches" which has a much different meaning in English.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 474 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Thu, May  2, 2002 (09:01) * 16 lines 
 
ATTENTION!
WHAT I DON'T KNOW PERHAPS IS NOT GENERALLY UNKNOWN!

But, if I am something, I can self-justifying saying that what I don't know is general unknown!!!!!!!!!


I will be clear:
I present you the following map of Greece. It was constructed by Dr. Thanassoulas and is based on gravity measurements, which are realized before about 50 years or more. It is found in the library of the Greek Institute of Geology and Mineral Exploration (IGME) for years.


Correlation of the location of recent large seismic events (red circles) to the location of the already calculated fracture zones - faults by the transformation of the Greek gravity field.


Many of the faults, which are showed in this map, are unknown to Greek seismologists!!!??? One is the Athens fault. A second case is the KOZANI area fault where became a strong and destructive EQ before a few years! In both cases seismologists was amazed!
What study and what charting of the Specific Breach at the Athens area are almost near completion? They are doing as they have just discovered India again! Its new name is UNKNOWN BREACH!
(...I am gentle even if I am enraged. I am sorry.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 475 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May  2, 2002 (15:19) * 3 lines 
 
Oh John! I was hoping this was NOT the case, but I also feared it was the truth. Thank you for your illuminating post. My righteous indignation joins yours. This is more of the bury your head in the sand (otherwise known as the Ostrich Effect) and pretend it does not exist. San Francisco discovered what liquifaction is all about in their last earthquake. They build on fill dumped into the Bay!

Another example of why world-wide seismological coöperation will not happen any time soon. They simpley don't want to know in some cases and don't care in others. I canot imagine being a professional seismologist and being so blind to the need for this working knowledge!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 476 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May  2, 2002 (16:04) * 4 lines 
 
That map is NOT comforting. One fault cuts across the Pagasistic Gulf and into Pelion. Why on earth does no one want to know? Greece's transit authority is building bridges and tunnels to carry the public yet they are endangering their lives at the same time. No, Greece is far from being alone in this. California is currently involved in a retrofitting of all the overpasses on their freeways to earthquake standards. It was a very costly and completely avoidable oversight.





 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 477 of 639: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, May  7, 2002 (16:24) * 1 lines 
 
The tunnels that are being built over the Greek faults seem particularly troubling.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 478 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May  7, 2002 (17:58) * 1 lines 
 
There is just about no place in Greece that is not on a fault. The tunnel is frightning. I would hate being buried alive.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 479 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May  7, 2002 (18:00) * 1 lines 
 
Speaking of which, John's earthquake prediction link on the portal page has a second page now. If you doubted the fractured nature of Greece, look at his graphics. http://www.spring.net/geo/JohnVolos/Public/pages/research/greek_seismicity_gb.htm


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 480 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, May  8, 2002 (23:36) * 9 lines 
 
Hi all,
This is my new updating graph-map for the seismicity in the Greek area that I have included in Geo Portal:



Notice that this is the recent seismic history during the last 7 days. You can see also the faults and the total number of the EQ's during this period. Interesting is the total equivalent released energy expressed as if it is released by one EQ. i.e. Totally 34 EQ's are released energy equal to one EQ with magnitude 4.95R Ms.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 481 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, May  8, 2002 (23:53) * 6 lines 
 
2002/05/09 01:49:39.3 36.5N 23.2E 10G Ml4.8 A. INGV SOUTHERN GREECE
2002/05/09 01:49:38.0 36.2N 23.0E 10G Mb4.2 A MIX SOUTHERN GREECE

http://www.emsc-csem.org/cgi-bin/ALERT_all_messages.sh?1.

John


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 482 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May  9, 2002 (16:03) * 6 lines 
 
Why am I not surprised in seeing the two Grecian Earthquakes John posted?! I do wish the signals would subside a bit. This is becoming worrisome.

Thank you, John, for the wonderful graphics. We have needed them very much!





 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 483 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 10, 2002 (23:14) * 7 lines 
 
Strong quake shakes Monemvasia

An undersea quake measuring 4.8 on the Richter scale occurred off the coast of the southern seaside
town of Monemvasia — about 160 kilometers southeast of Athens — just before 5 a.m. yesterday. No
injuries or damage were reported.

http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100016_10/05/2002_16266


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 484 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 12, 2002 (15:57) * 9 lines 
 
Weak tremor felt on Rhodes
11/05/2002 15:45:21

A weak earthquake measuring 4.9 on the Richter scale was recorded at
5:27 near the Aegean island of Rhodes. According to the Athens National
Observatory Geodynamics Institute, the epicentre of the quake was in
the sea east of Rhodes at a distance of 460 kilometres southeast of Athens.

http://www.hri.org/news/greek/apeen/2002/02-05-11.apeen.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 485 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 12, 2002 (16:27) * 3 lines 
 
Greece is poised to quake in no small way. I hope its epicenter is under the sea instead of on land. This prediction takes nothing more than eyes to read John's graphics. The coming week also enters the danger window of tidal forces. http://www.spring.net/geo/JohnVolos/Public/pages/inviation.htm




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 486 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 12, 2002 (21:30) * 39 lines 
 
'Earthquake risk' from dams

Large dams in mountainous regions could
threaten people living near them by stressing
the Earth's crust to danger levels, a scientist
says.

The researcher says there have been recorded
cases in several countries of dam construction
causing earthquakes. Large-scale mining, he
believes, can sometimes produce the same
result.

He says parts of Africa are especially
vulnerable because of the tectonic forces that
are shaping the continent.

The scientist, Chris Hartnady, is a former
associate professor in the department of
geological sciences at the University of Cape
Town, South Africa.

He was attending a conference here, the
Africa Mountains High Summit, hosted by the
United Nations Environment Programme (Unep).

Pulled apart

Professor Hartnady says in his presentation:
"Large areas of the African continent are in an
unstable, tectonically active state, and
especially in the mountain regions substantial
danger is posed to growing populations.

"The economic cost of seismic and volcanic
disasters is likely to escalate dramatically
during this century.

more and photos... http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/sci/tech/newsid_1974000/1974736.stm


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 487 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 12, 2002 (23:08) * 31 lines 
 
As though being astride a fault was not worrisome enough...

It's all water inside the bridge

By Alex Mita

WATER trapped in the flyover bridge close to Aphrodite's Rock outside
Paphos has caused erosion to the tarmac, according to experts of the
Ministry of Communications and Works.

In order to remedy the problem, the whole bridge now needs to be
resurfaced.

Experts are also debating whether the insulation between the tarmac and the
bridge under-layer should be replaced.

Communications Minister Averoff Neophytou told the _Sunday Mail_ the
erosion is not a big problem, and he brushed aside fears of structural
damage to the bridge.

"There is absolutely no fear of structural damage," Neophytou said. "All
that is needed is resurfacing."

He gave the assurance that the resurfacing would not cause traffic chaos.
"We'll fix it in two days," Neophytou said.

Work on the bridge is not scheduled to start until the autumn, however, in
order to prevent traffic congestion during the height of the tourist
season.

Copyright Cyprus Mail 2002


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 488 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, May 15, 2002 (17:05) * 59 lines 
 
Upper reaches of Compaq Center feel quake

Associated Press

SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Players assumed it was nothing more than exuberant fans shaking the
arena. High above the ice, though, a hockey executive knew something more unusual was
happening.

"I looked around, I said something wrong is going on here. Everything was shaking," said Michel
Goulet, vice president of player personnel for the Colorado Avalanche. "You start thinking, 'Should
I run or what?' "

Goulet was in the upper level at the Compaq Center when a moderate earthquake shook the
arena during the third period of a playoff game between the Avalanche and the San Jose Sharks.

The 5.2-magnitude quake rattled the upper level for about 10 seconds and violently shook lights in
an adjacent catwalk. The quake also was felt 47 miles north in San Francisco, where the Giants
played the Atlanta Braves.

Play did not stop at either game, and no injuries or significant damage was reported in the San
Francisco Bay area. The quake was centered near Gilroy, about 30 miles south of San Jose.

"I didn't feel anything. This building is pretty loud, so it's shaking anyway," said Colorado's Milan
Hejduk, who assisted on the winning goal as the Avalanche won 2-1 in overtime to force Game 7
in their conference semifinal series against the Sharks.

In San Francisco, the temblor rumbled through Pacific Bell Park as the Braves' Chipper Jones
batted in the ninth. Glass panes in the front of the press box rattled, but there was little reaction
from players or fans.

"Really? No kidding?" Giants infielder Damon Minor said when he heard the news. "I missed my
chance. That would have been my first one, too."

Moments after the quake, the Braves scored twice to tie it at 6 and force extra innings. The
Giants won 7-6 in 11 innings.

After the bottom of the ninth, the stadium sound system played Jerry Lee Lewis' song "Whole
Lotta Shakin' Goin' On."

"I was sitting upstairs and it was a good jolt," fan Jenny Hsin said. "At first I thought it was the
guy behind me kicking my chair, then I looked and saw the whole row shaking with me."

Pac Bell Park's predecessor, Candlestick Park, was rocked by a 7.0 magnitude earthquake on
Oct. 17, 1989, about a half-hour before the scheduled start of Game 3 of the World Series
between the Giants and Oakland Athletics.

The 1989 quake, which killed 63 people and caused an estimated $6 billion in damage, left cracks
in the Candlestick concrete and forced a 10-day delay in the World Series. The Giants moved to
Pac Bell in 2000.

The hockey game in San Jose was tied 1-1 with nine minutes left in the third period when the
quake struck.

Though photographers at ice level felt the quake, players on both teams said they didn't even
realize what had happened until they came off the ice at the end of the third period.

"I heard about it, but I didn't feel it," said Colorado's Peter Forsberg, who scored the winning goal.
"The puck is bouncing anyway."



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 489 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Thu, May 16, 2002 (15:40) * 11 lines 
 
Hi,
I can show you this picture now. Crevice is opened without quake suddenly in the Champaign of Thessaly, between Volos and Larissa cities.



This picture is from a local newspaper on January 1999. Many crevices like this are observed later in a big part of Thessaly Champaign. Observed also ground uplifts and ground down lifts.

Greek scientists say that this phenomenon is due to over pumping ground water. But my opinion is different. This area is located on the extension of the big Anatolian fault.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 490 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May 16, 2002 (16:24) * 4 lines 
 
That is an amazing photograph. Thank you for posting it. I agree it is faulting and not removal of growndwater. I have seen both and this is definitly deep fauting. Especially when it displays land deformation in the form of block faults. That is not the usual way of missing groundwater.

See John's earthquake graphics on the link of the portal page or look at the ones at this url http://www.tinynet.com/faults.html



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 491 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, May 16, 2002 (19:19) * 1 lines 
 
john what is that thing in the middle of the crevice? looks like a ladder or maybe a cattle gate.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 492 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May 16, 2002 (20:32) * 1 lines 
 
Whatever it is it fell in there. I also wondered what it was. I also wonder about the scale. I thought it was a gate.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 493 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, May 17, 2002 (07:59) * 26 lines 
 
They are nothing of these you are trying to imagine. It is the upper security cover of a multi-connection telephone cable that was destroyed finally. The gap distance is more than one meter. This picture is tacked from the old national road between Volos and Larissa, which is opened too. Crevice was opened quickly. A big truck that was traveling on the road was dropped inside the crevice. A car that was traveling back of the truck is nailed on the back of the truck.

This crevice extended for more than 60km like this. But a big triangle with sides about 40 to 60 km is cracked too. Crevices are started on 1990 and continue until the day.

Scientists, was found that the logarithm of T, (in days, from the first appearance of phenomena until the time of the EQ) is linear interrelation of magnitude M of the EQ.
The equation:

Log T = 0.76M-1.83


was proposed by Rikitake (1976) and it is based on big number of observations that became in many places on Earth.

If you apply this equation for earthquakes with magnitudes 3,.4,.5,.6,.7, and the 8 will receive back the table below that shows the corresponding time for each magnitude.

Magnitude Time of crevice
of the EQ appearance
3R 3 days
4R 16 days
5R 3 months
6R 1,5 years
7R 8,5 years
8R 49 years

I don't want of thinking that the above table is true. The time is running on the 12th year for this area. Additionally we have seismic quietness for more than 17 years. "Sigh"

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 494 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, May 17, 2002 (10:16) * 10 lines 
 
This is a second picture of one other area in Thessaly Champaign, from local newspaper on June 1999. This place is located about 30Km northern the previous place.



The crevices there are almost parallel to that presented in the previous picture. You can see also a down lift of the ground. These crevices were opened a few months later without quake.

This phenomenon is continued until the day in the southwest Thessaly.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 495 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, May 18, 2002 (17:24) * 1 lines 
 
More and more hisorical data tells us you are soon due for a stronger quake than usual. This is a worru. I also studied the available Anatolian Fault maps and other studies and have come to the conclusion that you are correct in realting the above fractures to this fault system. Excellent photos make me eager to install my own scanner and share photos I have taken that never made the newspapers. Thank you, John. That is a very impressive crack in the earth!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 496 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, May 18, 2002 (21:16) * 8 lines 
 
Earthquake suit

The relatives of employees of the Ricomex factory killed or seriously injured when the factory collapsed
during the September 1999 earthquake in Athens yesterday appealed to the Justice Ministry against a
decision by an Athens court to postpone until next February their cases for compensation against the
factory’s owners. The court said it had postponed the cases so that they can all be heard together as
most have witnesses in common. The six families are suing for a total of 11.7 million euros.
http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100022_18/05/2002_16568


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 497 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, May 19, 2002 (10:31) * 1 lines 
 
earthquakes happen, why are they suing?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 498 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 19, 2002 (22:33) * 1 lines 
 
I suspect some lawyer saw a way to get fame and publicity just as in America. They are the only ones who benefit from this sort of action. He gets paid no matter the outcome. I thought an "act of God" removed responsibility.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 499 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May 21, 2002 (17:07) * 18 lines 
 
John's much-acticipated Greek Earthquake:

Regional Location: SOUTHERN GREECE

Magnitude: 5.3M

Greenwich Mean Date: 2002/05/21
Greenwich Mean Time: 20:53:29
Latitude: 36.71N
Longitude: 24.47E
Focal depth: 96.0km
Analysis Quality: A


Source: National Earthquake Information Center (USGS-NEIC)

Seismo-Watch, Your Source for Earthquake News and Information.
Visit http://www.seismo-watch.com


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 500 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, May 21, 2002 (17:13) * 1 lines 
 
john, are you ok?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 501 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May 21, 2002 (20:08) * 6 lines 
 
John is well. He was kind enough to discuss it with me in the middle of his night before going to bed. However he was the only seismologically-aware person in Greece still awake at the hour it struck, so he fielded media questions. It seems that the salaried individuals in Greece were not aware of it until the press awoke them.

I found this map particularly useful since it dempnstrates how the Anatolian fault is associated with Greece and the stresses on that most beautiful of countries.





 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 502 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May 21, 2002 (20:10) * 1 lines 
 
The above makes me curious as to how rapidly the Greek mountains are increasing in height. Surely with pressure on two sides, they are doing just that. I suppose I should research this little puzzlement. I DO want to know.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 503 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, May 22, 2002 (12:56) * 44 lines 
 
POWERFUL EARTHQUAKE SHAKES CRETE
Heracleon, 22 May 2002 (14:08 UTC+2)

Many of Crete's residents preferred to spend the
night in city squares and on the streets after the
powerful seismic vibration that took place a few
minutes before midnight. Its epicenter was in an
underwater region between Crete and Milos.

The vibration was intense, between 6.1 and 5.8
points on the Richter scale. Specifically, the first
estimations came from the Patra labs, which
reported a 5.8 earthquake. The announcement of
the AUTh mentions a 6.1 R earthquake, Bucharest
recorded it at 4.8, Rome at 5.9, while the Strasburg
seismological center recorded an earthquake of 6
points on the Richter scale. On their side AUTh
seismologists characterized that differentiation is
natural and that this has happened before.

No aftershocks are expected however and AUTh
seismologist Manolis Scordilis, made the following
statement to the MPA: “As a rule, earthquakes of
an intermediate depth (those whose epicenter is
more than 60 km away from the Earth's crust) are
isolated phenomena, and are not followed by
aftershocks”.

The earthquake caused an upset in the island's
population who chose to spend the night outside.
There were some problems with communications,
as most residents immediately telephoned family or
friends, however the problem was fixed
immediately.

The quake also caused damages to
supermarkets, the church of St. Pelagia, and a
small fire was put out in a DEI electricity substation
in Heracleon, which was attributed to a
short-circuit.






 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 504 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, May 22, 2002 (14:39) * 55 lines 
 
SMU RESEARCHERS DESCRIBE TWO SEISMIC EVENTS WITH THE PROPERTIES FOR THE
PASSAGE OF STRANGE QUARK MATTER THROUGH THE EARTH


DALLAS (SMU) -- Researchers from Southern Methodist University have described two seismic events
that they believe may offer the first evidence of a previously undetected form of matter passing through
the earth.

This form of matter -- known as “strange quark matter” -- is so dense that a ton-sized nugget would be
about the size of a red blood cell. Physicists have suspected since 1984 that this very heavy form of
matter might exist, but no one has yet found evidence of it.

In 1984, Harvard physicist and Nobel Laureate Sheldon L. Glashow suggested that one way such matter
might be found would be if a physicist teamed up with a seismologist to search for traces of the matter
that might have passed through the earth at supersonic speed. In 1993, SMU physicist Vidgor Teplitz
asked Eugene Herrin, a seismologist in the Department of Geological Sciences in SMU’s Dedman College,
to collaborate with him on the project. The two were assisted by David Anderson, a senior systems
analyst in the Department of Geological Sciences, and Ileana Tibuleac, then a Ph.D. student in the
Department of Geological Sciences.

In a paper submitted to the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America and published online at
http://xxx.lanl.gov/ (subject area: astrophysics), the SMU researchers describe how they found evidence of
strange quark matter by searching through more than a million records of seismic events collected by the
U.S. Geological Survey from 1990 to 1993 that were not associated with traditional seismic events such as
earthquakes. These records of so-called “unassociated events” were collected from seismic stations set up
around the world to monitor earthquakes and nuclear testing.

In a paper previously published in 1995 (available online at
http://cornell.mirror.aps.org/abstract/PRD/v53/i12/p6762_1), Herrin and Teplitz had determined that it
would be feasible to search for seismic events that might indicate passage of strange quark matter (also
known as nuclearites) through the earth because such events would have a distinct seismic signal -- a
straight line. This would be caused by the large ratio of speed to the speed of sound in the earth. Herrin
estimates that strange quark matter might pass through the earth at 250 miles per second, 40 times the
speed of seismic waves. The team also determined that the minimum requirement for detection of a
nuclearite would be detection of its signal by seven monitoring stations.

In their new paper, the SMU researchers describe two seismic events with the linear pattern they were
looking for. One event occurred on Oct. 22, 1993, when something entered the Earth off Antarctica and
left it south of India .73 of a second later. The other occurred on Nov. 24, 1993, when an object entered
south of Australia and exited the Earth near Antarctica .15 of a second later. The first event was recorded
at seven monitoring stations in India, Australia, Bolivia and Turkey, and the second event was recorded at
nine monitoring stations in Australia and Bolivia.

“We can’t prove that this was strange quark matter, but that is the only explanation that has been offered
so far,” Herrin said.

The SMU team is now trying to determine where the heavy quark matter may have come from. In April
2002, two different teams of scientists reported that they had identified collapsed stars that might be
composed of ultradense strange quark matter. Scientists believe that chunks of strange quark matter might
be created when stars made of strange quark matter collide.

Unfortunately, Herrin notes, seismologists may not be able to find any more events that suggest the
passage of strange quark matter through the Earth. In 1993 the U.S. Geological Survey stopped collecting
data from “unassociated events” such as those that the SMU team used in its research.

http://www.smu.edu/newsinfo/releases/01342.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 505 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, May 22, 2002 (14:56) * 1 lines 
 
Congratulations to John for his earthquake prediction. Further congratulations to the media in Greece for keeping him busy confronting those who are paid to do this research and did not. John is not only a hero in his own land, as far as I am concerned, he is a world treasure. *HUGS*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 506 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, May 23, 2002 (18:29) * 1 lines 
 
*WOOHOO* way to go, john!!!!!!!!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 507 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, May 24, 2002 (02:16) * 24 lines 
 
Afterwards the last big EQ in Mylos Island area that was successfully predicted from my station’s signals the war between Greek seismologists increased by this secret document that published the newspaper Kathimerini. It was in the first page. I present you the original document without additional comments.

A heavy earthquake forecast
Prominent seismologist predicts major quakes within 2 years; 5.8-Richter rocked Crete on Tuesday

By Stavros Tzimas – Kathimerini


A powerful earthquake rocked the island of Crete late on Tuesday, causing minor damage but no injuries. The quake, occurring at 11.54 p. m., registered 5.8 on the Richter scale, the Athens Geodynamic Institute said. Thessaloniki University put it at 6.1 Richter. It was felt strongly in Athens, 170 km away, and in Cairo.

The fact that it occurred under the seabed at a depth of about 100 kilometers prevented it from causing severe damage. Objects in shops and houses on Crete came crashing down and residents of cities such as Iraklion rushed into the streets in alarm.

Officials said that the quake appeared to be an isolated incident, like the 6.6-Richter one that hit Karpathos, east of Crete, on January 22 and which was also at a great depth. Tuesday’s quake was on the inner side of the so-called Greek Arc, which starts in the Saronic Gulf outside Athens and stretches southward past the islands of Melos and Santorini before ending at Kos in the eastern Aegean. It is where the African and European plates meet.

“The evidence so far is very positive, in my opinion,” said Giorgos Stavrakakis, director of the Athens Observatory. “It is a very good sign that we have not had post-seismic activity,” he said. “But we will have to wait 48 hours before we can draw safer conclusions.”

The Greek Arc and two other areas are of particular concern to seismologists. Kathimerini has learned that last October Prof. Vassilis Papazachos of Thessaloniki University and his team sent a confidential report warning of powerful quakes in the midterm to the National Scientific Committee for Evaluating Seismic Dangers. It was discussed and passed on to the Public Works Ministry. In the report, Papazachos stresses that he is not trying to forecast earthquakes, which would have a practical value — such as predicting the day, epicenter and magnitude. The warning, he wrote, was aimed at bolstering anti-seismic preparations.

The midterm forecast concerns fears of a 6.8-Richter quake along the southwestern part of the Greek Arc after August 2002. (Most of the forecasts have a variable of 0.5 Richter in terms of magnitude and 18 months in terms of their date.) This would affect Kythera, the eastern Peloponnese, western and central Crete and the western Cyclades. On the eastern part of the same arc, a 6.6-Richter quake and a 6.8-Richter one might occur sometime around February 2003, affecting the Dodecanese islands, Samos, the eastern Cyclades and western and central Crete.

On the Northwestern Turkish Arc, a 6.4-Richter quake could come after May 2002 and a 7-Richter one after May 2003. These quakes would affect Turkey and northeastern Aegean islands such as Lesvos, Lemnos and Chios. “The western movement of the Anatolian lithospheric plate puts pressure on the Aegean plate,” the report said. “Therefore, large quakes in the Marmara Sea are usually followed (within a few years) by large quakes on the Greek Arc. The great quake of Nicomedia [Izmit, in August 1999] increases the possibility of large quakes on the Greek Arc this decade.” Also, after February 2003, a 6.7-Richter quake could hit the Ohrid region, where Greece, Albania and the former Yugoslavia meet.

http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100003_23/05/2002_16753

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 508 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, May 24, 2002 (03:25) * 8 lines 
 
Indeed. I was very busy with Greek publishing means. On 10th of May was here a TV reporter. I informed him that I was expecting a big EQ in the direction of South-South-East of Volos with magnitude between 5.5R and 6.0R on 15th or 21st of May. He was informed completely.

A 2.5 hours emission was from my house directly on the air, a few hours afterwards the EQ, by ASTR TV of Volos. The attestation of that reporter shakes the Greek public opinion. I was also in the evening news of STAR TV of Athens against professors of seismology.

Three Greek newspapers have presenting my prediction and I gave live interview in many radio stations. I am happy because this EQ was enough gentle. I believe that the EQ prediction is possible now; since I can do it with my poor means.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 509 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 24, 2002 (14:04) * 41 lines 
 
You will be honored in all of Greece and beyond. I cannot think of anyone more worthy of such honor as is John. Please think of us kindly if you become too important to exist in Geo's little world. *Hugs* John! More from the Kathimerini seismic debate:

COMMENTARIES

Seismic inconsistency


The tectonic tremors caused by the publication in yesterday’s Kathimerini of a report by Prof. Vassilis
Papazachos on Greece’s high-risk earthquake zones bring to the fore the major issue concerning
scientists’ and journalists’ social responsibility in issues that have a direct impact on the lives and safety
of Greek citizens.

In his remarks, the Thessaloniki University professor condemned the publication of his report by
Kathimerini as “an extremely anti-social act (committed) by irresponsible and unscrupulous individuals.”

Putting aside Papazachos’s characterizations, which are quite unusual for a university professor, one
inevitably wonders: What is it exactly that triggered Papazachos’s indignation? Kathimerini did nothing
but reprint a report that was published in a prestigious foreign journal, exposing, as he ought to, his
findings to the international scientific community, his students, and to any interested citizen who could
easily get the information via the Internet.

If Papazachos, intimidated by the burden of his own heavy earthquake forecast, accuses us of taking his
scientific study too seriously, he should let us know so that we do not repeat the same mistake in the
future. Unless, that is, he believes that geophysics and seismology have no predictive power but rather
share the same scientific status as theological disputes over the sex of angels, cosmological theories
over the birth of the universe, and philosophical disquisition into existential concerns.

If this is the case, then Papazachos and his colleagues have no right to fight, often in an artless fashion,
over allegedly trivial issues such as the funds from the Third Community Support Framework that are
allocated according to the expected practical merit of their research.

Unfortunately, many news media displayed the same lightheartedness as Papazachos. They first rushed
to reproduce Kathimerini’s revealing story, then went on to repeat accusations against it in an indecent
and unfair fashion.

When people working in the sciences and the media, two of the most sensitive institutions of Greek
society, display an attitude whereby they place their personal and factional interests before the social
good, it makes one sad to realize that the main perils facing us as a nation and as a society do not lie
next to us or under our feet. They reside inside us.
http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_columns_100002_24/05/2002_16793




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 510 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 24, 2002 (14:06) * 32 lines 
 
Storm over Papazachos quake study
Minister warns of funding cut


Kathimerini's publication yesterday of a confidential report by an eminent seismologist forecasting
earthquakes of around 7 Richter in four southern and northern regions of Greece within the next two
years provoked another round of recriminations between rival camps of seismologists. The government,
which said that it has several such studies in its drawers, called once again for seismologists to come up
with a united network for studying seismic activity.

Athens's Geodynamic Institute said Tuesday's quake in the southern Aegean registered 5.8 on the
Richter scale, while Thessaloniki University measured it at 6.1. «We have funded them to set up a
unified network. If they do not do this we will stop funding them,» said Public Works Minister Vasso
Papandreou. She said the study was the same one that the government had been given nine months
ago. «What it says about information and preparedness, that is what we are doing. But I do not
understand the point of publicizing such reports,» she said.

Emeritus Prof. Vassilis Papazachos of Thessaloniki University, who submitted his report to the National
Scientific Committee for Evaluating Seismic Dangers last October, attacked those who made it public.
«The leaking of information regarding estimates of the time and place of seismic activity is a very
antisocial act carried out by irresponsible people lacking in conscience,» Papazachos said. «The
publication of such information does not contribute to the correct solution of the problem of antiseismic
protection, but on the contrary, creates additional social problems.»

Kathimerini's report said Papazachos's midterm predictions, which had a margin of error of 18 months
and 0.5 Richter, were aimed at increasing awareness in Greece's northwest and northeast and the
southern arc stretching from the Peloponnese to Turkey.

Akis Tselentis, a seismologist at Patras University, charged that Papazachos was driven by the desire for
more funding and had not submitted the report to the committee on seismic dangers. «If I were a
Turkish hotelier I would be rubbing my hands with glee at this bombshell,» Tselentis said.

http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100001_24/05/2002_16800


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 511 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 24, 2002 (14:16) * 1 lines 
 
John, I found it significant that none of the governement news sources carried any of this information. But, from what you have told me, I should not be so surprised. Funding cuts will not fix the problem. You work completely with your own funds and produce reliable data. They have the luxury of status and funding as part of the University system yet no results are ever published. It is much the same world wide and for the same reasons. Please do not take "hemlock" for corrupting us with the truth.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 512 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 24, 2002 (14:20) * 23 lines 
 
PAPAZACHOS: EARTHQUAKE PREDICTION IS NOT FEASIBLE

The leak of information to the press on imminent strong earthquakes in four
regions in the next two years, was characterized by Thessaloniki Aristotle
University Geophysics professor emeritus Vasilis Papazachos as an antisocial
act of irresponsible and c onscienceless individuals.

Mr. Papazachos stated that a precise earthquake prediction is not feasible for
now and therefore, the people should not take such press reports seriously.
However, Mr. Papazachos did not deny that he had forwarded the document to
the responsible authorit ies.

According to a newspaper report, Mr. Papazachos in a confidential document he
forwarded to the responsible authorities calls on the state to take urgent
measures for the protection of the people from imminent strong earthquakes.
According to the report, Mr. Papazachos pinpoints the four regions where
earthquakes measuring 7 on the Richter scale are expected to hit in the next 2
years.

Those regions are the Peloponese in southern Greece, the region that includes
the island of Crete and the Dodecanese Islands in southeastern Aegean, the
region between Albania and FYROM and northwestern Turkey.
http://www.gogreece.com/news/headlines/story.html?id=4888


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 513 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 24, 2002 (14:42) * 36 lines 
 
From The Macedonian Press Agency


PAPAZACHOS: EARTHQUAKE PREDICTION IS NOT FEASIBLE
Thessaloniki, 23 May 2002 (16:27 UTC+2)

The leak of information to the press on imminent
strong earthquakes in four regions in the next two
years, was characterized by Thessaloniki Aristotle
University Geophysics professor emeritus Vasilis
Papazachos as an antisocial act of irresponsible
and conscienceless individuals.

Mr. Papazachos stated that a precise
earthquake prediction is not feasible for now and
therefore, the people should not take such press
reports seriously. However, Mr. Papazachos did not
deny that he had forwarded the document to the
responsible authorities.

According to a newspaper report, Mr.
Papazachos in a confidential document he
forwarded to the responsible authorities calls on the
state to take urgent measures for the protection of
the people from imminent strong earthquakes.
According to the report, Mr. Papazachos pinpoints
the four regions where earthquakes measuring 7 on
the Richter scale are expected to hit in the next 2
years.

Those regions are the Peloponese in southern
Greece, the region that includes the island of Crete
and the Dodecanese Islands in southeastern
Aegean, the region between Albania and FYROM
and northwestern Turkey.
http://www.mpa.gr/article.html?doc_id=270145


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 514 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, May 25, 2002 (23:59) * 12 lines 
 
The debate goes on. When I can find an article in English about John's memorable contribution to this current debate, I will post it immediately. As it stands now, I have one in Greek. Does anyone want that posted? I would be happy to do so.

QUAKE DEBATE
Document was a recommendation, not an official report, says seismologist


A prominent seismologist said yesterday that a confidential document he sent last October to an official
committee assessing earthquake dangers was not an official report, but a recommendation. The
leakage of such information creates unnecessary social concern, Professor Vassilis Papazachos said
following a speech at a primary school in the central town of Karditsa on precautions against
earthquakes and seismic effects. The document was published in Kathimerini on Thursday.

http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100022_25/05/2002_16844


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 515 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, May 27, 2002 (19:44) * 1 lines 
 
those news agencies don't have the ability to do up their website in english too? so we can just click the language and the site changes over?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 516 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 27, 2002 (19:48) * 2 lines 
 
No, alas. John did give me a rough translation which I will clean up and post.
I am so delighted that George from Athens has joined his conversation. The both speak the same languages, including the technical bits I will never learn in any tongue.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 517 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, May 27, 2002 (19:49) * 1 lines 
 
george is from athens? *woohoo* glad to see some of john's colleagues post here, finally! *HUGS*


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 518 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 27, 2002 (23:10) * 2 lines 
 
It might prove beneficial in more ways than are first apparent. I will post the editing of the literal Greek-to-English that John send me last night (his time)
as soon as I am certain my editing did not change the meaning of the original.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 519 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May 28, 2002 (01:12) * 1 lines 
 
Building up to another Greek earthquake, it appears. This is worrisome.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 520 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May 28, 2002 (15:33) * 27 lines 
 
Translation of first half of the article concering the recent Greek earthquake and John's media interviews (with his permission and approval)

The earthquakes of previous week caused new confrontations between the two sides. Seismologists and "unvalued children" in the war of prediction.

B. Karakostas, seismologist:
"Any collaboration should function in constructive base. I distinguish (at least) immoderate ambition of these persons, that they have achieved something and they want manage it alone ."

John Tsatsaragos, independent researcher:
"I tend believe that they are not interested in whether an earthquake will come or not. The prediction of earthquakes
is routine for us."

The earthquake of this past Tuesday in Crete upset the Greek nation once more, so much because as a phenomenon it always causes concern, but also for the confrontation that burst out for one more time between the seismologists specifically after the broadcast of the confidential report of professor Papazachos that big earthquakes are expected from the this year's summertime and up to 2003.

But what happens with independent researchers - for example the team of Dr Thanassoulas, (PhD in Geophysics) and Mr Tsatsaragos? According to what is alleged by some of the staff of the Organization of Anti-seismic Planning and Protection, there are many times they publish research findings, but they function outside the "scientific circles" of the official researching centers. How many times are they taken into consideration, when indeed their work has been published in foreigner scientific magazines and by academic laboratories abroad who are interested in their work?

"All of the research work about earthquakes, via the OASP, is submitted to the Committee of Estimate of Seismic Danger," reports the director of OASP Mr Papadopoulos. "Therefore the responsible committee is staffed with seismologists, geologists, geophysicists etc. approves them and with the proportional prestige that it allocates. It removes the conclusion and forwards it to the Minister for the rest. Beyond this, the scientists publish their work in the corresponding scientific magazines outside our country. If this process is not followed, it is dangerous because if they are publicized by any prediction it causes panic in the citizens ".

The seismologist Manolis Skordilis, lecturer in the department of Geophysics of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, declared, "In the frame of a program that would recognize some institution, it would be possible to collaborate with the independent researchers, if of course they could prove the correctness of their method."

For his part, a seismologist in the same department, Mr Basilis Karakostas, declared that he knows about the collaboration of Dr Kostas Thanassoulas with Mr Tsatsaragos but he does not know details of the method that they follow for the predictions (Note: all the methodology of the research from 1998 to the present is free for anyone interested on the internet, as well as in the library of IGME, where Dr Thanassoulas works in the Department of Geophysics while he has also been published in foreign magazines).

When Mr Karakostas was asked why there had been no collaboration even when confronted with the research of
Dr Thanassoulas, he said "Any collaboration should function in constructive base. I distinguish (at least) immoderate ambition of these persons, that they have achieved something and they want manage it alone ."

Mr John Tsatsaragos, the inventor of the method and collaborator in Magnesia of Dr Thanassoulas, declared that the scientific community treated them with scorn:
"I tend to believe that they are not interested if an earthquake will occur or not. It is routine for us to predict earthquakes. We have resolved the issue of calculation of the magnitude, the azimuth direction of the source of the electromagnetic signals, the time that the earthquake will occur - plus or minus one day. All that remains is the determination of the exact epicenter. The method is based on the electric signals that increase with tidal forces. What happens with the tide in the sea, also happens in the ground. In the faults that cause the earthquakes, it increases the piezoelectric phenomenon and it gives bigger currents which we also detect."



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 521 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, May 29, 2002 (01:27) * 11 lines 
 
The second half of the article translated above:

Dr Konstantinos Thanassoulas, Geophysicist (who did his doctoral studies under the guidance of Professor Papazachos,) talking about the history of the method, declared that his interest was started by the statements of professor Varotsos roughly 20 years ago when his team announced that they had resolved the problem of predictions.

"It was the year that I completed my doctorate with the professor Papazachos. I tried to confirm the measurements that had been publicized by Mr Varotsos. The system that I set up had recorded an amazing signal; the oscillations that preceded the earthquake of Limnos Island. I showed it to Mr Papazachos but he did not give it particular importance. The initial stages of my research were published in a scientific magazine, in collaboration with Professor Tselentis in 1986. Professor Varotsos presented to the participants a congress (Athens 1991) a large volume of continuous graphs of signals for a duration of one month prior to some large earthquakes.

"I took a copy of these graphs and entered them into a computer by hand. Then I did my first serious work on the calculations of the epicenter. I presented this work in a European Congress in Strasbourg and the participants characterized it as a "break-through in science." It was also published in the scientific magazine of the Academy of Sciences in Poland. So astonishing were the results that Mr Tselentis assigned a doctoral candidate at the University of Patras to confirm the elements as they were recorded. They shared copies of this work with seismologists but no correspondence occurred concerning a methodology that calculated the epicenter using the statistics in an analytic way.

"After the earthquake in Kozani (In 1995-96) the seismologists declared that "it came out of the blue" and that the area had not shown indications of seismicity in the past. Then I did the research that showed how the Greek area was cut and where the big earthquakes would occur. I presented this work in a meeting in the IGME in 1999 and it was disputed by the scientists. However, the earthquake of 1999 in Athens occurred and the area of damage which I said cuts Attica in two parts was verified. At that time, I decided to publish all my work in the Internet because there was no official reaction after the earthquake. Mr John Tsatsaragos found me there and we began our collaboration because I saw that his measurements were "diamonds".

"Until we set up two more stations and we have the possibility of processing all the elements crossing them, the possibility of coming out with official statements and predictions does not exist. They called me from the OASP (Organization of Anti-Seismic Protection) this past March, and I presented our method analytically there. But no official reaction came after that. I throw down the gauntlet to those who dispute us. I propose a meeting where I would present the method, and if disagreements exist that they are to be formulated officially and argued."


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 522 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May 30, 2002 (00:05) * 94 lines 
 
As I recall, the Colossus of Rhodes fell due to an earthquake. Now this???

Ministry grilled over Aphrodite plans

By Alexia Saoulli

THE TOURISM Ministry yesterday came under fire as deputies and
representatives from interested organisations slammed it for keeping them
in the dark over plans to construct a colossal statue of Aphrodite in a
floating theme park off the Paphos coast.

But the Ministry's Permanent Secretary, Soteris Soteriou, defended the
government's handling of the matter and assured an angry meeting of the
House Environment Committee that the plans had not yet taken definite form.

The committee met yesterday to assess plans put forward by a private
company to create the theme park and its impact on the scenic coastal area.

Soteriou was quick to assure the committee that plans put forward by a
private company to build a theme park and statue of the goddess off the
Kouklia area south of Paphos were only at a "very preliminary stage".

But AKEL, DIKO, United Democrat and Green Party deputies criticised the
government, particularly the Ministry, for its "lack of information" on the
matter and for failing to brief the committee on the project's progress.
Only DISY deputies asked for more information on the procedures and the
benefits to the local economy before taking a stand on the matter.

But the other deputies maintained that the government had "gone about
trying to upgrade the local tourism industry by showing off the island's
history and culture in the wrong way".

However, deputies were not the only ones kept in the dark over the
controversial plans.

Representatives from organised bodies, such as the Chamber of Fine Arts
(EKATE), the Architects' Association, Archaeologists, Tourism organisations,
ecological organisations, tour guides, as well as environmental services,
the Antiquities Department and Education Ministry Cultural Services also
lined up to claim they had been completely ignorant of any such
construction project.

But they had read enough press reports on the giant Aphrodite to express a
very definite opinion on the theme park.

Most said they were completely opposed to the construction of a giant
statue of the Goddess of Love, as a statue of this magnitude directly
contradicted the characteristic life-size statues that existed in the
Ancient Greek Classical period.

Only representatives of the Pancyprian Hoteliers Association (PASYXE) and
the Cyprus Tourism Organisation (CTO), who also said they had not been
informed of the plans, expressed support for the project.

This was because they said that if "strict guidelines were followed and all
necessary measures to protect the environment were taken" the construction
of such a theme park would be beneficial in upgrading the local tourism
industry.

But Soteriou admitted that environmental studies had not yet been carried
out nor had the Ministry assessed what consequences a project of this
magnitude would have on the surrounding area. However, he stressed, they
were still only studying the private company's proposal and that nothing
concrete had yet been decided, such as how much and what state land it
would be appropriate to lease.

"Besides, all procedures carried out will abide by the law and all deputies
will be fully briefed before a final decision is reached by the Cabinet,"
Soteriou said.

While politicians yesterday expressed their opposition to these plans,
artist George Mavrogenis was particularly upset by them, accusing the
people behind the project of "creative ownership theft".

According to Mavrogenis, the Paphos theme park plans include ideas from his
own 1996 study for a theme park in Oroklini, in the Larnaca district.

He said there had been some difficulties in securing the initial area
mapped out for his project, which was why they were now studying the
possibility of building the park in the Larnaca port area.

In order to get a fuller picture of the plans, DISY deputy Nicos Tornaritis
and Green Party deputy George Perdikis asked for the meeting to be
adjourned and invited Minister Nicos Rolandis to appear before the
committee next Tuesday. Tornaritis also proposed that the private company
involved send a representative to the next meeting as well.

Committee President George Lillikas characterised the whole affair as
"unacceptable and insulting" towards the committee and said the matter
would remain open until those responsible addressed the committee's
questions.

Copyright Cyprus Mail 2002



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 523 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jun  5, 2002 (01:55) * 20 lines 
 
Conviction for quake deaths

An architect involved in the construction of a building in northwestern Athens that collapsed during the
September 1999 earthquake, crushing the residents of an adjoining house, received a suspended
sentence of over three years yesterday for manslaughter.

In the first conviction resulting from a series of lawsuits against property owners, company officials,
architects and civil engineers following the destructive earthquake, an Athens court found Constantinos
Brembos guilty of the deaths of Evangelos and Maria Tsoumba, who lived in the smaller building. He
was sentenced to 40 months’ imprisonment, suspended.

The 5.9-Richter quake killed 143 people, mostly in the capital’s western and northern suburbs close to
Mount Parnitha, where the epicenter was located.

Brembos had designed the second floor of a building on Stratigou Syrma Street in Ano Liossia, which
fell onto the Tsoumbas’s house. The court found that he had failed to take into account illegal
additions to the lower parts of the building that should have been strengthened before the upper floor
was added.

http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100014_04/06/2002_17184


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 524 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jun  5, 2002 (21:18) * 1 lines 
 
I cannot see June's danger windows but Greece's signals are increasing. I suggest they are due for another quake within a few days if not sooner


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 525 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Jun  7, 2002 (01:59) * 8 lines 
 
Congratulations again Marcia!

2002/06/06 22:35:43 35.80N 26.20E 97.6 5.0 A CRETE, GREECE

http://wwwneic.cr.usgs.gov/neis/bulletin/


John


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 526 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Jun  7, 2002 (02:03) * 3 lines 
 
The tidal curve of June is there. It is appeared after the tidal curve of May. Simply wait a little. It is changing automatically.

John


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 527 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun  7, 2002 (16:05) * 3 lines 
 
Thank you , John! I thought I had seen the curve for June but when I tried to access it later, I guess I did not notice that both months were displayed.

There is no magic in the ability to predict Greek earthquakes. YOU have allowed us to watch your magic and from that it is very simple to predict. Have you spoken to the media as you arranged to do? I miss IM with you VERY much. *sigh* Thank you for holding my hand across the Pacific.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 528 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sat, Jun  8, 2002 (02:35) * 7 lines 
 
Thank you Marcia.
Indeed. The EQ’s are predictable. We need only suitable tools. I have my poor one. I am trying proving it but no one (except simple citizens) is hearing. Why we must expect deaths and not only, before a serious examination of our method? I will speak to the media when I will have a very strong signal. It will produce a different EQ. But I am disappointed from those that they have the scientist title.

I am proud that I am member of Geo family. You made the Earth very small with Geo. So, we can easily join our hands even from the two opposite sides of Earth.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 529 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sat, Jun  8, 2002 (02:44) * 5 lines 
 
This is the last seismicity in Greece as it is appeared in our Geo portal. See your EQ Maracia.


John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 530 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun  8, 2002 (12:28) * 1 lines 
 
It seems that Crete gets more than its share of earthquakes, but this has been its history since recorded time began. I am sorry it happened but it is part of where they are located on the Volcanic Arc of the Aegean Sea. I will look later to see if there was damage.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 531 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Jun  9, 2002 (09:04) * 4 lines 
 
I wonder if the of tomorrow eclipse will cause some significant seismicity and/or volcano activity. Surely it will apply bigger than usual tidal forces on Earth along the path of the eclipse.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 532 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun  9, 2002 (10:48) * 1 lines 
 
I also wondered if the eclipse would matter in world seismicity and volcanic activity, but upon consulting David and remembering what happened other years, the angle is so small in comparison with other new moon phases that it should only reflect the usual both-on-the-same-side of the earth. We shall see! I am still wondering how much difference it might mean. It is also close to the danger window. That is perhaps more relevant!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 533 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Jun  9, 2002 (10:49) * 8 lines 
 
I think that this is interesting for your recent place Marcia.



Perhaps it is interesting for David too.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 534 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun  9, 2002 (10:57) * 4 lines 
 
Interesting indeed for Iris, David and for me. I have not seen a danger window which went so low and whose next danger window was so high. It will be most interesting to watch the seismicity for this part of the North American plate.
They send you thanks and I send you *HUGS*!

I am posting the results of our 6 hour satellit hunting last night on Geo 24


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 535 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Jun  9, 2002 (11:08) * 7 lines 
 
Thank you.
The units of y-axis are ìgal multiplied by 10. Time (x-axis) is your local time.

We have a hot sunny day here. I see that we have 35 C degrees outside now. Have a good and pleasant Sunday all of you.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 536 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Jun  9, 2002 (11:51) * 3 lines 
 
I remind you that the above bar-graph means NOTHING without electrical signals from the ground. It describes only a natural phenomenon under your legs.

John


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 537 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun  9, 2002 (13:22) * 3 lines 
 
*sigh* I will remember and observe.

Now I will go to the other computer and see if it is working correctly. I miss you!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 538 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun 10, 2002 (01:15) * 10 lines 
 
CRETAN QUAKE - 5.4-Richter tremor shakes island, causes no injuries or damage

A strong earthquake, measuring 5.4 on the Richter scale, shook the port of Iraklion and other parts of
northern Crete at 1.30 a.m. yesterday morning, but no serious damage or injuries were reported. The
tremor, whose epicenter was 80 kilometers north of the Bay of Siteia, was felt on many islands of the
southern Aegean and even in some Athenian suburbs. It was the strongest to hit Crete since a 5.7 quake
on May 21.

http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100021_08/06/2002_1738



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 539 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun 10, 2002 (01:18) * 40 lines 
 
Strong earthquake rocks Crete, no damage or injuries reported Athens,

A strong earthquake measuring 5.4 on the Richter scale rocked the island
of Crete early Friday, causing panic but no damage or injuries. This was
the second strong quake to hit the island in the space of a month.

The quake, which was felt throughout northern Crete, was recorded at 1:36 a.m.
at a distance of 350 kilometers southeast of Athens with its epicenter in the sea
north of Lassithi, according to the Athens Observatory's Geodynamic Institute.

According to seismologists, the quake had an intermediate epicentral depth of
approximately 100 kilometers. They explained that quakes emanating from such
a depth were usually isolated, with no aftershocks.

Local residents returned to their normal activities Friday morning after
no post-quake activity developed. The tremor initially caused a minor panic and
residents took to the streets in fear that another shock would follow

The trembler was felt in Iraklion, Aghios Nikolaos, Lassithi, and on
the northeastern shores of Crete.

Seismologists said Friday's earthquake, which was not followed by after-shocks,
was of a small duration and was not related to a strong 5.8 Richter quake that
struck on May 21 in the sea region between Crete and the island of Milos, again
from an intermediate epicentral depth.

The Aristotelion University's Geophysics Lab in Thessaloniki also put the quake's
magnitude at 5.4 Richter, with its epicenter at a distance of 630 kilometers
southeast of Thessaloniki.

Aristotelion University seismology professor Manolis Skordilis told ANA that
although region was currently in a seismic lull, the southeastern section of what
is known as the Greek Arc, where both the Crete quakes emanated from,
presented some minor activity.

The same section also produced a 6.3 Richter trembler near Karpathos
on January 22, while in the past it has produced very strong quakes of 8.2 Richter
in 1856 and 7.5 Richter in 1877, emanating from intermediate epicentral depths.

http://www.gogreece.com/news/headlines/story.html?id=5501


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 540 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Jun 23, 2002 (11:39) * 16 lines 
 
A powerful earthquake struck yesterday north-western Iran at 7:30 a.m. when most people were still in their homes of brick, stone and mud. Now is reported as:


2002/06/22 02:58:20 35.63N 48.95E 10.0 6.5 A WESTERN IRAN (by NEIC)




Iran is mourning hundreds of people who have died after that powerful earthquake.

President Mohammad Khatami has declared three days of mourning as efforts to rescue those trapped beneath rubble are stepped up.

Read more in CNN:
http://europe.cnn.com/2002/WORLD/meast/06/23/iran.mourning/index.html.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 541 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun 24, 2002 (13:45) * 3 lines 
 
Oh John, one of your world signal quakes has become reality. I am so sorry for those afflicted. I seen to be in a seismically and volcanologically "dead" part of the world, but close enough to the New Madrid Fault to know I am not entirely out of danger.

*HUGS* John for taking such good care of Geo. My laptop is undergoing a professional hard drive installation followed by my son's programming and additional tweaking by me when it gets here (in this lifetime I hope) to enable me to set up an ether net.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 542 of 639: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Jun 30, 2002 (22:15) * 23 lines 
 

From the press release
(http://www.stanford.edu/dept/news/pr/02/pilothole710.html):

When drilling is completed in the next few weeks, researchers will
lower instruments into the hole to measure stress, fluid pressure, heat
flow and other properties to characterize the geologic environment of
the San Andreas Fault Zone and to determine the amount of stress
required to make the fault slip. They will then install an extensive
array of seismometers and other instruments in the hole to help study
and precisely locate earthquakes within the fault zone that will be
targets for later SAFOD drilling.

"The earthquakes that occur here are quite remarkable," Ellsworth
said. "Many of them recur time and time again with near clocklike
regularity. The pilot hole instruments will give us a powerful new tool
for understanding what makes them tick."

(Steve) Hickman added: "We'll also be analyzing in the laboratory
rock, water and gas samples collected during drilling to determine how
changes in fluid circulation and chemistry might be related to the
earthquake cycle."



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 543 of 639: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Jun 30, 2002 (22:16) * 48 lines 
 


SAFOD proposal

The SAFOD project -- which will be located just east of the pilot site
-- will require drilling a larger, deeper and more directionally
complex hole than the pilot hole being drilled this summer. SAFOD
drilling would start on the Pacific Plate, which forms the western
boundary of the San Andreas Fault Zone, and continue in a vertical
direction about 1.4 miles below the surface. Then, using technology
developed by the oil industry, engineers would alter the course of the
hole -- angling it eastward until it crossed the fault zone and ending
up in the North American Plate.

Scientists from more than 20 universities and government laboratories
spent a year examining the entire San Andreas Fault before selecting
the SAFOD site, (Bill) Ellsworth said. "Everyone agreed that this was a
most promising place to address some of the most fundamental questions
about earthquakes that have long eluded surface-bound observers."

According to Hickman, SAFOD will drill into, or very close to, a
repeating microearthquake source -- a region along the fault where
small magnitude 2.0 quakes repeatedly rupture the same area at regular
time intervals. Thus, for the first time, SAFOD will allow
around-the-clock monitoring of subtle changes in deformation, fluid
pressure and temperature during earthquake initiation and rupture
directly within the fault zone at depths where earthquakes originate.

"These magnitude 2.0 clusters are rarely felt, but they can end up
rupturing a football-sized piece of the fault," Hickman said.

SAFOD is one of four large-scale experiments proposed under the
umbrella of EarthScope, an interdisciplinary geophysical and geological
program dedicated to answering fundamental questions about the geology
of North America: Why do earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur? How
do continents form and evolve?

The EarthScope program involves NSF, USGS, NASA and more than 100
universities. The proposed budget for the SAFOD project alone is about
$30 million over six years -- $16 million to drill through the San
Andreas Fault, and $14 million to make downhole geophysical
measurements, conduct laboratory studies of fault rocks and fluids
recovered from the hole, and install a long-term earthquake observatory
within the fault zone that will operate for 20 years. Whether SAFOD
goes forward depends on whether the U.S. Congress decides to fund
EarthScope. A decision could be made by September.




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 544 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Jul  2, 2002 (06:10) * 3 lines 
 
SAFOD is a very hopeful project. I can imagine how difficult will be. But it is the first serious international earnest effort to understanding which are exactly the processings in the Earth's interior. We must applause it.

John


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 545 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul  3, 2002 (18:06) * 1 lines 
 
It sounds very exciting. I will bounce this off my son and see what he knows about it. This is the first I have heard if it. Thank you, Terry!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 546 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 10, 2002 (20:44) * 1 lines 
 
John either this computer and AOL refuses to load your danger window graph or you are in the process of creating a new one. It seems that Greece is safe for the time being. I am very surprised that you did not get an eq from the last increased signals. For that, I am delighted.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 547 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 10, 2002 (20:46) * 1 lines 
 
Meahwhile the world signals do not look so fortunate. We wait and watch. I had hoped to post signal reports today. Perhaps tomorrow?! I am keeping my fingers crossed.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 548 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Jul 12, 2002 (02:36) * 9 lines 
 
Hi Marcia
The increment of the amplitude of my 24-hour period signals means that we have a corresponding increment of the pressure at the fault rims. It will occur an EQ if the pressure exceeds the breaking limit of the rocks and the rocks will break. EQ will not occur if the pressure remain high but lower this limit.

I deduce that it is oncoming EQ if I observe an abrupt increment of my signals, continued for a few days. Constant azimuth direction is demanded as a precondition.

The waiting world signals are too much. We will see what will happen together with Geo family. I pray for gentle events.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 549 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 16, 2002 (11:41) * 1 lines 
 
Our prayers join yours. May they all be in the oceans and absorbed by the greatest shock-absorber the earth has. I posted some eq reports yesterday from m y old email. I am slowly getting through it. I had over 1300 (or was it 13,000?!) to download. David said it took over an hour to do so!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 550 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jul 16, 2002 (19:18) * 1 lines 
 
your email doesn't just shut the rest out? mine has a max and everything above it is deleted automatically.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 551 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 16, 2002 (19:32) * 1 lines 
 
My email on aloha.net is infinite. That is the advantage or disadvantage of a private email server and ISP. I don't know how you get online,but earthlink and netcom are both like Hawaii Online. We use Eudora to get and store our email. Currentlhy I can send via AOL (my host's server) but can receiver from aloha.net AND AOL. *sigh* It is inconvenient but it does work!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 552 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 16, 2002 (19:34) * 1 lines 
 
my Yahoo is finite but I only use it for a few people who are determined to use it like ROB... *;)


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 553 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Jul 16, 2002 (19:39) * 1 lines 
 
yeah, i've got hotmail and because i don't want to pay for a free email service, i'm stuck with limited storage.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 554 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Jul 22, 2002 (00:33) * 13 lines 
 
An Earthquake Test for New Zealand
Monday 22nd July 2002

New Zealand's ability to cope with a major disaster will be tested this week by a multinational civil defence exercise involving more than 50 agencies from Pacific Rim nations.
The exercise will test the response to an imaginary earthquake measuring 7.5 on the Richter scale which will hit Wellington. The exercise will involve 40 urban search and rescue (USAR) personnel from overseas, including Australia and the US. The United Nations is sending its closest USAR teams, in Taiwan and Singapore.

Earthquakes are a living reality for the Wellington region. The event-probability is twice that of volcanic activity in the Auckland region, which is a city further north situated in a volcanic zone.
(NZ Herald)

http://www.volcanolive.com/volcanolive.html

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 555 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jul 22, 2002 (20:08) * 1 lines 
 
I wonder how and what they are going to have the public do in this test. If drills are not carried out using the inhabitants, it is a hollow exercise. Rob, please tell us what happens and how effective it was, please!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 556 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Jul 23, 2002 (04:42) * 9 lines 
 
Moderate Earthquake Hits Germany (Magnitude 4.9)
Tuesday 23rd July 2002


A moderate earthquake shook homes on the border between Germany and the Netherlands on Monday morning, but caused little damage. The earthquake hit at 7:44 a.m. Monday near the border city of Aachen. A chimney was knocked off a house, and the quake shook mirrors and pictures from people's walls and cracked the facade of an apartment building. Small earthquakes are common in the area, which is the most seismically active part of Germany. The strongest recent earthquake to hit Germany was in 1992, when a magnitude 5.9 quake in the same region cracked the walls of homes and caused a few minor injuries. (AP)

http://www.volcanolive.com/volcanolive.html

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 557 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 23, 2002 (12:25) * 1 lines 
 
I have also noticed small quakes in France and Poland lately. I wonder if things are moving to brace for all those world great quakes we are expecting...


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 558 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 26, 2002 (14:09) * 3 lines 
 
I am looking at the fact that we are just now emerging from the danger window and John's signals for Greece are anything but steady. Since the last one I predicted never happened and the needle continues to scribe an eratic path, I will sit quietly and watch it run its course.

Has Greece not had any stong EQs lately? I know I was missing for a few weeks (t seemed like years!) but... surely I would have heard...


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 559 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 26, 2002 (19:03) * 6 lines 
 
Earthquake shakes Marathon

An earthquake measuring 3.9 on the Richter scale took part at 08:20
local time 33 kilometres east of Athens with its epicentre located in
Marathon. No damages have been reported.
http://www.hri.org/news/greek/eraen/2002/02-07-25.eraen.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 560 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 26, 2002 (19:04) * 1 lines 
 
I should know better than to ask...


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 561 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Jul 26, 2002 (21:50) * 21 lines 
 
Hi Marcia and all
None significant earthquake occurred in Greece this month. But I must inform you for this:

2002 JUL 17 14 48 15,9 39,40 22,91 5 3,2
It means magnitude 3.2Ml or 3.7Ms

It was nearby, almost under Volos city and was produced legitimate anxiety to the citizens. It was occurred at 5:48 pm local time. I had so many phone calls from reporters of local Radio and TV stations. One hour later I was in Local TV news. I was saying that NO DANGER EXIST FOR A BIG EARTHQUAKE THE NEXT 10 DAYS FOR THE ENTIRE GREECE! (Roughly 10 days is my window to the future for strong quakes).

Today, everyone knows that I was correct. I think that it was the first time in the world history that somebody GIVES FORTH IN PUBLIC such information.

We do not proceed in any process on my signals if they are small. We made this scientific process later (for the two previous days), and the results were Absolutely Correct.

Special notes
The epicentre is located almost on the extension of the followed fault



At the exact epicentre was observed a down lift one week before this small earthquake.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 562 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 27, 2002 (15:53) * 6 lines 
 
All of Greece has honored you with their trust. It is well placed.I can not think of a more thoughtful scholar or more cautious scientistn with whom to entrust such knowledge. The gods have chosen wisely!

I do know the little quakes are higly suspect and the data for them unreliable.
However,I could not resist when I noticed the press mentioning the Marathon quake.

I did not realize on July 14 you had a fame-gathering quake. *sigh* They are right to put their trust in you!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 563 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 27, 2002 (17:40) * 3 lines 
 
*Sigh* Just when I thought PBS was reliable I find them ill infomed about the state of the art of Greek Earthquake prediciton:

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/savageearth/earthquakes/html/sidebar2.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 564 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul 28, 2002 (16:56) * 14 lines 
 
Moderate quake felt in western Greece
28/07/2002 21:32:29

A moderate earthquake measuring 5.2 on the Richter scale was recorded early
Sunday evening in a sea region off the large Ionian island of Cephallonia, an
area often plagued by seismic activity.

The quake was recorded at 8:16 p.m., with seismologists at the University of
Patra noting that its epicentre was located some 15 kilometres below the
seabed.

The tremor was reportedly felt in much of southwestern Greece, although no
damages were reported.
http://www.hri.org/news/greek/apeen/2002/02-07-28.apeen.html#01


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 565 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul 28, 2002 (16:58) * 2 lines 
 
YOU can bet John is busy on television, Radio and telephone doing interviews.
I wondered about those signals... Marathon's was just not strong enough to count for their amplitude!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 566 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul 28, 2002 (17:40) * 81 lines 
 
A Reminder That We Live in Earthquake Country

For years, scientists have tried to understand what causes earthquakes.
They have recorded, catalogued, and analyzed them. Instruments and
telemetry systems are constantly upgraded, enabling us to collect greater
amounts of data from a single earthquake. Techniques have been developed
to better understand the complicated effects the soil and rock beneath us
have on the destructiveness of an earthquake. Modern computers have become
increasingly proficient at testing realistic models of an earthquake and
its effects.

Despite these advances, accurate earthquake prediction has remained
elusive, and we are unable to prevent an impending earthquake from
happening. Instead of prediction, recent efforts have focused on
mitigating seismic hazards by determining locations and types of structures
where damage is most likely to occur. Thus, we can minimize the impact of
a large earthquake by carefully planning the placement of future roads,
bridges, utilities, homes, and other buildings. In addition, appropriate
standards for earthquake-resistant construction can also be adopted.

While designing to the most earthquake-resistant standard may minimize the
risk, it is also the most costly mitigation measure. In some countries,
current building codes are ignored due to poor economic conditions, lack of
understanding, or bureaucracy.

In September 1993, a magnitude-6.3 earthquake struck the Latur area of
southern India, killing nearly 10,000 people and destroying several dozen
villages. Most homes were of stone construction, with only mud used as
mortar. Mud and timber were used for roofs, which easily collapsed on the
inhabitants while they slept at night. The larger, magnitude-6.7
earthquake in Northridge, California, less than four months later was
economically devastating, yet killed only 60 people.

On Hawai`i Island, over a decade has passed since an earthquake resulted
in considerable damage or casualties. A magnitude-6.2 earthquake in the
Kalapana area injured several people, destroyed five homes, and damaged
about 100 other homes on June 25, 1989. Other damaging earthquakes in the
past 30 years were the 1973 Honomu (M6.2), the 1975 Kalapana (M7.2), and
the 1983 Ka`oiki (M6.7) earthquakes. The 1975 earthquake caused over $4
million (nearly 14 million in 2002 dollars) in property damage. Two people
were killed as the tsunami generated by the earthquake struck a low-lying
beach campground at Halape.

In 1993, Hawai`i County approved adoption of the 1991 Uniform Building
Code (UBC). Seismic provisions in the UBC set standards for
earthquake-resistant design. More recent studies by the U.S. Geological
Survey convinced the Hawai`i State Earthquake Advisory Committee (HSEAC)
that zonation for Hawai`i County should be upgraded from zone 3 to 4, the
highest seismic hazard zone considered by the UBC. Thus, the International
Council of Building Officials incorporated Hawai`i County into seismic zone
4 in the 1997 publication of the UBC. The successor to the 1997 UBC was
drafted as the 2000 International Building Codes (IBC). Provisions of the
2000 IBC have already been adopted by several jurisdictions on the
mainland. Hawai`i County has amended the 1991 UBC to assign seismic zone 4
to the entire island.

Successful implementation of new building codes requires proper training
of government officials, building inspectors, architects, contractors, and
engineers. Many older post-and-pier houses are not tied to a solid
foundation. Such homes have had a history of sliding off their foundations
during earthquakes, resulting in major structural damage. There are means
to retrofit such post-and-pier foundations and other structural elements in
a home to increase their resistance to strong shaking.

Citizens can also prepare for the next "big one" by having emergency
supplies ready and knowing what to do in case of a large earthquake. To
assist residents, the Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes at UH-Hilo
produced a 30-minute video entitled, "Earthquake and Volcano Hazards on the
Island of Hawai`i." This video, which has been shown on public access
television, can be borrowed from libraries, community associations, and
many video rental stores free of charge. Information about the video can
be found at http://www.uhh.hawaii.edu/~nat_haz/video/video.html.
Benefits to adopting current building codes and educating about natural
hazards may not be immediately apparent, but they will eventually result in
reduced human and economic losses from earthquakes, hurricanes, and other
natural disasters.

This article was written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's
Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 567 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Jul 29, 2002 (01:00) * 15 lines 
 
Moderate quake felt in western Greece
28/07/2002 21:32:29

A moderate earthquake measuring 5.2 on the Richter scale was recorded early Sunday evening in a sea region off the large Ionian island of Cephallonia, an area often plagued by seismic activity.

The quake was recorded at 8:16 p.m., with seismologists at the University of Patra noting that its epicentre was located some 15 kilometres below the seabed.

The tremor was reportedly felt in much of southwestern Greece, although no damages were reported.

Athens News Agency

Note: The exact epicenter was between Zakynthos and Cephallonia Islands.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 568 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jul 29, 2002 (11:54) * 1 lines 
 
I am certain you were busy yesterday, John. I also posted the notice of the EQ as soon as MPA released it. ANA had not yet carried the story when I went to bed. THIS explains those strange signals you were receiving. I am not surprised.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 569 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Aug  1, 2002 (07:00) * 7 lines 
 
Greece Earthquake

An earthquake, measuring 4.5 on the Richter scale, occurred around 65 kilometers north of
Thessaloniki, between lakes Kerkini and Doirani in the northern prefecture of Kilkis, early yesterday
morning. No injuries or damage were reported. The same area had been devastated by a powerful
6.7-Richter quake in 1931.
http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100016_01/08/2002_19407


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 570 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Aug  1, 2002 (07:16) * 11 lines 
 
Large Earthquake Hits Costa Rica and Panama (Magnitude 6.5)
Thursday 1st August 2002
An earthquake of 6.5 magnitude shook Costa Rica on Tuesday evening,
knocking down three houses and injuring at least two people, Costa Rica's
national seismological service said. The quake, also felt in San Jose, was the
strongest in the nation's south, near the border with Panama, where it also
knocked out electricity in several communities.
The earthquake was also felt in Panama, where communities near to the
border with Costa Rica reported interrupted electricity and telephone service.
There were no injuries reported. (Reuters) More on Costa Rica...
http://www.volcanolive.com/volcanolive.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 571 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Aug  1, 2002 (08:09) * 1 lines 
 
Another spike on John's signal chart and the current 4.5 Eq reported this morning for Greece. I think they are not yet done with the shaking. I pray they are all small and in the sea.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 572 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Thu, Aug  1, 2002 (20:56) * 1 lines 
 
do ya think he could pick up costa rica as a world signal?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 573 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Aug  1, 2002 (21:11) * 2 lines 
 
Absolutely!!! He has picked up more distant places than Costa Rica. His world sensors picked up pre-quake signals - we seem to be awaiting several Huge earthquakes world wide!



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 574 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Aug  1, 2002 (21:23) * 12 lines 
 
Large Earthquake Hits Costa Rica and Panama (Magnitude 6.5)

Thursday 1st August 2002
An earthquake of 6.5 magnitude shook Costa Rica on Tuesday evening,
knocking down three houses and injuring at least two people, Costa Rica's
national seismological service said. The quake, also felt in San Jose, was the
strongest in the nation's south, near the border with Panama, where it also
knocked out electricity in several communities.
The earthquake was also felt in Panama, where communities near to the
border with Costa Rica reported interrupted electricity and telephone
service. There were no injuries reported. (Reuters) More on Costa Rica...



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 575 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug  5, 2002 (17:03) * 7 lines 
 
Greece - Earthquake

A moderate undersea quake, measuring 4.4 on the Richter scale, occurred in the Ionian Sea off the
east coast of Zakynthos late on Friday, seismologists said on Saturday. No injuries or damage were
reported.

http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100014_05/08/2002_19543


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 576 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Aug  7, 2002 (21:56) * 3 lines 
 
I was noticing the graph of 24 hour signals for Greece. They are increasing again after last week's 4.4 EQ which I was unable to post before it was taken off the source site. I would not be surprised to find mention of the next small (one always hopes) quake somewhere in the area of Greece.

Be safe, John!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 577 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Aug  7, 2002 (22:27) * 10 lines 
 
Finally I find what I was looking for...

Greece Earthquake

An earthquake, measuring 4.5 on the Richter scale, occurred around 65 kilometers north of
Thessaloniki, between lakes Kerkini and Doirani in the northern prefecture of Kilkis, early yesterday
morning. No injuries or damage were reported. The same area had been devastated by a powerful
6.7-Richter quake in 1931.

http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100016_01/08/2002_19407


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 578 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Aug  7, 2002 (22:35) * 139 lines 
 
The following article is old (1999) but interesting:

Greece is cracking 'like glass'

Threat in earthquake hotspot drives
old Aegean enemies together

Helena Smith in Athens
Sunday September 12, 1999
The Observer

Greece, which will host the 2004 Olympic
Games, has become a hothouse of
seismic activity with the bedrock beneath
the country - and earthquake-prone
Turkey - splintering like glass.

Scientists say the neighbours' killer
tremors, only three weeks apart, show
that both are located in one of the world's
most unstable earthquake zones.

`It's like a crack in a piece of glass,' says
James Jackson, of the Earth Sciences
department at Cambridge University. `If
you're moving a crack then you put all the
stress at the end of it and it makes the
next bit more likely to break.'

The discovery of a hitherto unknown
faultline near Athens last week has
highlighted the potential for disaster in the
Eastern Mediterranean basin - a
geological impact point where three
continental plates converge, overlap and
grind together.

The quake, which jolted many Athenians
from their afternoon siesta on Tuesday
afternoon, left 98 dead and at least 50,000
homeless. Authorities say it is likely to
change the face of Athens following
claims that thousands of damaged
buildings, including neo-classical
treasures, will have to be demolished.

`It didn't only shock us but the entire
scientific community,' said Antonis
Matsos at the Society of Greek
Cartographers. `We're still trying to
understand what fault provoked it. There
are dozens of faults in the region but we
never thought any of them would be
activated. This earthquake was certainly
not expected.'

Seismologists have spent decades
investigating Europe's most destructive
seismic hotspot. Since 1964 an
astounding 20,000 quakes have hit
Greece - particularly the Ionian region
much beloved by the British.

Tuesday's quake in Greece had its
epicentre on the slopes of Mount
Parnassus, 12 miles north of Athens. The
epicentre of the Turkish quake on 17
August was located near the
north-western city of Izmit. The North
Anatolian fault is 500 miles long
compared to the 20-mile fault that
triggered the Greek earthquake.

Some scientists now believe the Athens
tremor, as well as another two in northern
Greece on Thursday, may have been
linked to the Turkish quake. Although
around 150 times more powerful, the force
of the Turkish quake - which killed more
than 15,000 people - was such that it
created a 100-kilometre surface rupture
across the quake zone. That, say Greek
seismologists, has had a formidable effect
on seismic activity in the entire Eastern
Mediterranean basin.

`Anatolia was pushed, very suddenly,
further into the Aegean,' said Vassilis
Papazahos, an earthquake expert. `It has,
as a result, affected all of the
Mediterranean region where we have long
known that a strong quake can stimulate
the wider zone. The earthquakes in
Turkey, Athens and the northern Aegean
are undoubtedly interconnected.'

Other seismologists disagree, however.
They point out that the two earthquakes
were very different. The Turkish quake was
of a type which occurs when two
stretches of rock, deep underground, are
being pulled in opposite directions and
eventually slip, releasing all their energy.

By contrast, the Athens quake was
caused by two sections of underground
rock resting against each other. One
drops down, releasing energy - with
destructive results.

Scientists say the incidents are indicative
of heightened earthquake activity
stretching from Iran to Italy. Experts say
that since 1939, when it sparked a quake
that killed 33,000 people in eastern
Turkey, the North Anatolian fault has been
moving eastwards relentlessly. It now
affects the North Aegean fault under the
sea separating Greece and Turkey,
according to some academics.

Until now research on the extent of the
overlap has always been hampered by
political tensions between the two
countries. Last week, both Greek and
Turkish scientists said the rapprochement
between the two countries in the wake of
the recent quakes should be used to
investigate the relationship between the
faultlines in the region.

`If the scientists of the two countries work
together by benefiting from the
atmosphere of friendship, significant
research can be made in the Aegean
Sea,' said Professor Naci Gorur, Dean of
the Istabul Technical University.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/quaketurkey/Story/0,2763,201829,00.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 579 of 639: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Aug  8, 2002 (07:24) * 1 lines 
 
The formatting of that looks funny in my telnet session. I'm glad enemies are drawn together, albeit disaster is the motivating factor.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 580 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Aug  8, 2002 (14:09) * 7 lines 
 
The formatting for that article looks funny no matter what I did to it.

John has had people from Greece's formally hostile neighbor, Turkey offer to assist him in research. I think no matter how different your culture, Science will find a way to get past that and to what is really important. It is the same with art and music. Truth is truth. That is also why I avoid politics and religion here as much as possible.

I have heard from Sikander that his absence is due to malfunctioning of his computer and appalling service on behalf of the computer repair people. He was kind enough to email me of the difficulty because he knew how anxious I would be for his well-being. I was!

John is also busy. I hug them both to enable the absence to be less painful.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 581 of 639: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Aug  8, 2002 (14:48) * 1 lines 
 
Find out the details, maybe we can offer suggestions on how to fix it.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 582 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Aug  8, 2002 (15:20) * 1 lines 
 
Alas, when last I talked to Sikander (his only computer is a second hand one. Remember the one you crashed and was impossible to salvage?!) and he cannot even find the owner of the computer repair store. They seem to have locked up with his computer and taken a long vacation. I'll let you know when I hear from him , but I suspect that will happen when and if his computer is back online.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 583 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Aug 14, 2002 (04:34) * 27 lines 
 
Earthquake early warnings show promise

A clever computer system tested in Taiwan can give people as much as 25 seconds warning of an impending earthquake. This may not seem very long, but it is enough time for automated emergency systems to stop trains, shut down gas lines or tell surgeons to stop their work.

"This could be a 911 emergency call for earthquakes," says Ta-Liang Teng of the Southern California Earthquake Center at the University of Southern California.

When an earthquake strikes, waves radiate out from the epicentre at about 4 to 6 kilometres per second. Most tremors will not be strongly felt more than 160 kilometres away from the epicentre, giving a 40 second window to warn people on the outskirts of the quake zone of a coming shock.

Many earthquake-prone areas, like California and Japan, already have systems in place to relay information from seismometers near the epicentre of a quake out to surrounding areas. But these systems react slowly because they do not have enough detectors. They usually pick up the fast-moving pressure waves of a quake, but do not have time to analyse the slower shear waves. The latter can help pin down how destructive the quake will be, which is critical to deciding what action to take.

Information overload
Taiwan, however, has one of the densest networks of seismographs on Earth. There, the problem was on overload of information to analyse within the 40 second window. So Teng and colleague Yih-Min Wu devised a computer program that automatically picks a dozen key seismograph stations from within 60 kilometres of a quake's epicentre. By analysing that data alone, the detection and processing time is reduced to under the 40 second limit.

In a trial run, they analysed 54 quakes between December 2000 and June 2001, and managed to send out information about them within 14 to 41 seconds. For a quake in the same location as the 1999 Chi-Chi quake, which killed more than 2000 people, they say this system could have provided a Taipei with more than 20 seconds of warning

The system still has a central "blind spot," the researchers note, since the quake will travel faster than the warning system in areas within 50 kilometres of the epicentre.

In Japan, the detection of fast-moving pressure waves is already used to stop bullet trains when a quake is on the way. Now researchers there are investigating a system like Teng's that will give more accurate warnings.

The Japan Meteorological Agency and the Railway Technical Research Institute say a network of 180 seismic sensors should give them plenty of warning. They hope to have a system in use towards the end of 2003.

Journal reference: Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (vol 92, p 2008)

Nicola Jones

Source: NewScientist.com news service



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 584 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Aug 14, 2002 (04:48) * 32 lines 
 
Temperature rises hint at earthquake prediction

Subtle signals from within the Earth might one day warn of an upcoming earthquake, say NASA scientists who think they can explain why temperature rises appear to precede tremors. The idea could also explain the weird pre-quake behavior of weather, radio transmissions, animals and even people.

A weather satellite could detect these signals, according to Friedemann Freund and Dmitri Ouzounov at the NASA Ames Research Center in California, making it easy to conduct widespread forecasts. But many seismologists believe predicting individual earthquakes well enough to permit a planned evacuation is unrealistic.

Freund and Ouzounov's work stems from previous observations that earthquakes are sometimes accompanied by disruptions in radio transmissions in the ionosphere, the region of the atmosphere that begins about 90 kilometres above Earth. But no one could explain why.

"Without proof that there is a cause and effect relationship, most geologists have dismissed the phenomenon as a coincidence," says David Jackson of the Southern California Earthquake Center.

Semiconductor action
However Freund thinks he has figured out how it works. Earthquakes begin several kilometres below the surface and electromagnetic waves cannot travel far through dense rocks. But, in 2000, Freund showed that compressing a rock can lead to positive charges inside. These can form a charged region of rock that migrates to the surface at the rate of about 100 to 300 metres per second, where it can ionise the air - possibly explaining strange pre-quake phenomena sometimes reported.

A positive charge near the surface would draw negatively charged atmospheric particles closer to the Earth and Freund and Ouzounov think the combining of the charged particles releases infrared radiation. They believe they can detect this IR signal via weather satellites about two to five days before a quake happens.

The pair examined data from a NASA satellite called MODIS for the days preceding the 26 January 2001 earthquake in Gujarat, India, and found that the temperature rose 2 to 5 °C in the days preceding the quake.

Heat spike
Crucially, however, Freund and Ouzounov have yet to prove that these temperature increases are due to an increased IR signal. To try to do this, they are searching through the data from the 36 different wavelength bands (16 infrared and 20 visible) that the MODIS satellite monitors.

Freund has also yet to study the background variability of temperature in Gujarat, and argues that the work is promising, but preliminary.

Thomas Jordan, at the Southern California Earthquake Center, says that if there was a clear heat spike, people would have noticed it years ago, and adds that previous satellite studies have been inconsistent.

The NASA pair have also only worked out a mechanism for producing this signal for earthquakes where plates collide head on, not where they slide past each other. Seismologist Jackson says: "In order to make this idea useful, one would need to observe it at several earthquakes".

The new work was presented at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.

Catherine Zandonella

Source: NewScientist.com news service



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 585 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Aug 15, 2002 (12:45) * 1 lines 
 
Very Interesting, but not as significant as your basic research, John. However, any information forewarning of an impending EQ is very good news, indeed. Turn off the gas (I do not use gas for this reason) and get to the strongest place in your house (away from the three walls of plate glass windows in my living room!) is more than enough to save many lives and avoid injuries. Grab those shoes with strong soles, too. You will need them to walk over all that broken glass !


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 586 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug 16, 2002 (21:49) * 3 lines 
 
If greece has not had an earthquake yet, I predict one in the immediate future. Check John's signals. He will again be the media's favorite person.

http://www.spring.net/geo/JohnVolos/Public/pages/research/invite/inviationGB.htm


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 587 of 639: George Ghionis  (Geocoast) * Sat, Aug 17, 2002 (11:15) * 3 lines 
 
Marcia, you are probably right. The amplitude of John's signals is increased for quite some time now without a significant EQ, while at least a couple of tidal maxima and minima have passed. The amplitude decreased a little after each "danger window", only to increase again towards the next "danger window".
There are at least three areas of Greece with frequent seismic activity during the last month. The question is, do most of the signals come from a certain area or is the intensity vector of the electrical field varying significantly with time?
John, I think it would be very helpful for anyone visiting your pages, if you could post a daily graph of the polar distribution of the electrical field intensity vector.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 588 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Aug 18, 2002 (01:09) * 16 lines 
 
Hi Marcia and George.
You are absolutely correct George. But the amplitude of my signals is directly associated with the pressure value at the fault rims. We never see an earthquake if this pressure does not exceed the break limit of the rocks. The distance of the source and the magnitude of the expected EQ are also strong factors for the value of the amplitude. We found that the amplitude of my signals is approximately proportional to 1/(distance^2.5) and is also proportional to the total energy of the expected EQ(logarithmic relationship with the magnitude of the expected EQ).

Also, I can say (with a small reservation) that the amplitude of my signals has linear association with how strong will be the movement of the ground during the oncoming EQ in my station area.

I update also a map for the last one-week seismic activity in the Greek area. I use the list of the Institute of Geodynamics of Athens for it. Look this map, which is included in our Geo Portal and which shows also the seismic faults of the area:
http://www.spring.net/geo/JohnVolos/Public/pages/research/greek_seismicity_gb.htm



It is good idea for scientists to share the azimuth direction of my signals but it is not good consultant for the people that live to that areas. I have seeing extreme panic reactions in the past. On May 1985, I have seeing a whole city (Volos) in the streets when the local prefecture was testing the alertness of service for a hypothetical EQ alert. I was known that none EQ will become but none was believe me. A good friend was overhanging me that he will hurt me if they were lies that I was telling him!

I have also an additional reason. I don’t want throw oil on the flames of war between seismologists in Greece. If someone scientist needs my signals for personal analysis I can post to him the part on which he is interested. But I must confide him.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 589 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Aug 18, 2002 (15:54) * 1 lines 
 
How extraordinarily difficult it must be to know your research is giving you important informantion, then to have it misused, abused or cause friends to threaten you. I am most distressed. Perhaps I did not fully understand your quandry before the post above. Little wonder no one wants to be responsible for telling the public what they need to know. They do not THINK!!! My sympathies, John. Your work is worthy of recognition. Their resonse to it is NOT.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 590 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Aug 20, 2002 (20:17) * 7 lines 
 
EARTHQUAKE - Cretan town shaken

A mild earthquake that registered 4.5 on the Richter scale hit the town of Ierapetra in southeastern
Crete at 3.25 p.m. yesterday. No damage or injuries were reported.
http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100018_20/08/2002_19958

See? I told you!!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 591 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Aug 20, 2002 (21:11) * 1 lines 
 
John's world quake signals were strange but they did not lie. Look at Geo 26 for the evidence.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 592 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Aug 25, 2002 (18:04) * 34 lines 
 
Scientists plan to blow up fault line to study earthquake zone

Scientists plan to trigger a series of explosions across a fault
line in Japan to learn more about a potentially devastating
earthquake zone.

Experts from the University of Tokyo's Earthquake Research
Institute will pack 10 underground sites with 500 kilogrammes
of dynamite and detonate them in sequence.

They hope to map danger spots in the fault line by measuring
the vibrations of the explosions as they bounce off rock 30
miles beneath the surface.

Project leader Takaya Iwasaki said: "This is a very dangerous
area. Our experiment will provide information that is vitally
important in helping save lives."

Researchers say the test won't trigger a real earthquake, but
anyone standing within a kilometre of the area will be able to
feel the ground tremble.

The test, due to take place next Thursday and Friday, will focus
on the Philippine Sea plate and a frontier jutting from the Pacific
Ocean and curling under western Japan.

A major earthquake strikes that region every 100 to 200 years.
The researchers believe the fault line they're testing was linked
to the 1995 earthquake in Kobe that killed more than 5,000
people.

The team is using 1,200 seismographs borrowed from
America. A boat crew will also measure vibrations in the sea.
http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_656048.html?menu=news.scienceanddiscovery.naturalworld


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 593 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Sep  6, 2002 (00:39) * 8 lines 
 
(This is also posted in topic 26.)

A strong earthquake became in 01:19, local time, and its magnitude was 5.4R, as the Geodynamic Institute of National Observatory of Athens announced it. The epicentre is located in the sea, south of Island Skyros and eastward of Evia, 120 kilometres of northeast of Athens.

See also my daily updated pre-earthquake signals in Geo’s Special Table of Contents.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 594 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Sep  6, 2002 (08:19) * 10 lines 
 
Here is the announcement of the Geodynamic Institute of the National Observatory of Athens in the web, almost 13 hours later!

2002 SEP 5 22 19 51.5 38.72 24.53 30 4.7

Find the map of the event area HERE

Was 4.7ML + 0.5 = 5.2Ms finally. I wonder if it was the main EQ or pre-earthquake. We will see the next days...

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 595 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Sep  7, 2002 (14:06) * 12 lines 
 
After watching the quakes in the South Pacific lately with a 7.5 foreshock, I do not take anything for granted.However, I sincerely hope that this Crete quake was a solitary event.

Quake measures

Hundreds of families who lost their homes in the September 1999 earthquake that devastated parts of
Athens are still living in ostensibly temporary, unsuitable accommodation due to government
complacency, the central office of the Greek Communist Party (KKE) charged yesterday. Today is the
third anniversary of the quake in which 143 people died. State compensation for damage and
relocations was “paltry,” KKE claimed. The KKE also berated the government for failing to push through
legislation for the construction of earthquake-resistant infrastructure.

http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100014_07/09/2002_20633


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 596 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Sep  8, 2002 (19:36) * 11 lines 
 
Once the press coverage for an earthquake is gone, everyone assumes things have returned to normal. Not so!

Quake measures

Hundreds of families who lost their homes in the September 1999 earthquake that devastated parts of
Athens are still living in ostensibly temporary, unsuitable accommodation due to government
complacency, the central office of the Greek Communist Party (KKE) charged yesterday. Today is the
third anniversary of the quake in which 143 people died. State compensation for damage and
relocations was “paltry,” KKE claimed. The KKE also berated the government for failing to push through
legislation for the construction of earthquake-resistant infrastructure.
http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100014_07/09/2002_20633


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 597 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Sep 17, 2002 (20:22) * 9 lines 
 
Temporarily, I cannot post by FTP to Geo. My research is continued. You can see my daily updating graphs and the recent seismic activity in Greece if you visit my personal web site, which is:
http://users.otenet.gr/~bm-ohexwb/

We have noticeable high seismic activity in Greece as you can see also below:



John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 598 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Sep 18, 2002 (18:03) * 1 lines 
 
John, Terry said he would fix it. I am assuming he has!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 599 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Sep 18, 2002 (18:49) * 11 lines 
 
If nothing else perhaps the UN can agree to this option:

Anti-quake cooperation

Greece and Turkey’s foreign ministers, in New York for the UN General Assembly, agreed late on
Monday to spearhead a bilateral UN-backed initiative for dealing with natural disasters such as
earthquakes. Foreign Minister George Papandreou said the agreement was the continuation of several
others between Turkey and Greece since the major earthquakes that shook Istanbul and Athens in
August and September 1999 respectively, sparking supportive reactions from each country to its
neighbor.



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 600 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Sep 20, 2002 (22:31) * 23 lines 
 
Italy Quake Damage Hits $500M
Estimate of Quake Damage Hits $500 Million As Aftershocks Continue to Rattle Sicily

PALERMO, Sicily Sept. 10 — A strong earthquake and nearly 250 aftershocks that have rattled Sicily for the past four days have caused an
estimated $500 million in damage, officials said Tuesday.

Palermo Mayor Diego Cammarata gave the preliminary damage assessment during a press conference after government
officials toured the city and surrounding areas, the ANSA news agency said.

The aftershocks continued Tuesday, with a magnitude-4 temblor and a few less powerful ones. No injuries were
reported,but scores of residents poured into the streets in fear, ANSA said.

On Friday, a 5.6-magnitude earthquake hit Sicily the strongest to rattle the island in 20 years damaging dozens of
buildings in Palermo, the island's capital. Two people died of heart attacks.

Among the damaged buildings was the 9th century Palazzo dei Normanni, the seat of the Sicilian parliament, and the
baroque church of St. Ann's.

On Tuesday, a commission of experts began assessing damage to another historic area the Valley of Temples, a complex
of classic Greek temples about 55 miles south of Palermo. The complex, which dates to the 5th century, is considered the
finest grouping of classic Greek temples outside of Greece.

http://printerfriendly.abcnews.com/printerfriendly/Print?fetchFromGLUE=true&GLUEService=ABCNewsCom


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 601 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Sep 20, 2002 (22:35) * 13 lines 
 
EARTHQUAKE OF 3.7 ON THE RICHTER SCALE IN KAVALA

An earthquake measuring 3.7 on the Richter scale was recorded in the
northeastern city of Kavala this morning and its epicenter was located in the
region of Chrisoupolis.

The tremor caused alarm among the region's population. No damages were
recorded.

Thessaloniki's Aristotle University Geophysics Laboratory announced that the
earthquake was recorded at 8:17am and its epicenter was located 160 kilometers
east of the city of Thessaloniki.
http://www.goGreece.com/news/headlines/story.html?id=8491


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 602 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Sep 27, 2002 (19:42) * 13 lines 
 
Earthquakes make life interesting - sometimes too interesting:

EARTHQUAKE CONVICTION
Factory owner gets 18-month jail sentence for manslaughter

The owner of the Athens Fyaloplast plastics factory, which collapsed during the September 1999
earthquake killing his daughter and two employees, was yesterday sentenced to 18 months in jail after
being found guilty of manslaughter through neglect. Panayiotis Kalavrytinos was released after
appealing against the court’s verdict. In May an appeals court had ruled that Kalavrytinos had failed to
oversee necessary repairs to the factory building, which was damaged by an earthquake in 1981 and a
fire in 1995. An original ruling had deemed that the crime fell under the statute of limitations, as the
factory was built in 1971.
http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100018_27/09/2002_21381


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 603 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct  8, 2002 (19:55) * 21 lines 
 
Greece has been having small but significant little earthquakes:

Mild earthquake jolts Rhodes
02/10/2002 09:49:25
A mild earthquake measuring 4.8 on the Richter scale jolted the island
of Rhodes early Wednesday, but no damage was reported.

http://www.hri.org/news/greek/mpab/2002/02-10-05.mpab.html


EARTHQUAKE IN THE ISLAND OF CHIOS

Chios, 5 October 2002 (12:55 UTC+2)

An earthquake measuring 4.5 on the Richter scale rocked the
northeastern Aegean island of Chios at 7.51am today.

The earthquake's epicenter was located at the sea region northeast of
Chios, 216 kilometers east-northeast of Athens.




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 604 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Oct  9, 2002 (05:00) * 3 lines 
 
I must inform you that I interrupted in my co-operation with Dr. Thanassoulas definitively. I continue my research alone. Nothing will change on my results.

John


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 605 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct  9, 2002 (17:06) * 3 lines 
 
Keep doing your research! We need everyone on earth with the knowledge and good conscience to inform us as best they can. You have proven to be the best of the lot, John. You are reliable and back up your thoughts with data. We NEED you!!

*HUGS*



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 606 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Oct 23, 2002 (03:13) * 18 lines 
 
Hi all,
Now you can do your own correlation between tidal forces and seismicity!
You can colligate the change of gravity with seismicity, using the following graph. It is also updated every day.




On the above graph:
-White-pink bars shows the calculated medium daily tidal change of gravity.

-Red solid bars show the recorded from NOA (National Geodynamic Institute of Athens) total daily seismic activity.
(It is the total released energy in one day, expressed as one seism with magnitude on the ML scale).

According to Dr's Thanassoulas theory, big seisms occurring at the day where is the upper peak of the tidal curve, at the day of the lower peak of the tidal curve, plus or minus one day. Additionally, significant seism occurs a few days afterwards significant electrical signals from the ground.
Both parts of this theory were proved completely with the significant EQ's in the wide Greek area and the electrical signals that were recorded in my station during the last two years (2001 and 2002).

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 607 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct 25, 2002 (13:43) * 1 lines 
 
You have a wonderful graphic, John. Not only is it easy to understand, it is also aesthetic. I can even imagine that I can understand what you are saying. I am more than delighted that you are now independent in your research.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 608 of 639: Lucie  (alyeska) * Fri, Oct 25, 2002 (21:29) * 1 lines 
 
Another quake in Alaska. 6.7. They are so used to then that they hardly notice.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 609 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 29, 2002 (13:34) * 1 lines 
 
This is true for Hawaii, also. Earthquakes unless they are HUGE are mostly ignored.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 610 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Nov  5, 2002 (05:56) * 11 lines 
 
Tectonic monitoring: The fall and rise of Los Angeles
SCIGN (the Southern California Integrated GPS Network, on www.scign.org) is an array of Global Positioning System stations distributed mainly around greater Los Angeles to assess earthquake risk in the region. But an unexpected side effect of the voracious thirst of the Los Angeles conurbation may mean that it will be difficult for SCIGN to fulfil that role. Satellite radar images and GPS observations reveal that a large portion of the city of Santa Ana sinking by 12 mm per year and large regions of metropolitan Los Angeles are periodically rising and falling by up to 11 cm every year.


Image and more information from US Geological Survey


This 'breathing' of the Earth's surface is not tectonic in origin, but is caused by the widespread pumping and recharge of groundwater, the aquifer reacting like a giant sponge that is annually drenched and drained. And as these variations dwarf the signal expected from blind thrust faults that threaten the region, attempts to track tectonic squeezing may be more difficult than originally thought.

Source: NATURE



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 611 of 639: Julie  (cascadeclimber) * Tue, Nov  5, 2002 (11:34) * 1 lines 
 
Santa Ana may be sinking huh? Well that figures. Almost all the cities around us are at risk for liquidation if we had a strong enough quake. Now at least I can say Santa Ana is not just dangerous because of street gangs and violence, lol.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 612 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Nov 17, 2002 (23:23) * 5 lines 
 
Major Earthquake Hits Russia
The following is a release by the United States Geological Survey, National Earthquake Information Center:
A major earthquake occurred about 170 miles (275 km) ese of Poronaysk, Russia at 9:53 PM MST today, Nov 16, 2002 (Nov 17 at 2:53 PM local time in Russia).
A MAGNITUDE OF 7.5 WAS COMPUTED FOR THIS EARTHQUAKE.



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 613 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Nov 18, 2002 (17:42) * 1 lines 
 
Fascinating about the "breathing" of the earth. I had heard only briefly about such things. Certainly this is the first indication of a reason for the mechanics involved. John, You are the BEST!!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 614 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Nov 18, 2002 (18:56) * 6 lines 
 
Corfu quake

An undersea quake, measuring 4.8 on the Richter scale, occurred yesterday evening off the
northwestern coast of the Ionian island of Corfu. No damage or injuries were reported.

http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100014_18/11/2002_23233


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 615 of 639: Julie  (cascadeclimber) * Wed, Nov 20, 2002 (12:31) * 5 lines 
 
There was a chilling article in both the L.A Times and the Orange County Register a few days ago. It gave me the shivers when I read it. Scientists have found evidence of 14 historic earthquakes in Wrightwood, California all being 7.5 M or above. Since the year 534, the quakes have occured every 105 years. The last one was in 1857..the Fort Tejon quake. Just do the math...we are way over due.

And of course the fault I am talking about is the infamous San Andreas Fault, which cuts right through Wrightwood. 1857 was the last time that our section of the SAF ruptured. There is a 30% chance that the quake will be above a 7.5 M. There is about 13 million people in this geographical location. A quake that big would cause an estimated $50 billion in damages and a few thousand dead.

So technically we are just sitting on a ticking time bomb here. I am not sure which I should be more worried about...the SAF, the Newport Ingullwood Fault, or some of the other little nasties. Every fault is a ticking time bomb in California. But I guess some more than others. I hope I am out of California by the time that happens. And if not...I hope we pull through it.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 616 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 22, 2002 (17:41) * 1 lines 
 
Good Grief. Julie, you must be psychic. You manage to find things to worry me further when I am traveling back to Hawaii via California. *sigh* This is not my best lifetime!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 617 of 639: Julie  (cascadeclimber) * Mon, Dec  2, 2002 (12:50) * 3 lines 
 
I noticed there has been some interesting swarms of earthquakes in Alaska this past week. Check this out....
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/recenteqsUS/Maps/AK10/60.70.-150.-130_eqs.html



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 618 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec  8, 2002 (19:26) * 1 lines 
 
I think Lucie mentioned this. I wonder what is becoming restless. Mauna Loa continues to have migration of magma from the deep chamber to the shallow magma chamber. Now we watch for harmonic tremors to start.It might be nice to see one more little eruption of that hugest mountain on earth before I leave Hawaii.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 619 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Jan  5, 2003 (10:56) * 9 lines 
 
Hi all,
This is for your information and for test too.



This graph is the calculated tidal gravity variations for this month and for my station point on Earth. You can see the daily min and max values.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 620 of 639: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Jan  5, 2003 (11:11) * 3 lines 
 
I set up a new tsatsvol account for you John, please email terry@spring.net for details. Also one for Marci, Julie, etc.

The new server is cooking along pretty fast.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 621 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jan  5, 2003 (23:51) * 1 lines 
 
Thank you, John. HUGS!!! I noted it was missing from your website. Thank you Terry for setting us up with accounts. We'll make it count!!!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 622 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jan 18, 2003 (12:49) * 9 lines 
 
ILEIA QUAKE - Third tremor in a day 'not unusual'

A 4.2-magnitude earthquake early yesterday morning, the third tremor to strike the port of Kyllini in the
western Peloponnesian Ileia prefecture in 24 hours, is «not unusual» and no cause for alarm,
seismologists said. No injuries or damage were reported. Two earthquakes, measuring 4.5 and 4.4 on
the Richter scale, rocked Kyllini on Thursday.

http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100025_18/01/2003_25386



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 623 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 21, 2003 (20:52) * 30 lines 
 
one of John's great quakes:

A magnitude 7.3 earthquake IN COLIMA, MEXICO has occurred at:
18.81N 103.89W Depth 33km Wed Jan 22 02:06:35 2003 UTC

Time: Universal Time (UTC) Wed Jan 22 02:06:35 2003
Time Near Epicenter Tue Jan 21 20:06:35 2003
Eastern Standard Time (EST) Tue Jan 21 21:06:35 2003
Central Standard Time (CST) Tue Jan 21 20:06:35 2003
Mountain Standard Time (MST) Tue Jan 21 19:06:35 2003
Pacific Standard Time (PST) Tue Jan 21 18:06:35 2003
Alaska Standard Time (AST) Tue Jan 21 17:06:35 2003
Hawaii Standard Time (HST) Tue Jan 21 16:06:35 2003

Location with respect to nearby cities:
30 miles (50 km) ESE of Manzanillo, Colima, Mexico (pop 94,000)
30 miles (50 km) SSW of Colima, Colima, Mexico (pop 119,000)
65 miles (105 km) SSW of Ciudad Guzman, Jalisco, Mexico (pop 85,000)
310 miles (500 km) W of MEXICO CITY, D.F., Mexico

Flinn-Engdahl Region Number = 056
For the definition of Flinn-Engdahl regions, see:
http://neic.usgs.gov/neis/epic/fer_explain.html .

For additional information and subsequent updates, including
associated information and maps please consult the following
web page, which will be available shortly:
http://neic.usgs.gov/neis/bulletin/neic_phac.html .




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 624 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 21, 2003 (21:01) * 20 lines 
 
and another:

Date-Time
2003 01 20 08:43:06 UTC

Location
10.48S 160.74E
Depth
33.0 kilometers
Magnitude
7.3
Region
SOLOMON ISLANDS
Reference
80 miles (130 km) W of Kira Kira, Solomon
Islands
90 miles (140 km) SE of HONIARA, Solomon
Islands
120 miles (190 km) S of Auki, Solomon Islands
http://www.successunlimited.co.uk/stress/ptsd.htm#DSM-IV Diagnostic criteria


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 625 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 21, 2003 (21:12) * 3 lines 
 
Wrong link on the above

http://neic.usgs.gov/neis/bulletin/neic_pfah.html


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 626 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar  1, 2003 (07:20) * 2 lines 
 
John has made the special earthquake pages look beautiful.
http://www.spring.net/geo/JohnVolos/Public/pages/inviation.htm


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 627 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar  1, 2003 (07:25) * 1 lines 
 
John, you have had a LOT of earthquakes lately. Anything happening to cause this?


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 628 of 639: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Mar  2, 2003 (10:03) * 1 lines 
 
heard on the news last week that scientists believe there is a connection between EQ's at one place triggering EQ's at another....


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 629 of 639: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Mar  3, 2003 (08:04) * 5 lines 
 
Hi Marcia and All,
I think that we must wait a significant EQ in Greece. I think also, that it is not near to me.

John



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 630 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  7, 2003 (09:14) * 1 lines 
 
John! Welcome back. I am more than happy to hear that you think your significant earthquake will not be in your vicinity. That means it will be in the volcanic arc or the mountains to the north. I always pray that it is not in populated areas. Deep ocean would be nice providing that it does not trigger a tsunami. I believe you said Greece is not prone to having them unless another Thera occurs.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 631 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 10, 2003 (15:30) * 3 lines 
 
Quake Prediction Crackdown
Last month a Web site, GeoForecaster.com, began offering earthquake predictions to subscribers. Within a week, scientists' complaints prompted a state agency to accuse the firm of practicing without a license. These days, earthquake predictors, no matter what their credentials, provoke an instant scientific allergic reaction--with good reason.
http://geology.about.com/library/weekly/aa030903a.htm


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 632 of 639: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Mar 30, 2003 (11:22) * 31 lines 
 
Here's what one web site claims:

Recently some Earthquake Predictions have been very accurate on the internet.
One accurate predictor claims that he is a prophet. One of his recent hits, had a 625 to 1 probability of occuring. It happened as he stated, near Hanukkah a quake over 6.6 struck near Pentacost Island, within almost 100 miles of it! It occurred 4 days after Hanukkah.

The predition was posted to News Groups before it occurred! It can be verified through www.dejanews.com.

Had the quake struck that close exactly on Hanukkah, the probability would have been 5000 to 1. Since it occurred +/- 4 days, it became a 625 to 1 probability, based on the 37 year record of the USGS for quakes over 6.6 that close to Pentacost Island!

Another predictor who uses Astrology, is claiming great success also. When analyzed by a Seismology Professor, his predictions had a 57% chance of probability.

We've started a Quake Prediction Contest to try to measure their claims. The prophet continues to name dates and locations for events over 6.6.

Such events occur on average about 20 times a year.

The other predictor who is an astrologer, refuses to give dates for events over 6.6. He merely says when quakes over 6.0 will occur. He uses 3 day windows. A quake over 6.0 (over 100 occur on average each year) has a 57% probability of occuring in any 3 day window according to a respected seismology professor.

He has given some probabilities for events the prophet claim in the future. They have almost a 0% chance of probability according to this same professor! Or about a 5000 to 1 shot as did his Hanukkah prediction.

We will be tracking them here!

The same predictor that showed accurate results for Hanukkah, made only two other quake predictions for 1997. Both on radio shows. Both hit. One was for a 5.0 quake near Seattle in June. A 4.9 struck within 50 miles of Seattle ONE DAY from when he stated!

A quake over 6.0 killed thousands in May, a couple of days from when he stated on another radio show. Another quake over 6.0 did occur the exact day as he stated on the show!

If you think you can predict quakes over 6.6, enter our contest. If you hit it exactly as you predict, we will reward you $1,000.00.



http://www.theeunderground.net/quakes/index.shtml



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 633 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr  1, 2003 (00:13) * 1 lines 
 
On Yahoo there is a group who count toothaches, falling refrigerator magnets and other esoterica to "predice" earthquakes. They are fools. Geo has the only real research going on thanks to John of Greece.


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 634 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May 22, 2003 (21:24) * 19 lines 
 
Algeria Earthquake Death Toll Nears 1,100
The Associated Press
May 22 2003 7:59PM

ROUIBA, Algeria (AP) - Rescuers clawed by hand through rubble as stunned and weeping survivors wandered through collapsed buildings Thursday, after Algeria's worst earthquake in two decades killed nearly 1,100 people, injured thousands and left thousands more homeless.

Officials feared the death toll would increase with the search for bodies and survivors, helped by emergency teams from Europe and Asia that rushed to this North African country of 30 million after Wednesday night's disaster.

Entire families were killed in the 6.8-magnitude quake, which was strongest about 60 miles east of the capital Algiers. Injured people overflowed hospitals. Rescuers calling to any survivors under the wreckage occasionally heard voices answer back.

``The building shook like a ship. I sheltered with my daughters in a door-frame. That's why we're still alive,'' said Fatma Ferhani, 70, of Rouiba, a town 13 miles east of Algiers and near the epicenter.

Entire blocks lay in ruins. Mechanical diggers lifted away rubble as soldiers and civilians used their hands to scoop up small chunks of debris or probe through dirt for victims.

Women cried out the names of their dead or injured children, wails that mingled with the screams of ambulance sirens. Bodies piled at the town morgue were wrapped in blankets or plastic bags.

When the quake hit, ``People yelled, `God is Great!''' said resident Hakim Derradji. ``It was horrible, it was like we had been bombed.''

more... http://my.aol.com/news/news_story.psp?type=1&cat=0600&id=0305221959251603


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 635 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May 22, 2003 (21:26) * 1 lines 
 
I have been notified of the many strong aftershocks. It must be terrifying as they continue to adjust with the settling of the faults. Surely this one was foreseen by John's research. How sad that it killed so many!


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 636 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May 27, 2003 (00:33) * 15 lines 
 
Aftershocks Rattle NE Japan After Quake Injures 100
Reuters
May 26 2003 10:19PM

SENDAI, Japan (Reuters) - Aftershocks rattled northeastern Japan on Tuesday, a day after a powerful earthquake, but officials said it was not the huge quake which experts say is due to hit the region within a few years.

The government said 104 people were injured but no deaths resulted from the earthquake, which struck early Monday evening and measured 7.0 on the Richter scale, rocking buildings as far away as Tokyo about 280 miles to the south.

"This was an extremely large-scale earthquake, but for its scale, the damage and injuries were quite small. That's something to be thankful for," said Shiro Asano, governor of Miyagi Prefecture, close to the center of the tremor.

Damage was limited and there was no tsunami, or giant wave, because the quake's focus, 12 miles off the east coast, was deep at 44 miles below the surface.

It hit a mostly agricultural area that has several large cities and some high-tech factories.

more... http://my.aol.com/news/news_story.psp?type=1&cat=0600&id=03052622192514909


 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 637 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun 22, 2003 (21:21) * 21 lines 
 
Has anyone heard of damage or death due to the following earthquake report?

A magnitude 7.0 earthquake IN AMAZONAS, BRAZIL has occurred at:
7.51S 71.64W Depth 555km Fri Jun 20 06:19:38 2003 UTC

Time: Universal Time (UTC) Fri Jun 20 06:19:38 2003
Time Near Epicenter Fri Jun 20 02:19:38 2003
Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) Fri Jun 20 02:19:38 2003
Central Daylight Time (CDT) Fri Jun 20 01:19:38 2003
Mountain Daylight Time (MDT) Fri Jun 20 00:19:38 2003
Pacific Daylight Time (PDT) Thu Jun 19 23:19:38 2003
Alaska Daylight Time (ADT) Thu Jun 19 22:19:38 2003
Hawaii Standard Time (HST) Thu Jun 19 20:19:38 2003

Location with respect to nearby cities:
110 km (70 miles) E of Cruzeiro do Sul, Brazil (pop N/A)
335 km (205 miles) ENE of Pucallpa, Peru
410 km (255 miles) SSW of Leticia, Colombia
2730 km (1700 miles) WNW of BRASILIA, Brazil




 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 638 of 639: geomancer (cfadm) * Fri, Jul 14, 2006 (13:35) * 6 lines 
 
http://tsunamihelp.blogspot.com/ is the tsunami blog.

ust a heads-up that the World Wide Help Group is blogging about the floods in Suriname at http://worldwidehelp.blogspot.com/.

Information from and about Suriname in general, and the flood situation in particular would be most appreciated. As would information about aid efforts, whether official, NGO-led or ad-hoc, national or international. Mail us at suriname[AT]worldwidehelp[DOT]info.



 Topic 9 of 99 [Geo]: Seismology: Earthquakes - The Science and Updates on Current Activity
 Response 639 of 639: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 22, 2006 (15:34) * 1 lines 
 
Poor Indonesia. There have been two over 7 and many under. They live in the most geologically active place on Earth. Little wonder these events happen so frequently. The earth is a very dynamic place.

Prev topicNext topicHelp

Geo conference Main Menu