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Topic 19 of 56: Baroque and Rococo

Sat, Aug 8, 1998 (05:48) | Riette Walton (riette)




The Baroque style was a new direction in art that emerged in Rome at the turn of the 17tth century. The word
'Baroque' is originally a Portuguese word meaning rough or irregularly shaped - and was thus not a
complimentary term at the time to apply to art. This new art was committed both to geniune emotion and to
imaginatively ornamental works, and came as a reaction to the artificiality of 16th century art. Human drama
became a vital part of paintings, and featured rich colour combinations.

The Rococo style developed as a successor to the Baroque, not only in arts, but also including architecture,
music, and literature. The emphasis was on lightness, decorations, and elegance. The Rococo style emerged
in Paris in the early 18th century, and from there spread to the rest of Europe.

64 responses total.

 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 1 of 64: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Aug  9, 1998 (07:18) * 17 lines 
 

From Encarta:

Rococo Style, style of 18th-century painting and decoration characterized
by lightness, delicacy, and elaborate ornamentation. The rococo period
corresponded roughly to the reign of King Louis XV of France (1715-1774).
The style began with the interior architectural work of French designer
Pierre Lepautre and with the paintings of French artist Jean-Antoine
Watteau.

Rococo is characterized by architectural decoration based on arabesques,
shells, elaborate curves, and asymmetry; iridescent pastel colors; and, in
painting, light-hearted subject matter. Rococo artisans included French
painters François Boucher and Jean Honoré Fragonard, and Flemish-born
Bavarian architect and designer François de Cuvilliés. From France, the
style spread to other countries, where it was grafted onto baroque modes.



 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 2 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Aug  9, 1998 (08:58) * 5 lines 
 

And the first painter whose work I'd like to post here (and will do hopefully by Wednesday) is Caravaggio.
He was the first and probably the greatest painter to be affected by the scorn with which the art
establishment of the 19th century treated Baroque painting.



 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 3 of 64: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Aug  9, 1998 (11:54) * 7 lines 
 

can't wait to see it....you know, i don't know much (obviously) about the different
artistic periods...guess i go more with feeling about paintings or other artwork
that i fall in love with. this doesn't fit in this topic, probably, but i just
love the sculptures of Venus and David (and no, not because they're both naked).
Just something about them that draws my attention.



 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 4 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Aug  9, 1998 (12:58) * 5 lines 
 

Oh, if you keep coming back you'll soon be able to tell more or less the differences between art from
different periods. But don't worry about it - it is the feeling that counts. And I'll try and find a photo
of your Venus and David to post in here.



 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 5 of 64: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Aug  9, 1998 (14:30) * 1 lines 
 
woohoo!


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 6 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Aug 10, 1998 (04:59) * 1 lines 
 
whaa-haa!


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 7 of 64: wer  (KitchenManager) * Wed, Aug 12, 1998 (22:18) * 6 lines 
 


The Lute Player
by Caravaggio
94x120cm
c. 1596


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 8 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Aug 13, 1998 (01:18) * 13 lines 
 

I chose this painting to start this topic off with, because it was done by Caravaggio (1571-1610), who was
probably the first great painter to paint in this style. His early works consisted largely of genre
paintings, such as the one above:

A boy, painted with colours so full and rich that he can easily be mistaken for a girl. His beautiful,
girlish face is framed by seductive curls, his hands are cracful, and cracefully playing the curved lute, his
lips are soft and parted - perhaps he is singing? Therefore it is easy to understand why 16th century
viewers found this charm frightnening, decadent. It becomes obvious that its painter neither approve nor
disapproved of this young man: he presents him as he is, and adds an underlying sadnes ; he is a creature
whose favours will fade with time, and whose music will end in a dark room somewhere. The flowers will dry
up, and fruit will rot - just so will the young lute player whither too.



 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 9 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Aug 13, 1998 (01:19) * 1 lines 
 
DAMN. ..... graceful, and gracefully playing the lute, . . . . that should read. Sorry.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 10 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Aug 17, 1998 (07:39) * 9 lines 
 
My next contribution is this one by Orazio Gentileschi (1563-1639).



Orazio Gentileschi
Madonna and Child
early 1600's

Afraid alot of paintings before impressionism are religious. But isn't this one just beautiful?


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 11 of 64: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Aug 17, 1998 (17:44) * 1 lines 
 
it is indeed. and look at the halo around the angel's head, it's so delicate...


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 12 of 64: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Mon, Aug 17, 1998 (18:21) * 1 lines 
 
Mary and Jesus seem so natural in this painting.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 13 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Aug 18, 1998 (01:22) * 3 lines 
 
Very much so. If more religious art, if more people were as touching as this, so without pretence and hipocricy, then perhaps even I might have been saved!




 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 14 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Aug 18, 1998 (05:36) * 12 lines 
 
Now, here is something with a political theme:



Peter Paul Rubens
'The Apotheosis of Henri IV and the Proclamation of the Regency'
c. 1621/25
391cm x 727cm

In other words, a HUGE painting. I find that the vitality and tenderness of Rubens' paintings make for such an unusual combination that it seems almost unlikely that he became such a success as a political artist. But his genius was immense, and this is an excellent example of why he became so successful.
This one is from a series of paintings commissioned by Marie de'Medici, the widowed Queen Mother of France, who needed artistic help in refurbishing and decorating her Luxembourg Palace.
Although he is depicting a historical event, the painting is set in terms of classical myth - that, I think, is what makes his works so enduring and vibrant. I think he could probably make a mountain of art over any political molehill of fact.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 15 of 64: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Wed, Aug 19, 1998 (14:25) * 1 lines 
 
Henri IV will go down in history as the great conciliator--he converted to catholicism (he was protestant) for the sake of keeping France united and preached religious tolerance. (After Marie de Medici kicked Diane de Poitiers out of the chateau in Chenonceau that Henri had given her, I guess she needed help decorating it.)


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 16 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Aug 20, 1998 (11:22) * 10 lines 
 


Peter Paul Rubens
'Union of Earth and Water'
1618
222.5cm x 180.5cm

I suppose that with today's attitude towards fat people Rubens' paintings must be fairly unattractive to alot of people. He was defenitely a great painter of the fair and the fat. And how beautiful his women are!
According to my books Rubens was probably one of the most stable, fortunate artists who ever lived. He was handsome, healthy, well-educated, good-humoured, clever, wealthy, twice married, both times with blissful success, and one of the egreatest and most influential artists ever. And on top of all that he was a thoroughly good person. I find this all very evident in his paintings as well. There is just such a sweetness in his work. People in his paintings tend to look at one another with trust, accep
ance and confidence. Another artist I would have liked to have met.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 17 of 64: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Thu, Aug 20, 1998 (18:27) * 1 lines 
 
I love the detail in this one, the fruit, the skin, the water--it's so meticulous.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 18 of 64: Wolf  (wolf) * Thu, Aug 20, 1998 (21:43) * 2 lines 
 
i like this. look how she looks at him. y'all did notice the rather muscular cat
trying to get a bit of fruit.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 19 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Fri, Aug 21, 1998 (02:07) * 1 lines 
 
Lucky for them it's obviously vegetarian.....


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 20 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Aug 27, 1998 (08:44) * 11 lines 
 
Here's something pretty amazing for you.



Jan Brueghel (1568-1625)
'Allegory of Sight'
1670
Oil on Canvas

Jan was the second of the three sons of Pieter Brueghel (c.1525-69) who was the greatest Netherlandish painter and draughtsman of the 16th century. Jan's specialities were still lifes and landscapes, but he worked in an entirely different spirit from his father - using brilliant colours and mythological figures. His elder brother, Pieter the Younger (1564-1638) is best known for his copies an variants of his father's peasant scenes. His other speciality was scenes of fires, which earned him the nicknam
, 'Hell' Brueghel. Pieter Brueghel III (1589-c.1640) - yeah, I know! - was the lesser artist in the family, and never achieved fame or recognition. Poor bugger.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 21 of 64: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Sun, Aug 30, 1998 (15:47) * 1 lines 
 
This one is so rich with detail, I love it. What are they watching on TV, "Angels Among Us"?


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 22 of 64: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Aug 30, 1998 (20:23) * 1 lines 
 
my goodness, look at all the paintings within the painting!


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 23 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Aug 31, 1998 (01:18) * 3 lines 
 
ha-ha, Autumn! Suppose they had to watch TV by candle light back in those days, since they had no electricity.

It's amazing, isn't it, Wolf? It's painting like this one that make my illusional bubble of artistic skills burst like it never existed in the first place. And each painting within the painting is just overflowing with detail - not just some vague little suggestions in the backgrounds - they're for real!


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 24 of 64: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Aug 31, 1998 (12:22) * 3 lines 
 
exactly, and the subject matter is different too. he just put his whole career
into one piece of work! very clever... (you know, at first, the picture on the
table did look like a laptop!)


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 25 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Aug 31, 1998 (12:36) * 3 lines 
 
Yes, that's just what I thought!!! ha-ha!!

So, how about it, Wolfie. You with your naturalistic skills could do something like that.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 26 of 64: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Aug 31, 1998 (20:35) * 2 lines 
 
i'm not real good with drawing people or animals. i mean, i try, but the stuff
looks funny to me. think i could just paint skies all the time?


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 27 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Sep  1, 1998 (01:01) * 2 lines 
 
Sure, why not!? I just paint figures all the time, and nobody ever seems to wonder where the landscapes are! They ASSUME you can do them, because you call yourself an artist! ha-ha!!! But I'm a stern believer in the one golden rule of Art: paint what you're good at, not what you think you ought to be able to paint. I mean, why concentrate on something one is bad at, when you're GOOD at something else already?
And you're not just good at painting skies, the rest of your landscape was very good as well! I shall post Wer my first ever painting effort - an effort at being a naturalist in painting a studen in Caius College, Cambridge. THe poor guy would by seriously offended if he ever saw it, and it's give you a good laugh!


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 28 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Sep  1, 1998 (01:02) * 1 lines 
 
Damn, sorry for all the mistakes - having a bad flu, and not concentrating so well.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 29 of 64: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Sep  1, 1998 (10:35) * 1 lines 
 
hope you feel better soon!


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 30 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Sep  2, 1998 (01:07) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks, Wolf. I'm okay.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 31 of 64: Ray Lopez (ratthing) * Wed, Sep  2, 1998 (10:16) * 4 lines 
 

i hope so! we can't have our Queen Babe Goddess of the Spring feeling
bad!



 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 32 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Sep  3, 1998 (01:08) * 2 lines 
 
Why, gee, what do ya know?? I feel wonderfully invigorated all of a sudden!
Great to see your bear face here, King Hunk God of the Spring!


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 33 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Sep  7, 1998 (10:35) * 7 lines 
 
San Marco

Canaletto
'Piazza San Marco'
1735-1740

Canaletto was the most famous view painter of the 18th century. I think this painting demonstrates why.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 34 of 64: Wolf  (wolf) * Mon, Sep  7, 1998 (10:45) * 1 lines 
 
wow!


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 35 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Sep  7, 1998 (15:08) * 1 lines 
 
Or wowl! in your case....


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 36 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Sep 16, 1998 (15:11) * 13 lines 
 
I'd like to come back to the first artist whose work I posted in this topic, namely Caravaggio. You know, the painter who painted boys so girlishly that his works were considered to be decadent by the public and other artists alike. Now, his religious paintings were ifen more controversial. A good example is this one:



Caravaggio
'The Death of the Virgin'
1605-06
370cm x 244 cm

This painting really drew down condemnation for its uncompromising realism. The Carmelite priests who commisioned it rejected it in the end, saying it was indecent. There was even a rumour that the model for the Virgin had been a drowned prostitute.

I must say I find it a somewhat disturbing picture too; the way the light almost strikes the corpse's plain face as she lies there, sprawled across the bed with the dirty looking pair of feet sticking out quite unromatically. What is disturbing to me is the way he presents death as an event with a great deal of grief; there is no sense of hope in this painting, just this heavy DEAD feeling. But it's the way it should be, I feel. The poor, aged, worn Virgin he painted makes sense to me, as well as the
grief of the Apostles. I mean, this woman was all they had left of Jesus, right? The woman in the forground, I guess, must be Mary Magdalene. I find her very very poignant - she mourns differently from the Apostles; perhaps she mourns for Maria, and they for Jesus. And unlike most other religious paintings mary does not ascend to Heaven gloriously. She is surrounded by scarlet - perhaps a symbol of her Son's blood. I could go on. Basically I just find it an incredible painting.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 37 of 64: wer  (KitchenManager) * Wed, Sep 16, 1998 (21:25) * 4 lines 
 
are Carmelites not a Catholic order?
the non-ascension thing strikes me as odd, also...
and, I do like the painting
(maybe my Protestant brainwashing is leaking out...)


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 38 of 64: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Wed, Sep 16, 1998 (22:09) * 1 lines 
 
What denomination, wer? (Methodist here)


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 39 of 64: wer  (KitchenManager) * Wed, Sep 16, 1998 (22:15) * 1 lines 
 
Southern Baptist


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 40 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Sep 17, 1998 (01:03) * 3 lines 
 
Oh, THAT's what they call atheists nowadays!!! Just kidding, Wer, though I shouldn't, because I used to be DUTCH REFORMED before becoming a relativist....

Yes, the Carmelites are catholics. And that is, of course, what made the painting so shocking. So I must be a good thing.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 41 of 64: Wolf  (wolf) * Thu, Sep 17, 1998 (15:36) * 2 lines 
 
what is a relativist? (methodist by baptism, but really don't claim any particular
protestant sect)


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 42 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Fri, Sep 18, 1998 (00:54) * 1 lines 
 
I suppose. But I sure don't see myself as a protestant - probably sound like one alot of the time though! More like a person who believes in God, but it's more of a personal thing, and the person doesn't belong to any specific church, protestant or catholic. I figure I've had all the church going I can TAKE as a child. So much so, it turned me into a good atheist for a while - but that's not me either. I need a spiritual life of some sort to be happy, and so now I believe in God as I see Him.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 43 of 64: Wolf  (wolf) * Fri, Sep 18, 1998 (15:26) * 2 lines 
 
no, i don't believe God belongs to any specific church. He is ours and we are His.
there are things in both Catholic and Protestant faiths that i don't agree with.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 44 of 64: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Fri, Sep 18, 1998 (16:59) * 1 lines 
 
What faith does Dutch Reformed most closely resemble?


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 45 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Sep 21, 1998 (21:49) * 1 lines 
 
Oh, Jesus, Autumn, I don't know. But the rightest of right-wing Irish protestant kind of faith is utterly liberal in comparison....


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 46 of 64: Wolf  (wolf) * Tue, Sep 22, 1998 (21:34) * 4 lines 
 
so it's like puritan law or something? all i know is i believe. i really don't
like visiting a catholic church and being told that i cannot have communion. so, what, did Jesus only hang out with the people who "belonged"? i don't think so. and communion
means a great deal to me. i was seriously offended. AND i had gone with my mother
(who is Catholic) and SHE was the one who wouldn't let me participate. can you imagine? i think she was too stuck on rules.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 47 of 64: wer  (KitchenManager) * Tue, Sep 22, 1998 (23:43) * 4 lines 
 
yeah, 'cause if you don't believe, all that will happen
at communion is that you'll just be eating crackers, bread, etc...
and drinking grape juice, wine, etc...instead of being
a cannibal like everyone else...


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 48 of 64: Kristen Baker  (kristen) * Wed, Sep 23, 1998 (00:11) * 1 lines 
 
I spent hours in the Piazza San Marco. The artist captured it perfectly...minus all the annoying Italian guys hitting on me. They never show them in the paintings!!!


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 49 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Sep 23, 1998 (01:19) * 2 lines 
 
That's because Italian guys never stay with one particular girl long enough to be painted....



 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 50 of 64: wer  (KitchenManager) * Wed, Sep 23, 1998 (03:16) * 1 lines 
 
good point


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 51 of 64: Ray Lopez (ratthing) * Wed, Sep 23, 1998 (10:06) * 3 lines 
 

lol!



 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 52 of 64: Paul Terry Walhus  (terry) * Wed, Sep 23, 1998 (10:18) * 1 lines 
 
Stick with Norwegian guys, Kristen.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 53 of 64: Riette Walton  (riette) * Wed, Sep 23, 1998 (13:37) * 1 lines 
 
Absolutely! Italian guys are ghastly!


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 54 of 64: Conf admin  (cfadm) * Tue, Mar  1, 2005 (22:37) * 5 lines 
 
This is the second most viewed page on the Spring. Figure?

10,615 page views. 7,855 entry views. Amazing.

Can someone comment on why this topic is the most lurked of all time?


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 55 of 64: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Mar  2, 2005 (17:17) * 10 lines 
 
Caravaggio (1573-1610). Probably the most revolutionary artist of his time, the Italian painter Caravaggio abandoned the rules that had guided a century of artists before him. They had idealized the human and religious experience.

He was born Michelangelo Merisi on Sept. 28, 1573, in Caravaggio, Italy. As an adult he would become known by the name of his birthplace. Orphaned at age 11, he was apprenticed to the painter Simone Peterzano of Milan for four years. At some time between 1588 and 1592, Caravaggio went to Rome and worked as an assistant to painters of lesser skill. About 1595 he began to sell his paintings through a dealer. The dealer brought Caravaggio to the attention of Cardinal Francesco del Monte.

Through the cardinal, Caravaggio was commissioned, at age 24, to paint for the church of San Luigi dei Francesi. In its Contarelli Chapel Caravaggio's realistic naturalism first fully appeared in three scenes he created of the life of St. Matthew. The works caused public outcry, however, because of their realistic and dramatic nature.


Good thing they didn't call him by his birth name, what confusion that would have caused in the art world.

Evelyn says he is a "Firth favorite".


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 56 of 64: Wolf  (wolf) * Wed, Mar  2, 2005 (18:06) * 1 lines 
 
i think this is a popular site because we're all looking for ree-head!!


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 57 of 64: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Mar  3, 2005 (06:38) * 3 lines 
 
She sure was a kick when she was around.

Where in the world is ree ree?


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 58 of 64: Conf admin  (cfadm) * Thu, Mar  3, 2005 (06:51) * 12 lines 
 
http://www.astoft.co.uk/denmark/

The Astoft Collection of Buildings of Denmark

The aim is to illustrate the architecture of the buildings using photographs supported by architectural
descriptions. All photos are taken by the website owner, whilst the information provided by the annotations
has been obtained from various sources in print and on the web.







 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 59 of 64: Conf admin  (cfadm) * Thu, Mar  3, 2005 (06:53) * 32 lines 
 

The above site has both baroque and rococo architecture examples in Denmark. When you punch "baroque and
rococo" in to google, this site comes up at the top of the list.

The next site that comes up on google is

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13106a.htm

An excerpt:

Rococo Style 'This style received its name in the nineteenth century from French émigrés, who used the word
to designate in whimsical fashion the old shellwork style (style rocaille), then regarded as Old Frankish, as
opposed to the succeeding more simple styles.

Essentially, it is in the same kind of art and decoration as flourished in France during the regency
following Louis XIV's death, and remained in fashion for about forty years (1715-50). It might be termed the
climax or degeneration of the Baroque, which, coupled with French grace, began towards the end of the reign
of Louis XIV to convert grotesques into curves, lines, and bands (Jean Bérain, 1638-1711).

As its effect was less pronounced on architectural construction than elsewhere, it is not so much a real
style as a new kind of decoration, which culminates in the resolution of architectural forms of the interiors
(pilasters and architraves) by arbitrary ornamentation after the fashion of an unregulated, enervated
Baroque, while also influencing the arrangement of space, the construction of the façades, the portals, the
forms of the doors and windows.

The Rococo style was readily received in Germany, where it was still further perverted into the arbitrary,
unsymmetrical, and unnatural, and remained in favour until 1770 (or even longer); it found no welcome in
England. In Italy a tendency towards the Rococo style is evidenced by the Borrominik Guarini, and others. The
French themselves speak only of the Style Régence and Louis XV, which, however, is by no means confined to
this one tendency.




 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 60 of 64: Conf admin  (cfadm) * Thu, Mar  3, 2005 (07:45) * 1 lines 
 
This is the most popular topic on the Spring for the first 3 days or March, 2005.


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 61 of 64: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Mar  3, 2005 (08:20) * 1 lines 
 
See http://spring.net/top


 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 62 of 64: Boucher  (cfadm) * Sat, Mar  5, 2005 (12:38) * 19 lines 
 
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA.- The 300th anniversary of the birth of the French painter François Boucher took place in November 2003, an event celebrated by three large exhibitions of his drawings held concurrently in Paris and New York: one at the Louvre, another at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and the third at the Frick Collection in New York.

The Art Gallery of New South Wales is fortunate to have the École des Beaux-Arts, Paris (ENSBA) exhibition on display from Saturday 5 March to Sunday 1 May 2005. Assembled from one of the foremost collections of Old Master drawings in the world, the exhibition comprises over 80 magnificent drawings. It locates Boucher among his immediate predecessors and contemporaries and shows the extraordinary range of his subject matter including nudes, landscapes, ornamental designs and composition studies. The ENSBA collection was founded with the intention of amassing works of exemplary quality for the instruction of art students in Paris. Its range and quality of French drawings is quite unrivalled.

François Boucher was regarded during his lifetime as the foremost draughtsman in France, and was ranked by his contemporaries among the greatest draughtsmen of all time. Given this towering reputation, the demand for his work by collectors ensured not only that Boucher produced drawings and prints steadily and in quantity, but that his works were intensely studied, were well documented, and were treasured for posterity. The nineteenth-century novelists and art critics, the Goncourt brothers, called Boucher 'one of those men who signify the taste of a century, who express, personify and incarnate it'.

The exhibition celebrates Boucher's central role in defining a new style that was taken up by the French aristocracy and Royal court, and which spread through all the royal courts of eighteenth-century Europe. This style became known as the rococo.

In essence, rococo art is a purely French transformation of the Baroque idioms that developed in Italy a century earlier. As opposed to the grandiloquence, operatic emotions, intense religiosity and authoritarianism of baroque art, the rococo style which evolved in France during the reign of Louis XV was intimate, dainty, graceful and pleasure-loving.

Boucher's greatest predecessor, the painter Antoine Watteau (1684-1721) set the tone of the Rococo when he declined to paint the "great subjects" expected from the most accomplished and ambitious painters of the time. One of Boucher's first professional successes was a series of engravings he made after Watteau's drawings. In this exhibition there are eight drawings by Watteau and several examples of Boucher's engravings after Watteau, which enable us to follow the way the rococo style extended the implications of Watteau's art.

Complementing this exhibition at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, there will be a series of concerts of 18th-century music; a film program including such classics as Dangerous liaisons, Tous les matins du monde, and Ridicule; and a series of lectures and drawing workshops.

More about Boucher






 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 63 of 64: Conf admin  (cfadm) * Sat, Mar  5, 2005 (12:39) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 19 of 56 [art]: Baroque and Rococo
 Response 64 of 64: rococo and baroque trends  (cfadm) * Mon, Mar  7, 2005 (08:28) * 6 lines 
 
from the Globe and Mail (Canada):

The strongest news on the home front is that strict minimalism is giving way to ornament. Perhaps influenced by the reprise of patterns in fashion, the newest looks veer so far away from severity that they even flirt with the rococo and baroque.

Traditional damask is particularly hot, as with the kitschy steak-house wall covering lining the entry to the show's concept spaces, and is well used in Hudson Kruse's clever space, on everything from a dramatic damask foyer to the odd lampshade or throw pillow on a spare Knoll sofa. Out in the main show area, Thien Ta Trung of Montreal's Periphere chose to upholster his new clean-lined Uno Chair in blue and gold damask. Says Thien: "Minimalist is boring."


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