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Topic 20 of 56: Neoclassicism and Romanticism

Sat, Aug 8, 1998 (05:53) | Riette Walton (riette)
Around the middle of the 18th century artists started to reject Rococo and Baroque styles. They wanted a style that could convey serious moral ideas such as justice and honour. They wanted to re-create the simpler style of art of classical Greece and Rome. While some succeded, the movement suffered from a certain lack of energy and commitment, and was therefore overtaken by Romanticism when it began in the same era.
Romanticism was an approach that had to do with the modern rather than the antique, wild and expressive rather than controlled. Romantic artists abandoned the fixed laws relating to beauty and the proprieties of subject matter. It was a creative outlook, a way of life. A vast gulf existed between these two outlooks, but in the end Romanticism emerged as the dominant artistic movement of the first half of the 19th century.
26 responses total.

 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 1 of 26: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Aug  9, 1998 (07:23) * 5 lines 
 
Is Francois Boucher a neoclassic or rococo artist?

Reference: http://www.oir.ucf.edu/wm/paint/auth/boucher/




 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 2 of 26: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Aug  9, 1998 (09:04) * 2 lines 
 
Francios Boucher (1703-1770) was a Rococo painter, engraver and designer. He portrayed the superficiality of French court life around the middle of the 18th century. His career was hugely succesful, and he became the favourite artist of Louis XV's most famous msitress, Madamme de Pompadour, tho whom he gave lessons (in all sorts of things, I suspect!) and whose portrait he painted many times. Boucher was extremely versatile, and mastered absolutely every branch of decorative and illustrative painting,
ven doing stage settings for the opera. His most important pupil was Fragonard.


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 3 of 26: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Aug 18, 1998 (05:52) * 10 lines 
 
Okay, let's get this topic going properly.



Eugène Delacroix
'An Orphan Girl in the Graveyard'
1824
65cm x 54cm

This painting is so full and alive, despite its grave theme. I love the way the girl in the painting is not a tearful, passive orphan, but a vibrant young beauty, full of life, alamred by death, but nevertheless bare-shouldered as she looks away from the graves - towards rescue? Despite her label she is no victim.


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 4 of 26: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Wed, Aug 19, 1998 (14:27) * 1 lines 
 
There are a lot of question marks surrounding this one.


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 5 of 26: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Aug 20, 1998 (11:24) * 1 lines 
 
Such as?


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 6 of 26: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Thu, Aug 20, 1998 (18:29) * 1 lines 
 
Her expression holds so much emotion: fear, apprehension, bewilderment...it's unsettling.


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 7 of 26: Riette Walton  (riette) * Fri, Aug 21, 1998 (02:09) * 1 lines 
 
Yes, you're right. But I love the energy in her face. The feeling that she WANTS to survive whatever turmoil this tragedy will bring with it. Wonderful painting. Time for another, do you think? To set your mind at ease. I'll go look.


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 8 of 26: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Aug 23, 1998 (07:45) * 7 lines 
 
Here's a strange, sweet example of early neoclassicism.



David Allan (1744-96)
'Family of the 7th Earl of Mer at Alloa House'
1783


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 9 of 26: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Mon, Aug 24, 1998 (21:53) * 1 lines 
 
I always love those pictures of the landed gentry smoking their pipes with their dogs at their feet. Makes you kinda miss feudalism, you know?


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 10 of 26: Riette Walton  (riette) * Tue, Aug 25, 1998 (01:45) * 3 lines 
 
ha-ha!

Wish I could have seen what it was like to live like that back then.


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 11 of 26: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sat, Aug 29, 1998 (01:35) * 8 lines 
 


Thomas Gainsborough
'Mrs Richard Brinsley Sheridan'
1985-86
220cm x 154cm

Mrs Richard Brinsley Sheridan had a pretty tempestuous marriage with the great playwright Sheridan, as well as being renowned for her singing voice and her unearthly beauty. This portrait conveys loneliness to me. Only the grave, beautiful face is solid: everything else, from her dress to the wistful melancholy setting sun is thin and unstable. Very beautiful painting.


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 12 of 26: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Sun, Aug 30, 1998 (15:48) * 1 lines 
 
I am a great admirer of tempestuousness and unearthliness! They make great painting subjects.


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 13 of 26: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Aug 31, 1998 (01:20) * 1 lines 
 
They sure do!


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 14 of 26: Riette Walton  (riette) * Thu, Sep  3, 1998 (01:30) * 12 lines 
 
Here's a very famous one:

Panic

Francisco Goya
'The Colossus'
1810-12
115cm x 104cm

This painting is popularly known under the title, 'Panic'. This painting is an analogy for the monstrous destruction of war, one of the bloodiest in Spain's history when Napoleon invaded the contry and a guerilla war begin between the people of Spain and the French occupying forces. But this painting is more than just a historical document. I find it extraordinary how Goya managed to visualize fear for us, given it conrete form: a huge, hostiile presence, not even looking down at the terrified masses
elow - more like the monster of one's nightmares. There is a darkness in this work, an anger and wildness, that represents something within all of us, repress it though we may.



 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 15 of 26: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Thu, Sep  3, 1998 (22:38) * 1 lines 
 
It's pretty menacing--you can imagine all those little soldiers wetting their pants when they see Godzilla bearing down on them.


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 16 of 26: Riette Walton  (riette) * Fri, Sep  4, 1998 (01:02) * 1 lines 
 
Yes, only in this case Godzilla is merely a figment of their imagination - which in a way, makes him even more scary of course!


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 17 of 26: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Sep  6, 1998 (14:59) * 10 lines 
 
Work

Ford Madox Brown (1821-93)
'Work'
(1852-63)

Though this work was completed twelve years after the beginning of the Impressionist period, I find the feel of it neoclassical rather than impressionist.
Brown was born in Calais, but settled in his country of origin, England, in 1846 where he became a friend of the Pre-Raphaelites - which is the influence one can see in this work, I think. Rossetti studied briefly with him in 1848, but he never became a member of the Brotherhood. Personal characteristics were his individualism and difficult temperament.

I find the colouring of this painting brilliant - no wonder it took him so long to do! The way in which the poor workers are presented is very idealistic though - one can see he was never one of them, and therefore the painting, for all its brilliance, doesn't move me at all. There is no feeling of sympathy for these poor people.


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 18 of 26: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Sep  6, 1998 (15:04) * 2 lines 
 
i dunno, just wondering what the little boy did that his mother had to grab him
by the ear!


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 19 of 26: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Sep  6, 1998 (17:20) * 1 lines 
 
What's he shoveling?


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 20 of 26: Wolf  (wolf) * Sun, Sep  6, 1998 (20:08) * 2 lines 
 
yeah, i was wondering what they were doing. looks like they're digging a hole...
(nothing like stating the obvious)


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 21 of 26: Riette Walton  (riette) * Mon, Sep  7, 1998 (01:16) * 1 lines 
 
Digging a hole to bury the boy in, once his mother's finished with him, I think!


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 22 of 26: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sat, Sep 26, 1998 (12:16) * 7 lines 
 


Thomas Gainsborough
'Mr. and Mrs Andrews 1749
71 x 120 cm

Thomas Gainsborough was one of the artists who led English painting into this great period. I love this painting, though more for the landscape than the way in which he portrays Mr. and Mrs Andrews.


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 23 of 26: Wolf  (wolf) * Sat, Sep 26, 1998 (21:50) * 1 lines 
 
mr andrews is a sloppy old chap isn't he? feel sorry for mrs andrews...


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 24 of 26: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Sat, Sep 26, 1998 (22:07) * 1 lines 
 
She knew what he was like when she married him. It was just too good of a match to pass up.


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 25 of 26: Riette Walton  (riette) * Sun, Sep 27, 1998 (03:42) * 1 lines 
 
They look like they deserve each other to me.


 Topic 20 of 56 [art]: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
 Response 26 of 26: Autumn Moore  (autumn) * Thu, Oct  1, 1998 (14:20) * 1 lines 
 
Exactly.

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