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Topic 35 of 99: Gaia Magnetosphere

Mon, May 8, 2000 (20:18) | Mike Kana (aa9il)
Greetings From Radio Earth!

This topic is dedicated to the sounds of Natural Radio i.e. whistlers, dawn chorus, sferics, solar wind, earthquake emissions, aurora, etc. and the
practice of monitoring and recording this phenomena.
605 responses total.

 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 1 of 605: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, May  8, 2000 (20:41) * 1 lines 
 
including SETI???


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 2 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May  8, 2000 (20:42) * 1 lines 
 
Mike! Aloha! Off to do a google search for a good diagram to show what we (YOU?!) are talking about! (Yippee!!!)


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 3 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, May  8, 2000 (21:18) * 7 lines 
 
SETI?

Ya, sure... Makes it more easy to sneak in comments from the
radio astronomy side....

Mike



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 4 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May  8, 2000 (21:31) * 1 lines 
 
Excellent! *delighted grin* Love the name you chose, Mike! Perfect!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 5 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May  8, 2000 (21:36) * 29 lines 
 
http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/cowley.html
It begins:

A Beginner's Guide to the Earth's Magnetosphere

Earth in Space Vol. 8, No. 7, March 1996, p.9. © 1996 American Geophysical Union. Permission is hereby granted to journalists to use this
material so long as credit is given, and to teachers to use this material in classrooms.


The magnetosphere is the region of space to which the Earth's magnetic field is confined by
the solar wind plasma blowing outward from the Sun, extending to distances in excess of
60,000 kilometers from Earth. Much has been learned about this dynamic plasma region over
the past 40 years, since the first direct measurements were made by the early Sputnik and
Explorer spacecraft.

by Stanley W. H. Cowley, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester,
Leicester, United Kingdom

The Earth's magnetosphere is formed from two essential ingredients. The first is the Earth's magnetic field, generated by
currents flowing in the Earth's core. Outside the Earth this field has the same form as that of a bar magnet, a dipole field,
aligned approximately with the Earth's spin axis. The second ingredient is the solar wind, a fully ionized hydrogen/helium
plasma that streams continuously outward from the Sun into the solar system at speeds of about 300–800 kilometers per
second. This wind is therefore composed of protons and alpha particles, together with sufficient electrons that it is
electrically neutral overall. The solar wind is also pervaded by a large-scale interplanetary magnetic field, the solar
magnetic field transported outward into the solar system by the solar wind plasma. There is a third ingredient that also
plays an important role: the Earth's ionosphere. The upper atmosphere is partially ionized by far-ultraviolet and X rays
from the Sun above altitudes of about 100 km. The resulting ionosphere forms a second source of plasma for the
magnetosphere, mainly of protons, singly charged helium and oxygen, and the requisite number of electrons for electric
charge neutrality.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 6 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May  8, 2000 (21:45) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 7 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May  8, 2000 (21:53) * 21 lines 
 


The Earth's Magnetic Field

The Earth has a magnetic field with north and south poles. The
Earth's magnetic field reaches 36,000 miles into space.

The magnetic field of the Earth is surrounded in a region called the
magnetosphere. The magnetosphere prevents most of the particles
from the sun, carried in solar wind, from hitting the Earth.

Some particles from the solar wind can enters the magnetosphere. The particles that enter
from the magnetotail travel toward the Earth and create the auroral oval light shows.

The Sun and other planets have magnetospheres, but the Earth has the strongest one of all the rocky planets. The
Earth's north and south magnetic poles reverse at irregular intervals of hundreds of thousands of years.

Lots of links on this url - all are worth a look
http://www.windows.umich.edu/cgi-bin/tour_def/earth/Magnetosphere/overview.html




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 8 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May  8, 2000 (22:12) * 1 lines 
 
*Whew* Ok. Mike, it's your sand box. I'll try to stay out of it as much as possible. Enjoy! (Isn't that a killer diagram? I liked it so much I had to delete the post with the pix from the web and save it on my space on Spring's hard drive...)


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 9 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, May  9, 2000 (13:48) * 11 lines 
 
Greetings all

Well thats a good start!
An interesting tool that is available for the analysis of whistlers is a
FFTDSP program that runs on your PC. Check out www.webcom.com/af9y/
for information on this application. Also on this page is some good
info on Earth Moon Earth communications and other weak signal applications.

Mike




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 10 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May  9, 2000 (13:57) * 1 lines 
 
Mike, I think you're gonna have to write out what FFTDSP means (I'm gonna look it up 'cause I don't remember. About the EME communications, there is a rather lively group on the 14 MHz band which sets up schedules for folks to work in pairs so they know to listen very carefully. One sends the signal (often CW or Morse Code) to the moon at such an angle that the other guy with a calculated amount of time lapse for the signal to travel can receive the bounced signal. I think that is truly amazing. I have listened for it, but my antenna is all wrong for those frequencies they work. Going to check out the program you suggest.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 11 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May  9, 2000 (14:28) * 5 lines 
 
http://www.webcom.com/af9y/ is a totally amazing place. That one little program ($32 US to get by email) will allow you to "see" signals from NASA's Lunar Prospector, EME signals(see above), And has SETI applications. There is a month's free trial also available. Kew Features are available on
http://www.webcom.com/af9y/radio10.htm

Check it out! Thanks, Mike!



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 12 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May  9, 2000 (20:40) * 7 lines 
 
Solar Flux is on the rise! This morning it was 137. This just came in:

SFI=150 | A=10 down from 11 | K=1 down from 2 at 0000 on 10 May. SAF: low to moderate, GMF: quiet to unsettled Aurora Level: 7

More: http://hfradio.org/propagation.html




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 13 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May 11, 2000 (15:22) * 7 lines 
 
Check out posting
http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/read/geo/2.180

I wonder how much of that stuff will interefere with our global well-being and wave propagation. Never heard of ejecta from anything but out Sun having an effect on terrestrial matters. Mike, do you know?

SFI=179 | A=3 | K=1 down from 2 at 1800 on 11 May. SAF: low to moderate, GMF: quiet to active Aurora Level: 5



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 14 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May 11, 2000 (15:47) * 3 lines 
 
Mike, gotta few questions for you since you are going to be making the array to detect these things and please let us know what you are doing and how it is progressing. It will be like being at Genesis 1:1
You must not live in an urban stetting if a radio-telescope dish is in your future. What size are you planning and is it gonna be one of those altasimuth mounts or are you opting for a U-shaped movable yoke? Clock drive is imperitive, of course. This will be for the Project SETI observations.
What sort of antennas are you going to need for the ELF and EME listening? You must be building the world's most amazing antenna switch! Please let us hear your thinking and planning for these prohjects. That is almost the most exciting part - aside from actually capturing the signals themselves!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 15 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May 11, 2000 (16:13) * 16 lines 
 
Space Weather News for May 11, 2000

Material from a coronal mass ejection that left the Sun on May 8 is
expected to pass by our planet late on May 11 or early May 12. Depending
on the characteristics of the magnetic field within the disturbance, it
could trigger minor geomagnetic storms on Earth. There is a slim chance of
aurorae at mid-latitudes, but auroral activity will more likely be
concentrated over high latitude regions including northern Europe, Canada
and Alaska.

Visit http://www.spaceweather.com for more information and updates.

SpaceWeather.com

---



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 16 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 12, 2000 (14:36) * 43 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 19 - May 12, 2000
Solar flux and sunspot numbers were sharply lower over the past ten
days, but are now heading higher. Solar flux reached a low on
Saturday, May 6, when the three readings for the day were 126.3,
126.8 and 126.7. The noon 126.8 reading is the official flux for the
day. Daily solar flux values have not been this low since October 2,
1999, when it was 126.3. Average solar flux for the past week was
off by over 30 points when compared to the previous week, and
average sunspot numbers were down by nearly 13.
Another interesting number to look at is the total sunspot area
visible on the solar disk. These numbers are expressed as millionths
of a hemisphere, and you can see the daily value along with the
solar flux and sunspot numbers online at
gopher://sec.noaa.gov/00/indices/DSD. We reached a low of 130 for
visible sunspot area on May 7. Sunspot area has not been this low
since September 30 and October 1, 1999. This value represents a
nearly spotless sun, and is actually equivalent to .013 percent of
the visible surface. Contrast this with a short time back, April 23,
when the sunspot area number was 2860, representing 22 times the
visible area of the May 7 value.
All of this does not mean that we have passed the peak of the solar
cycle, however. Activity jumps around quite a bit, even during a
peak year of the cycle such as this one. It is only later when
viewing smoothed numbers on a graph that the progress of a cycle
looks steady. For more information, read Solar Ups and Downs at
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2000/ast09may_1m.htm.
As this bulletin is written on Thursday evening, the solar flux
seems to be ramping upward. It is measured three times per day in
Penticton, British Columbia at 1700, 2000 and 2300z, and the last
four values measured, from 2300z Wednesday through 2300z Thursday
are 167.7, 177.7, 177.7 and 186.5. The predicted solar flux for the
next five days, Friday through Tuesday, are 190, 195, 200, 200, and
205. Solar flux is expected to peak for the short term around 220 on
May 18, then drop down around 130 from June 1-3.
Unfortunately, this weekend there may be effects from a coronal mass
ejection that occurred on May 8. Predicted planetary A index for
Friday through Tuesday is 20, 20, 15, 8, 8 and 8.
Sunspot numbers for May 4 through 10 were 105, 122, 111, 130, 131,
149 and 174 with a mean of 131.7. 10.7 cm flux was 134.5, 129.8,
126.8, 130.9, 137, 149.5 and 179.2, with a mean of 141.1, and
estimated planetary A indices were 8, 14, 12, 7, 6, 11 and 7, with a
mean of 9.3.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 17 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 12, 2000 (16:46) * 4 lines 
 
Mike! Look!!! You should get all sorts of stuff tonight on short wave. Pop the BFO and enjoy! I plan to

SFI=190 up from 178 | A=15 up from 5 | K=2 at 2100 on 12 May. SAF: low to moderate, GMF: quiet to active Aurora Level: 7



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 18 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 12, 2000 (16:47) * 1 lines 
 
Of course, it'll be really noisy with the A index so high. The lower the better with that and the K.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 19 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 12, 2000 (17:35) * 80 lines 
 
The Cosmos Was Alive With the Sound of Matter
By K.C. COLE

When the universe speaks, astronomers listen.
When it sings, they swoon.
That's roughly what happened late last month when a group
of astronomers led by Caltech's Andrew Lange published the
most detailed analysis yet of the cosmos' primordial song: a low
hum, deep in its throat, that preceded both atoms and stars.
It is a simple sound, like the mantra "Om." But hidden within
its harmonics are details of the universe's shape, composition
and birth. So rich are these details that within hours of the
paper's publication, new interpretations of the data had already
appeared on the Los Alamos web for new astrophysical papers.

"It's stirred up a hornet's nest of interest," said UCLA
astronomer Ned Wright, who gave a talk to his colleagues on
the paper the next week.
So what is all the fuss about? Why are astronomers churning
out paper after paper on what looks to a lay person like a
puzzling set of wiggly peaks--graphic depictions of the sound,
based on hours of computer analysis?
Because there's scientific gold in them there sinusoidal hills.
The peaks and valleys paint a visual picture of the sound the
newborn universe made when it was still wet behind the ears, a
mere 300,000 years after its birth in a big bang. Nothing existed
but pure light, speckled with occasional subatomic particles.
Nothing happened, either, except that this light and matter
fluid, as physicists call it, sloshed in and out of gravity wells,
compressing the liquid in some places and spreading it out in
others. Like banging on the head of a drum, the compression of
the "liquid light" as it fell into gravity wells set up the "sound
waves" that cosmologist Charles Lineweaver calls "the oldest
music in the universe."
* * *
Then, suddenly, the sound fell silent. The universe had gotten
cold enough that the particles, in effect, congealed, like the
salad dressing left in the fridge; the light separated and
escaped, like the oil on top.
The rest is the history of the universe: The particles joined
each other to form atoms, stars and everything else, including
people.
"The universe was very simple back then," said Lange. "After
that, we have atoms, chemistry, economics. Things go downhill
very quickly."
As for the light, or radiation, it still pervades all space. In fact,
it's part of the familiar "snow" that sometimes shows up on
broadcast TV. But it's more than just noise: When the particles
congealed, they left an imprint on the light.
Like children going after cookies, the patterns of sloshing
particles left their sticky fingerprints all over the sky.
The pattern of the sloshes tells you all you need to know
about the very early universe: It's shape, how much was made of
matter, how much of something else.
The principle is familiar: Your child's voice sounds like no one
else's because the resonant cavities within her throat create a
unique voiceprint. The large, heavy wood of the cello creates a
mellower sound than the high-strung violin. Just so, the sounds
coming from the early universe depend directly on the density of
matter, and the shape of the cosmos itself.
Astronomers can't hear the sounds, of course. But they can
read them on the walls of the universe like notes on a page.
Compressed sound gets hot, and produces hot splotches, like a
pressure cooker. Expanded areas cool. Analyze the hot and
cold patches and you get a picture of the sound: exactly how
much falls on middle C, or B flat.
What they've seen so far is both exciting and troubling. The
sound suggests that the universe is a tad too heavy with
ordinary matter to agree with standard cosmological theories; it
resonates more like an oboe than a flute. Something's going on
that can't be explained. The answers may come when an even
more ambitious probe launches into space later this year.
Lest you think these sounds are music only for astronomers'
ears, consider: The same wrinkles in space that created the
gravity wells that gave rise to the sounds also blew up to form
clusters, galaxies, stars, planets, us.
Even Hare Krishnas murmuring: Om.


....and Mike and we are listening, too *grin*


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 20 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 12, 2000 (19:35) * 2 lines 
 
SFI=190 | A=17 up from 15 | K=4 up from 2 at 0000 on 13 May. SAF: low to moderate, GMF: quiet to active, Aurora Level: 8



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 21 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, May 12, 2000 (22:04) * 27 lines 
 
FFTDSP - Fast Fourier Transform Digital Signal Processing
Spectral Analysis using software algorithms....

Re the SETI, EME, and ELF stuff
EME calls for very large (for lower frequencies) antenna arrays
althogh some single yagi type arrays have been used at 144mhz.
At 1.2ghz, some EME antennas are yagi type antennas but the dish
starts coming into play - a large dish however.....
My initial dish is a reinforced solid aluminum 9ft dish that
came from a nondisclosed defense contractor antenna test range.
It is currently residing behind a garage covered with decaying
leaves... My goal would be to put up a 5meter or larger dish
but the backyard would be obscured - I was told to just put the
thing up and quit asking about it. The neighbors couldnt tell
an L-band feed from a hole in the ground....
As far as steering the antenna goes, I plan to use an AZ-EL
although the cheap alternative is to fix the position and just
do drift scan. Its ok as long as I do not clutter too much
of the yard - kind of interferes with summer parties.

The VLF antenna is actually quite small - just a short whip
connected to a high gain amplifier. Other experimenters have
used long wires. The design I have will get by with a small
vertical.





 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 22 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 12, 2000 (22:16) * 2 lines 
 
How nice - you already have the Big stuff in the back yard, and what a conversation piece for your summer parties! Just a short whip? Not a rubber duckie coiled miles of antenna wire into a little space? A real little whip? That must be some high-gain amplifier you have (and I have no reason whatever to question you on it - you are the expert and I am the novice in here). How are you going to record the stuff - rolls of paper like seismographs, autio tape, other I cannot imagine? Ummm...I like the idea of the 5 meter dish (or larger!)
Your less with-it neighbors are gonna want to know what TV programs you get on that dish! EME stuff is line-of-sight... How many of the others you are planning depend on propagation rather than line-of-sight? I wish I knew more to ask more intelligent questions. But, I'll work on it! Thanks, Mike!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 23 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 12, 2000 (22:21) * 5 lines 
 
Off to find an english (simple, hopefully) explanation of
"FFTDSP - Fast Fourier Transform Digital Signal Processing
Spectral Analysis using software algorithms.... "

I've heard it discussed often enough between two people who already knew what they were talking about. Off to try to teach myself a few new things...!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 24 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, May 13, 2000 (16:33) * 3 lines 
 
SFI=217 up from 190 | A=14 down from 17 | K=3 at 2100 on 13 May. SAF: low to moderate, GMF: quiet to active, Aurora Level: 7




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 25 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, May 14, 2000 (16:35) * 5 lines 
 
SFI=233 up from 217 | A=16 up from 14 | K=2 at 2100 on 14 May. SAF: moderate, GMF: quiet to unsettled, Aurora Level: 5

More: http://hfradio.org/propagation.html




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 26 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 15, 2000 (16:43) * 2 lines 
 
SFI=244 up from 233 | A=13 down from 15 | K=2 down from 3 at 2100 on 15 May. SAF: high, GMF: quiet to active, Aurora Level: 7



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 27 of 605: geospring (sprin5) * Tue, May 16, 2000 (13:37) * 1 lines 
 
How's the radio telescope project, Mike?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 28 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May 16, 2000 (16:34) * 3 lines 
 
SFI=259 up from 244 | A=15 up from 12 | K=2 down from 3 at 2100 on 16 May. SAF: moderate, GMF: quiet to active, Aurora Level: 6

Ok guys, how high can this go? Another coronal outburst is due to hit May 17-18


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 29 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May 18, 2000 (00:45) * 2 lines 
 
Please check post
http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/read/Geo/34.66


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 30 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 22, 2000 (13:45) * 12 lines 
 
Radio JOVE -- NASA helps students tune in to radio bursts from Jupiter

Jupiter is a source of powerful radio bursts that can
produce exotic sounds on common ham radio receivers.
NASA scientists are helping students tune in to the
giant planet as part of an innovative educational program
called Radio JOVE. FULL STORY at

http://spacescience.com/headlines/y2000/ast22may_1.htm?list

Radio JOVE



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 31 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, May 22, 2000 (19:27) * 34 lines 
 
Greetings all

Back from the bog.....

Well, some of the obnoxious distractions are behind me so
I can focus on the more important things like building
equipment - as far as the ELF monitoring equipment goes,
the antenna is a 57 inch steel whip that is part of an
E-field preamp - this was a construction project in the July
1999 'Lowdown' publication (Longwave Club of America).
This might take a back seat to my 24ghz transmit/receive
system which I need to get to building. I will post more
info as time allows - also check out: www.triax.com/vlfradio/
which is a webpage dedicated to VLF monitoring along with
actual recordings of whisters.
Finally, regarding the radio telescope project - I need to
come up with some designs for the down converter and receiver
assembly then how to log the data - plus have to get that
8ft dish moved over....
The first stage is (other than the dish, feed, LNA, AZ EL, etc...)
is to build a stable L band (1.4ghz) down converter which will
feed some type of analogue to digital converter which then feeds
the PC doing data logging. This is a very long term project
with the end not in sight at the moment. Not to say that components
will not be built up and integrated - the dish will allow for some
satellite or EME experiments as well.
Re the Jovian experiments - listening to Jupiter is one of the initial
steps in radio astronomy and can be copied on radio receivers that
tune 21Mhz. The next would be a simple 12ghz solar observatory
using available ku band satellite tv components.
With the arrival of new surplus components, the 24ghz project beckons...

radio free cosmo



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 32 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 22, 2000 (19:57) * 2 lines 
 
Yay! Mike is back. Terry and I were about to send out a posse to rescue you!
Now to read what you posted. We thought mebbe a DXpedition or a swap meet had taken you hostage...*grin* It is great to have you back. Now, I'm gonna read what you wrote...!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 33 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 22, 2000 (20:04) * 5 lines 
 
Have the receiver with the 21 MHz band right beside me - surely not in SSB or is it? Know any freq's off hand for the Jovian listening (or I could hunt at the url I posted above - which is what I should be doing...)

It is really great to have such great long-term projects which will interface. I know Terry is eager to know what you are doing and I am sure you will be seeing his posts in here.

The propagation was out of sight last week and weekend - and I could get stations in daylight which I normally do not get. It was interesting and not too noisy - something of a surprise!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 34 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 22, 2000 (20:21) * 4 lines 
 
Check out Mike's suggested url
http://www.triax.com/vlfradio/

Lots of what he will be talking about is there and a terrific photo of an Aurora over Canada. Too bad it is black and white!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 35 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 22, 2000 (20:22) * 2 lines 
 
but keep going...http://www.triax.com/vlfradio/sndbites.htm
is the sound page and it is in color there! Absolutely spectacular. Thanks for the URL !


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 36 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 22, 2000 (20:25) * 1 lines 
 
The sounds are phenomenal. Have you ever heard Aurora sounds, Mike? How loud are they and how much like this wav file do they sound?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 37 of 605: Claudine  (Passionata) * Mon, May 22, 2000 (22:35) * 1 lines 
 
Testing


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 38 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 22, 2000 (22:38) * 1 lines 
 
Coming in loud and clear. Welcome!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 39 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May 23, 2000 (19:04) * 5 lines 
 
Mike, I am downloading and installing SETI@home software
http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/windows.html

There is a topic concerning this software and what it does
http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/read/software/172/new


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 40 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, May 23, 2000 (19:08) * 1 lines 
 
I am up and running! I signed in and now it is data crunching. I feel joined to the cosmos!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 41 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, May 23, 2000 (22:09) * 21 lines 
 
Im still here for the moment but will have to observe radio silence
for a bit - no need to call out the rescue units (grin) Will try
to check in if possible.

Re Aurora - a popular mode of communcating amongst the VHF and up
crowd is Aurora scatter - point the antenna at the aurora and use
it as a giant reflector - have not heard cw signals from aurora
propagation but I think it has a raspy note to it (?) I have
listened to microwave signals using rain scatter - once during
the June VHF contest, I listened to 5ghz ssb signals from a station
35 miles to the west (off the back of my dish) talking to a station
across the lake in central Michigan - neat stuff. This type of
propagation also can happen in snow blizzards. The mode I want
to work on is tropo-ducting where the hot and cold air near the
lake surface form a 'duct' that acts as an excellent propagation
medium. For 24ghz, I will have to rely on dry days with little
humidity due to the absorption problems caused by moisture.

Anyway, be back sometime in the near future....
Mike
AA9IL


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 42 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, May 24, 2000 (12:06) * 4 lines 
 
Good business, Mike. I have heard tropr-ducting across a small lake in upper NY State. We could hear quite plainly the voices and allied noises of the people across the lake who were making breakfast and using china plates. It is amazing how loud and clear it is. How is skip doing these days? It has been years since it was worth the effort.
My SETI software is still crunching numbers from Arecibo. This is the most fascinating program I ever downloaded! Take care - we await your next post
3's n 8's
Marcia


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 43 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, May 26, 2000 (00:20) * 24 lines 
 
Here's another interesting monitoring and data crunching possibillity:

From: Glenn Thompson - glenn@mvomrat.com

With a single PC workstation it is now possible to compute plots (e.g.
spectrograms) of continuous seismic data for dozens of stations and display
these on the World-Wide Web within minutes. Web-based seismic monitoring of
volcanoes offers several advantages, perhaps the main one being that a
person on beeper duty can respond to an alarm without having to leave home
in the middle of the night. It also makes it easy to share data with other
scientists and schools.
I spent the last two years developing a Web-based system to monitor the
seismicity at Alaskan volcanoes. I am curious to learn what other systems
exist out there. I would be very grateful if the creators of such systems
would get in touch with me and give me a short (a paragraph would be fine)
description of your system (would be helpful if you included URL and related
publications if any). I would also be happy to hear from anyone who is
currently developing (or thinking about developing) such a system, or
anyone's views on the future of Web-based monitoring of volcanoes (including
web-cams, satellite data etc.).
Many thanks,
Glenn Thompson (glenn@mvomrat.com)
Seismologist
Montserrat Volcano Observatory


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 44 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun  3, 2000 (23:41) * 11 lines 
 
Lack of coronal outbursts lately caused the solar flux to plummet. They are recovering nicely, now - and they have added another parameter to their reports:

SFI=166 | A=11 | K=2 down from 3 at 0300 on 4 June.
SAF: moderate to high, GMF: quiet to unsettled

Aurora Level: 4
Solar Wind: 443.1 km/s at 3.5 protons/cc

More: http://hfradio.org/propagation.html




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 45 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun  5, 2000 (14:21) * 16 lines 
 
First Light for a Space Weather Satellite

NASA Science News for June 5, 2000

NASA's IMAGE mission, a unique satellite dedicated to the
study of space storms, has returned its first pictures of
electrified gas surrounding our planet. Using antennas as
large as the Empire State Building, IMAGE is taking
an unprecedented look at Earth's magnetic environment and
its response to fierce gusts of solar wind.

FULL STORY at

http://spacescience.com/headlines/y2000/ast05jun_1m.htm?list
__



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 46 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Jun  6, 2000 (19:28) * 11 lines 
 
Ok, back again....
The seismic monitoring seems tres kewl - have to dig up that
web page and give it a look-see.
First on the list is some goofy microwave stuff but I need to
build up the final parts for a project INSPIRE receiver to
take out into the country for Whistler monitoring. Free
time, what is that?

Let Chaos Reign! Hail Eris!
Mike



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 47 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jun  6, 2000 (19:45) * 3 lines 
 
Mike! There you are! Another solar burst is on its way - use your cosmic umbrella this week. I am just about finished crunching my 8th block of SETI data. Welcome home.

Of course, Chaos reigns... and there is even order in Chaos!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 48 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jun  7, 2000 (14:13) * 20 lines 
 
Solar Storm Warnings

Date: Wed, 7 Jun 2000 12:30:08 -0500
From: NASA Science News

NASA Science News for June 7, 2000

An interplanetary shock wave from a solar coronal mass ejection is
expected to pass our planet this Thursday, possibly triggering
aurora at middle-latitudes. This story includes animations of
the solar eruption as well as aurora borealis observing tips.
Note: Science@NASA readers who capture photos of the aurora
are invited to send them as email attachments to
phillips@spacescience.com for possible inclusion in a follow-up
web story.

FULL STORY at

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2000/ast07jun_1m.htm?list
__


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 49 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Jun  8, 2000 (19:31) * 9 lines 
 
Anyone going out tonite to watch for the Aurora?

- In the VLF communications area, another organization that
is doing research in VLF communications is AMRAD - the Amateur
Radio Research and Development Corporation. See their web
page at www.amrad.org

73's de Mike



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 50 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jun  8, 2000 (20:07) * 2 lines 
 
Thanks mike - my ex is gonna try!!!
I posted the coronal storms on Geo 34 I'll try but we are pretty far south...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 51 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun  9, 2000 (11:23) * 17 lines 
 
June 8-9 Aurora Update

Space Weather News for June 8-9, 2000

Geomagnetic disturbances are finally subsiding after an interplanetary
shock wave struck Earth's magnetosphere around 930 UT on June 8. The event
triggered intense aurora over sparsely-inhabited regions of northern Asia
and the Pacific. However, by nightfall over North America conditions had
quieted. There is still a chance for isolated auroral substorms that might
be visible tonight (June 8-9) at middle latitudes.

The next opportunity for viewing aurora borealis may arrive as soon as June
10, when another solar wind disturbance is expected to reach Earth. For
more information and updates please visit http://www.spaceweather.com

SpaceWeather.com



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 52 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun  9, 2000 (12:25) * 29 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 23 - June 9, 2000

A large coronal mass ejection on June 6 is raising havoc with HF
propagation. Geomagnetic conditions were rough on Wednesday, with K
indices of 3 and 4, but the big effect was measured on Thursday,
when the planetary K index was 7 at 0900 and 1200z, followed by 6 at
1500z. The planetary A index for Thursday was 53, while the College
A index (in Alaska) was 79. This indicates a severe geomagnetic
storm, which should disrupt HF communications but may provide
interesting auroral communication opportunities for VHF enthusiasts.
Regarding visible aurora effects, the chances over North America are
declining on Friday morning, although earlier in the day there was
an intense aurora visible over Asia.

To add to the excitement, there was another coronal mass ejection on
Wednesday, June 7. The latest word has solar wind providing another
disruption on Saturday, June 10.

Planetary A index should rise on Friday to 75, then drop to 40 on
Saturday, 25 on Sunday, 18 on Monday and 15 on Tuesday. Solar flux
is expected to rise over the same period, to 185 on Friday, 190 on
Saturday, 200 on Monday and 210 on Tuesday. Solar flux is expected
to peak over the short term around 245 on June 16.

Last week's bulletin mentioned monitoring WWV for the latest solar
and geophysical numbers, and both WB6RIB and W9LYN wrote to suggest
the URL of ftp://ftp.sel.noaa.gov/pub/latest/wwv.txt for the latest
text of the WWV bulletin that appears at 18 minutes after every
hour.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 53 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Jun  9, 2000 (22:10) * 8 lines 
 
No aurora here but plenty of mosquitos. Took the high tech
scooter around the neighborhood and barely made it to the
door alive. Oh well, see what happens on 6-10 with the
solar wind blast.

de Mike
Radio Cosmo International



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 54 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun 10, 2000 (00:08) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks for reporting in, Mike. My respondants reported city light glare, clouds and rain but no aurora. Don't think my message got to the European contingent. I had a transfusion when I got back as well. Eruptions are much nicer. They smell bad enough and are hot enough to discourage mosquitoes. Maybe you need to burn mosquito coils on your high-tech scooter?!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 55 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun 10, 2000 (18:11) * 9 lines 
 
The solar storm has hit us:

SFI=180 up from 169 | A=25 up from 7 | K=3 at 2100 on 10 June.
SAF: low to moderate, GMF: quiet to active

Aurora Level: 9
Solar Wind: 460.7 km/s at 1.6 protons/cc

More: http://hfradio.org/propagation.html


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 56 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sat, Jun 10, 2000 (21:09) * 10 lines 
 
Well, did some VHF/UHF operating during the June ARRL contest.
Worked across the lake into Michigan on 144Mhz and heard some
bursts on 223Mhz. Someone else was working 6 meters (50Mhz)
but the band did seem open - most likely sporadic E propagation
although maybe F??? No Aurora but plenty of storm clouds
to the North. Brought the 5.7ghz transverter out for show
and tell - need to hook that thing up and operate!

73 de Mike
AA9IL


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 57 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun 10, 2000 (21:19) * 1 lines 
 
Let me know when you are GOING to be on (rather than after it) - would love to hear your voice... the 14 MHz is sort of dead but there is a huge pile up on 14.204. Pretty quiet, actually!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 58 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun 10, 2000 (21:55) * 17 lines 
 
A solar flare, a CME, and a solar wind disturbance -- all in one day!

Space Weather News for June 10, 2000

The prolific flare-producing sunspot group #9026 unleashed another
moderately strong solar flare today. The eruption was accompanied by a
partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME) that might be Earth-directed. If
so, material from the CME would arrive in the vicinity of our planet on
June 12 or 13. A SOHO coronagraph animation of the event shows a beautiful
billowing CME peppered by speckles and meteor-like streaks resulting from
energetic particles hitting the spacecraft's camera.

Earlier in the day, as predicted, a solar wind disturbance from a CME on
June 7 struck Earth's magnetosphere. Active geomagnetic conditions were
observed for about nine hours, but have since subsided.
For more information and pictures, please visit
http://www.spaceweather.com


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 59 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun 10, 2000 (22:06) * 12 lines 
 


This rare red-colored aurora over North Carolina
was photographed by Chuck Adams on April 6, 2000.
The bright object near the horizon is the Moon. Also
visible in the background are the Pleiades, Taurus, and
Orion. The photographer used a Nikon FM2 camera
equipped with a 28mm f/2 lens. The exposure time was
one minute on Kodak Elite 100 slide film. (Copyright
2000, Chuck Adams, all rights reserved.)




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 60 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun 11, 2000 (16:52) * 12 lines 
 
The storm is approaching:

Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 14:31:21 -0700

SFI=187 up from 180 | A=25 up from 23 | K=5 up from 4 at 2100 on 11 June.
SAF: moderate, GMF: at unsettled to minor storm levels

Aurora Level: 9
Solar Wind: 569.3 km/s at 7.2 protons/cc

More: http://hfradio.org/propagation.html



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 61 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun 12, 2000 (18:56) * 12 lines 
 
Wonder how high its going to go....

Date: Mon, 12 Jun 2000 14:30:44 -0700

SFI=193 up from 187 | A=16 down from 24 | K=3 down from 4 at 2100 on 12 June.
SAF: moderate, GMF: at unsettled to minor storm levels

Aurora Level: 7
Solar Wind: 466.1 km/s at 1.5 protons/cc

More: http://hfradio.org/propagation.html



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 62 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Jun 12, 2000 (19:10) * 11 lines 
 
Greetings all

In the most recent Lowdown (Long Wave Club of America), there was
a short description of a ELF/ULF/SLF receiver built by John WB7TQT.
- frequency range 0.03 to 300Hz - 47000 turn loop. John has tapes
available of the signals heard at these frequencies. I will post
the address once I find it.

73 de AA9IL
Mike



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 63 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun 12, 2000 (19:34) * 1 lines 
 
Great news. The last ones you posted the urls for were spectacular!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 64 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jun 13, 2000 (19:40) * 10 lines 
 
Supposedly the solar storm has passed us (see Geo 34 today) but the numbers keep going up. The latest:

SFI=199 | A=16 | K=3 up from 2 at 0000 on 14 June.
SAF: low to moderate, GMF: quiet to unsettled

Aurora Level: 6
Solar Wind: 433.5 km/s at 8.5 protons/cc

More: http://hfradio.org/propagation.html



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 65 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jun 14, 2000 (19:09) * 10 lines 
 
Date: Wed, 14 Jun 2000 14:32:20 -0700

SFI=201 up from 199 | A=17 up from 16 | K=4 at 2100 on 14 June.
SAF: low to moderate, GMF: quiet to active

Aurora Level: 6
Solar Wind: 447.0 km/s at 41.7 protons/cc

More: http://hfradio.org/propagation.html



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 66 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jun 14, 2000 (19:10) * 1 lines 
 
Note the increase of velocity of the solar wind. I think it is not over yet...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 67 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jun 15, 2000 (21:26) * 5 lines 
 
Check the sunspots with this amazing little updating image:






 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 68 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Jun 16, 2000 (20:52) * 14 lines 
 
Howdy all

Well, just finished a neat book - 'Boffin' which was a historical
account of early radar during WWII. Also some neat info about
the early experiments at Jodrell Bank and design work on interferometers.
I know book reviews should be in the Books section but this should
appeal to the Geo crowd. BTW, the author is R Hanbury Brown.
Currently plodding through 'Gravity's Rainbow' and will also be
starting up on the history of the crypto group at Bletchley Park
that cracked the Enigma Cipher.

73 de Mike
Radio Cosmo International



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 69 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun 16, 2000 (22:34) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 70 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun 16, 2000 (22:36) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 71 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun 16, 2000 (22:55) * 7 lines 
 
HanaHou......

Mike! Been there and seen them. Amazing stuff Gotta get that book. Was at your webpage today. Really great
antenna you have and it is widely used here with palm trees at the corner posts and the ubiquitous chain link fence below.


Check AA9IL http://www.qsl.net/aa1ll/


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 72 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun 23, 2000 (17:39) * 19 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 25 - June 23, 2000

Average solar flux and sunspot numbers rose slightly this week, and
geomagnetic indices were lower. Planetary and mid-latitude A indices
have been mostly in the single digits. Unfortunately, geomagnetic
conditions may be a bit more active for Field Day this weekend. The
predicted planetary A index for Friday through Tuesday is 15, 15,
20, 20 and 12, but no major disturbance is likely. Solar flux for
the same period is expected to be around 175, 175, 170, 165 and 165,
and should begin rising again around July 1. The short term outlook
is for flux values to slowly rise and then peak around 200 before
the middle of next month.

NASA has an article this week on a proposed model for better
predicting the arrival time of the effects from Coronal Mass
Ejections. You can see the NASA article at
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2000/ast22jun_1m.htm?list and see
more info from a solar physics meeting at
http://www.lmsal.com/spd/Press/ .


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 73 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Jun 25, 2000 (12:55) * 24 lines 
 
Greets to all

Well, back again after another week of silliness. Did pick
up some microwave goodies tho and visit with a fellow radio
op regarding mysterious signals on the HF bands - primarily
Numbers Stations and bizarre digital modes. Also, discussion
on a cw 'beacon' that transmits at intervals on 10.106 Mhz
in the 30 meter band. Strange slow cw text that could be
a prank or a coded message? (ooooh...) No luck hearing it
now since it is early afternoon - will have to try again
at sunset due to propagation.

Speaking of propagation, an interesting book to read is 'Beyond
Line of Sight' by Emil Pocock and is published by the ARRL.
This is a series of reprints from QST covering VHF and up
progagation studies. Kewl Stuph

Also, checked out the web page listed above (AA1LL) - not mine
but does have some interesting links plus a picture of a bug
semi auto key similar to one that I have.

73 de Mike
Radio Cosmo International



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 74 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun 25, 2000 (14:56) * 3 lines 
 
No wonder I had trouble connecting it with you.....you are AA1IL......sigh. I did note the big brass bug and though it would be an object of envy for sure.

Ever catch those voice 'number stations' which recite two number units on and on?? It has been suggested that it is the method of choise to covey covert information - I have heard all accents but the numbers are always in English.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 75 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Jun 25, 2000 (19:59) * 15 lines 
 
Ok, looks like another hot thread with number stations - will have to
move that to the 'Radio' page. I have listened to Spanish speaking
number stations - might have heard some in English as well in my
far distant past... The ones I remember the best are the Spanish
ones tho... There are many theories regarding the purpose of the
stations - most likely a means of passing secret info to operatives
in the field. Not likely a hoax...? It is just about nitefall here
where there will be a peak in grey line propagation - the HF rig is
tuned to 30M but all I hear is static - the HF bands were kind of
poor today to begin with. Well, back to the listening post.

73 de
Secret Agent Mike




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 76 of 605: Mata Hari  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun 25, 2000 (20:15) * 2 lines 
 
I kept a list of frequencies a few years ago...must dig it out and post it.
Wow, I wonder what reminded of them... No hoax... You are right about to operatives in the field and every country did it... Read an article a few years back by an ex CIA operative writing in a Ham-trade magazine (not sure now which one) The code changes daily and an hour which varies from day to day.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 77 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun 25, 2000 (20:25) * 1 lines 
 
Please create the new topic in radio while I hunt for my list... Meet you there!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 78 of 605: Mike Kana  (aa9il) * Sun, Jun 25, 2000 (20:38) * 22 lines 
 
50291 39710 71002 52983
47016 84392 91023 62091
89015 39102 75223 97738
.....

Well, I can see that even my pseudo random key strokes are hardly
pseudo random - you can notice a distinct frequency of 1-0's
plus a pattern of upper 5 digits alternating with lower 5 digits.
The Cray's do have job security, dont they.....

Thought I heard some possible traffic of interest on the target
frequency but was just someone calling CQ.

Shades of the monitoring stations in the Mediterranean that would
copy diplomatic traffic up and down the coast along with a bit
of intercept of North African signals to liven things up a bit.

Ok, back to the static - will have to move this to the radio
page if this keeps up.

RYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRYRY



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 79 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun 25, 2000 (20:41) * 1 lines 
 
You have a pretty good fist and you came up with those results? Amazing! It is very funny that the guy calling CQ was so bad you mistook it for something else. Talk about Novice Class...! Hey, we can topic drift right here. All that stuff was bounced off the Kennelly-Heavyside Layer, anyway.....


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 80 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun 25, 2000 (20:42) * 1 lines 
 
RY? aa9il, what is RY? (I'll get your call right one of these days...sorry!)


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 81 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Jun 25, 2000 (20:53) * 20 lines 
 
Howdy again

RY harkens back to ye olden days of teletype where commercial
stations would send a string of RY's on their channel in between
traffic. Also, (not quite memorized the Baudot) I think the letters
R and Y mirror themselves - kind of like 73 which would be:
_ _ ... ... _ _

Have to look up the baudot sheet for that.
Also, regarding the chap sending CQ - heard a faint cw signal
down in the noise floor - got my attention never the less...

Probably the same effect of trying to pull cw signals out of
the noise on microwave or EME. During the June contests years
ago, I could have sworn I was hearing CW down in the noise floor
on 5.7 GHz. Sleep depravation more likely.

73 de Mike
Radio Cosmo International



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 82 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun 25, 2000 (21:03) * 5 lines 
 
Sleep Depravation can make for interesting notes in the log book, never again to be duplicated. I remember doing it for my Dad when I was the little kid in the family. But, never do I recall anything like in the GHz range. The old HRO just did not have that capacity and I don't think anyone was broadcasting in that range in any case. Not when I was a little kid.

Oh Yeah, *That* RY... Yes! I think you are correct about the mirror image call




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 83 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun 25, 2000 (21:08) * 30 lines 
 
Regarding Number Stations (I recall hearing them in the 6MHz band)

Number Stations
Timothy Lehto

1. Introduction
When listening around the lower frequencies of the international shortwave bands, one may hear stations, usually weak,
reciting endless groups of numbers (usually groups of five, with a letter at the end of each group). These stations, dubbed
"number stations" have been found to be radio stations, operated by foreign governments for the purpose of
communicating to their field agents. Yes, folks, spy radio, and you can listen in!
The first thing you must realize is that, there is no given frequency for certain number stations. They do change frequency
when they feel that security is being compromised. However, they do tend to stay in the lower frequencies for two
reasons. One reason is that at night, an enormous amount of range can be achieved with low power output on low
frequencies. Another is that, for the most part, international broadcasts are above 7 MHz (giving ham operators
headaches).

2. Where and when to look
The best range of frequencies to hunt in is anywhere from 2 MHz to 6.5 MHz. And the best time of day to go hunting for
them is at night. However, it is not impossible for you to hear these clandestine broadcasts during the day -- you just have
to look harder.

3. Listening tips
It is useful to write down the beginning and the end of the broadcasts. Some people are saying that there is a form of
identifier for the station, and it is usually at the beginning or end.
Keep a careful log of where you heard the station, and at what time. Over a period of a few weeks, you may notice a
pattern that will make monitoring easier. And you will be able to determine what part of the world they are communicating
with, the day of the week and time at which they communicate, and if you are lucky, figure out a frequency pattern so that
you can make listening regular.

more at: http://www.tdyc.com/archive/radio/number.html


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 84 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun 25, 2000 (21:13) * 7 lines 
 
The Ultimate Frequency list for the Number Stations:
http://www.btinternet.com/~simon.mason/page51.html

This guy thinks they're fake
http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Hall/5751/what.html

And, if you are truly interested in this subject, I did a google.com search and they came up with 421,997 hits for Number stations.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 85 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Jun 26, 2000 (21:54) * 30 lines 
 
I guess the secret on number stations is out judging from the number
of hits. But has anyone cracked the code yet? Most likely one time
pad ciphers...

Anyway, working back towards earth science, saw a nice picture of
the Aurora in the July issue of CQ. This was a red one. The only
Aurora I ever saw was out a plane window on the way to Seattle.
Looked out and saw this powder blue curtain in the sky - a few
seconds later, the captain announced over the PA that the Aurora
was visible - seconds later after that it was gone.

Just thought of another interesting theory about whistlers - there
was an article in a book titled RadioText(e) published by Semiotext(e)
about an experiment to correlate whistlers with the Marfa lights.
The Marfa lights was a strange visible phenomenon that occurred in
Marfa, Tx (natch...) - strange orbs of light that would jet across
the ground. Speculation ranged from ball lightning, to ghosts, to
strange plasma balls formed from intense geological pressure on
rocks (quartz fissures perhaps?). No end conclusions but interesting
none the less. Closest I ever came to ball lightning was once
witnessing the plasma dissipation after a close lightning strike.
Sort of like strings of lightning pearls.

3's de Mike
radio cosmo international

p.s. - never saw the Marfa lights but did see hundreds of jack rabbits
along the road side during one night of an epic road trip through
West Texas....



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 86 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun 26, 2000 (23:08) * 7 lines 
 
Interesting and nice try, Mike! (random coeds no cracking re number stations)

Your near-ball lightning reminds me of my experience with it. Purple sheet lightning succeeded by these odd plasma pearls (good name for them). Don't ever want to be that close to them again.

The best aurora pix from the latest coronal ejections I posted the best on
http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/read/geo/35.59



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 87 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun 26, 2000 (23:12) * 1 lines 
 
Make that Random CODES not coeds......*grin*


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 88 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Jun 27, 2000 (19:20) * 6 lines 
 
Random coeds

- ah yes, shades of my college days....

:-)



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 89 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Jun 27, 2000 (19:50) * 17 lines 
 
anyway...

Another interesting form of lightning that has been more in
the news in the past decade are the 'sprites' and 'jets'.
These were observed by astronauts and pilots as upward charges
that flare up from the top of a cloud during a strike. These
can be seen as red tendrils and white bursts - must have to
do a search on these as to what is the theoretical (or actual)
cause. One other interesting form of lightning I had a chance
to witness (although, given the circumstances, rather had not...)
was some of the cloud to cloud bursts that would light up the
night sky while viewed from an airplane window. Intense
beauty but rather un-nerving - flying by storms aint much fun.

73 de mike
radio cosmo....



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 90 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jun 27, 2000 (20:52) * 3 lines 
 
You're right about flying in storms. Ain't fun. Did that landing in Tucson once. Blind lighning everywhere. Have NO idea how the pilot landed the place but we gave him a hearty ovation when he emerged from the cockpit!

I've seen NASA footage of Elfs and Sprites and jets. Truly amazing - and colors too. Wonder if I can find pix of them to post...going hunting!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 91 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Jul  4, 2000 (21:35) * 21 lines 
 
And howdy once again....

Got the latest Lowdown yesterday - why is it when I finally
hunker down to work on one project - I get some info on
something completely different that distracts me. This
issue had a discussion on SLF continuous and irregular pulsations.
Frequency range is in the 0 to 3hz range. I guess I'll have
to do some web searches and find some design criteria for
receivers or tunable amplifiers that work at that low frequency.
Then, off to the surplus store to by a 10lb spool of #30awg
copper wire to wind up a 50000 turn pickup loop. Until then,
packaging on the 10ghz transverter will continue....
Talk about interests at the opposite ends of the spectrum.

At least I have not decided to move up to the THz range and
experiment with long range laser communications and optical
cloud bounce. Stay tuned....

73 de Mike
Radio Cosmo International



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 92 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul  4, 2000 (22:52) * 2 lines 
 
No middle of the road for you, Mike! 10 GHz is WAY up there!
I have wound transformers with my Dad - that is a really laborious task. How tedious is winding that loop?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 93 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Jul  6, 2000 (21:14) * 15 lines 
 
Hi Marcia and Geo-ites

I need to do some web research on these loops - I remember from an
old Scientific American book that included a chapter on amateur
seismology that the pickup loop was wound on a large bobbin which
was balanced between the polls of a magnetron magnet. The balance
was fixed to a large concrete pier which picked up the activity
by moving the coil up and down between the magnet poles - awesome
book - wished I could find a copy. The coil for this receiver will
probably be wound on a good dielectric former - not sure if it is
an air coil or has a ferro-magnetic core - probably does. Needless
to say, 50000 turns will require automation!

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 94 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul  6, 2000 (21:45) * 2 lines 
 
Aloha Mike!
Wow!!! 50000 turns....indeed! I shall hunt too for that book. One of us should find what you are looking for. They are reissuing those old but great Scientific American books. Gotta check on the web to see what is available. I would like it as well to make the seismology loop. When my son was young we looked everywhere for that book, but have not looked recently... And, if it as elaborate as you say, it is not a job for a novice former transformer winder!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 95 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Jul  7, 2000 (18:22) * 27 lines 
 
The title of the book is: "The Scientific American Book of Projects for
the Amateur Scientist" or something close to that - the book was written by
CL Stong and sadly it is out of print. This was one of those 'mad scientist'
books which included articles on model rocketry (not Estes!), building
Van de Graff generators, particle accelerators, X Ray machines and other
way cool gadgets that, if printed today, would cause litigation jittery
folks to excrete bricks. This is hard core science in the classic sense
and not for the weak of heart. - I.e. you could either get a cool project
up and running or kill yourself in the process. Now, this is what I
call a science book. The lilly livered can stick to making plaster
of paris volcanos that use baking soda and vinegar.

Anyway, there was a whole section on amateur seismology including mechanical
and electrical designs. Of course, today, you can build up the system
using OP Amps but the pickup coil and pivot/balance should still apply.

Speaking of cool old books - there is an outfit called Lindsay Publications
that puts out books on lost technology - stuff like how to build steam
engines, lathes, tesla coils, and other weird science stuff. They seem
to have quite a bit on Tesla - would like to build up something that
generates a couple of MEV and throw lightning bolts around the basement.
I found a perfect corona discharge orb at a ham fest once and just need
to get a large plexiglass pipe to wind the coil. Kewl stuff.

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 96 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul  7, 2000 (21:49) * 5 lines 
 
For out of print books and rareties: http://abebooks.com/

The things of which dreams are made - Mine, anyway...Van de Graf Generator, Tesla Coil, wood-panelled library with a ceiling orerary. Never mind the rest of the house...I definitly need to find that book! Particle accellerators?!

Mike, if you have not been the British Museum of Science off Cromwell Road in London, get thee hither and watch the lightning in there. What a show - and what a bang! oh, I also need a full length Foucault Pendulum...and...and...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 97 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul  8, 2000 (14:47) * 14 lines 
 


Coronagraphs
on board the Solar and Heliospheric
Observatory (SOHO) recorded a full halo
coronal mass ejection (CME) on July 7 at
1030 UT (6:30 a.m. EDT). Forecasters
estimate that material from the CME,
which was expanding away from the Sun
at 455 km/s, will arrive in the vicinity of
Earth on July 11, 2000.






 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 98 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul  8, 2000 (18:32) * 10 lines 
 
And the propagations rises:

SFI=210 up from 187 | A=7 | K=2 down from 3 at 2100 on 8 July.
SAF: low to moderate, GMF: quiet to unsettled

Aurora Level: 5
Solar Wind: 368.6 km/s at 3.4 protons/cc

More: http://hfradio.org/propagation.html



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 99 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Jul  9, 2000 (23:03) * 12 lines 
 
Got a chance to go to the Science Museum last time I was in London.
Way cool stuph. Only had a short time and focused on the space
section and the telecom/wireless section. Even got to see an
Enigma machine and did also see the pendulum. Missed the lightning
show. Anyway, I'll have to do some rare book searches for the
Sci American book. Probably alot of updated info already exists
on the web. Still need to do some searches on ELF and SLF monitoring
and the integration and/or DSP methods used to extract data.

Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 100 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jul 10, 2000 (00:14) * 1 lines 
 
Mike, you gotta to the the top floor and look at the old boat anchors - there is my dad's HRO there!!! On the same floor and room as the Enigma Machine!!! The lightning generator was in the next building back I think - science and technology. Really great stuph in there!!! Good luck on your searches!!!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 101 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 14, 2000 (12:01) * 51 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 28 - July 14, 2000

Solar activity rose substantially this week. Average sunspot
numbers compared to the previous week rose nearly 68 points to
244.6, and average solar flux rose nearly 39 points to 207.5. A
strong solar flare around 1037z on Wednesday sent a bubble of
electrified gas, or plasma, toward the earth at more than 2 million
miles per hour. Effects of the blast are being felt on Thursday,
and a second more powerful wind is expected to arrive on Friday.
This could be bad news for the Pacific 160 Meter Contest this
weekend, although possible aurora could prove interesting for the 6
Meter Sprint. There is a good chance that any geomagnetic upset may
decline through the weekend though.

These flares originate in sunspot group 9077, which is large and
magnetically complex. It harbors energy for powerful solar flares
which could erupt on Thursday or Friday. For late updates, visit
www.spaceweather.com.

Another URL that bears checking is www.qsl.net/w3df. Dan has put
together some great links of interest to propagation and sun
watchers, including a chart which compares solar cycles 19 through
23. Go to http://www.qsl.net/w3df/sol_f0.html and click on ''Cy
19-23 Comparison.'' You will see that the current cycle is not as
bad as cycle 20, but weaker than cycles 21 or 22, and of course
nowhere near the biggest one of all, cycle 19. The author suffered
through cycle 20 as a teenaged ham in the 1960s, but as a small
child heard the effects of cycle 19, which peaked in the late 1950s.
Father's low band VHF FM business radio in the company car brought
in unfamiliar voices from all over the country to our home in
California's San Joaquin Valley.

The three daily 2000z flux values reported by the Penticton
observatory for July 10-12 were 244.5, 241.6 and 314.6. Because
they were flare enhanced, the NOAA Space Environment Center and the
U.S. Air Force collaborated to come up with more realistic solar
flux numbers, which were 215, 225 and 230. The lower numbers are
the ones used here in our weekly summary.

The latest prediction shows solar flux peaking on Friday around 230,
then drifting down below 200 by July 18, and reaching a short term
minimum around 165 from July 23-26. The next expected peak in solar
flux is around August 6-9. Expect geomagnetic conditions to remain
active. Based on the previous solar rotation, there are no
predicted days over the next month when the planetary A index is
expected to be in the single digits.

Sunspot numbers for July 6 through 12 were 210, 226, 260, 262, 232,
281 and 241 with a mean of 244.6. 10.7 cm flux was 174.3, 187.1,
210, 211.3, 215, 225 and 230, with a mean of 207.5, and estimated
planetary A indices were 7, 8, 7, 7, 19, 31 and 12, with a mean of 13.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 102 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 14, 2000 (14:55) * 12 lines 
 
Powerful Solar Flare Triggers Radiation Storm

Space Weather News for July 14, 2000

This morning an X5-class solar flare, one of the most powerful flares of
the current solar cycle, triggered a proton storm in the neighborhood of
our planet. Just after the eruption, coronagraphs on board the ESA/NASA
Solar and Heliospheric Observatory recorded a full halo coronal mass
ejection heading toward Earth at greater than 1000 km/s. Please visit
http://www.spaceweather.com for details and updates on this developing
story.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 103 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 14, 2000 (19:20) * 22 lines 
 
The following Alerts and Warnings are in effect:

sr@hfradio.org

The following Alerts and Warnings are in effect:

Magnetic A-Index greater than 50 Watch for 15 Jul 2000 UT
Comment: K-indices of greater than 6 are possible beginning at 1800 UT on 15 July

Magnetic A-Index greater than 50 Watch for 16 Jul 2000 UT
Comment: K-indices of greater than 6 are possible beginning at 1800 UT on 15 July

Magnetic A-Index greater than 50 Watch for 17 Jul 2000 UT
Comment: K-indices of greater than 6 are possible beginning at 1800 UT on 15 July

Magnetic K-Index of 6 Observed 14 Jul 2000 from 15:00 to 18:00 UT
Comment: None


More: http://hfradio.org/propagation.html




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 104 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 15, 2000 (16:36) * 22 lines 
 
An Extreme Geomagnetic Storm is Underway

Space Weather News for July 15, 2000

A powerful shock wave from the fast-moving July 14th coronal mass ejection
has arrived in the neighborhood of Earth. An extreme geomagnetic storm
was underway at 1900 UT (3:00 p.m. EDT) on July 15th. If conditions
persist as they are now, aurora could be visible at middle (and possibly
even equatorial) latitudes. The best time to view aurora is usually near
local midnight. In this case, sky watchers are advised to look for aurora
as soon as night falls. For more information and updates please visit
http://www.spaceweather.com

Readers are invited to send pictures of tonight's aurora and the July 16,
2000, total lunar eclipse (visible across the Pacific Ocean) as an email
attachment to phillips@spacescience.com for possible posting on
spaceweather.com and/or spacescience.com.

For more information about the lunar eclipse:

Pacific Lunar Eclipse
http://spacescience.com/headlines/y2000/ast14jul_1m.htm


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 105 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 15, 2000 (18:01) * 8 lines 
 
SFI=213 up from 204 | A=118 up from 29 | K=9 up from 8 at 2100 on 15 July.
SAF: moderate to high, GMF: at minor to severe storm levels

Aurora Level: 10
Solar Wind: 257.2 km/s at 0.7 protons/cc

More: http://hfradio.org/propagation.html



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 106 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 15, 2000 (18:07) * 36 lines 
 
SEVERE GEOMAGNETIC STORM:

Kp Index is at 9. A Index is 118.

We are in a catagory G5 Storm. NOAA's Space Weather
scale indicates the following effects:

Power systems: grid systems can collapse and
transformers experience damage.


Spacecraft operations: extensive surface charging,
problems with orientation, uplink/downlink, and
tracking satellites.


Other systems: pipeline currents reach hundreds of
amps, HF (high frequency) radio propagation
impossible in many areas for one to two days,
satellite navigation degraded for days,
low-frequency radio navigation out for hours, and
the aurora seen as low as the equator.

The Proton Monitor on the Solar and Heliospheric
Observatory is registering solar wind speeds in
excess of 900 km/s

The wave of solar particles - known as a solar
proton event - is already four times more intense
than any other event detected since the launches
of SOHO in 1995 and ACE in 1997. At mid-afternoon
(UT) on July 14th, the storm of particles from
the Sun was still intensifying.

More: http://hfradio.org/propagation.html



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 107 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 21, 2000 (12:14) * 123 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 29 - July 21, 2000

This has been quite a week for solar activity, with blasts of solar
wind dominating space weather news. Saturday was the big day for HF
radio blackouts and aurora, with the planetary A index jumping to an
incredible 152 and the mid-latitude A index at 148. The planetary K
index, updated every three hours, was at 9 for three readings on
Saturday. A K index reading of 9 over a 24-hour period would be
equivalent to an A index of 300. This is big, really big.

These numbers are associated with an extreme geomagnetic storm that
was nearly off the scale. On Friday one of the most powerful solar
flares of the current cycle triggered a storm of protons directed
toward earth. The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory recorded a full
halo coronal mass ejection heading toward earth at greater than
one-million meters per second. Check out animations of this event at
http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/data/CME/.

There are only a few events of this magnitude in the average solar
cycle. The only factor that probably impeded a spectacular aurora
visible far down into the U.S. was that this is the summer season.
A dark evening sky would reveal a rich tapestry of northern lights.
Of course, it being winter in the southern hemisphere, bright
displays were reported in Australia and New Zealand. The author made
a weak attempt Saturday night, walking barefoot into the middle of
the street and trying to peer north past city lights, but no auroral
glow was visible. Seattle is north of the 47th parallel, and
although there were no local reports of aurora, there were
observations as far south as 40 degrees in Europe, Asia, and parts
of Eastern North America. If you point your web browser toward
http://www.sec.noaa.gov/info/kp-aurora.html you will see a nice map
from the June, 1968 issue of Sky and Telescope which shows how far
south aurora may be visible depending on the planetary K index.
What is not clear from this map is whether it shows how far south
the edge of the aurora extends, or how far south it is visible when
looking north.

Another coronal mass ejection emerged on Wednesday, July 19, but the
predicted effect is uncertain because the ejection may not be aimed
squarely at earth. On Thursday the planetary K index went up to 6
for several hours, but by the end of the UTC day it was 3. The
planetary A index for Thursday was 43, and the College A index,
recorded in Alaska, was 57.

The latest forecast shows the planetary A index rising to 50 on
Friday, then dropping to 20 and 15 and then 10 on Saturday through
Monday. Solar flux peaked for the recent short term at 252.9 on
Thursday, and is expected to drop to 245, 235, 230 and 225 on Friday
through Monday. The next short term minimum is predicted around July
28 at 170, followed by another peak above 200 around August 6-9.

The author has received many more inquiries recently asking for
explanations of the various parameters reported in this bulletin.
Although the explanations were repeated six weeks ago, it is
probably time to run them again, and they follow this paragraph.
Feel free to send questions to the author via k7vvvarrl.net.

Amateur Radio operators who use HF generally like increased sunspots
because they correlate with better worldwide radio propagation.
When there are more sunspots, the sun puts out radiation which
charges particles in the earth's ionosphere. Radio waves bounce off
of these charged particles, and the denser these clouds of ions, the
better the HF propagation. When the ionosphere is denser, higher
frequencies will reflect off of the ionosphere rather than passing
through to space. This is why every 11 years or so when this
activity is higher, 10 meters gets exciting. 10 meters is at a high
enough frequency, right near the top of the HF spectrum, that radio
waves propagate very efficiently when the sunspot count is high.
Because of the wavelength, smaller antennas are very efficient on
this band, so mobile stations running low power on 10 meters can
communicate world wide on a daily basis when the sunspot cycle is at
its peak. There are also seasonal variations, and 10 meters tends to
be best near the spring or fall equinox.

The sunspot numbers used in this bulletin are calculated by counting
the sunspots on the visible solar surface and also measuring their
area. Solar flux is measured at an observatory in British Columbia
using an antenna pointed toward the sun tuned to 2.8 GHz, which is
at a wavelength of 10.7 cm. Energy detected seems to correlate with
sunspots and with the density of the ionosphere.

Other solar activity of concern to HF operators are solar flares and
coronal holes, which emit protons. Since the charged ions in the
ionosphere are negative, a blast of protons from the sun can
neutralize the charge and make the ionosphere less reflective.
These waves of protons can be so intense that they may trigger an
event called a geomagnetic storm.

The Planetary A index relates to geomagnetic stability.
Magnetometers around the world are used to generate a number called
the Planetary K index. You can hear the Boulder K index updated
every three hours on WWV, or by calling 303-497-3235.

A one point change in the K index is quite significant. A K index
below 3 generally means good stable conditions, and above 3 can mean
high absorption and poor reflection of radio waves. Each point
change reflects a big change in conditions.

Every 24 hours the K index is summarized in a number called the A
index. A one point change in A value is not very significant. A full
day with the K index at 3 will produce an A index of 15, K of 4
means A of 27, K of 5 means A of 48, and K of 6 means A of 80. You
can find an explanation of these numbers on the web at
http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/stp/GEOMAG/kp_ap.html.

The number reported here is the Planetary A index, which is a
worldwide average based on the K readings from a number of
magnetometers. The numbers reported on WWV are the Boulder K and A
index, measured in Colorado. Generally the higher the latitude of
the measuring station, the higher the K and A indices reported.
This is because the effects of geomagnetic instability tend to
concentrate toward the polar regions of the globe.

Currently we are near the peak of the solar cycle, so conditions are
generally better because of the increased ionization of the
ionosphere. But along with the increased sunspots come more solar
flares and coronal holes, producing disturbed conditions.

Sunspot numbers for July 13 through 19 were 240, 243, 229, 268, 335,
343 and 342 with a mean of 285.7. 10.7 cm flux was 231.9, 203.9,
213.1, 218.9, 228.3, 261.9 and 249.9, with a mean of 229.7, and
estimated planetary A indices were 33, 35, 152, 46, 9, 13 and 15,
with a mean of 43.3.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 108 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Jul 26, 2000 (19:39) * 10 lines 
 
And, back again....

No real activity during the last geo storm - there was supposedly
band openings in TX but I didnt work any and no contacts on 2m
SSB.

when is the next one?

de AA9IL



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 109 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 26, 2000 (20:58) * 1 lines 
 
Soon, Mike, and I shall let you know as soon as I do!! I stayed up looking for both Comet Linear and the Aurora and saw nothing.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 110 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 27, 2000 (12:48) * 1 lines 
 
(If I could predict the next coronal mass ejection (CME) I would be a wealthy and classified person!)


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 111 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Jul 28, 2000 (18:20) * 19 lines 
 
If you could predict CME's, Id think you were working on the
HAARP project. Or, at least simulating geo storms in the upper
atmosphere.

Back down on earth, the need to do the across the lake propagation
experiments is high on the list. The weather just seems right
for such stunts. Just need to schedule with someone on the
Michigan side.

Speaking of HAARP and such, ever heard of the International Tesla
Society - used to publish a magazine on weird science stuff
including those govt conspiracy projects. There is probably
a web page covering this group. Needless to say, a good place
to look for info on Scalar Waves and generating signals at the
earth's resonant frequency.

de Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 112 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 28, 2000 (23:49) * 2 lines 
 
Yup....plenty of weird stuff in the "real" world about Tesla including "the Philadelphia project.
Protecting my identity by assuming the guise of a mild-mannered Geo conference host...Maaarcia


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 113 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Aug  2, 2000 (16:51) * 18 lines 
 
Mike, here's one for you, or did you know about this frequency?!

Unknown Submarine Volcano
Volcano Islands, Japan
22-27 N, 138-141 E

Robert Dziak at the NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in
Newport, Oregon reported that 10 Hz band-limited tremor was detected from
the Volcano Islands area after a 6 month hiatus (Bulletin, v. 24, nos. 11
and 12). The current episode of signals began at 0800 UTC on 13 June, but
were loudest at 0100-0200 UTC on 14 June. The tremor tracks to presumed
submarine volcanism at an uncertain volcano.

Information Contact: Robert P. Dziak, Oregon State University/NOAA,
Hatfield Marine Science Center, 2115 SE OSU Drive, Newport, OR 97365 USA
(Email: dziak@pmel.noaa.gov; URL: http://newport.pmel. Noaa.gov/).




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 114 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug  4, 2000 (20:48) * 41 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 31 - August 4, 2000

Solar activity for last week (July 28 - August 3) was mostly at low
levels. A minor M-class flare from region 9090 occurred on July 28.
Several new regions (9110, 9111, 9112, 9113, 9114, and 9115) emerged
later in the week. Region 9114 produced a C7 flare and associated
CME on August 2.
The 10.7 cm solar flux, following the sun's 27-day rotation period,
decreased to a minimum of about 155 at the beginning of last week.
Solar flux is forecasted to steadily climb to a maximum of about 240
around mid-August. A comment about 10.7 cm solar flux - although
10.7 cm solar flux is easy to measure because the Earth's atmosphere
is transparent at that wavelength, energy at 10.7 cm is about 1
million times less energetic than the true ionizing energy. Thus
10.7 cm solar flux contributes nothing to the formation of the
ionosphere. But it is an indicator of the general activity level of
the sun, and smoothed solar flux values (a 12 month running average)
correlate very well with smoothed sunspot numbers (SSN).
Solar activity for next week (August 4 - August 10) is expected to
be at moderate to high levels. Isolated M-class flares are
expected, along with a chance for an isolated major flare.
Historically the equinox months (September and March) give us the
greatest amount of magnetic storms due to the orientation of the
Earth at these times with respect to the solar wind. Thus expect an
increase in storms up to mid-September, then a gradual decrease
after that to a minimum in December.
Cycle 23 continues its march upward, with a peak forecasted by the
end of the year. For details, see the web site referenced in last
week's bulletin (http://www.sec.noaa.gov/weekly/index.html). The
latest SSN data is 113 for January 2000. The estimated SSN for the
month of August is 120. Cycle 23 appears to be similar to, but just
a bit higher than, Cycle 20, which peaked at an SSN of 110. This
level of activity, while not approaching that of Cycles 22 and 21,
will still give us excellent conditions on the higher HF bands as we
progress from Summer to Fall and into Winter.
Sunspot numbers for July 27 through August 2 were 174, 163, 183,
138, 123, 139 and 153 with a mean of 153.3. 10.7 cm flux was 162.4,
157.8, 153.2, 149.9, 147.9, 149.4 and 150.6, with a mean of 153, and
estimated planetary A indices were 9, 30, 27, 10, 19, 15 and 14,
with a mean of 17.7.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 115 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Aug  9, 2000 (19:11) * 20 lines 
 
Greetings All

I would suspect the SLF crowd and earthquake monitoring bunch
got some good integration signals from that volcano.

New web page - check oug www.vlf.it

No new info otherwise on this end - started pulling out parts
for a 5.7ghz transverter that is close completion.

Weird weather info tho - we have been having some strong
thunder storms pass through the area. One day, it was very
balmy and hot prior to a big storm front pushing through.
Went driving and watched the outside temp shoot from the
80's to 101 in one area - some kind of heat cell? Of course,
after the storm hit, the temp dropped down to the 70's.
Have to do some research on that.

73 de Mike



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 116 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Aug  9, 2000 (23:55) * 3 lines 
 
WOW!!! The conspiracy theorists would have a field day with temperature inversions like that! Let us know what you discover!

You do know about the mass coronal emissions headed this way?! Posted it next door on 34 today.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 117 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug 11, 2000 (21:12) * 13 lines 
 
and yet another one...

SFI=187 up from 181 | A=49 up from 26 | K=3 at 2100 on 11 August.
SAF: low to moderate, GMF: at active to minor storm levels
Aurora Level: 9
Solar Wind: 645.3 km/s at 4.0 protons/cc

SFI=187 | A=56 up from 49 | K=6 up from 3 at 0000 on 12 August.
SAF: low to moderate, GMF: at active to major storm levels
Aurora Level: 10
Solar Wind: 627.8 km/s at 10.8 protons/cc




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 118 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug 21, 2000 (14:46) * 14 lines 
 
Ham Radios in Space

NASA Science News for August 21, 2000

Ham radio operators are notorious for their love
of long-distance radio chats. Now, thanks to
NASA's SAREX program, hams and students on Earth
can enjoy the ultimate long-distance radio
experience by contacting astronauts in orbit.

FULL STORY at

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2000/ast21aug_1.htm?list



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 119 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug 25, 2000 (11:56) * 57 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 34 - August 25, 2000

Solar activity took a big dive over the past week, with sunspot
numbers dropping to 84 on August 22 and 23. Although NASA's
Spaceweather.com reported that the Boulder sunspot number has not
been this low in this calendar year, our records from past bulletins
show that it has been lower than this several times in January.
Boulder sunspot numbers, which are the ones reported weekly in this
bulletin, were 69 on January 1 and 2, 77 on January 3, 81 on January
29 and 82 on January 31, 2000.

Does this drop mean that the peak for the current cycle has passed?
Not at all. There are many wild variations in solar activity over
the course of the average 11 year cycle, and the only real way to
determine the peak or the minimum is to look back at a moving
average many months later.

The quieter sun did present some advantages for HF operators,
because while the activity was lower, the earth's geomagnetic
conditions were quieter as well. The College A index, from
Fairbanks, Alaska, was mostly in the single digits, and there were
19 three-hour periods over the week when the College K index was
actually 0, lower than the planetary K index at any time. This is
significant because the higher latitudes have greater geomagnetic
instability at times of heightened solar activity. During this week
the area near the Arctic Circle, at least in Alaska, was quieter
than the average for the entire planet.

Conditions look quieter for the near term as well. Solar flux is
probably bottoming out over the next few days, with predicted values
for Friday through Tuesday at 128, 128, 130, 132, and 135.
Predicted planetary A index looks quiet as well, with unsettled
conditions possible for August 30 through September 3. Solar flux
for the next few weeks is expected to peak at only 175 near
September 7-9. This is based only on what is known about activity
during the previous rotation, and any new activity could change
this.

The fall equinox is less than one month away (September 22), and
soon we should see a transition from summer to fall conditions.
Daytime absorption on the upper bands and atmospheric noise on lower
frequencies should be lessened, and stronger signals should be the
rule for this equinox at the peak of solar cycle 23.

AE4TM sent along a web link for his experiments using Pactor with
ionospheric observations. Check out his web page at
http://home.earthlink.net/~ae4tm/hamradio.html and send him your
feedback. Another interesting link was received this week. Check
http://www.discovery.com/cams/sun/uv.html to see a live webcam from
the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory which is updated every 12
minutes with a new ultraviolet solar image.

Sunspot numbers for August 17 through 23 were 252, 231, 209, 150,
132, 84 and 84 with a mean of 163.1. 10.7 cm flux was 177.1, 169.5,
157.1, 152.4, 151.4, 144.2 and 136.9, with a mean of 155.5, and
estimated planetary A indices were 11, 6, 6, 7, 12, 5 and 11 with a
mean of 8.3.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 120 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Sep  4, 2000 (12:19) * 16 lines 
 
Ok, and back again....

Another part of the radio telescope has been found - a 1.1 to
1.2 GHz phase locked brick oscillator - this requires an external
source to get lock. Hopefuly this is a 'quiet' oscillator (i.e.
low phase noise) otherwise I will have to resort to 'plan B'
whatever that is....

This oscillator will be good for a hydrogen line receiver (1.4ghz).
With fall/winter coming up, plenty of time to be cooped up in the
house to work on projects.

73 de Mike
p.s. - most recent Sky and Telescope has an interesting article
on detecting gravity waves - more details to follow....



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 121 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep  4, 2000 (12:59) * 4 lines 
 
How fantastic that progress is by leaps and bounds now rather than by things measured by micrometers! You will know soon enough if you are doing your searching "silently" - neighbors seldom suffer in silence!

I found another site to listen to some of the goodies Mike will be hearing in his quest of things not normally discernable by the human ear...
http://216.156.129.123/home/


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 122 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Sep  4, 2000 (15:34) * 20 lines 
 
Howdy howdy

Yea, it will be interesting to see the reaction to the 8 foot
solid aluminum dish in the back yard. Thats scheduled for
after the spring thaw tho... (2001 - an appropriate year to
start the search)

Until then, all the work will be indoors - building receivers
and such - I might try to whip together a VLF loop antenna
for winter listening. BTW, there is quite a bit of VLF
activity in the UK on 137khz. There has also been research
on VLF beacons conducted by AMRAD - dont have their URL
but a search on AMRAD will turn up the pages.

Finally, a couple of good articles on the Magnetosphere in
CQ magazine.

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 123 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep  4, 2000 (16:01) * 5 lines 
 
Aloha Mike, the man from RCI,

Thanks for the heads-up on the activity in the UK (from whence commeth your latest hernia and boat anchor...) I think I need to climb back onto the roof with emery paper, sharp knife, wire strippers and soldering iron plus a bunch of shrink tubing and duct tape to fix the corroded antenna downlead connection to the rooftop trap dipole. It has gotten to the point where wiggling does not work and I am sure the next time I wiggle it will disconnect it altogether.

Marcia, fluxing my way to aural fulfillment....


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 124 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Sep  4, 2000 (16:29) * 17 lines 
 
Hey Marcia

I take it that you are crunching for seti@home? Might be phun
to post what part of the sky you are doing analysis on.

Oy - forget what its like to have salt air to corrode the
antenna - we just have acid rain from Chicago. Get hold
of some RTV cement and liberally coat the solder connections.
That should help.

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international

currently crunching:
from 18hr 23' 56" RA 13deg 35' 24"
1.419472626Ghz
(splish splash in the water hole...)


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 125 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Sep  4, 2000 (20:18) * 11 lines 
 
Well, judging how fast the old P90 is cranking, this data
reduction will take a while....

Good reason to get a Beowulf cluster up and running....

crunch crunch crunch
pull back mechanical tabulation handle
crunch crunch....

de Mike



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 126 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep  4, 2000 (20:26) * 7 lines 
 
Currently crunching my 76th block of data (1193 hours on...)

5 hr 3' 7" Right Assention, +10° 13' 47" Declination

recorded on Fri, June 16th 16:15:03 GMT

Thanks for the tip on protecing the new solder joint... Yeah not only do we have salt air, we also have mother nature's very own acid rain when the volcano fumes are wafted in this direction and it rains. Cannot believe how it corrodes glass! I hate to think of metals which are so much more reactive...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 127 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep  4, 2000 (20:26) * 1 lines 
 
sigh...Ascention...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 128 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep  4, 2000 (20:40) * 9 lines 
 
Base Frequency: 1.420556641 GHz

Doppler drift rate: -6.7730 Hz/sec

Best Gaussian: power 1.49, fit 5.172

(have no idea what that last refers to... what is a fit??!)

I gather you are also receiving data from Arecibo?!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 129 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Sep  7, 2000 (20:03) * 12 lines 
 
Yep, the data is from Arecibo.
Just started crunching on data again but this is gonna
take a while. I figure it will be nice to analyze
data parallel to building my system. Of course, the
frequency stability and sensitivity will be a far
cry from the big dish but it should collect some
good sky data (given I overcome drifty receivers,
man made noise, internal system noise, dish pointing,
etc. etc. etc....) Should be fun!

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 130 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Sep  8, 2000 (00:53) * 1 lines 
 
Looking forward to seeing how your dish data compares with Arecibo's...hardly in the same league of course. Not eveyone has has a bunch of mountains in their back yard into which to set a super-sized radio telescope dish...!!! Please let us know how it progresses. I am salivating at the thought and I can see atleast 7 world class telescopes from my front yard!!! If only they'd build one closer to the house...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 131 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sat, Sep  9, 2000 (13:25) * 23 lines 
 
Howdy howdy Marcia and Geo-ites

Well, still cranking on the FFT's - so far no unique modulation
patterns although there is some distinct noise sources that are
showing up - have to take the RA/DEC coordinates from Arecibo
and see what part of the sky they are pointing at. I wonder what
the data display looks like for folks who are actually pointing
at galactic noise sources.
Seven telescopes? Tres cool. One of the neat things about
living near a major research site. Lots of inspiration.
Next on my 'to buy' list will be an A to D converter to collect
data to load on my PC. The ones with low resolution are not
too expensive - have to check out the radio astronomy parts
web pages. Then, get a feed horn for the dish - I could build
one if I had some reasonable metal working skills but I dont...
I could solder a couple of coffee cans together since they are
at about the right frequency. Major inspiration for me today
was driving around and listening to Pink Floyd's 'Astronomy Domine'
and 'A Saucerful of Secrets'. Appropriate space music....

73 de Mike
Radio Cosmo International



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 132 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Sep  9, 2000 (15:41) * 4 lines 
 
Pink Floyd ain't all that bad, but I am giving Napster a real go through getting my stock of 80's rock from Moody Blues to Arrowsmith and Elton John. They can inspire the most primal and lofty urges depending on the company I am keeping and the job at had at the moment....=)

Arecibo is sending me 6hr 34min 22 sec RA..... +9 degrees 6 minutes 35 seconds Declination at the moment. How odes that compare with yours??? Wonder if my low latitude matters compared with yours...!



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 133 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sat, Sep  9, 2000 (21:35) * 23 lines 
 
The 'Floyd is for those spacey pondering moments. Tonite I picked up
some techno and dance remix stuff plus some rowdy garage punk at a
Chicago northside cd store before going to the local used book place
to sift through astronomy text books and chess strategy tutorials.
Guess I shift on musique tastes quite a bit...

BTW, the date on my data block was June 15 04:38:03 2000 - still
crunching the same block from a couple of postings ago. One thing
Im going to save some extra $$ for is a faster CPU!

If you check out the Society of Amateur Radio Astronomers home page,
there is a link to a radio astronomy supplies to get an idea of
some of the components available. These include hydrogen line
receivers and Jupiter receivers. I will probably buy the feed
horn and A-D converter but will build up the receiver from scratch.
The LNA will be in kit form if I can find it otherwise will have
to go with factory built.

Rock On!
de Mike
radio cosmo international




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 134 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Sep 10, 2000 (20:53) * 3 lines 
 
You sound as eclectic in music as I am. I used be entirely classical - Bach and Telemann up reluctantly through Stravinsky and Copland. Lately I have discoverd how great some of that 80's stuff really is..and since I also love baseball I have Dan Fogarty's Centerfield Hey, the Moody Blues used the London Symphony Orchestra for their background music!!!

Will be eager to know when you get higher power for your CPU. 700 MHz sucks the data out of the air. Tis a wonderful thing, power!!!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 135 of 605: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Tue, Sep 12, 2000 (18:15) * 1 lines 
 
I had the hardest time with classical music of the Early Twentieth Century, such as Schoenberg and Charles Ives. To me it sounded, at first, like a cross between a jackhammer and sewer backing up. It is what can be termed an "acquired taste".


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 136 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 12, 2000 (23:51) * 13 lines 
 
Spectacular Solar Eruption on Sept 12, 2000

Space Weather News for Sept 12, 2000
http://www.spaceweather.com

On Tuesday, Sept. 12, less than 24 hours after the sunspot number plunged
to its lowest value of the year, the Sun unleashed a surprising full-halo
coronal mass ejection (CME). The leading edge of the CME could reach
Earth on Thursday, Sept 14. Forecasters estimate a 30% chance of severe
geomagnetic disturbances (possibly including aurora) at middle latitudes
when the shock front arrives.

For more information and images, please visit http://spaceweather.com


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 137 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Sep 13, 2000 (00:31) * 1 lines 
 
Cheryl, that is hilarious!!! My thoughts exactly. I was offended by the composer who wrote "7 minuites of silence" until I heard "avant guarde" music. Oxymoron of the most nasty sort. I was offended more by the noise than the silence!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 138 of 605: Maggie  (sociolingo) * Wed, Sep 13, 2000 (03:16) * 1 lines 
 
Oops! Not sending you my composition 'noise and misunderstanding' then. definitely a child of the 60s!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 139 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Sep 14, 2000 (16:38) * 10 lines 
 
The CME has entered the Ionosphere! Look for Aurura tonight!!!

SFI=151 up from 133 | A=7 down from 9 | K=1 at 2100 on 14 September.
SAF: low to moderate, GMF: at quiet to major storm levels

Aurora Level: 7
Solar Wind: 333.2 km/s at 1.7 protons/cm3

More Info and Unsubscribe at http://hfradio.org/propagation.html



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 140 of 605: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Thu, Sep 14, 2000 (19:28) * 1 lines 
 
There was supposed to have been a geomagnetic storm within the last 24 hours. Does anybody know anything about it?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 141 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Sep 14, 2000 (20:21) * 1 lines 
 
Yup....read the above two posts. the was a major CME (Coronal Mass Ejection) on the 12th...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 142 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Sep 16, 2000 (17:43) * 11 lines 
 
Check for Aurora tonight!!!


SFI=175 up from 159 | A=18 up from 12 | K=3 down from 4 at 2100 on 16 September.
SAF: moderate to high, GMF: unsettled to active

Aurora Level: 8
Solar Wind: 386.0 km/s at 10.4 protons/cm3

More Info and Unsubscribe at http://hfradio.org/propagation.html



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 143 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Sep 16, 2000 (19:36) * 21 lines 
 
16 September, 2000

Two full-halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occurred on September 15, 2000,
and a third CME on September 16, 2000 has been observed as the brightest of
the three. These were associated with solar flares (M5-class for the
latest of the three CMEs). Due to the complex delta magnetic field in the
Sunspot group 9165, there is a good chance for further eruptions.

Those who wish to experience Aurora (visual as well as the radio
propagation mode) should be on the lookout from this point forward. At
the time of writing, the Aurora index is 10, the highest level.

:ALERTS:

Magnetic K-Index of 4 Warning valid from 16 September, 2000 1800Z to
17 September, 2000 1500Z. Magnetic A-Index greater than=30 Watch for 19
September, 2000Z. Magnetic A-Index greater than=30 Watch for 20 September, 2000Z.

Report by NW7US

More: http://hfradio.org/propagation.html


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 144 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep 18, 2000 (17:47) * 11 lines 
 
All I can tell you from the Latitude of Hawaii is that Radio Australia was almost intelligible last night (listening to the Olympics) due to the "noise" Aurora level is down but the solar flux is higher than ever...!

SFI=204 up from 182 | A=33 up from 28 | K=2 down from 5 at 2100 on 18 September.
SAF: low to moderate, GMF: at active to minor storm levels

Aurora Level: 5
Solar Wind: 667.8 km/s at 0.8 protons/cm3

More Info and Unsubscribe at http://hfradio.org/propagation.html




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 145 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep 18, 2000 (22:31) * 11 lines 
 
Mike, how's your Seti@home doing?
Mine is working on its 92nd block of data (almost finished) in 1406 hours 57 minutes

22hr 15' 10" RA
+ 25 deg 45' 0" Dec

1.420800761 GHZ

Be sure you are running the 2.04 version - is is much speedier!




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 146 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep 18, 2000 (22:33) * 1 lines 
 
Does anyone know how or if the current Geomagentic storm affects these transmissions? It certainly must...!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 147 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Sep 21, 2000 (15:22) * 13 lines 
 
A Whale of a Sunspot

Space Weather News for Sept. 21, 2000
http://www.spaceweather.com

The biggest sunspot to come along in 9 years is now rotating toward the
center of the Sun's disk. Visit http://www.spaceweather.com to find out
how this huge spot compares to other sunspots in history and how to safely
view the sunspot for yourself.

SpaceWeather.com




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 148 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Sep 21, 2000 (15:27) * 2 lines 
 
check it out here



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 149 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Sep 21, 2000 (15:28) * 1 lines 
 
or.... http://sec.noaa.gov/solar_images/current_fdha_stamp.gif


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 150 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Sep 23, 2000 (00:10) * 12 lines 
 
Aloha Mike...I need you input. I get a guy in California running Seti@home now and he has a few questions - some a little tongue-in-cheek, but I told him I'd ask the resident expert. Will you let me know what to tell him...Please?

* What makes them think ET transmits on normal frequencies... I
mean even Star Treck uses sub space... a feasible concept.

* Ask him why the Seti's think ET would use technology we are familiar with

* If someone shot a standard radio signal into space, I think it would decay before it got out of the galaxy

*I would think that cosmic radiation would fairly much wipe out a signal

Mahalo for thinking about it...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 151 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Sep 23, 2000 (00:58) * 56 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 38 - September 22, 2000

Last week's bulletin reported that the sun was almost spotless, with
one day's sunspot number the lowest since February of last year.
Now this week we can report the appearance of sunspot 9169, the
largest observed in nine years. The area of this spot is a dozen
times the area of the earth's surface, and what should make it
interesting for HF radio is that it is rotating toward the center of
the sun's earth-facing hemisphere, which aims its effects right
toward us. A large sunspot such as this can produce big solar
flares, but so far this one, although magnetically complex, seems
quiet.

This week's big one measures 2,140 millionths of the visible solar
disk. The largest sunspot recorded in the twentieth century was in
1947, and it measured 6,132 millionths of the solar disk. You can
see more information about big sunspots at
http://www.spaceweather.com/sunspots/history.html .

Solar flux has been much higher this week than predicted. Last
week's bulletin projected a solar flux around 170, but by Sunday it
was above 180 and the next day over 200.

The projected solar flux for the next five days, Friday through
Tuesday, is 230, 235, 235, 230 and 225. Planetary A index for those
same days is expected to be around 10, 10, 10, 15 and 12. So for
this weekend we not only have the autumnal equinox, which is a great
time for HF propagation, but solar flux and sunspot numbers are
increasing as well. This means good conditions, as long as
geomagnetic activity stays low.

Geomagnetic activity was anything but low on Sunday and Monday, when
the effects of several solar flares were felt. Planetary A index for
both days was 40 and 45, and K indices were as high as 7. The
College A index, recorded in Alaska, was 59 on September 17, and the
College K index was 8 during one period. This was indicative of a
severe geomagnetic storm as well as an aurora at that time.

Over the next few weeks expect the higher frequencies, especially 10
meters, to improve as we change to fall conditions.

Last week's bulletin mentioned a chart showing solar cycle progress.
Check out another chart showing activity over the past few months on
Jan Alvestad's Solar Activity Report at http://www.dxlc.com/solar/ ,
or the past year of Daily Effective Sunspot Numbers at the NW
Research Associates site at
http://www.nwra-az.com/spawx/ssne-year.html . For an explanation of
Effective Sunspot Numbers, which are based on ionospheric F-layer
observations rather than solar observations, see
http://www.nwra-az.com/spawx/ssne.html .

Sunspot numbers for September 14 through 20 were 109, 113, 148, 146,
154, 140 and 171 with a mean of 140.1. 10.7 cm flux was 150.8,
159.4, 174.6, 181.5, 203.8, 207.1 and 211.4, with a mean of 184.1,
and estimated planetary A indices were 6, 10, 21, 40, 45, 27 and 13
with a mean of 23.1.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 152 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 26, 2000 (19:03) * 16 lines 
 
Possible aurora this week

Space Weather news for Sept. 26, 2000
http://www.spaceweather.com

A solar coronal mass ejection that left the Sun on Sept. 25th could
strike
Earth's magnetosphere on Wednesday and trigger mid-latitude aurora.
The
timing is good because the Moon will reach its new phase on Sept. 27th,
affording dark skies for aurora watchers.

For more information, please visit http://www.spaceweather.com
SpaceWeather.com




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 153 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Sep 29, 2000 (14:56) * 128 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 39 - September 29, 2000

Solar flux and sunspot numbers were up over the past week, while
average geomagnetic indices were lower, which is always a happy
condition for HF radio enthusiasts. Solar flux peaked at 232.2 on
Friday and sunspot numbers peaked at 255 on Sunday. Average sunspot
numbers for the week were up nearly 87 points, and average solar
flux rose by almost 39 points, when compared to the previous week.

The sunspot number is calculated by counting the visible sunspots
and factoring in their size, so a significant factor was sunspot
9169, reported in last week's Propagation Forecast Bulletin ARLP038
as one of the largest seen in many years. It is now fading as it
rotates off of the visible solar disk. We were lucky not to have a
great deal of flare activity from this magnetically complex spot.

K4WY sent a web reference concerning this particular sunspot. Check
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap000925.html .

The most active geomagnetic day over the past week was Tuesday, when
the planetary A index was 21. Planetary K index was 4 during most of
the day, but Alaska's College K index, which is usually higher
because of the polar region proximity, was as high as 6. College A
index was 37 for the day.

Friday and Saturday were the quietest geomagnetic days, with A
indices in the single-digits, Planetary K indices at 2 and 3, and
mid-latitude K indices at 1 and 2. Fortunately for HF enthusiasts,
this was also the period when the sunspot count and solar flux were
the highest, which often is not the case.

Geomagnetic indices should remain stable over the next few days,
with planetary A indices predicted at around 10. On Monday through
Wednesday the A index is forecast at 12, 15 and 12, probably based
on the previous solar rotation. This indicates an unsettled to
active geomagnetic conditions, with higher absorption of HF radio
signals, particularly in the higher latitude or polar paths.

Solar flux is expected to decline over the next few days, with
Saturday at 190 and Sunday around 180. For the short term, flux
values should reach a minimum near 155 around October 7-9, then head
above 200 again around mid-month.

We have now passed the autumnal equinox, and are experiencing Fall
HF conditions. 10 and 12 meter operators should expect great
propagation, at least when the K index as reported by WWV is 3 or
less. Openings follow the sunlight, with propagation to the east in
the morning and toward the west later in the day. 15 meters should
offer plenty of worldwide openings as well, but also later into the
evening after 10 meters has closed. Worldwide 20 meter openings
should be available around the clock. As the northern hemisphere
moves further from the summer season, 160 and 80 meters should
improve with shorter days and less of the static commonly associated
with summer.

Judging by recent email, it is time to repeat the occasional
explanation of the various numbers and indices that are cited in
this weekly bulletin, which appears below. Questions and comments
are always welcome at k7vvv@arrl.net.

Amateur Radio operators who use HF generally like increased sunspots
because they correlate with better worldwide radio propagation.
When there are more sunspots, the sun puts out radiation which
charges particles in the earth's ionosphere. Radio waves bounce off
of (refract from) these charged particles, and the denser these
clouds of ions, the better the HF propagation.

When the ionosphere is denser, higher frequencies will refract from
of the ionosphere rather than passing through to space. This is why
every 11 years or so when this activity is higher, 10 meters gets
exciting. 10 meters is at a high enough frequency, right near the
top of the HF spectrum, that radio waves propagate very efficiently
when the sunspot count is high. Because of the wavelength, smaller
antennas are very efficient on this band, so mobile stations running
low power on 10 meters can communicate world wide on a daily basis
when the sunspot cycle is at its peak. There are also seasonal
variations, and 10 meters tends to be best near the Spring or Fall
equinox.

The sunspot numbers used in this bulletin are calculated by counting
the sunspots on the visible solar surface and also measuring their
area. Solar flux is measured at an observatory in British Columbia
using an antenna pointed toward the sun tuned to 2.8 GHz, which is
at a wavelength of 10.7 cm. Energy detected seems to correlate with
sunspots and with the density of the ionosphere.

Other solar activity of concern to HF operators are solar flares and
coronal holes, which emit protons. Since the charged ions in the
ionosphere are negative, a blast of protons from the sun can
neutralize the charge and make the ionosphere less refractive.
These waves of protons can be so intense that they may trigger an
event called a geomagnetic storm.

The Planetary A index relates to geomagnetic stability.
Magnetometers around the world are used to generate a number called
the Planetary K index. You can hear the Boulder K index updated
every three hours on WWV, or by calling 303-497-3235.

A one point change in the K index is quite significant. A K index
reading below 3 generally means good stable conditions, and above 3
can mean high absorption and poor reflection of radio waves. Each
point change reflects a big change in conditions.

Every 24 hours the K index is summarized in a number called the A
index. A one point change in A value is not very significant. A full
day with the K index at 3 will produce an A index of 15, K of 4
means A of 27, K of 5 means A of 48, and K of 6 means A of 80. You
can find an explanation of these numbers on the web at
http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/stp/GEOMAG/kp_ap.html.

The number reported here is the Planetary A index, which is a
worldwide average based on the K readings from a number of
magnetometers. The numbers reported on WWV are the Boulder K and A
index, measured in Colorado. Generally the higher the latitude of
the measuring station, the higher the K and A indices reported.
This is because the effects of geomagnetic instability tend to
concentrate toward the polar regions of the globe.

Currently we are near the peak of the solar cycle, so conditions are
generally better because of the increased ionization of the
ionosphere. But along with the increased sunspots come more solar
flares and coronal holes, producing disturbed conditions.

Sunspot numbers for September 21 through 27 were 198, 248, 216, 255,
215, 223 and 233 with a mean of 226.9. 10.7 cm flux was 225.1,
232.2, 225.2, 224.5, 225.6, 223.6 and 204.7, with a mean of 223, and
estimated planetary A indices were 9, 7, 7, 10, 16, 21 and 11 with a
mean of 11.6.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 154 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct  3, 2000 (14:14) * 15 lines 
 
Aurora Watch + An Unusual Asteroid

Space Weather News for Oct. 3, 2000
http://www.spaceweather.com

Ongoing geomagnetic activity could intensify on Wednesday or Thursday when
an Earth-directed solar coronal mass ejection arrives in the neighborhood
of our planet. With the Moon just past New, it may be a good time for
stargazers to watch for dark-sky aurora.

In other news, a Near-Earth Asteroid that passed our planet in September
appears to be a binary space rock. See http://spaceweather.com for
amateur video of the asteroid racing through the sky on October 2nd.

For more information and images, please visit http://SpaceWeather.com


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 155 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct  6, 2000 (14:40) * 12 lines 
 
A Geomagnetic Storm on October 5th

Space Weather News for Oct. 6, 2000
http://www.spaceweather.com

An interplanetary shock wave buffeted Earth's magnetosphere on October 5th
and triggered a strong geomagnetic storm. Skywatchers in Canada and the
northern tier of US states spotted red- and green-colored aurora for hours
before local dawn on Thursday. The disturbance subsided after nearly 21
hours of high activity. For more information about the event and pictures
of the aurora, please visit http://www.spaceweather.com.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 156 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct  6, 2000 (22:21) * 61 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 40 - October 6, 2000

Average solar flux and sunspot numbers were off for the week, while
geomagnetic indices were up, the result of coronal mass ejections
and the subsequent solar wind. Average sunspot numbers were off by
nearly 43 points and solar flux was down nearly 28 points.

A series of coronal mass ejections kept things lively, with two days
(Saturday and Wednesday) when the planetary A index reached 45. This
is an indication of a geomagnetic storm. Until daybreak on Thursday,
October 5, auroral lights were spotted as far south as latitude 43
degrees. This was probably the result of a solar coronal mass
ejection on October 2. The NASA ACE spacecraft recorded an
interplanetary shock wave at 0240z on October 5.

Effects are expected to fade over the next few days, with the
planetary A index predicted for Friday through Wednesday at 35, 15,
10, 10, 12 and 12. Solar flux is expected to reach a minimum during
this period with a 10.7 cm flux value at 150. Predicted flux values
for Friday through Wednesday are 170, 160, 150, 150, 150 and 160.
Solar flux is expected to rise above 200 again after October 16, and
peak around 215 from October 18-22.

Because September 30 marked the end of the third calendar quarter of
2000, it is time to review quarterly averages of solar flux values.

The average daily solar flux for July 1 through September 30 was
181.9, one point lower than the earlier quarter, 182.9. The first
quarter of this year had an average daily solar flux value of 180.5.
This seems to indicate a fairly flat average solar flux value for
this year, which was predicted to be the peak year for this solar
cycle. These values are higher than the solar flux levels for 1999.

Average solar flux for September was 182.1, which is an improvement
over August, which was 163.1. Average monthly solar flux values
since the beginning of this year were 159, 174.1, 208.2, 184.2,
184.5, 179.8, 200.5, 163.1, and 182.1.

Readers who use Scott Craig's Solar Data Plotting Utility noticed
that it would not suck up data from last week's Propagation Forecast
Bulletin ARLP039. This is because of wording in the bulletin that
confused the automatic data gathering feature in the software. Scott
is writing a revision to the code so that it will not have that
problem in the future, if ever that particular sequence of words
that caused the problem is used again. Of course you can manually
edit the data file to update the solar flux and sunspot numbers. You
can also check http://edge.net/~scraig/index.html or specifically
http://edge.net/~scraig/sol.htm for an update. Look for something
beyond the current version, which is 3.08w.

G3LDI wrote to inquire about a source for solar flux, A index and K
index data over the past year. To get this data, go to the Space
Environment Center's FTP server at http://sec.noaa.gov/getftp.cgi ,
then click on the Indices, Events and Region Data line, then click
on Solar, Particle and Geomag Indices beginning Jan 1994.

Sunspot numbers for September 28 through October 4 were 211, 164,
155, 157, 190, 196 and 216 with a mean of 184.1. 10.7 cm flux was
202.3, 192, 193.6, 201.6, 202.6, 192 and 184.1, with a mean of
195.5, and estimated planetary A indices were 12, 7, 45, 13, 11, 37
and 45 with a mean of 24.3.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 157 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 10, 2000 (14:10) * 15 lines 
 
Here Comes the Sun (again)

Space Weather News for Oct. 10, 2000
http://www.spaceweather.com

Early this morning magnetic fields around sunspot AR9182 became unstable.
A nearby solar filament explosively collapsed and a coronal mass ejection
is now heading toward Earth. There could be aurora and other geomagnetic
disturbances later this week when the leading edge of the CME hits our
magnetosphere.

For more information and animations, please visit
http://www.spaceweather.com

-


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 158 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Oct 10, 2000 (22:49) * 49 lines 
 
Greetings Marcia and the Geoites

Sorry for falling off the face of the Earth but have been
slightly distracted with work (annoying but it does pay the
bills...), grad school, and a trip to PA for Microwave Update 2000.
Got lots of neat mmWave components to fuel the passion and projects.
Anyway, to answer your questions...

Why the frequencies we use....
When the search started years ago, it was logically decided to
check around the 'water hole' frequencies (1.4ghz) bounded
by the resonant frequency of hydrogen and hydroxyl. Plus, the
available dishes/receivers were already set up for those frequencies.

Why would 'ET' use technology we are familiar with?
Well, we are using the technology we have available for galactic
monitoring - microwave, mmWave, Xray, UV, optical.

Would the radio wave diminish in the galaxy?
No - The radio astronomy community has equipment that monitors
signals light years away. If signals faded within the bounds
of a galaxy, then we would never see any stars or other sources
beyond our own.

Would the signal be lost in cosmic noise?
Thats one of the interesting things about radio astronomy.
You are basically listening to -Noise-. Thus, one has to
differentiate between man made and terrestrial noise sources
and those that are galactic. You are listening to noise on
top of noise.... But since the noise sources are 'loud' against
a 'cold' sky, one can pick them out, so to speak...

These are ultra distilled answers to complicated questions.
I would suspect checking with web sites such as the seti league
and seti.org as well as the NRAO and Society for Amateur Radio
Astronomers web pages for a more complete (and probably enlightening)
discussion.

Anyway, glad to be back into the fray - will try to be a bit more
frequent in the future - plus have some results on the 24ghz system
and another distraction - the interface of a GPS engine to a PC
for various and arcane experiments....

73 de Mike
Radio Cosmo International






 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 159 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct 11, 2000 (12:49) * 4 lines 
 
I knew you'd come up with all the Right Stuff! Thanks, Mike... Some answers I knew but could not have put as well, and others escaped me. Now were all sitting at your enlightened feet (ow wherever they sit for enlightenment...)
Many thanks!

Grad school and you are NOT at Penn State??? *gasp* Oh well, if you are brilliant (as I know you to be) any source of degree will stand you in good stead. Wondering what the advanced work entails... MS in some sort of Engineering would be my guess. PhD? Go, Mike!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 160 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Oct 11, 2000 (20:22) * 51 lines 
 
Howdy Marcia and the Geo-ites

Boy - kinda wish I was going for the PHd now... but the MS CS
is keeping me busy ;)

After looking at my hastily compiled answers, I realized I didnt
adequetly answer a couple of them. So, anyway - some more
mumbo jumbo...

If someone did shoot a regular radio signal, would it ever get
out of the galaxy? Well, depends on what you mean by a 'regular'
signal - Watts, Kilowatts, Megawatts, etc.... Humans have been
sending signals into space since the invention of radio. Now, radio
signals do diminish over distances. Lets treat space as a perfect
medium for the propagation of radio signals (which, it does a pretty
good job....) Anyway, what you get into is what type of receiver
on the other end is there to pick up that signal? What is its
MDS (minimum discernable signal) it can hear - this will depend on several things - the noise figure of the receive system, the gain of the antenna,
integration times, etc. I think we are still getting signals back
from Pioneer - it should be out of our solar system by now. I think
the power output is 10 watts in the X band (9-10ghz). What this
is all leading to is if 'ET' is transmitting a beacon - would they
use very high power and a substantial antenna. Is it omni directional
or tightly focused in a beam from a cluster of dishes? If the answer
is yes to both, and the signal originates reasonably close star clusters,
then our largest dishes could possibly pick up a signal. If the signal
originates from 'close in' (in space terms) and the power was significant,
then maybe even the smaller SETI dishes will pick it up as well. I once
read an article about what distances an Arecebo dish could communicate
with a comparable system - have to look that up sometime....

Of course, then you get into all the unknowns - what is the modulation
scheme, what frequency is it on, etc. A nice fantasy would be that
Pulsar stars were 'created' for the sole purpose of being a beacon
using natural materials.....

How do you tell that the signal is intelligent and extraterrestrial?
Well, you have to look at the pattern of the signal - does it have
a fast or slow doppler shift, can it be confirmed by multiple
stations in different parts of the world that can also confirm
the signal characteristics and origin from their respective locations.
If you search the Seti League page, there should be an article
on 'Anatomy of a SETI Hoax' where there are good discussions with
example data of what an ET signal is NOT.

So, a little more data or mumbo jumbo for what its worth....

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 161 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct 11, 2000 (22:50) * 3 lines 
 
Oh Mike!!! You did it!!! Thank you! *gratutde by the bucketsful* and a big *HUG* for your attention to details. THanks (knew most of that but cvould not have put it so well...)

Onem ust MS the CS before he can PhofD...one step at a time, m'dear, and all good wishes!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 162 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct 11, 2000 (23:30) * 3 lines 
 
Holy cow...been at this for far too long today...

Mike, One must MS the CS before he can Ph of D... and I am stll trying to get voice on line...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 163 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct 12, 2000 (19:03) * 12 lines 
 
Sun Sample Return Mission Nears Launch

NASA Science News for October 12, 2000

The science payload for NASA's Genesis
spacecraft, which will collect samples of the
solar wind and return them to Earth, is now
complete.

FULL STORY at

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2000/ast12oct_1.htm?list89800


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 164 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct 12, 2000 (20:24) * 14 lines 
 
Interplanetary Shock Wave Passes Earth -- Aurora Likely

Space Weather News for Oct 12, 2000
http://www.spaceweather.com

NASA's ACE spacecraft recorded an interplanetary shock wave heading toward
Earth on October 12th at 2145 UT (5:45 pm EDT). Sky watchers should be on
the alert for aurora between the times of local sunset on Oct. 12th and
sunrise on Oct 13th. The bright full Moon will likely outshine faint
aurora, but intense geomagnetic storms can produce auroras that are
visible in spite of lunar interference. For more information, please
visit http://www.spaceweather.com




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 165 of 605:  (sprin5) * Fri, Oct 13, 2000 (07:38) * 1 lines 
 
Cool an aurora! I saw them when I lived up in Ettrick Wisconsin many years ago. It was an awe inspiring sight. We lived up on a ridge in a 16 by 32 army tent way out in the woods. And the sky was so incredibly clear that far out in the boonies.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 166 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct 13, 2000 (13:24) * 1 lines 
 
I saw red and green aurora in Ohio when I was just out of college - and out in the boonies visiting my sister. Amazing to see! Would love to hear the booming noises they make (audible not radio interference)... maybe some time...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 167 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct 20, 2000 (19:15) * 36 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 42 - October 20, 2000

The rise in solar flux for that was predicted this week in last
week's Propagation Forecast Bulletin ARLP041 did not happen. Last
week's bulletin stated that by October 18 and 19 we should see a
short term peak in solar flux around 220. Instead, solar flux rose
slightly over the weekend, then dropped below 160, and on October 18
and 19 it was 151.1 and 157.8. These short range predictions are
based upon the previous solar rotation, plus what sunspot regions
can be seen rotating toward the center of the solar disk, as well as
a bet placed upon whether the activity in each region is increasing
or decreasing.

The current outlook is for a slowly and modestly rising solar flux,
with the values for Friday through Monday at 160, 160, 165 and 170.
The latest best guess is for solar flux to peak for the short term
at only 190 on October 29 and 30, then decline to 145 around
November 5.

Geomagnetic conditions are expected to remain fairly stable on
Friday and Saturday, but planetary A index my rise to 20 and 25 on
Sunday and Monday. Geomagnetic indices are expected to calm down
after that, but become unsettled to active around October 30 through
November 1.

It has been some time since Propagation Forecast Bulletin ARLP032 on
August 11 when we last presented a path projection. This weekend we
have two. One is for the VK/ZL Oceania CW Contest, and the other is
for the RSGB 21/28 MHz CW Contest. The points of origin for each
path will be pretty general, one for the center of the continental
U.S.A, one for the East Coast, the other for the West Coast. The
solar flux value used will be 160, which represents an average of
values over ten days, including the projected values for October 20
and 21. The date used for the prediction is October 21.




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 168 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Oct 26, 2000 (20:53) * 13 lines 
 
And, back again....

Finally tested out the new 10ghz transverter on receive - next
comes packaging and hopefuly a test before the winter winds
blow off the lake and no more outdoor radio foolishness until
2001. 24ghz is next on the complete list - just need to kit out
the oscillator and start bolting waveguide.

And, just crunching away on Seti data....

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 169 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct 26, 2000 (20:58) * 5 lines 
 
You...me too re SETI... Wheee!! Amazing what 700MHz will do for your crunching!!!

Great to hear you are getting data with you 10 ghz lashup. What does winter have to do with it? I know it affects transmissions but I never noticed the difference here. Is that because I am in the tropics and therefore hopeless?!

Watch out for the CME.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 170 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Oct 26, 2000 (21:18) * 16 lines 
 
700mhz would be very cool. Ok, big debate question - more
radio parts or a faster computer? Thats a tough one.
re winter: -40 degree windchill is enough to keep me
away from the lake. Although....
24 and 47ghz are great bands during low humidity days
(especially when all the moisture is frozen out)

Enjoy those warm january days - I'll be huddled in front
of the fire bottle gear listening to 160 and 75 meter AM.
Of course, there will be plenty of time to build up the rest
of the microwave gear. There IS a contest in January
for VHF and up - roving during that one is kind of like
the Iron Man and Iditarod of the vhf-microwave radio world.

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 171 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct 26, 2000 (21:55) * 3 lines 
 
decisions...decisions... Yes..alas Why does it have to be OR instead of AND?! Reality check dictates such things. Let's see, one trip across the pond and a nice boat anchor...hmmm.... no, would have done as you did. I did not have the other choice. Enjoy your bottle gear and let us know how the sensitivity to aurorae is. should be really active tomorrow...

What is this stuff about negative figues as regards wind chill temperatures? Another planet? Will my warm thoughts help? You have them!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 172 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct 26, 2000 (21:58) * 1 lines 
 
Geez, you roam in wx like that? I'll be listening and running ice cubes down my arms trying to 'feel your pain'...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 173 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct 27, 2000 (13:21) * 12 lines 
 
I'm glad he clarified this:

Thought for Friday, Oct 27, 2000
TFTD-L@TAMU.EDU

*
Albert Einstein, when asked to describe radio, replied: "You see, wire
telegraph is a kind of a very, very long cat. You pull his tail in New
York and his head is meowing in Los Angeles. Do you understand this?
And radio operates exactly the same way: you send signals here, they
receive them there. The only difference is that there is no cat."



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 174 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct 27, 2000 (14:04) * 21 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 43 - October 27, 2000

Average solar flux for the past week was exactly the same as the
previous week. It was 160.9 for the past week, and 160.2 for the
week previous. Average sunspot numbers dropped about ten points.

Solar flux is rising, and is expected to peak on November 2 around
190. But the main interest among many radio amateurs is the forecast
for this weekend, when the CQ Worldwide DX Phone Contest commences.
Unfortunately, on October 25 a full halo coronal mass ejection was
detected blasting away from the sun, and effects may be felt this
weekend. The predicted planetary A index for Friday through Monday
is 10, 15, 15 and 12. This does not signal terrible conditions, but
the outlook for Saturday and Sunday is for unsettled to active
geomagnetic conditions.

Solar flux for the same four days is predicted at 175, 175, 180 and
180. After the November 2 peak in activity, solar flux is expected
to bottom out around 155 on November 6 or 7.




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 175 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Oct 28, 2000 (19:20) * 18 lines 
 
We are into the initial stages of the CME. These two arrived almost simulatneously!

SFI=182 up from 176 | A=12 up from 4 | K=2 down from 3 at 2100 on 28 October.
SAF: low to moderate, GMF: unsettled to active
Magnetic K-Index of 4 Warning valid from 28 Oct 2000 0700 to 29 Oct
2000 1500 UT
Aurora Level: 7
Solar Wind: 400.9 km/s at 15.1 protons/cm3

More Info http://hfradio.org/propagation.html

SFI=182 | A=17 up from 12 | K=5 up from 2 at 0000 on 29 October.
SAF: low to moderate, GMF: at active to minor storm levels
Magnetic K-Index of 4 Warning valid from 28 Oct 2000 0700 to 29 Oct
2000 1500 UT
Aurora Level: 7
Solar Wind: 402.4 km/s at 10.2 protons/cm3



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 176 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov  1, 2000 (17:52) * 32 lines 
 
All-Ham Crew is ISS-Bound

A Russian Soyuz rocket carrying the all-ham International Space
Station Expedition 1 crew blasted off October 31 from the Baikonur
Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Amateur Radio operation from the ISS is
expected to debut by mid-month. The crew will spend four months
aboard the ISS.

On board the Soyuz are US astronaut and Expedition 1 Commander
William ''Shep'' Shepherd, KD5GSL, and Russian cosmonauts Yuri
Gidzenko and Sergei Krikalev, U5MIR. The Soyuz is expected to dock
with the ISS November 2.

Shepherd, 51, is only the second US astronaut to go into space
aboard a Russian launch vehicle. The Soyuz lifted off from the same
launch pad where the space race began 43 years ago this month with
the launch of the Sputnik 1 satellite.

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station--or
ARISS--initial station gear already is aboard the space station. It
will be installed temporarily in the Zarya Functional Cargo Block of
the ISS and will permit operation on 2 meters--FM voice and packet.
Tentative operating frequencies are: Worldwide downlink for voice
and packet, 145.80 MHz: worldwide packet uplink, 145.99 MHz; Region
1 (Europe) voice uplink: 145.20 MHz; Region 2 and 3 voice uplink,
144.49 MHz.

Crew members may use their personal call signs or one of the ''club
station'' call signs issued for ISS use--NA1SS, RZ3DZR, or DL0ISS.

For ARISS information and updates, visit the ARISS Web site,
http://ariss.gsfc.nasa.gov/.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 177 of 605:  (sprin5) * Wed, Nov  1, 2000 (18:49) * 4 lines 
 
Cool, I'll be listening on 145.55, the freq the astronauts use. And the ones you mention of ours. 145.2 and 144.49. Wow!


Good stuff Marci!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 178 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov  1, 2000 (20:56) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks! I'll be listening, too! Thanks also for the additional frequency!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 179 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov  1, 2000 (21:10) * 1 lines 
 
For those wishing to watch live coverage http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/countdown/video/video45m.html


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 180 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov  1, 2000 (22:13) * 66 lines 
 
Previous article posted in Radio Conference of interest here: Get your ears on!

ISS ham gear cleared for takeoff

The way has been cleared for the Amateur Radio gear destined for use
aboard the International Space Station to be launched into space.
The initial amateur gear is scheduled go up to the ISS on mission
STS-106 aboard the shuttle Atlantis on September 8. As part of the
multinational Amateur Radio on the International Space Station
project, the gear will be stowed aboard the ISS for use by the
Expedition 1 crew, set to come aboard in late October.

''We have been working for years to bring the first ISS hardware to
fruition,'' ARISS Administrative Chairman Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, said
this week. ''It looks like the final issues that have held us back
are now over, and we are moving ahead toward the launch of the
initial hardware on STS-106.''

Bauer said three events over the past couple of weeks were key to
moving the ARISS project forward. The first was the launch and
docking of the Russian-built Zvezda Service Module that eventually
will house the ARISS gear. In addition, Bauer said, a series of RF,
power-up and other tests on the amateur equipment were successfully
completed in Russia, thanks to Lou McFadin, W5DID, of ARISS and
AMSAT and Carolynn Conley, KD5JSO, of NASA. He said NASA also signed
off on the required flight safety package, giving the go-ahead to
release the amateur hardware for flight aboard the upcoming shuttle
mission.

The Expedition 1 crew will consist of three amateurs: US astronaut
Bill Shepherd, KD5GSL, and Russian Cosmonauts Sergei Krikalev,
U5MIR, and the recently licensed Yuri Gaidzenko, whose call sign was
not available.

To be available to the first crew, the ARISS initial station gear
will be installed temporarily aboard the ISS Functional Cargo Block.
It will use an existing antenna that's being adapted to support FM
voice and packet on 2 meters but not on 70 cm. Eventually, the ARISS
gear will find a more-permanent home aboard the Zvezda Service
Module.

A Russian call sign, RZ3DZR, has been issued for the ISS ham radio
station.

The ARRL and AMSAT have been providing leadership and consulting
services for ARISS. ARRL Field and Educational Services Manager
Rosalie White, K1STO--a member of the Space Amateur Radio EXperiment
Working Group--says this is an exciting moment for the project,
which has one goal of letting students on Earth communicate with the
ISS inhabitants via Amateur Radio.

''All of the hard work from the many volunteers is starting to pay
off,'' she said. ''We have so many people to thank--all of the AMSAT
volunteers, ARRL people, the NASA folks--so many of whom are hams.
But seeing the youth of the United States and other countries
benefit is our reward.''

Bauer says the astronauts and cosmonauts plan to take some time off
for educational outreach contacts with schools, even during the busy
years of ISS construction that lie ahead. Bauer says access to
Amateur Radio also is considered a morale booster for ISS crew
members who will be in space many weeks at a time.

As the International Space Station takes its place in the heavens,''
Bauer said, ''the Amateur Radio community is prepared to do its part
by helping to enrich the experience.''


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 181 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Nov  2, 2000 (17:43) * 25 lines 
 
Asteroids Galore (and a coronal mass ejection)

Space Weather News for Nov. 2, 2000
http://www.spaceweather.com

While asteroid Toutatis garnered plenty of attention as it passed by Earth
on Halloween, a newly-discovered space rock named 2000 UK11 glided by
almost 10 times closer than Toutatis during the early morning hours of
Nov. 1st.

Asteroid 2000 UK11, which was briefly visible through amateur telescopes,
is rapidly fading. But if you missed it, don't worry. There's an even
brighter near-Earth object (NEO) on the way: 2000 UG11. Like Toutatis and
2000 UK11, there is no danger of a collision with 2000 UG11, which will
pass 6 times farther from Earth than the Moon. Amateur astronomers with 8
inch or larger telescopes and CCD cameras can spot the fast-moving NEO
early next week as it grows brighter than 14th magnitude.

In other news for sky watchers, SOHO coronagraphs recorded a solar coronal
mass ejection yesterday that could strike Earth's magnetosphere and
trigger geomagnetic activity this weekend.

For images and animations of the asteroids and yesterday's CME, please
visit http://www.spaceweather.com.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 182 of 605:  (sprin5) * Fri, Nov  3, 2000 (07:02) * 1 lines 
 
These are not colorful names like Lowell-Biederman or something. I thought they named them after the discoverers.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 183 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov  3, 2000 (13:33) * 1 lines 
 
They name them after prominent astronomers...living or dead. Comets are always named after their discovers.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 184 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Nov  3, 2000 (21:41) * 28 lines 
 
Howdy howdy

A good investment (or freeware if you can find it...) is a
satellite tracking package. One such is Instantrack which
is described at the AMSAT web page www.amsat.org

With this application, you can track satellites including
MIR, the ISS, and the amateur satellites. The amsat board
also has the kep elements to load into the tracking software.

I have used this software to track low earth orbit satellites
- nothing like watching the satellite footprint cross into
my geographic area and hearing the satellite beacon coming
in on the downlink - then 15 minutes of high speed QSO's
with other hams on the satellite. This would comprise of
sending a burst of 'dits' and spinning around the frequencies
until finding my signal - then calling CQ. This madness would
go on until loss of signal.

Anyway, once the ISS is operational, the tracking software
will come in handy for predicting when the space station
will make a flyover. Since the station will be line of
sight, signals will be very strong - simple 5/8 wave verticals
on 2 meters will provide a good signal.

73 de mike

radio cosmo international


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 185 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov  3, 2000 (22:08) * 7 lines 
 
Thanks Mike!!! Here are a few satellite tracking URLs to try out for your area

http://spacelink.nasa.gov/Instructional.Materials/Multimedia/Satellite.Tracking/.index.html

and this killer site:

http://www.nlsa.com/


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 186 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov  3, 2000 (22:10) * 1 lines 
 
Good point you made about listening to the frequencies I listed above. They are FM frequencies and are strictly line of sight. If you cannot see the satellite or space station, neither can your radio.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 187 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov  3, 2000 (22:17) * 68 lines 
 
http://www.amsat.org and I will post the Keplerian data here from now on:

Keplerian Bulletin 84 - November 3, 2000

Decode 2-line elsets with the following key:
1 AAAAAU 00 0 0 BBBBB.BBBBBBBB .CCCCCCCC 00000-0 00000-0 0 DDDZ
2 AAAAA EEE.EEEE FFF.FFFF GGGGGGG HHH.HHHH III.IIII JJ.JJJJJJJJKKKKKZ
KEY: A-CATALOGNUM B-EPOCHTIME C-DECAY D-ELSETNUM E-INCLINATION F-RAAN
G-ECCENTRICITY H-ARGPERIGEE I-MNANOM J-MNMOTION K-ORBITNUM Z-CHECKSUM

AO-10
1 14129U 83058B 00305.01290756 -.00000384 00000-0 10000-3 0 7100
2 14129 26.7222 303.7829 6009247 97.2062 330.5402 2.05870124102757
UO-11
1 14781U 84021B 00308.21668696 .00004235 00000-0 66836-3 0 3452
2 14781 98.0013 268.9945 0011412 24.6167 335.5585 14.72865666892769
UO-14
1 20437U 90005B 00308.55830010 .00000606 00000-0 24845-3 0 5650
2 20437 98.3934 10.8160 0010847 159.4099 200.7553 14.30555357562796
AO-16
1 20439U 90005D 00307.76197337 .00000716 00000-0 29008-3 0 3636
2 20439 98.4332 17.1082 0010810 165.7762 194.3728 14.30645995562702
LO-19
1 20442U 90005G 00306.74375718 +.00000738 +00000-0 +29718-3 0 03696
2 20442 098.4510 019.6823 0011630 168.3007 191.8450 14.30881732562644
FO-20
1 20480U 90013C 00306.91012867 -.00000005 +00000-0 +53304-4 0 02819
2 20480 099.0728 051.6432 0540584 103.4921 262.6980 12.83282019502947
RS-12/13
1 21089U 91007A 00306.90858958 +.00000191 +00000-0 +18565-3 0 02877
2 21089 082.9188 083.6059 0030180 100.0802 260.3761 13.74228202488592
UO-22
1 21575U 91050B 00306.93976715 +.00000803 +00000-0 +27934-3 0 00946
2 21575 098.1424 327.2835 0008109 138.8672 221.3129 14.37885820487716
AO-27
1 22825U 93061C 00308.51819640 .00000562 00000-0 24218-3 0 8502
2 22825 98.3892 0.2506 0007834 208.6031 151.4723 14.28261526370364
IO-26
1 22826U 93061D 00308.16976623 .00000645 00000-0 27451-3 0 8435
2 22826 98.3929 0.6094 0008033 214.4539 145.6118 14.28417132370349
KO-25
1 22828U 93061F 00306.69662848 +.00000676 +00000-0 +28480-3 0 08284
2 22828 098.3880 359.3791 0009012 197.6165 162.4707 14.28826398338309
RS-15
1 23439U 94085A 00308.12578659 -.00000024 00000-0 52829-3 0 4992
2 23439 64.8185 315.7925 0167904 265.3795 92.7930 11.27539717241179
FO-29
1 24278U 96046B 00306.76524319 +.00000076 +00000-0 +11585-3 0 04018
2 24278 098.5742 196.4603 0350592 230.7887 126.1640 13.52745288207899
TO-31
1 25396U 98043C 00308.56470039 -.00000044 00000-0 00000+0 0 4043
2 25396 98.7105 22.5581 0003023 57.0700 303.0771 14.22799728120473
GO-32
1 25397U 98043D 00306.90738260 -.00000044 +00000-0 +00000-0 0 03773
2 25397 098.7091 020.6270 0002514 087.1820 272.9655 14.22480512120241
ISS
1 25544U 98067A 00308.81250000 .00018454 00000-0 21627-3 0 2454
2 25544 51.5723 149.6973 0005972 139.0991 37.7385 15.61556636111818
SO-35
1 25636U 99008C 00307.92723670 .00001347 00000-0 36786-3 0 2489
2 25636 96.4517 118.4091 0153521 102.3162 259.5272 14.41540289 89076
UO-36
1 25693U 99021A 00308.38529108 -.00000140 00000-0 24524-6 0 3558
2 25693 64.5616 45.8793 0050460 277.5124 82.0271 14.73543462 82812

Keplerian bulletins are transmitted twice weekly from W1AW.
The next scheduled transmission of these data will be Tuesday,
November 7, 2000, at 2330z on Baudot and AMTOR.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 188 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov  3, 2000 (22:23) * 3 lines 
 
ok...next time just posting the ISS and the decoder....




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 189 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Nov  4, 2000 (19:49) * 31 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin - November 4, 2000

Solar activity was up for the past week. During the CQ Worldwide DX
Phone Contest, geomagnetic activity rose through the weekend,
reaching storm levels on Sunday. Both the mid-latitude and planetary
K indices reached 5, and the A indices were 24 and 26, respectively.
The Alaskan College K index, which is higher during high geomagnetic
activity due to its high latitude, was 6 over two periods and the A
index was 41 for Sunday, indicating a severe geomagnetic storm. No
doubt contest operators in Fairbanks experienced dead HF conditions.

Average sunspot numbers were up nearly 19 points and average solar
flux was up nearly 26 points compared to the previous week. Last
week's Propagation Forecast Bulletin ARLP043 mentioned a predicted
solar flux peaking around 190 on November 2. The noon flux reading
at Penticton on Thursday was 196.3, but flux values are now expected
to peak around 200 on November 3 or 4. Solar flux is expected to
decline below 190 by November 8, then reach a broad minimum around
160 between November 11-17.

A coronal hole has been developing in the center of the solar disk
facing earth, and this could cause some unsettled geomagnetic
conditions over the next few days. Currently the planetary A index
is predicted at 20 for November 4 and 15 for the next day, followed
by quiet conditions until November 10 when it may be 15 again. A
planetary A index of 15 is also predicted for November 13 and 15,
and on November 17 and 18 the projected A index is 20 and 25, based
on the previous solar rotation.

Average solar flux for October was 167.7. For June through September
it was 179.8, 200.5, 163.1 and 201.7.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 190 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Nov  9, 2000 (16:27) * 9 lines 
 
Leonid Meteor Balloon Rises Again

NASA Science News for November 9, 2000

A team of NASA scientists and ham radio amateurs will loft a weather balloon toward the stratosphere on Nov. 18th to record the sights and sounds of the 2000 Leonid meteor shower. Readers can follow the balloon flight thanks to a live webcast at LeonidsLive.com.


FULL STORY at
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2000/ast09nov_1.htm?list89800


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 191 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sat, Nov 11, 2000 (19:23) * 11 lines 
 
Hey Marcia and Geoites

Another cool balloon site to check out is EOSS Edge of Space
Sciences - there is a whole ham radio subsect interested
in balloon launches, transmitting environmental data, video,
and gps tracking information. This page will lead to other
interesting balloon topics/pages as well.

Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 192 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Nov 11, 2000 (22:08) * 3 lines 
 
Thanks, Mike! http://www.eoss.org/

Check out the links! There is great stuff in there!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 193 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Nov 11, 2000 (22:42) * 5 lines 
 
Mike, I have been remiss. Now you are properly Lei'd. My gratitude expressed in flowers fragrant and fresh from Hawaii to the cold north


He'e (red) Muck Orange (green) Tuberose (white)



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 194 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Nov 13, 2000 (18:02) * 26 lines 
 
ISS crew completes installation of Amateur Radio hardware

According to Will Marchant, KC6ROL, the International Space Station
crew has completed installation of the Amateur Radio hardware in the
Functional Cargo Block.

With the successful execution of engineering tests today, the
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) project has
passed a significant milestone. The initial two passes were tested
at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) ham shack R3K in
Star City near Moscow. The control operators were Sergej Samburov,
RV3DR, and Vladimir Zagainov, UA3DKR. Sergej is the Russian delegate
to the ARISS team.

Subsequent tests at the NN1SS station at the Goddard Space Flight
Center (Greenbelt, MD) and the W5RRR station at Johnson Space Center
(Houston, TX) were equally successful. Engineering tests with the
packet rig still need to be organized.

The crew, while still very busy, expressed their interest and
support of Amateur Radio activities on the ISS. It seems likely that
over the next few weeks, as the crew's schedule settles out,
amateurs may be able to look forward to more Amateur Radio activity
from humanity's latest foothold in space.




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 195 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov 14, 2000 (23:18) * 43 lines 
 
Phase 3D Launch Slipped By One Day

The highly anticipated launch of the AMSAT Phase 3D Amateur Radio
satellite has been delayed by a last-minute technical glitch. Acting
Phase 3D Project Leader Peter Guelzow, DB2OS, reported from the
launch site at the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, that
a problem with a microwave link has delayed the launch for 24 hours.
The satellite was to go into space early on November 15 UTC.

The troublesome link only affected the telemetry between the
PanAmSat PAS 1R commercial payload and the ground facility. It had
nothing to do with the operation of Phase 3D. PAS-1R is the
mission's primary payload.

Guelzow said the telemetry link problem was promptly repaired, but
by then, it was too late to resume the countdown to make the
required launch window.

The launch agency Arianespace described the problem as an ''anomaly
in the ground-based telemetry system'' for the PanAmSat PAS-1R
satellite, which is installed atop the Ariane 5. Jean-Charles
Vincent, the head of Arianespace's Kourou facility, said the problem
was pinpointed in the umbilical mast on the Ariane 5 mobile launch
table.

''We detected the anomaly this afternoon, and decided on the one-day
postponement to provide sufficient time to resolve it,'' he said
Tuesday. The decision to delay happened before Arianespace crews
began fueling the main stage.

Also aboard the launch vehicle with P3D and the huge PAS-1R
communications satellite are the smaller British STRV-1C and 1D
mini-satellites. Vincent said both the launcher and its
multisatellite payload are in a safe mode, enabling the countdown to
begin again Thursday. The launch window remains the same--opening at
0107 UTC and closing at 0203 UTC (10:07 PM until 11:03 PM Kourou
time) on November 16.

In the planning, design and construction phases for the past several
years, Phase 3D promises to usher in a new era in Amateur Radio
communication. Once in its final orbit high above Earth, Phase
3D--the largest Amateur Radio satellite ever built--will offer
capabilities unavailable on current amateur satellites.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 196 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov 14, 2000 (23:20) * 1 lines 
 
Anyone heard the ISS Hams yet? I have not....


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 197 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov 15, 2000 (17:38) * 20 lines 
 
W1AW to participate in meteor scatter/APRS experiment

ARRL Maxim Memorial Station W1AW again will participate in a
meteor-scatter experiment by attempting to bounce APRS packets off
the ionized particles resulting from the Leonids meteor shower.

Beginning at 2100 UTC on November 17 through November 20, W1AW will
operate WinAPRS-equipped stations on 6 and 2 meters. W1AW will
monitor and beacon on 53.530 MHz and 147.585 MHz continuously,
transmitting its grid square.

On 6 meters, W1AW will use an ICOM IC-756 running 100 W with an
MFJ-1278 TNC. On 2 meters, W1AW will use an ICOM IC-271 at 45 W with
a AEA PK232 Multimode controller. An article ''Leonids Meteors for
the Regular Guy'' by Ev Tupis, W2EV, is available to ARRL members on
the ARRL Web site, http://www.arrl.org. Also see ''An Automated
Meteor-Scatter Station'' by Tupis in November 1999 QST.

QSLs will be available for all stations receiving W1AW's APRS
beacons. An SASE is requested.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 198 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Nov 15, 2000 (20:31) * 15 lines 
 
WOO HOO!

Phase 3D is up! For the complete scoop, check out
www.amsat.org

Its going to be a bit of time before the transponders are
switched on (talking months) since the satellite has to
be positioned into its proper orbit. Then the systems
will have to be activated and tested out. Now time to
get the mode S (2.4ghz) and mode L (1.2ghz) transverters
up and running.

de AA9IL
Mike



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 199 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Nov 16, 2000 (20:57) * 80 lines 
 
Yes indeedy!!!

Phase 3D is In Orbit!

In what was described as a ''spectacular nighttime launch,'' the
next-generation AMSAT Phase 3D Amateur Radio satellite blasted off
from Earth on schedule November 16 at 0107z. Hitching a ride aboard
an Ariane 5 vehicle, Phase 3D was among four satellite payloads
heading off into orbit from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French
Guiana--just five degrees north of the equator.

''It was a textbook launch,'' said Phase 3D Mission Director and
AMSAT-DL Executive Vice President Peter Guelzow, DB2OS. Guelzow,
who's filling in for Phase 3D Project Leader Karl Meinzer, DJ4ZC,
said that from launch through separation about 45 minutes later,
''all received telemetry indicates the launch went perfectly, and our
satellite appears to be in very good health.''

When Phase 3D was successfully deployed by the Ariane 5 launcher at
0153z, cheers erupted from the AMSAT team monitoring the flight's
progress from the Arianespace control room.

Newly elected AMSAT-NA President Robin Haighton, VE3FRH, hailed the
news of the launch. ''You know, this really is the start of a new era
in ham radio,'' Haighton said. He called the design, building and
financing of P3D by international volunteers ''a great achievement.''

A ''general beacon'' was said to be transmitting on approximately
435.450 MHz. Earlier today, the Phase 3D PSK beacon turned up on
145.898 MHz--slightly different from the expected frequency. It was
monitored by Norbert Nothoff, DF5DP, transmitting
telemetry--including text blocks. ''We had some concern earlier this
morning because the satellite didn't show up on the expected
frequencies and hence missed any sign of life from the bird,''
Nothoff said.

The Ariane 5 placed Phase 3D into geostationary transfer orbit, from
where it will be nudged into its final elliptical orbit. It was the
last of the four payloads to be ejected into orbit by the launch
vehicle. The satellite is not expected to be ready for general use
for about nine months. Initial housekeeping tasks were under way in
the hours following the launch and separation. To move P3D from the
geostationary transfer orbit, the satellite's onboard arcjet motor
will burn intermittently at perigee over a 270-day period, with
final inclination and apogee adjustments made by the spacecraft's
400 Newton motor. Once these maneuvers are completed and three-axis
stabilization is achieved, the solar panels will be deployed. At
that point, Haighton said, it's anticipated the satellite will be
fully operational for use by Amateur Radio operators around the
world.

The satellite's initial orbit puts it some 585 miles above Earth at
the closest point. Phase 3D's final elliptical orbital configuration
will put the satellite some 2500 miles away from Earth at its
nearest point, and some 29,500 miles at its farthest.

At 630 pounds and some 20 feet across when the solar panels are
deployed, Phase 3D is the largest Amateur Radio satellite ever put
into space. The launch culminates years of planning, design and
construction as well as an ambitious fundraising campaign. The ARRL
was among the major contributors to the Phase 3D project. Three
other satellites--the giant PanAmSat PAS-1R communications satellite
and the smaller STRV-1C and 1D satellites--joined AMSAT Phase 3D for
the ride.

Haighton's immediate predecessor as AMSAT-NA president, Keith Baker,
KB1SF, told AMSAT News Service that he was ''delighted'' by the news
of the Phase 3D launch. ''I have no doubt that today will be regarded
as one of the greatest days in the history of Amateur Radio,'' he
said.

AMSAT-NA Board Chairman and past AMSAT-NA President Bill Tynan,
W3XO, was among those keeping a close ear on the launch activities
and participating in the AMSAT Launch Information Service. ''I can't
begin to tell you how happy I am to see P3D in orbit,'' said Tynan.
''It's been a long time, a long road--a bit rough at times,'' Tynan
observed.

For more information, visit the AMSAT-NA Web site,
http://www.amsat.org.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 200 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Nov 16, 2000 (21:39) * 20 lines 
 
Yes indeed-ie!

I guess I can wait a few more months to get the transverters
built up (have almost all the parts...) Getting too cold
to do anything outside anyway - today, the WX was 31 deg F
with snow flurries. The one neat thing is that there will
be some great nights for sky watching when the temp goes
sub zero (usually -25 degrees without the windchill). All
the moisture and gunk in the sky just seems to vanish and
the stars look incredible.

Aside from LEO satellite contacts, the last major DX I did
was on AO-13 several years ago. Using mode B, I was able
to hear some interesting (and work as well) DX. Cant wait
till P3D is fully functional. The portable sat microwave
station can finally be realized.

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 201 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 17, 2000 (12:31) * 3 lines 
 
Did anyone DX the Leonids last night??

Good on ya, Mike! Toast those marshmallows and hunker down by the bottle rig!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 202 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 17, 2000 (21:32) * 14 lines 
 
Listen to the Leonids Tonight

Space Weather News for Nov. 17, 2000
http://www.spaceweather.com

Scientists at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama are
operating a radio meteor detection system that records audible echoes as
meteors streak by. During the Nov. 18th Leonid meteor shower (Friday
night and Saturday morning) sounds from the system will be available live
on the web at http://www.spaceweather.com and http://www.leonidslive.com.
Every ping you hear corresponds to a meteor over the Eastern U.S.!

For more information visit SpaceWeather.com.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 203 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Nov 18, 2000 (13:04) * 35 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 46 - November 17, 2000

Sunspot numbers and solar flux were down over the past week. Average
sunspot numbers were down over 40 points and average solar flux was
off by 36 points relative to the previous week. The expected
geomagnetic disturbance arrived earlier than predicted, with Friday
being the worst day, with a planetary A index of 41. Planetary K
indices reached 6 for several periods on Friday. Saturday was fairly
quiet, and Sunday was fairly active with the planetary K index at
20. Following the weekend the geomagnetic conditions have been
quiet.

Solar flux probably reached a short term minimum of 143.7 on Monday,
and is now rising. Flux values for Friday through Tuesday are
expected to be 155, 155, 160, 160 and 165. Solar flux is expected to
peak around 200 from November 27-29. Expected planetary A index
values for Friday through Tuesday are 12, 10, 20, 12 and 10, so the
current predicted value for this Sunday is nearly identical to last
Sunday. The unsettled conditions on Sunday will probably be due to a
solar flair that occurred early Thursday.

Beyond the weekend, the next predicted unsettled day is November 29,
and December 5 looks like an active geomagnetic day, as well as
December 8 and 9. Of course this is based upon the previous solar
rotation.

Look at the chart at http://www.wm7d.net/hamradio/solar/. It looks
as if solar flux and sunspots generally declined over the past six
months.

Sunspot numbers for November 9 through 15 were 149, 141, 128, 112,
99, 131 and 144 with a mean of 129.1. 10.7 cm flux was 166.2, 153.4,
149.6, 146.6, 143.7, 148.6 and 146.5, with a mean of 150.7, and
estimated planetary A indices were 11, 41, 12, 21, 8, 5 and 5 with a
mean of 14.7.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 204 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov 21, 2000 (18:22) * 10 lines 
 
Did you catch any, Mike? Anyone? We caught raindrops...!


NASA Science News for November 21, 2000

The art of predicting Leonid meteors officially became a science this weekend as sky watchers around the globe enjoyed three predicted episodes of shooting stars. This story includes video and some unusual pictures of Leonid fireballs.

FULL STORY at

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2000/ast21nov_1.htm?list89800


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 205 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov 22, 2000 (19:01) * 23 lines 
 
Shepherd makes first casual QSOs from ISS

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station program has
announced that Commander William ''Shep'' Shepherd, KD5GSL, has made
the first casual Amateur Radio contacts from Space Station Alpha.

Shepherd reports that he was able to take a few minutes out of his
busy schedule on Friday, November 17, to engage in contacts with a
few lucky hams. Before then, the only Amateur Radio contacts
involved engineering test passes between the ISS and Russian and US
amateur facilities.

ARISS spokesman Will Marchant, KC6ROL, says that with the recent
arrival at ISS of a Progress cargo craft, the crew will have to
redouble its work pace. The space shuttle Endeavour STS-97 mission
to the ISS will launch November 30, so the Expedition 1 crew will
continue to put in some long hours preparing for its arrival.
Endeavour is carrying a large new solar panel for the ISS that will
permit the station to be fully powered for the first time.

More information about Amateur Radio on the International Space
Station is available on the ARISS Web site,
http://ariss.gsfc.nasa.gov/.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 206 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Nov 22, 2000 (19:13) * 40 lines 
 
Limited AO-40 use possible in near future

Plans are in place to make AO-40 available for a limited period of
general amateur use ''possibly within a week or two,'' says AMSAT-NA
President Robin Haighton, VE3FRH. Launched November 16, the
next-generation Amateur Radio satellite formerly known as Phase 3D
remains for now in a geostationary transfer orbit while initial
housekeeping and checkout procedures are under way.

Just when and how the ''limited operation'' will occur is up to the
ground controllers, Haigton said. The provisional operation would
involve ''one or two bands at a time.'' Since the satellite's solar
panels will not be deployed until AO-40 is in its final orbit, full
power will not be available.

Haighton said the most likely configurations for the limited test
period would be 70 cm up and 2 meters down and 1.2 GHz up and 2.4
GHz down, SSB and CW.

Details of the limited test period will be announced.

AMSAT has stressed that the Phase 3D/AO-40 controllers are closely
monitoring the power budget and the satellite's current orbital
parameters. ''These two areas will be among the most important
factors that determine what happens with P3D in the near future,''
AMSAT said this week.

From all indications, most AO-40 systems are working properly at
this point, with the possible exception of the 70-cm transmitter.
Phase 3D Project Manager Karl Meinzer, DJ4ZC, says ''a problem with
the 70 cm transmitter'' led controllers to shift the telemetry
downlink from 70-cm to 2 meters, 145.898 MHz.

Phase 3D will not be opened for full amateur use until it's been
placed in its final orbital configuration. That's expected to take
about nine months.

For more information, visit the AMSAT-NA Web site,
http://www.amsat.org/.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 207 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Nov 26, 2000 (18:47) * 15 lines 
 
Interplanetary shock wave hits Earth; more to come....

Space Weather News for Nov. 26, 2000
http://www.spaceweather.com

The first of several coronal mass ejections now heading toward Earth hit
our planet's magnetosphere between 0500 and 0600 UT on Nov. 26th.
Geomagnetic activity could become severe during the next 48 hours as one
shock wave after another reaches Earth. We encourage sky watchers to be
alert for auroras at middle- and perhaps even low-latitudes. The new Moon
will afford dark skies for spotting faint Northern Lights.

Visit http://www.spaceweather.com for details and updates.




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 208 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Dec  3, 2000 (17:24) * 20 lines 
 
Howdy All

Sorry for falling off the face of the earth but those ledges
at the prime meridian are not well marked and there is NOT
a guard rail either....

Anyway, with grad skool complete for this semester, I actually
have time to do stuff including finally bolting my 24 and 47
ghz up/down converters to their respective antenna switch
assemblies. The main reason for this post is that I finally
got the address for the SLF/ELF audio recordings - these are
time compressed onto a 90 minute cassette and cover signals
below 3 Hertz. The tape costs $10 money order mailed to
John M. Lauerman
26810 S.E. Duthie Hill Road
Issaquah, WA 98029

73 de Mike
Radio Cosmo International



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 209 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec  3, 2000 (18:50) * 1 lines 
 
Mahalo Mike! Welcome out of your Ivory Tower Dungeon for the holidays.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 210 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Dec  5, 2000 (20:13) * 19 lines 
 
Howdy Marcia and Geo-ites

Yea, Ivory Tower Dungeon is an apt term - good thing I
like going to school. Now, if I could just figure
out how to do school full time and not have to work...
Anyway, no exciting signal reports as of yet since
I have not been listening to the radio much. The R390A
got shipped off for restoration and the SP600 has been
pressed into backup duty. It fired right up despite
sitting dormant for a year. (No telling how long it
sat dormant in a surplus warehouse... I plugged it
in and it came right back to life. Ah, good ol tube
gear....) Right now, catching up on microwave stuff
which seems to have piled up again (and again and again...)

Cheers from the radio room
de Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 211 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Dec  5, 2000 (20:35) * 1 lines 
 
wishing I were a mouse in the corner so I could listen, too... I'd even share my cheese with you!!!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 212 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Dec  8, 2000 (18:21) * 35 lines 
 
Propagation - December 8, 2000

Average solar flux was down and sunspot numbers were up this week.
At least there weren't any major geomagnetic disturbances. Quiet and
stable conditions prevailed, with A indices in the single digits.
Solar flux probably reached a short term minimum at 1800z on
December 6 of 140.2, and at the 1800z reading the next day it was
140.8. The official daily readings are at 2000z, which is why you
won't see those numbers reported here in the summary at the end of
this bulletin.


After the low flux numbers for the previous two days, solar flux is
expected to rise to a peak near 200 around December 20-23. Current
prediction shows flux values for Friday through Tuesday, December
8-12 at 145, 150, 150, 155 and 160. The next short term minimum for
solar flux is predicted for after the new year.


Unfortunately for hams looking forward to the 10-Meter contest this
weekend, the quiet conditions will probably not continue. The
predicted planetary A index for Friday through Tuesday is 15, 25,
15, 12 and 10. The active conditions in this weekend's forecast are
probably due to a coronal hole in the center of the visible solar
disk. This will be a problem for high latitude and east-west
propagation. There was also a solar flare toward the end of the UTC
day on December 6.


Sunspot numbers for November 30 through December 6 were 191, 157,
141, 186, 120, 90 and 99 with a mean of 140.6. 10.7 cm flux was
192.3, 184.5, 167, 163.6, 152, 147 and 141, with a mean of 163.9,
and estimated planetary A indices were 6, 6, 4, 12, 10, 4 and 7 with
a mean of 7.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 213 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 11, 2000 (15:42) * 25 lines 
 
Listen to the Geminids

Space Weather News for Dec. 11, 2000
http://www.spaceweather.com


GEMINID METEOR SHOWER: Scientists at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center
have established a radio meteor detection system to monitor this week's
Geminid meteor shower. Although the shower doesn't peak until December
13th, plenty of Geminid meteoroids are already streaking through Earth's
atmosphere. You can listen to their eerie-sounding radio echoes in
realtime at http://www.spaceweather.com.


SUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS: The glare from this week's nearly-full Moon will
substantially reduce the number of visible Geminid meteors. Nevertheless,
sky watchers in rural areas will likely spot 20 or more shooting stars per
hour -- a fairly pleasing shower. We invite photographers who capture
images of Geminid meteors to submit their photos for display on
spaceweather.com. Simply send your files as email attachments to
webmaster@spaceweather.com.






 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 214 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec 14, 2000 (15:37) * 95 lines 
 
PROJECT SETI@HOME UPDATE

PROJECT STATUS
Halfway through our second year of operation, SETI@home has processed
over 7000 hours of digitally-recorded signals from the Arecibo radio
telescope, using the power of millions of Internet-connected computers.
As this processing continues, SETI@home's own computers are
doing the next phase, in which we separate man-made radio signals from
those originating outside our solar system. Our goal is to detect
signals from other civilizations.

By using the Internet to form the world's most powerful computer,
SETI@home has inspired other scientific computing projects,
and is often credited (along with Napster) with defining a
new generation of computer system design, called "peer-to-peer".

Because of the strong continued interest in SETI@home, the project will
continue for at least a year beyond its original ending time. Plans are
not finalized, but we hope to expand our search to the
southern-hemisphere sky, and to search new frequency bands.

We will also try to make SETI@home more fun and interesting by adding
new content and features to our web site. Our small but hard-working
staff (5 part-time members) has had little time to work on this area,
but we're expanding our efforts.

--------------------------
RELEASE OF VERSION 3 SOFTWARE
After almost a year of testing and debugging, we recently released a
major new version of our screensaver program. The new version does
much better signal analysis; it looks for two new types of signals
(pulses and triplets) and it covers a wider range of drift rates.
As a result, it takes more time to process each work unit.

The old version of SETI@home should automatically notify you when
it's time to upgrade to the new version. You can download and
install it from our web site:
http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/download.html

--------------------------
NEW SPONSORSHIP FROM ONE COSMOS NETWORK AND THE PLANETARY SOCIETY
We're proud to announce an alliance of SETI@home with One Cosmos Network
and The Planetary Society. This alliance will give us the financial
support necessary to continue and expand SETI@home, as well as
enabling us to provide a richer Web experience.

Founded by Internet executive Joe Firmage and Ann Druyan, Carl Sagan's
wife and collaborator of 20 years, One Cosmos Network is dedicated to
carrying on Sagan's effort to humanize science and bring it to people
everywhere. Toward this end, One Cosmos is constructing an Internet
portal, OneCosmos.net, and a production studio, Cosmos Studios, which
will create compelling science-based entertainment for television and film.
Their first release is an updated, digitally remastered Collector's Edition
of the Emmy and Peabody Award winning 13-hour television series, "Cosmos."
The series is currently available for purchase in DVD or VHS format,
with "The Music of Cosmos" available separately in a double-CD format;
find them at http://OneCosmos.net.

The Planetary Society is the founding sponsor of SETI@home, and its
membership is open to anyone who shares the goals of exploring our
solar system and searching for extraterrestrial life. In fact, the
Society supports six different SETI efforts, along with many other
projects in space exploration. We encourage you to join
The Planetary Society and help advance their many worthy programs at
http://planetary.org/html/member/JoinUs.html

We are also extremely grateful to our other sponsors, including
the University of California Digital Media Innovation Program,
Sun Microsystems, Fuji Film Computer Products, Quantum, and
the SETI Institute.

Thanks also to the hundreds of individuals who have made
contributions to SETI@home. Their names are listed at
http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/donorlist.html

SETI@home is free for everyone, but if you can consider
making a tax-deductible donation to SETI@home, please visit
http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/donor.html.

--------------------------
NEW SETI@HOME GEAR IS HERE
While our goal is to detect life in outer space, we can't do that
without the support of our fellow Earthlings. Last year, we introduced
several SETI@home products in our online store. The response was so
great that this year we've expanded the product line. There are great
new sweatshirts, mugs, T-shirts, jackets, desk clocks, lapel pins,
patches, and even a heat-sensitive mouse pad. Want more? How about
your very own, very elegant, blown-glass globe? Or (our personal
favorite) a stylus, red and black pens, and mechanical pencil packed
into one very cool gravity-fed tool. You'll find them all online at
http://www.exploratoriumstore.com/setihome.html.

The profits from each sale help fund the SETI@home project.




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 215 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 18, 2000 (21:32) * 47 lines 
 
AMSAT OSCAR-40 remains silent, and command stations on the ground
still have been unable to reestablish contact with the Amateur Radio
satellite. It had been hoped that an onboard computer timeout
expected on or about December 16 would restart the beacon telemetry
and give the ground crew some clues as to why AO-40 suddenly stopped
transmitting on December 13.
AMSAT-Germany's Peter Guelzow, DB2OS, of the AO-40 team, said
nothing was heard over the weekend, and command stations tried to
re-establish communication by sending blind commands. If the reset
had occurred, the satellite would have been restored to its
post-launch configuration and attempt to transmit on 70 cm. However,
the 70-cm transmitter has been problematic, and the satellite likely
still would need to be reconfigured for 2-meter transmission at that
point to be heard on Earth.

The AO-40 team is continuing to investigate reports of weak signals
on the 2-meter downlink frequency of 145.898 MHz that seem to be
coming from AO-40, but it has discounted reports of telemetry heard
there as a hoax. Other reports persist of a weak, unmodulated
carrier, however.

Guelzow said today that the AO-40 team is encouraged by a report
from the North American Air Defense Command--NORAD. The report
indicates that AO-40 was found to be in one piece, that the orbit
was exactly were it should be, that the radar cross-section was as
expected, and that no other pieces were found. Guelzow said the
NORAD data counter rumors ''which no one on the inner team
believed'' that AO-40 might have exploded.

AMSAT-NA President Robin Haighton said ground controllers were
exploring several options.

When and whether the satellite will be heard from again depends, in
part, on whether AO-40 has picked up any of the ''blind commands''
sent by ground controllers. Guelzow says that if no commands were
accepted by the IHU-1 onboard computer since contact was lost
December 13, then a ''command-assist'' watchdog routine on December
21 will cycle the satellite through various receive, transmit,
high-gain and low-gain antenna modes. If AO-40 did pick up some
commands, Guelzow said, the command-assist watchdog will be reset
for another 10 orbits. That could extend the wait until sometime
after Christmas.
Guelzow says the ''watchdogs'' are software resets. Ground
controllers want to avoid doing a hard re-boot of the main computer,
which is considered a last resort. ''There is no need to hurry, and
the command team doesn't want to miss any option,'' he said.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 216 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec 24, 2000 (19:13) * 35 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 51 - December 22, 2000

Average solar flux and sunspot numbers were up sharply this week.
The solar flux average for the week was up over 47 points and
sunspot numbers rose over 85 points. It has been a quiet week
geomagnetically, with planetary A indices in the single digits.

Solar flux probably peaked at 2200z on December 20, when it reached
207.7. Solar flux is predicted over the next few days, Friday
through Monday at 195, 195, 190 and 190. The planetary A index for
those days is predicted at 12, 15, 15 and 12. The reason for the
unsettled geomagnetic condition is a coronal mass ejection on
December 18 that is expected to cause a weak disturbance.

Beyond this weekend look for solar flux to drop to a short term
minimum of 140 around January 3-5. The next peak is expected from
January 16-19.

Check the bottom of Jan Alvestad's Solar Terrestrial Activity Report
at http://www.dxlc.com/solar/ . He has a table showing monthly
averages of solar flux and sunspot numbers, as well as a smoothed
sunspot number. According to his table, the highest average monthly
solar flux was in March of this year, although July was almost as
high. The highest sunspot number was in July, and during April he
shows a smoothed sunspot number of 120.8, which may be the peak of
this solar cycle. The peak of cycle 23 has probably passed, although
we could get an increase in activity which would extend the peak.
Fortunately, sunspot cycles seem to go up faster than they decline.

Sunspot numbers for December 14 through 20 were 157, 181, 217, 229,
174, 163 and 183 with a mean of 186.3. 10.7 cm flux was 182.2,
187.8, 190.5, 196.7, 198, 198.6 and 201.3, with a mean of 193.6, and
estimated planetary A indices were 4, 3, 4, 8, 10, 5 and 4 with a
mean of 6.3.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 217 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Dec 26, 2000 (17:00) * 45 lines 
 
Space Bulletin 027 - December 22, 2000

It was a historic moment for Amateur Radio. Some 200 youngsters,
teachers, parents, and news media representatives were on hand at
Luther Burbank Elementary School near Chicago December 21 to witness
the first successful Amateur Radio on the International Space
Station school contact.

Several pupils plus one teacher got to chat with Space Station Alpha
Commander William ''Shep'' Shepherd, KD5GSL, via ham radio. Earlier
attempts by the school on December 19 were unsuccessful, despite the
extensive technical preparations.

On December 21, however, Shepherd, using the special NA1SS call
sign, came right back to a call from veteran SAREX/ARISS mentor
Charlie Sufana, AJ9N, at the school. Sufana and his ARISS team had
spent the better part of two weeks setting up gear and antennas for
the scheduled contact. Antenna setup was hampered by repeated
snowstorms and frigid temperatures, but the efforts paid off.

''I'm happy that we were able to pull it off,'' Sufana said. ''The kids
were bouncing off the walls.''

During the 10-minute pass, 14 first through eighth graders plus
science and math teacher Rita Wright got a chance to pose questions
about life aboard Space Station Alpha to Shepherd.

Shepherd said he especially enjoyed being able to float around in
the space station. He said the crew is keeping detailed logs about
life on the space station, and that the crew was enjoying taking
pictures of Earth from space, ''because you can see things that you
can't see from the ground.'' Shepherd also explained that about 90
percent of water in the air inside the space station is recovered
and reused.

At the conclusion of the successful contact, the grateful crowd
applauded loudly and offered up a hearty ''thank you!'' and ''73!'' to
Shepherd and his Russian crewmates. Shepherd said he was looking
forward to future school contacts. Another two dozen schools are
under consideration for ARISS school contacts. Schools in Virginia
and New York are tentatively scheduled for contacts next month.

More information about requesting dedicated contacts is available on
the ARISS web pages, http://ariss.gsfc.nasa.gov/.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 218 of 605:  (sprin5) * Wed, Dec 27, 2000 (04:10) * 1 lines 
 
That's great, I'd like to find the frequencies they're on and post them here. Or maybe you know the recent schedule, Marci?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 219 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 27, 2000 (14:19) * 26 lines 
 
I'll see what I can find Terry!

FCC Requests Voluntary Communications Emergency in and around TEXAS

The FCC has requested that Amateur Radio operators in and around
Texas voluntarily relinquish the use of 3870 to 3878 kHz to enable
the handling of emergency traffic. Ice storms have disrupted power
and communication and made for hazardous travel conditions in the
region. Amateur Radio operators have activated the Emergency and
Tactical Traffic Net to handle traffic related to the weather
emergency.

At the request of ARRL South Texas Section Manager Ray Taylor,
N5NAV, Leroy Pittman of the FCC has asked the amateur community to
cooperate in recognizing the existence of a voluntary communications
emergency and to stay clear of the specified 75-meter frequencies.
Taylor reports that Amateur Radio operators already have helped with
hospital communications after hospital telephones were knocked out.

A net on 7285 kHz has been handling much of the winter storm-related
traffic during daylight hours.

A copy of Pittman's request to voluntarily relinquish use of the
specified 75-meter frequencies was sent to the FCC's HF Direction
Finding facility in Columbia, Maryland.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 220 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Dec 28, 2000 (20:42) * 15 lines 
 
Howdy All

Well, one very good bit of news. Control stations were able
to jump start AO40 and its transmitting with its mode S (2.4ghz)
beacon. There is hope for the satellite future!

Of course, way too busy as of late but progress has been made
on the 5.7ghz system and some tests were run on a cobbled
together 24ghz receive system. Plus playing with the new
Christmas toy - a Garmin GPS receiver.

Anyway, back to the lab.

Happy Holidays from the Radio Cosmo Collective



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 221 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec 28, 2000 (23:45) * 2 lines 
 
Yes, Mike!!! Good show and great news about AO40. Much concern about that.
Happy New Year *hugs* for keeping us up to date


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 222 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jan  4, 2001 (16:11) * 39 lines 
 
AO-40 Recovery Continues - January 4, 2001

Efforts continue to assess the status of AO-40 following a
resumption of telemetry transmissions. AO-40 went silent December
13, but ground controllers successfully reset the main computer on
Christmas Day and got the satellite transmitting again.

Ground controllers now are analyzing the telemetry sent via the S2
beacon on 2401.305 MHz. AMSAT-NA President Robin Haighton, VE3FRH,
says the command team worked through the holidays in an effort to
determine just what went wrong aboard AO-40. Among other things,
ground controllers would like to know what actually happened on
December 13 and why, as well as which telemetry functions are known
to be correct and which data are suspect and why. The satellite went
silent during maneuvers to test its onboard 400-Newton propulsion
system following an earlier orbit-shifting burn.

Ground controllers also want to know the spacecraft's actual
attitude with respect to Earth--and if it has changed attitude.
Other parameters they'll be examining include spin velocity, the
status of batteries, battery chargers and regulators, and what
happened to the onboard computers, IHU-1 and IHU 2, and why.

The AO-40 command team also wants to find out if all the antennas
are operational and what can be done next to improve communications,
and if there are any risks involved in attempting to restart onboard
systems. So far, the 2-meter beacon transmitter has remained off the
air since AO-40 was returned to ground control on Christmas Day.
It's believed that problems with the 70-cm transmitter developed
shortly after launch. The 2.4 GHz transmitter appears to be
operating ''nominally,'' however.

''When questions such as these--and others--are answered, it may be
possible to determine the working capability of the spacecraft, and,
if appropriate, to start to try operation on other bands,'' Haighton
said. He said critical decisions will be made over the next week or
two ''based on the results of the analysis and much discussion among
the command team.''



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 223 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jan  5, 2001 (16:55) * 48 lines 
 
AO-40 Could Be Leaking

AO-40 team member Peter Guelzow, DB2OS, says a small leak on AO-40
could account for the higher spin rate ground controllers have
noticed since the satellite resumed telemetry transmissions on
Christmas Day. Guelzow called on the amateur community to be patient
during the AO-40 recovery.

''The good thing is that AO-40 seems to be in a very stable
condition, and there are no signs of further damage,'' Guelzow said
today in a posting to the AMSAT bulletin board. ''However, there is a
sign of a small leak.''

Ground controllers continue to look into the reason for the higher
spin rate as well as into other items under investigation, Guelzow
said, and the results will be reported when the AO-40 team reaches
its final conclusions. He said the priority for now is to get AO-40
back to normal as soon as possible.

AO-40 went silent December 13 while ground controllers were testing
the onboard 400-newton propulsion system. Guelzow's posting did not
indicate whether he thought that propulsion system fuel or some
other substance was escaping through the suspected leak. A computer
reset command Christmas Day brought the satellite back to life, but
telemetry data suggest that AO-40 suffered some damage. Since
Christmas, the AO-40 ground team has been analyzing telemetry sent
via the 2.4 GHz beacon--the only transmitter now operating--to
determine the status of AO-40's onboard systems.

Guelzow said that once the AO-40 team has a handle on the antenna
situation it might attempt to get the 2-meter and possibly the
70-cm transmitters working. Until then, he said, AO-40 will continue
to use the 2.4 GHz downlink. Guelzow said that because of the
currently limited downlink capabilities, uploading of new commands
and analyzing the results is taking somewhat longer than it would
under normal circumstances.

The AO-40 team also is evaluating the satellite's magnetorquing
attitude control system and wants to spin down the spacecraft and
adjust AO-40's attitude for better sun and squint angles. In
addition, ground controllers will be taking a close look at various
other systems and experiments onboard, including the arcjet and the
stabilization wheels.

''Once this is completed and we have a complete overview, then we can
declare the spacecraft to work normally and perhaps think about
re-defining the mission of AO-40, whatever it will be,'' Guelzow
said.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 224 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Jan  7, 2001 (18:46) * 23 lines 
 
Hey Kids

Well, still waiting for the AO40 reports to trickle in.
The way things are looking, I will have plenty of time
to cobble bits together in time for the spring thaw.
(Got up to 32 deg today - yow!)

Playing with some new toys from the most recent ham fest.
One step closer to amateur television with the new CCD
camera unit (in CosmoVision, of course....)
Also picked up a Delorme Tripmate GPS unit very cheap.
Hooked it up to the pc and ran a terminal emulator - after
goofing around for a bit, got the unit to come to life
by sending over the correct init code which resulted in
the unit spewing over raw GPS data. Finally, a multimode
RF data modem so I can play with Packet, Amtor, RTTY, APRS,
etc....
enuf stuff to keep me humored/annoyed for a while....

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 225 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jan  7, 2001 (22:15) * 10 lines 
 
Mike! Fantastic - now just hook up your little computer tv cam and we can watch you do all this stuff! Seems as though cabin fever is held in abeyance by your soldering finger together and fluxing... thanks for sharing!

Seti settings currently for me: 179 blocks of data crunched

16 hr 45' 28" RA

+9° 3' 36" Dec

1.420664063 Ghz



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 226 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Jan 11, 2001 (19:12) * 19 lines 
 
Yow! 179 blocks?
I wont say what my piss weak P90 has finally completed.
I guess there is justification for shelling out some
bucks for a 1GHz system. Either that, or hit all the
local garage sales, buy a bunch of P90's and build up
a Beowulf cluster.
While I was at the last ham fest, I saw P90 boards with
CPU -and- memory for less than $50. You can guess what
I payed for mine all those years ago. Sort of like back
in ye olden daze when 386's were being taken over by the
486 and folks spend a couple thousand for that tricked
out 386 that was destined to be a big paperweight for
the desk....
Oh well, progress....

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 227 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jan 11, 2001 (22:00) * 1 lines 
 
Yup...technology has struck again - I started out on a Commodore which we upgraded to 64! Before that we had to load programs via tape - it HAD no memory. Uh huh...this is my 6th genereation computer is about 10 years... I have a thief to thank for one upgrade...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 228 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jan 11, 2001 (22:01) * 1 lines 
 
183 blocks completed now...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 229 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Jan 15, 2001 (19:16) * 11 lines 
 
Greetings Marcia and Geo-ites

Just curious - what would you think about starting up
a dedicated SETI thread on GEO? Would this be handled
by Beyond Planet Earth? This could cover both the
hardware, software, and philosophical aspects. What da ya
think?

73 de Mike
Radio Cosmo International



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 230 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jan 15, 2001 (22:46) * 2 lines 
 
Create it Mike!!! Great idea!!! There is and old one in another seldom-used topic but if I could telnet I would tie them but cannot here now with this server. Create, my dear!



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 231 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 16, 2001 (13:27) * 27 lines 
 
Hams Respond to El Salvador Earthquake

According to reports from the Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio
Network, El Salvador's worst earthquake in at least a decade January
13 has claimed more than 400 lives and injured nearly 800 others in
El Salvador and Guatemala. More than 1000 still are missing.
SATERN's Pat McPherson, WW9E, cited figures from El Salvador's
National Emergency Committee.
Hundreds of aftershocks have rocked the region since the initial
quake, which measured 7.6 on the Richter Scale. SATERN activated a
net January 14 to respond to health-and-welfare requests and
emergency traffic from the affected region. McPherson reports that
SATERN volunteers continue monitoring 14.265 MHz, but the formal net
has been terminated for now.
McPherson says that SATERN Coordinator for Honduras Hermann Cueva,
HR1HCP, reports that a net is operating on 7090 kHz to assist El
Salvador.
SATERN has a health-and-welfare inquiry form on its Web site,
http://www.qso.com/satern.
Meanwhile, a team of 22 Turkish rescue personnel has been dispatched
to the disaster scene. Turkey was hit by a devastating earthquake in
the summer of 1999, and Amateur Radio played a role in providing
emergency communication in the aftermath.
Heading up communications for the Turkish rescue team is Serdar
Demirel, TA2NO. TRAC President Aziz Sasa, TA1E, reports that the
team is equipped with an INMARSAT telephone and VHF and UHF amateur
gear.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 232 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 16, 2001 (16:22) * 35 lines 
 
AO-40 Report Suggests Damage to Antenna Systems

The latest information on AO-40 suggests that the satellite might
have suffered antenna system damage when it went silent last
December 13. The satellite stopped transmitting while ground
controllers were testing the 400-newton propulsion system.
AMSAT-DL Vice President and AO-40 team member Peter Guelzow, DB2OS,
reports that efforts to restart the 2-meter transmitter continue to
be unsuccessful. The satellite had been sending telemetry via the
2-meter transmitter when it quit transmitting last month.
Guelzow said this week that while the 2-meter, 70 cm and 1.2 GHz
receivers are working on the high-gain antennas, none of them will
work on the omnidirectional antennas. He speculated that either the
omnidirectional antennas or the cabling or the antenna relays are
damaged. Additional tests will be carried out, he said, including
testing the VHF transmitter using the omnidirectional antennas.
Plans also call to test the 70-cm transmitter on both the high-gain
and omnidirectional antennas, once the spacecraft's spin rate has
been reduced and AO-40's heat-dissipation mechanism is working
again.
Guelzow said that AO-40's attitude control system is fully
functional--something that would be critical to keeping the
satellite in orbit on a long-term basis. But, the sun sensor's
electronics have quit working, and, Guelzow said, without sun and
attitude information, no magnetorquing can be performed.
AO-40 team leader Karl Meinzer, DJ4ZC, was reported to be developing
a software fix that does not rely on data from the sun sensor. It
will be tested soon.
Guelzow expressed the hope that once the sun angle and
antenna-pointing capabilities have been established, the ground
crews will have a better chance to check out the status of the 2
meter and 70 cm transmitters through ''better-controlled and suitable
experiments.''
He indicated that AO-40's arcjet thrusters and the reaction wheels
also will undergo testing as soon as possible.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 233 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Jan 29, 2001 (22:12) * 16 lines 
 
Howdy All

Yep, still around - just driving across Texas way too many times...
Anyway, while goofing around the used book store in Austin, I found
a neat project book - "How to Build Earthquake, Weather, and Solar
Flare Monitors" by Gary Giusti (Tab Books - ISBN 0-07-025209-2)
Lots of neat projects that seem to be within the realm of buildability
for various electonics experimenters. Most of the circuits are
opamp designs - the real construction comes in the building of the
seismic transducers - in this case coils of wire in plastic buckets
with suspended magnets which move up and down based on vibration.
Neat stuph. Anyway, more details to follow. The trip itself
was uneventful which, in a way, is kinda good....

73 de AA9IL
radio cosmo international


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 234 of 605:  (sprin5) * Tue, Jan 30, 2001 (07:54) * 3 lines 
 
Great, it was fun to catch on 442.15 while you cruised through Austin, next time stay a while, Mike!

Another project for you!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 235 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan 31, 2001 (16:03) * 3 lines 
 
Duck Mike... he is gonna put you to work on some Harp project of other WOOOOOOoooooooooooooooOOOOOOOOOOooooooooooo thingy. Speaking of which,

ART BELL is back on the air starting Monday, February 5, 2001


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 236 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jan 31, 2001 (20:35) * 10 lines 
 
Students make First Contact with the ISS

NASA Science News for January 30, 2001

Last month a group of Chicago students used ham radio gear to talk to
astronauts on the International Space Station. Their long-distance chat
was the first of its kind between students and the ISS.

FULL STORY at
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2001/ast30jan_1.htm?list89800


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 237 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Feb  1, 2001 (18:42) * 46 lines 
 
ARRL Takes Part in ITU Study of Unwanted Emissions.

The ARRL Technical Relations Office in Washington participated in
just-completed International Telecommunication Union studies of
''unwanted emissions'' in the radio spectrum. Unwanted emissions
consist of out-of-band and spurious emissions. The
ITU-Radiocommunication Sector has conducted two multi-year studies
of out-of-band and spurious emissions during the past decade.

ARRL Technical Relations Manager Paul Rinaldo, W4RI, chaired a
second-round task group with an international membership, drafting
out-of-band emission specifications. ARRL Lab Supervisor Ed Hare,
W1RFI, and his staff participated in task group meetings and
provided technical support to the League's Washington office.
Representatives of the International Amateur Radio Union also took
part.

''Had we not invested all those hours and travel, the amateur and
amateur-satellite services probably would have some unwanted
emission limits that would be more difficult to meet and make
amateur equipment more costly,'' Rinaldo said. The panel's
recommendations are being circulated to governments for final
approval.

Out-of-band emissions are those falling outside the necessary
bandwidth of a signal and are the result of modulation. ''Amateurs
know them as key clicks and splatter,'' Rinaldo said. The ITU defines
spurious emissions as emissions beyond 250% of the necessary
bandwidth, but the definition is still under debate. Spurious levels
already are spelled out in the international Radio Regulations. ARRL
Lab tests have shown that amateur gear could meet a standard of -50
dB relative to main signal for HF and -70 dB for VHF bands and
above.

Out-of-band limits for amateur equipment were agreed upon at the
final task group meeting last year, and Rinaldo says these are
consistent with the idea of establishing a safety net--not stringent
levels of emission. A suite of ITU-R recommendations on unwanted
emissions is being circulated and should be approved by mid-year.

More work lies ahead for the ARRL Washington staff. Radio
astronomers and earth-exploration passive services are not satisfied
with present levels of unwanted emissions from satellites and are
concerned about interference to their sensitive receivers. A new ITU
task group is studying the issue and preparing information for
presentation at WRC-03.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 238 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Feb  5, 2001 (18:41) * 22 lines 
 
Howdy All

So ol' Art's back on the air? I would have to come up with some type
of timer/tape recorder since the Chicago stations air his show in the
wee hours o' the morning. Wished I had more time in Austin this trip
but it was one of those 'just passing through' trips although I did
fit in a trip to the used book store and the record store. I did
notice more changes in the cityscape (something Ive noticed over the
past 10 years....) which I will probably post in the 'Austin' discussion
page. Re projects - nope! no new projects for me until I get this
current batch done (although a HAARP type system would be neat and
would scare the hell out of the neighbors....). I am also going to
do something with the SETI discussion but thats kinda on the back
burner for the moment. Did just get the latest copy of the Lowdown
(Long Wave Club of America) and will have to read thru and see
if anything interesting worth passing along. Otherwise, back to
a microwave transverter interface so I can upgrade another one
of my systems - Spring/Summer is in the distance and its time
for roving microwave work!

73 de Mike
Radio Cosmo International


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 239 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb  6, 2001 (20:41) * 54 lines 
 
Yupper, Art Bell's first program was on last night. Was good to hear him even if he is "out there."

AO-40 Future Rests on Reducing Spin, Regaining Attitude Control

The key to a successful AO-40 recovery effort continues to be a
matter of reducing the satellite's spin and regaining the ability to
adjust its attitude from the ground. ''The current problem is the
lack of accurate AO-40 attitude data,'' AMSAT News Service said.
Accurate data are not available because AO-40's sun sensor is not
seeing the sun because of the satellite's attitude.

Only when ground controllers can accurately determine the
satellite's attitude will it be possible to change it and correctly
aim AO-40's high-gain antennas for optimal reception on Earth--and
that's assuming the transmitters are functioning on bands other than
2.4 GHz. Ground controllers have had no luck hearing AO-40's
transmitters on the omnidirectional antennas on 2 meters, 70 cm or
1.2 GHz. Since the satellite's computer was reset and telemetry
resumed December 25, the AO-40 ground team has been analyzing
telemetry sent via the 2.4 GHz beacon--the only transmitter now
operating.

AMSAT-Germany described AO-40 as ''in the fog'' because its high
angle with respect to the sun temporarily prevents the sun sensors
from providing attitude data.

Ground controllers have been pinning their hopes on a previously
announced ''de-spinner'' programming routine that would permit AO-40
spin control without having to rely on the sun sensors. The
satellite's current spin rate is reported to be 17.7 RPM. But even
if the programming fix fails, ''it's no cause for panic,'' AMSAT-DL
said. By April, controllers reason, the satellites sensors will
again see the sun and ''thanks to magnetorquing, spin and attitude
can be actively improved upon the rising tide.'' Once the spin is
reduced, sun angle improved, and antennas pointed, testing can
resume. Still outstanding are tests of the VHF and UHF transmitters,
the arc-jet motor, and the reaction wheels, among others.

Both AMSAT-DL President and AO-40 Project Leader Karl Meinzer,
DJ4ZC, and AMSAT-NA President Robin Haighton, VE3FRH, have continued
to be optimistic that AO-40 will have a useful life of Amateur Radio
service. Command stations James Miller, G3RUH, Stacey Mills, W4SM,
made a long-term prediction of AO-40's new orbit. They say that even
after last year's incident--which silenced the satellite for nearly
two weeks--and the resulting decrease of perigee, AO-40's orbit will
be stable, although perigee will oscillate by several hundred
kilometers.

AMSAT-DL says the recovery effort has been slowed somewhat because
of limited access time on the part of the command team, due to
AO-40's current orbital parameters.

Discussions of the future of AO-40 are expected to dominate the
eighth AMSAT-DL Symposium on March 17, AMSAT-DL said.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 240 of 605:  (sprin5) * Wed, Feb  7, 2001 (08:51) * 1 lines 
 
Art Bell is back on, great stuff for insomniacs who need to listen to some wild stuff on AM radio.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 241 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb  7, 2001 (15:49) * 5 lines 
 
Art Bell is great stuff if taken with a very large grain of salt!

Shuttle Atlantis going up!




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 242 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Feb 16, 2001 (21:22) * 22 lines 
 
Hey kids

One of the few things that make long distance drives bearable
is the chance to bring along the 10 meter rig. 10 was in good
shape in the morning with lots of European contacts booming in
- significant contacts included working the D68C DXpedition
on Comoros island off the coast of East Africa. Power was
25 watts into a converted cb mag mount antenna stuck on the
vehicle roof. Today, afternoon driving yielded a contact
to Jamaica and hearing Brazil and Easter Island. As the
sun set in the west, the West Coast stations came in including
Hawaii, Alaska, then working towards VK's (Australia) and JA's
(Japan). Those signals were too down in the noise floor to try
a contact - after night fall, the band was completely dead.
With Summer coming, this kind of DX will only get better. A friend
of mine has been working lots of exotic DX with low power on
the HF bands using cw. Sounds good to me!

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 243 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Feb 17, 2001 (00:07) * 4 lines 
 
Ok Mike, need approx frequencies you work so I might hear you in those pileups.
Also time GMT, please!

Wonder what the CME is going to do to the background noise level tomorrow!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 244 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 20, 2001 (19:26) * 35 lines 
 
LF-to-LF Transatlantic Amateur Contact is Completed

Amateur Radio history was made this month when amateurs in Canada
and the UK completed what appears to be the first two-way
transatlantic Amateur Radio exchange on 136 kHz. Larry Kayser,
VA3LK, and Lawrence ''Laurie'' Mayhead, G3AQC, managed the LF feat
using extremely slow CW that featured 90-second-long dits and
180-second-long dahs. The two-way contact took two weeks to
complete.

''We are the first to do a two-way QSO on LF across the North
Atlantic as far as I am concerned,'' Kayser said. ''We are the ones
who put the stakes in the ground; others will build on what we have
done.''

The VA3LK-G3AQC contact began February 5 and was completed February
19 with the reception and confirmation of VA3LK's report by G3AQC.
Both stations used spectrographic software and computers for
receiving. The participants agreed in advance to a ''firewall''
between them for the duration of the contact and that all QSO
information was exchanged over the LF radio link.

The UK has an amateur band at 136 kHz. While Canada has not yet
authorized general Amateur Radio operation on 136 kHz, Kayser and a
few other Canadian amateurs have received special authorization to
conduct LF experiments there.

G3AQC and VA3LK were using a combination of commercial and surplus
equipment at their respective stations. G3AQC estimated his
effective radiated power at 350 mW, while VA3LK said he might have
been at the 5 W ERP level.

In October 1998, the ARRL petitioned the FCC to create two amateur
LF allocations at 135.7-137.8 kHz and 160-190 kHz. The FCC has not
yet acted on the request.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 245 of 605:  (sprin5) * Wed, Feb 21, 2001 (08:27) * 3 lines 
 
Art Bell was talking about a new woodpecker style fequency the other night. Do you know what it is, Marci? He was asking amateur radio ops worldwide to try and tune it in during the daytime to find out where it is, he had a gusest talking about emf and radio.

This was about two nights ago, heard on my pillow spaeaker.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 246 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Feb 24, 2001 (21:37) * 4 lines 
 
yup caught part of it (you use a pillow speaker , too???!!!) They did not get enough people responding to his request for hearing it and location to determine what or where it was originating but you can hear it on http://www.artbell.com
However it was on only briefly and by the time I heard about it, it had been turned off.

He also mentioned the longest pedestrian (carrying your radio not a rig on your desk the size of a boat anchor) contact via ham radio voice. From New Zealand to souther California!!! Two women!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 247 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 28, 2001 (16:42) * 28 lines 
 
Hams Responding to Northwestern US Earthquake

An earthquake estimated at magnitude 6.8 hit February 28 about 25
miles southeast of Seattle, Washington. No deaths and few serious
injuries are reported. A state of emergency has been declared in
King County, Washington--the greater Seattle area.

ARRL Western Washington Section Manager Harry Lewis, W7JWJ, reports
that some communities are without power. Telephone lines are jammed,
and customers were being asked to not use their telephones.

District Emergency Coordinator Ed Bruette, N7NVP, was reported
enroute to the Kitsap County Emergency Operations Center. "State
RACES officer Jim Sutton, WA7PHD, is NCS on the Washington State
Emergency Net operating from the State EOC at Camp Murray," Lewis
said. ARES volunteers in King County were active on an emergency
repeater net with King County EC Rich Hodges, KB7TBF, and Lt Russ
Reed, N7NOV, of the US Coast Guard acting as NCS. Lewis said that
several other county ARES nets were active as well.

"I am deeply impressed by the immediate response that occurred with
hams coming out of the woodwork, just like it might have been
planned," Lewis said. He noted that Red Cross, with Amateur Radio
operators assisting, was already doing damage assessment, and that a
temporary 2-meter net was set up for that purpose.

Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network reports it is standing
by on its net frequency of 14.265 MHz.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 248 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Mar  1, 2001 (21:13) * 18 lines 
 
Hey Kids

Regarding the 'woodpecker' signal - this was supposedly a Russian
over the horizon radar system. I remember listening to this
signal at various places around the shortwave bands. In the most
recent issue of Monitoring Times, there is mention of the woodpecker
again used for propagation study. There is also mention of a
Russian experiment with a high gain antenna array used to direct
very high energy (1000kw) plus signals into the upper atmosphere.
It was found that as the power was increased, the received signal
level dropped - turned out the signal burned the ionosphere.
Some of the scientists on this project later went on to work on
HAARP.
Speaking of shortwave, just got the refurbed R390A back.
Hunka Hunka Heavy Metal!

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 249 of 605:  (sprin5) * Fri, Mar  2, 2001 (07:46) * 2 lines 
 
So what's your take on HAAP?



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 250 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  2, 2001 (16:22) * 1 lines 
 
weather altering machine as Art Bell suggests?? Sub communications? What is the current state of facts known about HAARP? I can get all the wild and wooly conjecture from Art. It's be nice to know what the state of the art is actually doing.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 251 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Mar  2, 2001 (20:12) * 19 lines 
 
Howdy all
Guess I'll have to do some research on this one - I seen various
articles on HAARP in both ham radio and Tesla mags so I can get
a couple of different sides of the story. Also a 'warning' book
titled 'Angels Dont Play This HAARP'
As far as I know, the frequencies in use were in the HF spectrum.
There is possibly VLF as well.
The big question I have is that this is for propagation/ionospheric
study - to be able to charge the ionosphere to help enhance propagation?
Create a passive (in a sense...) reflector?
I'll do some snooping and see what I can find.
One tech tidbit - one of the primary contractors was E Systems
in Richardson Tx (Now Raytheon). This outfit builds tres cool
spook gear for the gov (ELINT, SIGINT, etc...). Had a
chance to drive by their building once - oh to have seen some of the
projects in there.

73 de secret agent cosmo



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 252 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Mar  2, 2001 (20:18) * 3 lines 
 
Doh!
If all else fails, do a google search



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 253 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sat, Mar  3, 2001 (10:58) * 17 lines 
 
Howdy Howdy

Listening to a 'numbers' station on 15.015Mhz at the moment (16:30
GMT). Modulation mode was too distorted in AM so I switched to
CW and tweeked the BFO to reproduce some clear audio - This was
an english speaking woman giving phonetics interspersed with
'standby'. The neat thing that ties into propagation was that
the signal had a slight echo - longpath and shortpath propagation?
After two repeats and some silence, the signal was back on but
very much weaker. (Must of pointed the beam elsewhere....).
Also, at the conclusion of each number sequence, there were two
distinct DTMF tones - possibly an end of transmission signal
for mechanical recording?

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international intercept station



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 254 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar  3, 2001 (20:37) * 3 lines 
 
Hmmmm interesting. On scanner frequencies you can count how many repeaters by how often the squelch tail repeats. I gather that was NOT what you heard?! I programmed 15.015 into my s SWL so I can monitor her too. Nothing on now.

Ooh, I know someone in Richarson. Hmmmm. Have no idea what he does...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 255 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Mar  5, 2001 (20:51) * 16 lines 
 
Howdy Howdy

Just got the most recent LWCA Lowdown. Some interesting links
in the natural radio section:
http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/ for pictures of the magnetosphere
taken by the IMAGE satellite.
Another:
http://www.vlf.it/ for lots of good links and articles on VLF,ELF,
and ULF monitoring, atmosphere studies, analysis, etc.
Lotsa good stuff on this page.
I am looking for a page that details a ELF event that took place
before the India quake - the Lowdown had a link but it didnt work.
Details to follow.

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 256 of 605:  (sprin5) * Tue, Mar  6, 2001 (08:46) * 3 lines 
 
Great you're checking in cosmo, any more trips to Austin planned?

You know we had *two* Mikes check in on 442.15 last week, so we're calling it Mike Reunion Week. Mike at Applied Materials and Mike the real estate baron.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 257 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar  6, 2001 (12:07) * 3 lines 
 
(must have been on CW or each of you would have had your own mike, thus doubling the number of mike's present.)

Cosmo-Mike, let us know if your find that India Earthquake stuff. That is just the sort of thing I am also rying to track down.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 258 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Mar  6, 2001 (21:21) * 29 lines 
 
Oy veh
The Mikes are multiplying like Tribbles

Well, i did a bit of sleuthing and found the page:
try http://dc3mf.tripod.com/ (think thats it...)
I did a search on the dc3 call and found it. This
page includes the spectrogram of the signals preceeding
the quake.

I also want to further research some of the ELF projects
described on the vlf.it page. What I would like to build
is a receiver that works in the sub hertz range. I would
have to find a quiet area up here for listening - not where
I live in the land of light dimmers and noize generators
and misc. other krap.

Re an Austin trip - I wish I was making a trip to Austin
perchance to buy a place in the country with good elevation
and no neighbors. Probably next 'for fun' visit will be
in the summer sigh.....

The good news is that the temp is getting above 30 degrees
and the Spring Equinox is not too far off. Soon it will
be time to go to the lake and do some 10Ghz over water
experiments.

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 259 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar 28, 2001 (15:34) * 18 lines 
 
Regarding the CME mentioned in Geo 34:


SFI=274 up from 273 | A=25 up from 17 | K=2 down from 4 at 2100 on 28 March.
SAF: moderate, GMF: at unsettled to minor storm levels

Magnetic A-Index greater than 30 Warning valid from 28 Mar 2001 1400 to 2359 UT

Magnetic A-Index greater than 30 Watch for 30 Mar 2001 UT

Magnetic A-Index greater than 20 Watch for 31 Mar 2001 UT

Aurora Level: 7
Solar Wind: 585.2 km/s at 1.7 protons/cm3

More Info and Unsubscribe at http://hfradio.org/propagation.html




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 260 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Mar 30, 2001 (12:10) * 11 lines 
 
Howdy all

Word has spread around to the vhf/uhf hams up here that the most recent
CME will lead to auroral propagation patterns. In this case, you point
the beam north to take advantage of the extra ionization which enhances
propagation. Might even be some good aurora viewing as well if the
sky stays clear.

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 261 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 31, 2001 (16:58) * 45 lines 
 
Aurora was visible last night down to New Mexico and I could swear I saw some red bands also - and I am an experienced aurora watcher! But, never in Hawaii before!!!

SFI=246 down from 257 | A=140 up from 12 | K=7 up from 6 at 2100 on 31 March.
SAF: high, GMF: at active to severe storm levels

Magnetic K-Index of 5 Warning valid from 31 Mar 2001 0041 to 1500 UT

Magnetic K-Index greater than 6 Warning valid from 31 Mar 2001 0055 to 1500 UT

Magnetic A-Index greater than 30 Warning valid from 31 Mar 2001 0601 to 1500 UT

Magnetic A-Index greater than 50 Warning valid from 31 Mar 2001 0625 to 1 Apr 2001
0600 UT

Magnetic A-Index greater than 30 Watch for 1 Apr 2001 UT

Magnetic A-Index greater than 20 Watch for 2 Apr 2001 UT

The following Warning was EXTENDED at 1327 UT and is now valid through
2359 UT on 31 Mar 2001
Magnetic A-Index greater than 30 Warning valid from 31 Mar 2001 0601 to 1500 UT
Comments: This Warning is continued through 01/1500 UTC.

The following Warning was EXTENDED at 1329 UT and is now valid through
2359 UT on 31 Mar 2001
Magnetic K-Index greater than 6 Warning valid from 31 Mar 2001 0055 to 1500 UT
Comments: This Warning is continued through 01/1500 UTC.

The following Warning was EXTENDED at 1330 UT and is now valid through
2359 UT on 31 Mar 2001
Magnetic K-Index of 5 Warning valid from 31 Mar 2001 0041 to 1500 UT
Comments: This Warning is continued through 01/1500 UTC.

The following Warning was EXTENDED at 1331 UT and is now valid through
2359 UT on 31 Mar 2001
Magnetic K-Index of 4 Warning valid from 30 Mar 2001 1445 to 31 Mar
2001 1500 UT
Comments: This Warning is continued through 01/1500 UTC.

Aurora Level: 10
Solar Wind: 564.5 km/s at 2.7 protons/cm3

More Info and Unsubscribe at http://hfradio.org/propagation.html




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 262 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 31, 2001 (17:05) * 5 lines 
 
LARGEST SUNSPOT IN 10 YEARS BLAZES AWAY WITH ERUPTIONS
------------------------------------------------------
A huge sunspot over a dozen times larger than the surface area of the Earth and growing, has now rotated with the
Sun to face our planet. The sunspot, which is the largest of the current solar cycle, is also the largest to appear in a decade.
http://spaceflightnow.com/news/n0103/31sunspot/


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 263 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Apr  1, 2001 (19:41) * 9 lines 
 
Oy veh, this is going to be a good DX summer if this holds
out. Guess its time to put up some dipole wires for
30 meter cw.

WOO HOO!
73 de AA9IL
mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 264 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr  1, 2001 (20:03) * 25 lines 
 
Here's the newest solar flare...another one today!!!

SFI=258 up from 246 | A=27 down from 131 | K=4 up from 2 at 2100 on 1 April.
SAF: high, GMF: unsettled to active

The following Warning was EXTENDED at 2358 UT on 31 Mar 2001 and is now
valid through 2359 UT on 1 Apr 2001
Magnetic A-Index greater than 50 Warning valid from 31 Mar 2001 0625 to 1 Apr 2001
0600 UT

The following Warning was EXTENDED at 0438 UT and is now valid through
2359 UT on 1 Apr 2001
Magnetic A-Index greater than Warning valid from 31 Mar 2001 0601 to 1500 UT

Flare:
Class M5.5 BEG 1 Apr 2001 1055 MAX 1 Apr 2001 1217 END 1 Apr 2001
1324 UT


Comments: Possible SE (S20) limb event.

Aurora Level: 7
Solar Wind: 668.0 km/s at 0.4 protons/cm3

More Info and Unsubscribe at http://hfradio.org/propagation.html



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 265 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Apr  5, 2001 (23:54) * 39 lines 
 
Overwhelming response to Intruder Survey

The response to ARRL's call last fall for reports of apparent
unlicensed operation on 10 and 12 meters has been ''overwhelming,''
according to Brennan Price, N4QX, administrator of the ARRL
Monitoring System. The survey last October 1-14 was initiated in
response to an increasing number of complaints from the amateur
community.

Price said that more than 400 separate reports, nearly all from
United States amateurs, detailed more than 1000 separate instances
of apparent unlicensed operation. An analysis suggests that nearly
half of the transmissions originated in the US. Of the remaining
reports, most appeared to document transmissions originating in
Latin America.

''The variety of languages, dialects and beam headings relating to
these transmissions clearly indicates that this is a worldwide
problem'' Price said. Surveys by monitoring-system administrators in
other IARU Region 2 countries confirm this conclusion, he said.

ARRL has shared its data with the FCC. Price points out that before
the Commission can take any action, an offending transmission must
be documented and its source found. ''Given the changeable nature of
10 and 12-meter propagation, especially at the top of the sunspot
cycle, this is not an easy task,'' Price said. He said the FCC cannot
make its sophisticated HF direction-finding facility available for
routine intruder-signal searches.

Price said the FCC relies on the Amateur Service to be self-policing
and has indicated that it is most likely to act in suspected
unlicensed operator situations when amateurs themselves document the
cases.

Price said active use of the bands by licensees is the best way to
discourage unlicensed operation.

''It is not easy or quick work, but it has been successfully done in
the past,'' he said.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 266 of 605:  (sprin5) * Fri, Apr  6, 2001 (10:50) * 1 lines 
 
Equipment is geting cheaper, better and more prevalent. Just about anyone can get a low cost all band trasceiver and set up shop. Need a call sign? Just make one up or look one up on the callsign server. It's going to be tough to control this.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 267 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr  6, 2001 (15:54) * 84 lines 
 
That does not sound good. We really don't need the weird and kids messing up the Ham frequencies. CB was bad enough!

Propagation Forecast Bulletin

This has been another week of remarkable solar activity, with
Sunspot 9393 producing more excitement. Sunspot numbers peaked on
March 28 and 30 at 352 and 349, and solar flux on March 27 and 28 at
273.4 and 273.5. Total visible sunspot area peaked on March 29 at
3940 millionths of the solar hemisphere. This week solar flares
tossed out enough energy to overwhelm the equipment that measures
10.7 cm solar flux.

At 2300z on April 2 the flux reading was 563.1, and on April 5 the
readings were 582.5 and 398.7 at 1700 and 2000z. These
flare-enhanced readings would certainly be a new record far beyond
any daily values reported for this solar cycle, but they are
discarded because they don't reflect actual 10.7 cm energy. So for
April 5, instead of a daily reading of 398.7, NOAA reported 210,
probably a guess based upon declining daily readings and a more
accurate 2300z reading of 207.5.

Following the new high in sunspot numbers, we have seen a number of
large solar flares and resulting aurora. On April 2 the most
powerful flare in at least 25 years erupted. Fortunately most of it
was aimed away from earth. A few days earlier on March 31 the
planetary A index soared to 155 and the planetary K index went as
high as 9 during a severe geomagnetic storm. There were incredible
auroral displays, seen as far south as Mexico. See an amazing
gallery of aurora images, many from southern regions that very
rarely see aurora, at
http://spaceweather.com/aurora/gallery_31mar01.html .

Since March and the first quarter of the year are both over, it is
time to report some numbers for those periods. Average solar flux
for March was 177.7. This is an increase, as the average daily solar
flux for December through February was 173.6, 166.6 and 147.2.
Average daily sunspot numbers for March were 166.7, and for December
through February were 146, 143 and 131. Quarterly average solar flux
for last year was 180.5, 182.9, 188.3 and 173.3.

For the first quarter of this year the average solar flux was 164.4.
The average daily sunspot number for the quarter just ended was
147.3, and the quarterly sunspot averages for last year were 168.9,
190.8, 193.1 and 145. Although this quarter really ended with quite
a bang, the quarterly averages for both solar flux and sunspots were
lower than the same period a year earlier.

Although the really active regions have now rotated off of the
visible solar disk, there are more rotating into view. Predicted
solar flux for the next few days, Friday through Monday, is 210,
210, 205 and 205. The predicted planetary A index for those days is
15, 8, 8 and 10.

Someone passed along some interesting comments that Paul Harden,
NA5N posted on Thursday to a discussion group for low power amateur
radio. He noted that there seemed to be an HF blackout below 20 MHz
caused by ionizing radiation reaching the D layer. E and F layer
enhancement of the ionosphere is good for HF propagation, but D
layer enhancement tends to absorb radio waves. He recommends the
NOAA Space Weather Now site at http://www.sec.noaa.gov/SWN/ , then
clicking on D-region absorption to go to
http://www.sec.noaa.gov/rt_plots/dregion.html.

For some time now W6EL's MiniProp program for propagation prediction
has been unavailable. This is the program used to generate the
occasional path predictions shown in this bulletin. I am extremely
happy to report that W6EL has just released a new free version of
his software, this time for Windows, and you can get it at
http://www.qsl.net/w6elprop/. It works with all recent versions of
Windows, including 95, 98, ME, NT and 2000. Be sure to give this a
try, and send W6EL a note of thanks. It is a great piece of software
for looking at seasonal, time of day, frequency and solar activity
variables and their effects on HF communications.

In closing, there was just too much to report this week, but thanks
to everyone who wrote. I should also note that DL9KAC mentioned in
last week's Propagation Forecast Bulletin ARLP014 is actually
DL6KAC.

Sunspot numbers for March 29 through April 4 were 315, 349, 326,
320, 223, 228 and 217 with a mean of 282.6. 10.7 cm flux was 261.7,
256.8, 245.6, 257.5, 228, 223.1 and 204.8, with a mean of 239.6, and
estimated planetary A indices were 22, 10, 155, 30, 20, 5 and 15
with a mean of 36.7.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 268 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Apr  6, 2001 (19:43) * 16 lines 
 
Howdy howdy

Its really very easy to get ham type rigs now a days (regretfully)
If you go to a ham fest, there are plenty of used rigs as well
as 12,11, 10 meter rigs (BTW, 11 meters is polite for CB) - there
are also new rigs as well. Plus, you can go to the local cheap
electronics emporium and buy a new 10 rig as well.
Where do these rigs end up? Fishing boats in the Gulf of Mexico,
taxi cabs in the far east, bootleggers, etc.
Not sure how activity on the bands and policing will change things.
Possibly some stations would be caught if they are overly blatant
in their violations. Otherwise, additional noise to contend with.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
long live CW!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 269 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Apr  9, 2001 (20:19) * 3 lines 
 
Oh yeah, I know - and harrassment too. Wait'll contesting time again. It is hard enough in a pileup without idiots. Lets just hope the bootleggers won't know antenna theory well enough to get their signal farther than locally. Myabe they'll feed their signal back into the rig and fry it!!!

CW reigns!!!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 270 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 10, 2001 (18:52) * 67 lines 
 
Look for more aurora - lates CME posted in Geo 34

FCC holds the line on license restructuring

The FCC has declined to make any significant changes to the way it
implemented Amateur Radio ''restructuring'' last April. The
Commission has turned down several requests for changes in the
Amateur Service rules contained in five petitions for partial
reconsideration of its Report and Order WT Docket 98-143, released
December 30, 1999. The ARRL was among the petitioners.

In a Memorandum Opinion and Order released April 6, the FCC by and
large denied all petitions for changes to its restructuring Order.
It took the opportunity to make some minor housekeeping changes to
the amateur rules.

Among the issues was a request from the ARRL and other petitioners
that the FCC continue to maintain records that indicate whether a
Technician licensee has Morse code element credit. The FCC noted
that its current Universal Licensing System software was modified to
display a ''P'' (for Plus) in the field that indicates former
license class when a Technician Plus class license is renewed.
''This capability results in the amateur service database being able
to provide a de facto Technician Plus licensee database,'' the FCC
asserted in its MO&O. The FCC did not address how its database would
distinguish current Technician licensees who subsequently earn Morse
code (Element 1) credit. Those licensees have only a Certificate of
Completion of Examination (CSCE), which will never be reflected in
the database, even upon license renewal.

The FCC also decided to not extend Element 1 credit to all past
licensees who had ever earned it--something else the ARRL had asked
for. Under current rules, the holder of an expired Novice or a
pre-February 14, 1991, Technician license can get Element 1 credit.
The FCC said the change was not needed and that ''most examinees''
who ever held a General, Advanced or Amateur Extra ticket also once
held a Novice or a pre-February 14, 1991, Technician ticket that
grants Element 1 credit.

The FCC also declined to extend permanent credit to Element 1 CSCEs
held by Technicians to obtain HF privileges. These CSCEs are good
for 365 days for upgrading purposes but confer only additional
operating privileges beyond that time.

The FCC refused to reinstate the 20 WPM Morse code exam for Extra.
The FCC that since restructuring went into effect nearly a year ago,
the FCC said, ''there does not appear to be any decline in the
proper operation of amateur stations.'' The FCC also declined to ban
the practice of allowing applicants to retake a failed examination
element at a single test session simply by paying a second fee. The
Commission also turned down a proposal to set the total number of
questions at 50 for the Technician and General class test and at 100
for the Amateur Extra test.

The FCC also declined to make any changes--at least for now--in the
arrangement of mode-related Amateur Radio subbands, as some
petitioners had requested.

Also denied were requests to: institute a new entry-level
Communicator license class in the Amateur Service; elevate former
''Class A'' operators licensed prior to 1951 to Amateur Extra; and
give Element 4 exam credit to examinees who had held a Conditional,
General or Advanced ticket before November 22, 1968--when
''incentive licensing'' became effective.

The FCC MO&O is available at
http://www.arrl.org/announce/regulatory/wt98-143-recon.pdf .


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 271 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 11, 2001 (13:35) * 25 lines 
 
SFI=170 | A=10 | K=8 up from 3 at 1800 on 11 April.
SAF: moderate to high, GMF: at active to major storm levels

A satellite proton event began at 0850 UTC on 10 April. A polar cap absorption event is in progress.A proton event is expected to continue.

Magnetic A-Index greater than Watch for 11 Apr 2001 UT

Magnetic A-Index greater than Watch for 12 Apr 2001 UT

Magnetic A-Index greater than 20 Watch for 13 Apr 2001 UT

Magnetic K-Index of 5 Warning valid from 11 Apr 2001 1330 to 12 Apr
2001 1500 UT

Magnetic K-Index greater than 6 Warning valid from 11 Apr 2001 1606 to 12 Apr
2001 1500 UT

Magnetic A-Index greater than 30 Warning valid from 11 Apr 2001 1645 to 12 Apr
2001 2359 UT

Aurora Level: 10
Solar Wind: 629.3 km/s at 11.5 protons/cm3

More Info and Unsubscribe at http://hfradio.org/propagation.html



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 272 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 11, 2001 (16:48) * 10 lines 
 
Fire up the rig, Mike and Terry - good DXing tonight just after sundown.

A satellite proton event began at 0850 UTC on 10 April. A polar cap absorption event is in progress.
A proton event is expected to continue.

Aurora Level: 10
Solar Wind: 713.4 km/s at 16.7 protons/cm3

More Info and Unsubscribe at http://hfradio.org/propagation.html



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 273 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 13, 2001 (20:20) * 4 lines 
 
Lets hope this updates - for You, Mike!





 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 274 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 13, 2001 (20:32) * 6 lines 
 
a smaller versions:







 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 275 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 13, 2001 (20:39) * 5 lines 
 
Yet another map:



http://hfradio.org/propagation.html#aurora


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 276 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Apr 15, 2001 (17:16) * 15 lines 
 
Powerful Easter Sunday Solar Flare

Space Weather news for April 15, 2001
http://www.spaceweather.com

One of the most powerful solar flares ever recorded (an X14-class
explosion) erupted near sunspot group 9415 today, climaxing a two-week
spate of X-class flares from that active region. The source of the
explosion is near the Sun's western limb, so the blast was directed mostly
away from Earth. That's a good thing because today's flare was nearly as
powerful as one in 1989 that triggered the collapse of a power grid in
Canada -- no such calamities are expected this time. A moderate radiation
storm is in progress. For details and updates, please visit
SpaceWeather.com.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 277 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 17, 2001 (22:04) * 11 lines 
 
Watch out for auroras on April 17th and 18th

Space Weather News for April 18, 2001
http://www.spaceweather.com

An interplanetary shock wave struck Earth's magnetosphere as night fell
across the Americas on Tuesday. Sky watchers located in northern Europe,
Canada, and across the northern tier of US states could spot auroras
Tuesday night and Wednesday morning. The shock wave was generated by a
powerful solar explosion on Easter Sunday. For more information and
updates please visit SpaceWeather.com.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 278 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 27, 2001 (04:35) * 113 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 18

After bottoming out on April 16 at 123.4, solar flux is on the rise.
Average flux values for this week were up over 50 points, and
activity is still increasing with the return of sunspot region 9393.
Solar flux is expected to peak this weekend around 210, but a rise
in geomagnetic activity due to a large M7-class solar flare on
Thursday is expected on Sunday. This flare was from sunspot 9393,
which also hurled a full halo coronal mass ejection. This sunspot
covers about half the area that it did when it was on our side of
the sun last month, but it is still quite large. Last month it
produced the largest solar flare ever recorded, which fortunately
was not pointed toward earth.

On Monday an enormous prominence (a filament of cool dense gas
suspended above the sun) extended over the sun's southwestern limb.
You may still be able to view a photo from the Solar and
Heliospheric Observatory at
http://spaceweather.com/images2001/23apr01/20010423_1837_eit_304_big.gif
.

N4CD took a trip to Costa Rica from April 4-17, and reported that he
had great HF propagation, even as higher latitudes were disrupted.
He worked about 9,300 stations on his trip. Probably the worst days
during that period were April 8 and 11-13, when geomagnetic storms
raged. But N4CD worked many stations on 10 meters who said that his
was the only signal they heard. These were probably stations working
him on a north-south path. This isn't because north-south
propagation is enhanced during geomagnetic storms, but because when
propagation is disrupted these are often the only paths that work
for high frequencies. He said his best DX for QRP was working WD3P,
who was only running 500 milliwatts into a dipole.

A number of emails have arrived lately asking about some of the
numbers reported in this bulletin, so it is probably time to run the
following explanation.

Amateur Radio operators who use HF generally like increased sunspots
because they correlate with better worldwide radio propagation.
When there are more sunspots, the sun puts out radiation that
charges particles in the earth's ionosphere. Radio waves bounce off
of (refract from) these charged particles, and the denser these
clouds of ions, the better the HF propagation.

When the ionosphere is denser, higher frequencies will refract off
it rather than passing through to outer space. This is why every 11
years or so when this activity is higher, 10 meters gets exciting.
10 meters is at a high enough frequency, right near the top of the
HF spectrum, that radio waves propagate very efficiently when the
sunspot count is high. Because of the shorter wavelength, smaller
antennas are very efficient on this band, so mobile stations running
low power on 10 meters can communicate world wide on a daily basis
when the sunspot cycle is at its peak. There are also seasonal
variations, and 10 meters tends to be best near the spring or fall
equinox. If the ionosphere is not so dense, the Maximum Usable
Frequency may be below 10 meters, and perhaps only signals with
frequencies as high as 15 meters or below will propagate.

The sunspot numbers used in this bulletin are calculated by counting
the spots on the visible solar surface and also measuring their
area.

Solar flux is another value reported in this bulletin, and it is
measured at an observatory in Penticton, British Columbia using an
antenna pointed toward the sun hooked to a receiver tuned to 2.8
GHz, which is at a wavelength of 10.7 cm. Energy detected seems to
correlate somewhat with sunspots and with the density of the
ionosphere.

Other solar activity of concern to HF operators are solar flares and
coronal holes, which emit protons. Since the charged ions in the
ionosphere are negative, a blast of protons from the sun can
neutralize the charge and make the ionosphere less refractive.
These waves of protons can be so intense that they may trigger an
event called a geomagnetic storm. In addition, energy from a solar
flare may energize the D-layer of the ionosphere, which absorbs
radio waves.

The Planetary A index relates to geomagnetic stability.
Magnetometers around the world are used to generate a number called
the Planetary K index.

A one-point change in the K index is quite significant. K index
readings below 3 generally mean good stable conditions, and above 3
can mean high absorption of radio waves. Each point change reflects
a big change in conditions.

Every 24 hours the K index is summarized in a number called the A
index. A one-point change in the A value is not very significant. A
full day with the K index at 3 will produce an A index of 15, K of 4
means A of 27, K of 5 means A of 48, and K of 6 means A of 80. You
can find an explanation of these numbers on the web at
http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/stp/GEOMAG/kp_ap.html.

The geomagnetic number reported here is the Planetary A index, which
is a worldwide average based on the K index readings from a number
of magnetometers. The numbers reported on WWV are the Boulder K and
A index, measured in Colorado. Generally the higher the latitude of
the measuring station, the higher the K and A indices reported.
This is because the effects of geomagnetic instability tend to
concentrate toward the polar regions of the globe. You can hear the
Boulder K index updated every three hours on WWV, or by calling
303-497-3235.

For an interesting web page on the earth's magnetosphere, check
http://science.nasa.gov/ssl/pad/sppb/edu/magnetosphere/bullets.html

Sunspot numbers for April 19 through 25 were 85, 103, 156, 164, 140,
175 and 182 with a mean of 143.6. 10.7 cm flux was 144.5, 180.4,
191.1, 192.5, 196.4, 193.5 and 193.9, with a mean of 184.6, and
estimated planetary A indices were 7, 8, 7, 28, 21, 8 and 7 with a
mean of 12.3.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 279 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Apr 28, 2001 (11:43) * 46 lines 
 
AO-40 Transponder Operation Possible This Summer

AMSAT-NA President Robin Haighton, VE3FRH, has raised the
possibility that AO-40 could inaugurate transponder operation this
summer, if tests and orbital maneuvers between now and then go as
planned.

''We are learning how to fly this thing,'' Haighton said. ''But I still
think we're going to end up with a darned good satellite.''

The most likely initial transponder configurations, Haighton said,
would be Mode L/S--1.2 GHz up and 2.4 GHz down, Mode U/S--435 MHz up
and 2.4 GHz down, and possibly Mode V/S--145 MHz up and 2.4 GHz
down.

Recent data suggest that the mid-December incident that silenced
AO-40 for two weeks and rendered some systems unusable also might
have blown a hole on the 400-newton motor side of the spacecraft.
''Speculation is there could be damage, and sunlight is getting right
in,'' Haighton said. He noted that ground controllers have detected a
distinct rise in temperature when sunlight strikes that side of the
satellite.

Ground controllers plan to raise the height of the perigee in the
very near future, Haighton said. That process, using the onboard
arc-jet motor, could take up to several weeks. The AO-40 team hopes
the maneuver will minimize or eliminate possible effects on the
satellite's orbit caused by atmospheric expansion at the peak of the
solar cycle.

AO-40 currently is approximately 320 km--almost 200 miles--above
Earth at perigee--its closest point--and some 51,000 km--some 31,600
miles--at apogee. Plans call for raising the orbit at perigee to
around 520 km, or some 320 miles.

Once the orbit has been adjusted, ground controllers would orient
the spacecraft's attitude and check out the various onboard
transmitter and receiver systems to see what works and what does
not. ''We're still pretty confident that the 2 meter and 70 cm
transmitters are not there,'' Haighton said, ''but we're equally
confident that the receivers for those bands still are.''

The satellite has been transmitting telemetry on the 2.4 GHz (S-2)
beacon, and signals reportedly have continued to improve--although
the beacon has been out from time to time as needed to conserve
power during eclipse periods.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 280 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, May 26, 2001 (14:26) * 29 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 22 May 25, 2001

Geomagnetic conditions were quieter this week, and solar flux and
sunspot numbers were a little higher. Average solar flux was up
nearly 10 points and average sunspot numbers were up by about 7.
Last Saturday had unsettled to active geomagnetic conditions, with
both the planetary and mid-latitude K indices at 4 over two of the
eight three-hour reporting periods, but the planetary A index for
the day was only 12.

Solar flux is expected to peak over the next week. Solar flux for
Friday is predicted at 165, and then 170 for Saturday through
Tuesday. The predicted planetary A index for Friday through Monday
is 8, 10, 20 and 12. The earth is currently inside a solar wind
stream flowing from a coronal hole. Sunspot 9463 is rapidly growing
at the center of the disk, and holds the greatest chance of emitting
solar flares. A holographic image of the far side of the sun shows
no substantial sunspots that might rotate into view in the next
couple of weeks.

This weekend HF contesters will be enjoying the CQ Worldwide WPX CW
Contest. Conditions should be good on Saturday, but may get rough on
Sunday with higher geomagnetic activity.

Sunspot numbers for May 17 through 23 were 137, 109, 92, 99, 118,
159 and 192 with a mean of 129.4. 10.7 cm flux was 147.4, 138.2,
141.3, 141.5, 150.1, 152 and 158.7, with a mean of 147, and
estimated planetary A indices were 9, 11, 12, 10, 8, 9 and 11 with a
mean of 10.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 281 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, May 30, 2001 (14:35) * 37 lines 
 
ARRL seeks FCC probe of long-range cordless telephone sales

The ARRL has asked the FCC to investigate and ''take appropriate
action'' against several companies it alleges have been marketing
so-called ''long-range cordless telephones'' via the Internet. The
ARRL took the action in the wake of an interference complaint and
numerous reports from the amateur community about sales of the
devices, some operating on amateur VHF and UHF frequencies.

ARRL General Counsel Chris Imlay, W3KD, said the League was seeking
the FCC probe because the apparently uncertificated devices operate
on amateur bands and are capable of interfering with amateur
communication. He also noted that the devices are not likely to meet
maximum permissible exposure levels for RF.

''ARRL has not been able to locate any FCC certification for these
devices and, based on the advertised frequency bands and ranges, it
is believed that none of these devices could be certificated, or
legally marketed or sold, under FCC rules,'' Imlay wrote.

Imlay said the ARRL also is looking into the marketing of products
such as 434-MHz video surveillance equipment and other ''apparently
non-certificated devices'' that use amateur frequencies but are being
marketed in the US to non-amateurs.

ARRL Lab Supervisor Ed Hare, W1RFI, said he's received at least one
report of actual harmful interference from a long-range cordless
telephone to amateur communication. The amateur reporting it tracked
the telephone to the home of a neighbor, who said he'd bought the
device on eBay.

Hare said some long-range devices are legally certificated to
operate on the 900 MHz or 2450 MHz Part 15 bands. ''These legal
devices are only an issue if they cause actual harmful interference
to the Amateur Service,'' he said.




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 282 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, May 31, 2001 (13:46) * 29 lines 
 
AO-40 transponders off in preparation for orbit shift

Ground controllers for AO-40 have shut down the satellite's
transponders as preparations continue for a slight shift in orbital
configuration.

''Due to changes of the spacecraft latitude for the arcjet cold
firing, the squint pointing angle is more than 30º and not currently
useful for transponder operation,'' said AMSAT-DL President and
AO-40 team member Peter Guelzow, DB2OS. ''Therefore we have
suspended transponder operation for now and give the RUDAK team more
access.''

Guelzow said the S2 transponder will remain off ''until further
notice.'' The RUDAK beacon and the 2.4 GHz middle beacon will remain
up.

Plans call for raising the AO-40's perigee by approximately 200 km.
AMSAT-NA President Robin Haighton, VE3FRH, said ground controllers
will use magnetorquing to adjust AO-40's attitude to 270/0, then
fire the arcjet using only ammonia fuel.

Haighton said it's hoped that a slightly higher perigee for AO-40
will eliminate the effects of what he described as ''a mysterious
force'' that alters the satellite's attitude when it comes through
perigee.

Ground controllers also have suspended for now further testing on
the X and K band transmitters and C band receiver.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 283 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun  8, 2001 (19:36) * 35 lines 
 
Propagation Forecast Bulletin 24

Solar flux is rising a little faster than forecast in last week's
Propagation Forecast Bulletin ARLP023, which predicted a solar flux
of 140 for June 8, 145 for June 11 and 150 by June 14. It passed 145
by June 3 and 150 by June 4. The current outlook calls for solar
flux to rise to 170 on Saturday and Sunday and peak around 175 on
Monday and Tuesday. There is a possibility of a dramatic drop in
flux values between Thursday and Friday of next week, then another
rise over the following week.

Geomagnetic conditions have been unsettled, but should quiet down
with the planetary A index in the single digits over the next few
days.

Solar flux and sunspot numbers probably reached a short term minimum
around May 30 or 31, right between the two reporting periods from
this week's bulletin and last week's. Average daily sunspot numbers
for the week were down 21 points this week compared to last, and
average solar flux was down a little over four points.

The High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) satellite was
supposed to launch this week, but has been delayed until June 14.
This is another tool for solar observers, and will be used to
explore the physics of particle acceleration and energy release in
solar flares. Learn more about it at
http://hesperia.gsfc.nasa.gov/hessi/sheet.htm . HESSI will use
germanium crystals as detectors, and is capable of downloading data
at the rate of 3.5 megabits per second.

Sunspot numbers for May 31 through June 6 were 93, 120, 141, 143,
125, 160 and 170 with a mean of 136. 10.7 cm flux was 132.8, 133,
134, 145.3, 153.8, 153.4 and 157.7, with a mean of 144.3, and
estimated planetary A indices were 7, 11, 21, 11, 11, 9 and 10 with
a mean of 11.4.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 284 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun 16, 2001 (00:12) * 21 lines 
 
***********************
Propagation Forecast
***********************
Sunspot numbers and solar flux rose this week. Average daily
sunspot numbers were up nearly 75 points and average daily solar
flux was up over 26 points. The daily sunspot number peaked on
Saturday at 250, dipped, and rose again to 249 on Monday. Daily
sunspot numbers have not been that high since the big jump in
activity around the end of March.
Disturbed days were Saturday and Sunday, when planetary A indices
were 20, and the planetary K index was five over two 3-hour
reporting periods. The high latitude College A index was 28 and 31
over the same two days.
Solar flux rose to 194.7 on Thursday, but is expected to dip below
170 this weekend. Predicted planetary A index is 10 for Friday and
Saturday and 15 for Sunday.
On Wednesday a strong solar flare was released from sunspot group
9502. It propelled a coronal mass ejection from the sun's eastern
limb, pointed away from earth. The sun is currently covered with
small sunspots, and there is a possibility of more flare activity on
Friday.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 285 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jun 23, 2001 (20:30) * 7 lines 
 
SFI:206 | A:8 up from 7 | K:2 up from 1 at 0000 on 24 June.
SAF: moderate, GMF: quiet to unsettled

A major flare occurred at 0408 UTC on 23 June.
Flare:
Class M5.6/1N/N09E24 BEG 23 Jun 2001 0010 MAX 23 Jun 2001 0015
END 23 Jun 2001 0020 UT


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 286 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jun 24, 2001 (01:39) * 11 lines 
 
SFI:206 | A:8 | K:3 up from 2 at 0300 on 24 June.
SAF: moderate, GMF: quiet to unsettled

A major flare occurred at 0408 UTC on 23 June.
Flare:
Class X1.2/1B/N10E23 BEG 23 Jun 2001 0402 MAX 23 Jun 2001 0408
END 23 Jun 2001 0411 UT

Aurora Level: 7
Solar Wind: 472.7 km/s at 1.5 protons/cm3



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 287 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Jul  4, 2001 (23:01) * 23 lines 
 
Hey kids, rock and roll.... rock on

Although not propagation related, tonite was a beautiful
full or nearly full moon which did not get obscured by
all the fireworks in the area set off by the League of
Junior Pyro's.

Been looking over some of the old posts here about SETI
and RA - plus just sent in my renewal to the society of
radio astronomers. I can feel the pull of space monitoring
tugging at my heart or brain or both. I just started reading
a book on the philosophy of quantum mechanics which gave me
a headache (subtle) so my eyes wandered back to my RA stuff.
Of course, my project book is buried under a pile of rubbish
somewhere so I have to dig that out. Feng Shui is a good
thing but a long drawn out battle against the forces of clutter.
Since my life seems to be governed by chaos, that does not
help much either. Anyway, blah, blah, blah.... :)

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 288 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul  5, 2001 (15:23) * 1 lines 
 
If you ever find a force stronger than clutter, please pass it on. I think I am going to reinstall SETI on mine. I just get tired of switching off other things to enable SETI to run without freezing my monitor. (I am an inveterate multi-tasker.) The moon was exquisite here last night, as well, a sort of exotic golden orange as it rose through the volcano fumes. Kinda neat!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 289 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul  5, 2001 (15:36) * 33 lines 
 
Amateur LF signal spans the Pacific!

A signal transmitted on 184 kHz from ZL6QH--the Wellington, New
Zealand, Amateur Radio Club's Quartz Hill station--has spanned the
Pacific. The transmission, part of a series of announced
transpacific tests, was received on June 30 by Steve McDonald,
VE7SL, of British Columbia, Canada.

''A claim is made for the confirmed reception of ZL6QH by VE7SL, on
184.4 kHz, over a path of 11,709 km,'' said Bob Vernall ZL2CA, who
organized the transpacific tests. ''This is a one-way confirmation,
as VE7SL does not have transmitting capability.'' Vernall said that
on June 30, seven New Zealand stations--including ZL6QH--and one
Australian transmitted test signals in the 160-190 kHz band for the
transpacific tests. Amateurs in New Zealand have access to that
band.

McDonald used Argo software to capture the ZL6QH signal and very
likely that of ZL4OL, although no claim was being made for the
latter. The reception occurred right around the time of sunrise in
British Columbia.

ZL6QH was transmitting dual-frequency CW with two-minute elements,
one frequency representing dits, the other dahs. The ZL6QH station
was running approximately 100 W into a longwire antenna.

Amateurs spanned the Atlantic in both directions earlier this year
on 136 kHz. Efforts to make it across the Pacific have been under
way during the winter season in the Southern Hemisphere.

The ARRL has petitioned the FCC to authorize Amateur Radio
allocations at 136 kHz and in the 160-190 kHz band. The petition is
pending.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 290 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 11, 2001 (16:10) * 42 lines 
 
AO-40 Now in Long-Term, ''Safe'' Orbit

AO-40's new orbit should be good for at least the next 20 years,
according to AMSAT-DL President Peter Guelzow, DB2OS, who heads the
satellite's ground team. Following maneuvers to shift the
satellite's orbit at perigee, AO-40 perigee now is ''oscillating in a
safe range between 810 and 1260 km,'' Guelzow said.

AO-40's height at apogee--58,971 km--was unchanged by the orbital
adjustment. The satellite's transponders remain off as ground
controllers reorient the spacecraft. Still in question is whether
ground controllers will be able to deploy the satellite's solar
panels.

Ground controllers were able to change AO-40's orbit through
successive ''cold'' firings of the onboard arcjet motor--using only
ammonia gas. The move raised AO-40 some 300 km higher than
predicted, but it apparently depleted the spacecraft's ammonia
supply. As a result, AO-40 likely will remain in its current orbit.

Stacey Mills, W4SM, of the ground team said it's ''quite possible''
that an ammonia leak accounted for the unexpected loss of ammonia.
''If we did have a slow leak, it is very fortunate we did not wait
any longer to use the remaining fuel,'' he said.

Mills said that AO-40's old orbital configuration, while stable, was
too close for comfort at perigee.

''I sincerely hope that nothing else malfunctions for a long, long
time, but this is, after all, rocket science,'' Mills said. ''Nothing
is guaranteed.''

Ground controllers plan to fully test AO-40's momentum wheels prior
to any decision to deploy the spacecraft's solar panels. The
momentum wheels provide three-axis control of the spacecraft. If the
momentum wheels are not operational, it's unlikely the solar panels
will be deployed.

For more information on AO-40, visit the AMSAT-DL Web site,
http://www.amsat-dl.org/ or the AMSAT-NA Web site,
http://www.amsat.org. AMSAT-DL now offers an AO-40 ''Quick Status''
page.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 291 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Jul 12, 2001 (21:07) * 21 lines 
 
Howdy Howdy

Been seeing lots of posts on the amsat news group regarding the
arcjet firings so its good to see that they had some success.
The next thing to see will be when the transponders are reactivated
and what the next steps are for the system recovery. Looks like
the 432 up and 2400mhz down/1.2ghz up and 2400mhz downs might be
the optimum modes. Anyway, still have some time to finish kludging
my mode S dish/downconverter together.

Regarding rockets and stuff - picked up a couple of interesting
books while shopping the used bookstores near the University
of Wisconsin in Madison - a nasa publication detailing the Skylab
missions, a history of the early V1 and V2 rocket experiments thru
Saturn V, and a radioastronomy history book - add em to the stack
to read.....

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r c i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 292 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 12, 2001 (22:55) * 7 lines 
 
Sounds like you will stay out of trouble for a while - or have a good excuse not to - I take either one! Sounds like you are having your own Junkyard Wars. I think our British counterparts call it Bodgering (however it is spelt) when you fit bits and pieces of other things and make them into something else that works. Pretty usually does not count!


NASA-tv makes good watching now that the shuttle is up again and fiddling with the ISS. It is a good time to watch the skies for it to pass over, as well!
Talk to them, Mike! Or, bounce your signal off the ISS (or is that a NO-NO?)

Fat free Marcia somwhere on a volcano


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 293 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Jul 15, 2001 (21:24) * 17 lines 
 
Howdy Doody Kids

The ISS actually has (Im pretty sure...) an unattended packet
station on 2 meters so bouncing a signal would be ok. I have
yet to monitor the downlink for voice tho.

I recently received a new club newsletter via email called
'The Watering Hole' which is geared to the DIY radio astonomy
crowd - this is still a work in progress project that is
growing - Im going to ask permission to post the first newsletter
so maybe there will be some more new members - its free so thats
a good reason if any. Details to follow...

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r c i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 294 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jul 16, 2001 (15:53) * 1 lines 
 
What great idea, Mike. DIY is the way to go nowadays with so many space age parts hanging around waiting to be turned into something else. Some kids I know are currently working on an old laptop of mine to program a remote telescope. You enter the Messier object or coordinates and off it goes to look for it and show you what you wanted to see.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 295 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 20, 2001 (14:13) * 45 lines 
 
AO-40 Transponders Back on the Air

AO-40's transponders are back on the air, following an orbital shift
that put the Amateur Radio satellite into an orbit that AMSAT says
should be good for many years to come. Transponders have 435 MHz and
1.2 GHz uplinks and a downlink in the 2.4 GHz ''S band.''

The transponders have been off since late May, when preparations
began to shift AO-40's orbit at perigee. That operation was
completed earlier this month, and ground controllers have been
readjusting the spacecraft's attitude since then.

Ground controller Stacey Mills, W4SM, said the transponders would
operate from orbital positions MA 10 through MA 99. Uplink
frequencies (without taking Doppler into account) are
435.495-435.780 MHz and 1269.211-1269.496 MHz, and the downlink
passband is 2401.210-2401.495 MHz. The transponders are inverting,
so a downward change in uplink frequency results in an upward
frequency shift in the downlink.

Mills emphasized that earthbound ops should not use any more uplink
power than necessary. He also noted that the transponders could be
switched off to accommodate additional testing.

AMSAT Awards Manager Bruce Paige, KK5DO, in Houston, was among the
first stations to get on AO-40 after the transponders were
reactivated. ''It sounds awesome,'' Paige said. ''I am transmitting
with 25 watts up, and it sounds great!'' In addition to some domestic
contacts, he and his daughter, Mahana, W5BTS, worked EA8/DJ9PC in
the Canary Islands.

Although AO-40's attitude still is not optimal at this point, ground
controllers had to suspend operations to adjust it after an onboard
sensor lost its view of the sun. Without data from the sun sensor,
ground controllers cannot be certain of the satellite's attitude.

Mills said now that the ground team has ''a very good fix'' on the
spacecraft, they'll do nothing to change its attitude for several
weeks, while the solar angle decreases. Once the sensor regains its
view of the sun, efforts to adjust the spacecraft's attitude will
resume, so that AO-40's antennas are pointing toward Earth.

Mills said ground controllers will use the interim period to see if
they can re-calculate the so-called ''mystery effect'' that had been
impacting AO-40 at perigee under its former orbit.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 296 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 20, 2001 (23:38) * 4 lines 
 
I didn't know they could do this:
http://citeseer.nj.nec.com/arslan97voice.html

Talk about Radio Free Cosmic Connection ...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 297 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 20, 2001 (23:40) * 32 lines 
 
Propagation report... 20 July 2001

Last week's Propagation Forecast Bulletin ARLP029 stated that the
next peak in solar flux would probably be near 170 around July
20-22. This now appears a bit optimistic based upon current
readings. Solar flux and sunspot numbers have been up this week, but
flux values probably reached a peak on Monday when the noon reading
was 149.8.

Current forecasts show flux values slowly drifting downward over the
next week, with values around 140 from Friday through Monday, then
between 135 and 140 until around the end of the month.

Over the past week the average daily solar flux was up nearly 17
points and average sunspot numbers increased by over 63 points, when
compared with the previous week's report.

Due to a persistent solar wind, geomagnetic conditions became
unsettled to active this week. The most active days were Monday and
Tuesday, when the planetary A index was 17. Alaska's College A index
was also 17 on Monday, but jumped to 31 on Tuesday, when K indices
went as high as 5 over several periods.

A slowly erupting coronal mass ejection billowed away from the sun
on Tuesday, but there is little chance that it will affect the
earth's magnetosphere.

Sunspot numbers for July 12 through 18 were 119, 146, 161, 142, 179,
191 and 193 with a mean of 161.6. 10.7 cm flux was 133.9, 133.3,
140.8, 142.1, 149.8, 145.6 and 143, with a mean of 141.2, and
estimated planetary A indices were 9, 9, 13, 11, 17, 17 and 11 with
a mean of 12.4.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 298 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Jul 22, 2001 (02:33) * 10 lines 
 
Hi Mike,
EARTH’S ELECTRIC FIELD.
Manies from the natural elements that characterizes the environment in which we live are invisible to us and they are not perceivable. However, they significantly affect on the live organisms and on us. Such element is the earth’s electric field.

If electric fields were visible, then even the most barren spot on the earth would provide an awesome sight. Standing on a hilltop, you would see a forest of electric-field lines shooting out of the ground everywhere, stretching up to the ionosphere. You could watch them sweep across the horizon to gather under storms. In fact, the earth's electric field is far more dynamic and, for me, very interesting.
This electrical phenomenon is generated (as described by scientists) by the thousands of thunderstorms that pummel our planet continuously with 100 lightning bolts a second and that also deliver to the ground a tremendous amount of charge on raindrops. As a result, we live atop an ocean of negative charge that generates an electric field of approximately 100 volts per meter elevation. In other words, when you are standing, your head is about 200 volts greater than your feet. And when a thunderstorm passes overhead, the electric fields can increase to thousands of volts per meter. Fortunately, there is very little free charge (unattached electrons and positive ions) in the air around us, and so these high voltages cannot create any large currents, which would otherwise surely electrocute us.

I measure some times this electric field, and I ensure you that it presents a lot and important changes. I know that scientists from the Academy of Sciences of Sofia (Bulgaria), it searches pre-aerthquke changes in the earth’s electric field. I wanted to occupy more with it but I can not now.
John (HPSO)



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 299 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Jul 22, 2001 (16:06) * 12 lines 
 
Howdy John

Yea, studying the earth's magnetic and electrical fields is fantastic.
Even more so when you can listen to them using audio frequency and
lower receivers to pick up whistlers as well as seismic events. There
are several good web pages devoted to this that include some of the
receiver designs which I would like to replicate - especially the
integrating subsonic receivers. What type of equipment do you use?

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r c i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 300 of 605: Mike Kana  (aa9il) * Sun, Jul 22, 2001 (16:08) * 82 lines 
 
Howdy All

As promised, the radio astronomy info news...

How about a free radio astronomy newsletter?
Just reply to this message and say YES in the subject or message.
No information about you will be shared with any other party.
I do not intend to ask for anything other than your email address.
You will only get correspondence from me.
If you wish to stop your membership an email will suffice.

Your newsletter will be sent as a blind copy so no one will have access to your email address.

What’s going on?

I am going to experiment with a website called
Wait a week or so before trying it. I need the practice to get it going!
And a free newsletter called the "WaterHole" tm

Why do this?

There are several fine groups working in the area of radio astronomy and related interests.

Unless you join each group it difficult to learn what is happening. It also can be expensive.
I want to provide a dues free way of sampling the various interest groups.
I also want to provide a dues free way for those interested to share information.

I also do not want to make a huge project out of this.
With capabilities of the internet I believe this will work.

The website will contain links to all forms of radio astronomy, SETI, Jupiter Noise monitoring,
meteor showers and any other listening activity that includes aiming an antenna to the sky.
This operation will not be affiliated with any specific group and will strive for the success of all
groups.

For practical purposes I will not include my friends that do moonbounce or other transmitting
operations.

I will welcome articles on any RA topic.
Anything provided will be shared free of charge to anyone interested.
If you submit an article it still remains your property, however you will have agreed to share you
ideas without charge.
You will retain all commercial rights to your intellectual property and
other groups will have to get YOUR permission to re-distribute your ideas.

All articles will be accepted in Microsoft Word or Word Perfect (RTF format).
Images can be in just about any format. I will send a proof to you prior to publishing.

If you have a completed article in Adobe pdf format, I can accept that as is, providing you do not
add security to the document.

All newsletters will be sent in Adobe Acrobat pdf format with security to allow only printing and
viewing.
This is important to help protect the Author's property rights.

If there are enough requests for hardcopies, it may be possible to have one of the subscribers
contract directly with members to provide hardcopies.

My goal is to avoid the complications of collecting dues and maintaining a membership list other than
the confidential email list.

Chuck Forster

cforster@forstereng.com

Copies of the first news letters are located at the following url's:

Volume 2001 Issue A- http://www.forstereng.com/Vol2001A.pdf
Intro to goals of RAInfo.net

Volume 2001 Issue B- http://www.forstereng.com/Vol2001B.pdf
12,000 MHz Radio Telescope for less than $200 ? C. Forster

Volume 2001 Issue C- http://www.forstereng.com/Vol2001C.pdf
What is the Water-Hole? ? Paul Shuch
Radio Astronomy Consortium Press Release ? Jim Van Prooyen
Note from Gergely (Gary) Forintos of Hungary

Volume 2001 Issue D- http://www.forstereng.com/Vol2001D.pdf
JSS/PARI/SARA Conference on October 13/14, 2001
New Zealand Radio Science group ? Wayne Thresher
Note from the OpenSpace Foundation, Inc. ? Gary Herbst


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 301 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jul 23, 2001 (12:38) * 1 lines 
 
YES (and may I borrow some if it for Geo 35, or shall you do it?) Are you going to going to NEW ZEALAND?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 302 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Jul 23, 2001 (19:54) * 12 lines 
 
Hi Marcia

Ok! Send the YES to Chuck Forester to be added to the list - Im sure
it would be ok to post stuff but best ask the source.

New Zealand - I wish I could make a trip there - one of my all time
dreams would be to visit Australia and NZ. (and bring my ham gear
along...) Only big trip will be to Microwave Update 2001 to buy
more microwave junk (as if I needed more junk...)

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 303 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 24, 2001 (15:34) * 12 lines 
 
Chuck does not need my permission - in fact, without his being logged in, I have no way of contacting him. Please ask him to come into
http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/public/browse/geo/all
then enter any topic. The shorter the better. The hit the join button. He will be taked to a page where he can choose his login name and password.

Then tell him to come back to http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/browse/geo/all/new

This is where I enter spring and Geo to check for new posts... Then I go to the 50 most recent posts http://www.spring.net/yapp-bin/restricted/confifty/geo
whihc usually tells me how chatty I have been.

Tell Chuck he is welcome amongst us and to make himself comfortable and pop a few good words on us when the inspiration strikes him. Aloha! (He doesn't get a hug if he just lurks!)




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 304 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 24, 2001 (20:44) * 38 lines 
 
Today in Science/Astronomy:

* Life On Mars: Swimming Right Under the Surface?
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/solarsystem/glacial_volcanoes_010724-1.html
As NASA struggles to refocus its Mars program on the heels of two failed missions, one supremely logical mantra has emerged to guide the search for Martian life:

Follow the water.

* White Dwarf Sends Ripples Through Red Spider Nebula
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/red_spider_010724.html
A stellar wind speeding from one of the hottest-known stars in the Universe has sculpted ripples resembling a mother-of-pearl butterfly in the Red Spider nebula.

* Miniature Supernova Created in Lab
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/generalscience/supernova_lab_010723.html
A form of matter called Bose-Einstein condensate, which first was created in a laboratory in 1995, has been tinkered with until it caused miniature explosions that resemble exploding stars called supernovae, according to a new study.

-----------------------------------
Today in Missions/Launches:

* Atlantis Aims for Tuesday Night Landing After Rain Keeps Crew Aloft
http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/missions/sts104_update_010724.html
The Atlantis astronauts will make another attempt to return to Kennedy Space Center late Tuesday after rainstorms forced the shuttle crew to forego two after-hours landing opportunities earlier in the day.

* Atlas Carries Advanced GOES-M Weather Satellite into Earth Orbit
http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/launches/atlas_launch_010723.html
An advanced weather satellite capable of tracking dangerous storms in the atmosphere -- as well as storms on our sun -- is cruising along in Earth orbit after an apparently perfect rocket ride from Cape Canaveral early Monday.

* Putin, Bush Agree Missile Shield, Arms Cuts Link
http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/putin_bush_010722.html
U.S.-Russia arms talks took an unexpected bound forward on Sunday, when Vladimir Putin and George W. Bush agreed to link missile defence systems to cuts in nuclear arsenals in a bid to strike a new strategic pact.

------------------------------------
Today in Business/Industry:

* Hunt For Solar Sail Continues After Capsule Separation Failure
http://www.space.com/businesstechnology/technology/solar_sail_update_010723.html
Scientists on Monday continued to analyze telemetry data received from a Russian-made solar sail to determine what had gone wrong during its disappointing test flight last week.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 305 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jul 29, 2001 (20:35) * 7 lines 
 
. The skylight formed in the past
week, possibly in the past 2 days, at a place where a previously obtained
geophysical transect, using the VLF (Very Low Frequency) technique, had
predicted the axis of the tube. The skylight is 3-4 m long and 2 m wide.


Mike, can you hear lava underground, too?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 306 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug  3, 2001 (16:56) * 25 lines 
 
********************************
New ISS Crew to Launch August 9
********************************

NASA says the International Space Station Expedition 3 crew will
head into space August 9 aboard the shuttle Discovery. Frank L.
Culbertson Jr, KD5OPQ, will head up the Expedition 3 team. His
Russian crewmates are Mission Pilot Vladimir Dezhurov and Flight
Engineer Mikhail Tyurin. NASA says that Discovery's launch on the
12-day STS-105 mission has been set for 2138z.

In addition to the new crew, Discovery will transport a host of
supplies and scientific racks and experiments to the ISS. The launch
follows by only a couple of weeks the return of the shuttle Atlantis
from the ISS.

Once in space, Culbertson, Dezhurov and Tyurin are scheduled to
conduct three space walks and continue scientific research aboard
the space station. The new crew also will oversee the arrival of the
Russian docking compartment, set to launch in mid-September.

The station's second resident crew, directed by Russian Commander
Yury Usachev, RW3FU, with American astronauts Susan Helms, KC7NHZ,
and Jim Voss will return to Earth aboard Discovery on August 21,
ending more than five months in orbit.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 307 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug  3, 2001 (19:08) * 36 lines 
 
**************
Propagation
**************
Average daily sunspot numbers dropped again this week, this time by
nearly 64 points. The average daily solar flux dropped over 20
points. On July 31 the planetary A index rose to 23, the result of
a solar wind stream. Geomagnetic activity on that day caused some
impressive auroral displays.

Solar flux is predicted to be 125 for Friday, and around 130 for
Saturday through Monday. Currently flux values are expected to rise
slowly to 140 by August 10. A holographic image of the sun's far
side taken on July 30 shows what may be a large group of sunspots,
so there may be more activity rolling around in a couple of weeks.

Geomagnetic activity could be active again on Friday, settling down
to unsettled for the weekend. The planetary A index for Friday is
predicted to be 20, and 15 for Saturday and Sunday.

With July just ended, here are monthly averages for sunspot numbers
and solar flux from the beginning of the year. Average daily sunspot
numbers, January through July were 142.7, 131, 166.7, 163.6, 135.1,
196.7 and 124.6. Average daily solar flux readings for the same
months were 166.6, 147.2, 177.7, 178.2, 148.7, 173.7 and 131.3.

There was a rise in activity during June, similar to the one around
the end of March and beginning of April, but not as high. The
monthly solar flux average for June probably beats March and April
because the high activity earlier in the year was split over the two
months.

Sunspot numbers for July 26 through August 1 were 115, 96, 88, 59,
64, 85 and 108 with a mean of 87.9. 10.7 cm flux was 123.4, 121.4,
115.5, 116.9, 114.5, 116.8 and 120.2, with a mean of 118.4, and
estimated planetary A indices were 14, 9, 5, 8, 9, 23 and 12 with a
mean of 11.4.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 308 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Aug  7, 2001 (21:48) * 17 lines 
 
Hey Kids
Ok, back again...
Marci - what is the full details of the above mentioned skylight?
More details!
Anyway, not sure how lava is detected - Im sure that it can be
detected using seismic techniques - for VLF, there would have to
be some kind electrical activity - lava and quartz? Quartz
fracture from heat... Just wild assed guessing on that one.
Been slightly busy of late but did finish the 10 ghz transverter
integration project - the 10ghz contest is two weeks away so
have plenty of other loose ends to tie up.
Anyway, hope to be a bit more frequent.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r - c - i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 309 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug 13, 2001 (22:30) * 3 lines 
 
Mike!!! Now I remember - how could I have omitted the url for that one. That was how the volcanologist on Kilauea discover where the active lava tubes carrying magma are - using VLF, as I recall. Skylights are places where the top crust has fallen in and you can view the lava streaming downhill brilliant orange-yellow and 2000°F

http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea/update/main.html


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 310 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug 13, 2001 (22:32) * 1 lines 
 
Curiously enough our lava is extremely rich in silica. Is it peizo-electric in that state? No quartz here, alas.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 311 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Aug 15, 2001 (13:42) * 36 lines 
 
AO-40 ''S1'' Transmitter Goes Silent

AMSAT reports the 2.4 GHz ''S1'' transmitter aboard AO-40 has gone
silent. Ground controller Stacey Mills, W4SM, says the transmitter
abruptly quit August 13 at around 1258z while AO-40 was in view of
most of the Eastern Hemisphere during orbit 362.

He reports normal telemetry readings up to the point that the
transmitter ceased operating and that no commands were being sent or
experiments under way at the time.

An onboard scheduler switched on the S2 transmitter at the
appropriate point in the spacecraft's orbit. Mills said subsequent
telemetry indicated no abnormalities or logged events to account for
the failure.

The S1 transponder, connected to a higher-gain parabolic antenna,
had been brought into the rotation to offer improved coverage when
the satellite was farther away from Earth. The S2 transponder is
connected to a helical antenna that has about 10 dB less gain than
the parabolic antenna.

An initial attempt to manually switch the S1 transmitter back on did
not appear successful. While ground controllers continue to study
the situation, the S1 transmitter has been taken out of the
schedule. The U-band and L1-band to S2-band transponder passbands
will remain active from MA 10 to MA 30 and MA 44 to MA 100. The
RUDAK digital transponder is connected to the S2 transmitter, and
the beacon is off from MA 30 to MA 44.

''The schedule may also be modified for longer passband periods,
given the broader coverage of the S2 helical antenna,'' Mills added.

For more information on AO-40, visit the AMSAT-DL Web site,
http://www.amsat-dl.org/ or the AMSAT-NA Web site,
http://www.amsat.org.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 312 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Aug 17, 2001 (06:29) * 4 lines 
 
Hi Mike and Marcia,
Piezoelectric? HMMM…..I have an idea. I think that perhaps it is possible the prediction of a big volcanic explosion. Method that can it is tried, is the same with which I make the EQ prediction in Greece. Device of measurement will be more simple, because it is enough only one channel for measurements. By this method you can (theoretically) watch the process of increase of pressure under volcano crater. Sun and Moon and Earth rotation around its axis, will be effective helpers as they are for me.
John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 313 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug 17, 2001 (14:43) * 1 lines 
 
Aloha John! I was hoping you would find your way into this topic. This is fascinating. I shall quiz my son about the meaurements he took in the field when he worked for Hawaii Volcanoes Observatory. I know they did laser detection of tilt (bouncing images of target mirrors) and inflation of the mountain to detect injections of magna in to the system. But, I have never heard of their using piezoelectric measurements. HMMM... as you say! I will also ask him about the VLF detectors they use and what they are picking up using them - the ones they use to detect subsurface active lava tubes. You really don't want to fall into one of them by making a new skylight. One volcanologist did and his scorched and partially melted coveralls are in the Thomas Jagger Museum. He was fortunate to be in the field with a volcanologist from Italy who pulled him to safety with just "minor" burns. I shudder to think of such things. I stay a safe distance from the active lava now that I am a bit older and wiser.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 314 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Aug 17, 2001 (18:44) * 5 lines 
 
Aloha Marcia,
Exacty for this reason I was scared when you had that explosion so much near you. Some times, when we explore a beautiful hair near to it, we cannot understand that it belongs to a monster because we are on the monster. Unfortunately human sapience increases with the age.

However, my idea can it is applied enough longer. Think that my system, finally, conceives changes of pressure in distance of 600Km long. From Volos to Crete. It could it is located into your house!
John


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 315 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug 17, 2001 (20:43) * 6 lines 
 
Oh dear... my house?! I am on a 9000 year old flow from Kilauea and it no longer flows in this direction. Perhaps you are sensing something of a personal nature rather than geological? In any case, it is not in your house and that is a relief to me.

As to the monster whose hair I minutely examine, this one has a heartbeat which is monitored almost beyond belief. She gives plenty of warnings when she is going to do something. The last explosive summit eruption killed one photographer because they had been expecting the explosion for many weeks and he stayed too close. He was hit by flying debris which was pretty big as close as he was. And, he did not even get a picture to leave behind for his immortality!
I am in the back row appreciating all the while that I am looking at and living on a volcano. To harm me, she will have to get a lot of other people first, and that will give me time to get to safety! Please do not worry! *Hugs* You are very sweet to be so concerned.

My house...???!!!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 316 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sat, Aug 18, 2001 (01:13) * 2 lines 
 
Oh...It is my phrasal error. I mean that the monitor unit could be installed in your house, for example. I am sorry for my error. In any case I am trying to measure physical changes in nature. I am sorry again for my mistake and for my English.
John


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 317 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Aug 18, 2001 (19:51) * 2 lines 
 
I was hoping I was misunderstanding you. Please do not apologize for your English. It is fine. My Greek, as I have told you elsewhere, is non-existant!
I am delighted that a monitor unit and not a lava flow could be installed in my house! I much prefer that option.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 318 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sat, Aug 18, 2001 (22:29) * 18 lines 
 
Hey kids

We interrupt the cool volcano chat for a report on the first day
of the 10 ghz contest - 5 contacts today in the 30 to 40 mile
range plus copy of a beacon on the opposite shore of Lake Michigan.
Antenna was a 2 foot dish on a surveyors tripod pointing East
from a hill about 40 miles from the lake shore. Lots of rain
and T storms which provided interesting rain scatter contacts
at the first part of the contest - it did clear up and got
hot but more storms were pushing in from the west - anyway,
a successful first test for the 10ghz transverter.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international

now, back to the lava



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 319 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Aug 19, 2001 (00:34) * 5 lines 
 
Hi Mike
I tried to say that receiving ELF signals from the ground, it is possible to predict volcano activity I.e. with the method that I apply in Greece for the EQ prediction. (You can find the result in topic 9). Unfortunately, With my badly English, I carried lava in the house
of Marcia. How I can remove lava from a house? Perhaps learning correct English.
It was not cool discussion. It was frozen shower…with lava!
John


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 320 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Aug 19, 2001 (14:38) * 5 lines 
 
Congratulations, Mike. Are you getting any bounce or just rain scatter? This is always interesting. And, you have a subsiding CME to contend with. What kind of background QRM do you get from that? Can you make use of a ground plane antenna in the case of a downpour and flooded yard?

John, it was my fault, and any lava in my living room was from MY error in reading your perfectly good English. I read it again last night and I realized I had first responded too quickly, thus making it seem like the lava was in my living room. Happily, it is UNDER my concrete slab on which the house is constructed, and all is happy with that situation. Your English and findings continue to fascinate me. I promise not to come to hasty conclusions, again if you will remain with us to continue to tell us of your work. Your Priestess needs you!

Hmmm, High Priest of the Volos Oracle, you can get piezoelectric signals from a molten state of the rocks? How does one squeeze a river of lava?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 321 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Aug 19, 2001 (21:26) * 7 lines 
 
Good successful work Mike. I feel your satisfaction. Congratulations!

I did not occupy never, with so much high frequencies. I want it always, but I can not find the suitable accessories in Greece and specially in Volos. Since 1981, I occupied with the EQ’s and passed at the other end of the electromagnetic spectrum i.e. Near quasi dc. Some time, receiving signals from the ground in frequencies 25 KHz to 30 KHz (I explored from those frequencies and down) I could I see storms in big distance, that they reached to me up to 6 hours later. However, my objective was the pre-earhquake electric signals and the only that it should I make, it was to avoid these signals from the storms.

Explicitly, lava does not have piezoelectric attributes. However, solid state layer that exists above lava, it contains crystals surely. Before the explosion, lava presses to above solid state layer of rocks, and I am almost sure that are created piezoelectric tendencies there.
You know, in the factory where I am working, I occupy with something like lava. Molten material from the rotary kiln, in temperatures of about 1500 Celsius degrees, should be cooled with checking rhythm by air, in a cooling chamber. Afterwards, the solid cold material that contains crystals, it has also piezoelectric attributes because it contains SiO2. This material is named klinker and is the about 80% of cement. Production of klinker is about 5000 tons/day.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 322 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Aug 19, 2001 (21:58) * 41 lines 
 
Howdy Howdy

Generally, there is no QRM around 10ghz unless you are near
an airport, miliary radar site, or a speed trap. Signals
passing through rain drops tend to have a fluttery sound to
them - a pure CW note will be 'raspy' as the signal experiences
doppler shift and slight delays causing the flutter as the
signal arrives - also, interesting things happen when a rain
drop is a 1/4 wavelength at 10ghz. Signals tend to diffuse
and broaden thus making it easier to find the signal when
sweeping the horizon but more difficult to understand due to
the doppler shift. Anyway, neat stuph. Today, I tested with
another station about 10 miles away but could not hear them
very well - a combination of low power levels, signal drifting,
poor aiming, and my signals grazing the tree tops which tended
to attenuate the signal. Pointing my antenna to the lake, and
I could still hear the Michigan beacon in the noise floor - this
was 100+ miles away. The antenna was a 'horn' a small flared
waveguide whose aperature was 3 inch by 3 inch tapering down
to a small quarter wave radial in the waveguide (about .75 cm)

John - very interesting on your frequencies of interest. I have
listened to Omega signals in the 15khz range but have never heard
spherics and whistlers (yet). One receiver that interests me is
the ULF integrating receivers that listen to signals less than
1Hz - I would suspect these are pressure waves and other phenomena
such as the signal given off by plasma. Is there a URL describing
your receiver designs?

And, Marcia - very glad to hear you do not have a lava river
too near your house. Once I get past the next month of foolishness
with work, I will have time to think about radio stuff again -
Winter is coming so I will be shut in to do projects or brush
up on my CW. This weekend I got to use a German made Junkers
military key that was given to me as a present - most fun to
put to use.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 323 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug 20, 2001 (00:16) * 7 lines 
 
No, the nearest lava river is a good 50 miles away (the summit is 30 miles away but it is not active now - just the ongoing rift eruption.) Please all, rest assured that the worst that can happen to me is to walk into a wall while I am distracted. It really has happened! (I get to thinking way too deeply at times!)

Crucibles - yes, I understand about the walls of the lava tubes. I also know what is clinker (in English - but we should have used a kappa in the first place!) In fact, thinking back on peizo-electricity, my dad was a radioman as a passtime and he made me my first crystal radio which got one station. I clipped it to the iron radiator in my bedroom, and I was alone in the dark of night no longer! He had rigged a set of headphones for me and I was blissfully content to have radio waves inside my head all night long. And, now I listen to cricket matches that way. Now you know why I am like this. My brain is radio-active!

I too would be most interested in John's detecting equipment. Do not explain it to me, though, please. That would require too much time. Talk from one electronics person to another and I will understand what I can of it. I am entirely fascinated. I make a very good assistant if anyone needs one. I even climb trees if necessary - or did for my father.

Interesting effects, Mike! I never thought of the doppler effect on them. Does sleet and snow make different sounds, as well? How about fog? I guess I never thought about that before. I had heard of rain scatter. Omega I am very familiar with, We had a large Loran station on the northernmost tip of this island which was converted to an Omega station. I think it has been disassembled and rendered inopperative for several years, but you should see the antenna they left behind! Would I ever like to have that in the back yard!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 324 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug 20, 2001 (00:18) * 1 lines 
 
Mike, regarding the Junkers, did you get the plane, too? It sounds like you are accumulating quite an enviable collection. I hope it is solid brass as is good and proper.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 325 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Aug 20, 2001 (12:06) * 13 lines 
 
Hi Mike,
In the past, I received all of that exists from 30 kHz and lower. For example submarines storms etc. I found a tape with spherics, whistlers and storm noises that I received and I do not remember when. It is beautiful and I posted to you and to Marcia, by separate e-mail. I must have two or three more tapes like this, but I do not remember where.

It is very difficult to receive sounds like spherics and whistlers in Hawaii or in low latitudes. I have also an old computer program that makes colour graphs making fast Fourie analysis in audio frequencies from a wav file. It is for windows 3.1 but works properly with windows 98. If you want I can post it to you. I found it free in the web.

As I remember, I used a simple audio amplifier to receive that sounds. The antenna was the long metallic grille of my small farm. Ground was on the tube of my water drill.

Today, my receiver is hand made and I receive frequencies with a period below of 13 minutes and especially signals with a period of 24 hours. I use hand made active filters, which are my designing too. It is very difficult to see if these filters are correct, because must be wait about 10 days (10 periods). One other important thing is that on the ground existing about 500 to 1000 mVolts at 50 Hz from power lines or power grounds.

I use as antenna the ground between electrodes located in a distance of about 110 meters. Electrodes are the tubes of three water drills. The electrodes are placed so as made two crossing dipoles. E-W and N-S.
Regards
John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 326 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug 20, 2001 (15:29) * 7 lines 
 
Remarkable sounds, John. Alas, living at the latitude that I do limits radio and aurora experiences, you are correct! However, we do get whales making similar sounds though not comparable and, of course, not from a similar source. I wonder if they can detect things and react to them as you have observed the cockroaches doing...?!

It seems we are the most intelligent beings on earth, and we have to be since we are the least sensitive to natural signals from the earth. Thus, you were intelligent and intellctually gifted enough to create your own detection equipment. We have seen how it has proven to work in predicting earthquakes, and for that you have become world famous.

Here, it has to quake at 4.0 magnitude or greater for most of us to feel it. Little else is sensed naturally - we all use sophisticated and highly sensitive instruments to do that for us. If it were not for the creativity of your mind and those like yours, we would know so much less than we do now.
Thank you!



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 327 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Aug 21, 2001 (01:57) * 11 lines 
 
As I read, whales forefeel the EQ’s and they react with sounds of about 17 Hz. They become very anxious and they approach near the land a few hours before.

We are the most intelligent beings on earth but with our lifeway, we put in the margin certain significant abilities, that first persons had. Exactly as we drive away our fur with our attire.

I think that if you need a special tool and cannot you find it, it is better for you to manufacture it. If you don’t know how, you can learn, in order to manufacture it.

It is correct that the EQ’s are watched with seismographs. However, the nature repeats herself but not always and not in the same place. Thus, statistics show only the tendency, but not the reality.

I needed a new tool and I manufactured it. However, still exists a lot of work.
John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 328 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Aug 21, 2001 (22:12) * 15 lines 
 
Hi all

Curious about the designs of the filters and amplifer. Another
good design involves using a computer/soundcard running an FFT
spectrum analyzer although what type of transducer is used? I would
suspect a VERY large inductor. Could the receiver be simulated
entirely using digital signal processing algorithms up to the
actual pickup loop? Finally, what would be the integration time
be for signals in the 1hz and lower range? I bet there are some
interesting signals to be 'heard'.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 329 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Aug 22, 2001 (03:07) * 11 lines 
 
Hi Mike,
In the this hamile's frequencies private problems do not exist. I thought the card of sound but because I do not know poja it can the apo'krjsi of he of card is in so much hamile's frequencies him avoided.

I use an analog/digital input card, the PCL718, which has 16 channels of analogue inputs. This card is located on the bus of a computer 486/66MHz. It is enough. I made also the program to read/store and monitor the signals in real time. I made this program in Quick Basic. Measurements are stored as daily text files with name the date. Next, is very easy to you, any process that you can think.

The active filter that you can use, is a common four pole low pass filter, with resistances and capacitors. Inductor does not exist. I use also, the common idegrated circuit 741, with a +-12Volts stabilised power supply. If you wish, I can send you analytic drawing.

Indeed they exist very interesting signals under 1 Hz. You can easy win your bet. I can help you in any difficulty.
Regards
John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 330 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Aug 22, 2001 (03:10) * 2 lines 
 
I am sorry. I mean integrated circuit.
John


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 331 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Aug 22, 2001 (15:25) * 3 lines 
 
John, *Smile* We knew - I seem to do that a lot!

This is where I watch the minds far greater than mine discuss things I have only heard mentioned before. I do know my limitations very well. I am delighted to have you carry on the conversation with Mike and to let me sit aside and admire your great thoughts.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 332 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Thu, Aug 23, 2001 (01:21) * 4 lines 
 
Dear lady:
I do not know what says Mike for it, but I think that it is preferable to participate you in our discussion. I believe that you understand our manner of thought and you know much more than of that you indicate. My experience is that simple feminine ideas can be very useful. Women are thinking simply and effectively. We are men and we are thinking more complex than you, and some times we feed the fishes in a spoon of water. Mike, what do you think about it?
John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 333 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Aug 23, 2001 (14:48) * 3 lines 
 
My Dear John, you should know me well enough by now to know I will not sit quietly for long. I am far too curious to do that. Especially with such patient and qualified minds to guide my thoughts. Mike is similarly eager to share what he knows and explains things to us. This little fish will be eager to learn more that is provided in a spoon of water. I am overjoyed to know that men think differently from women. That is what makes them so fascinating. I think of so many things at one time, like most women. Men usually concentrate on pursuing an answer to one problem. Your analytical minds compliment ours!

I suspect Mike is out taking advantage of the wonderful weather before cold and wet winter weather stops his outdoors activities. I would hope he is more successful in seeing Aurorae this winter than he was last year. Are you too far south to see Aurora? I am, alas! I am only 19° 50' north latitude.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 334 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Aug 24, 2001 (19:23) * 9 lines 
 

Nature has portioned even the manners with which humans think. This is a good manner, although a little foxy, in order to she carries near men and women.

I live in 39° 19' north latitude and I have never seen aurora too. However, you run around the world, a little faster than I, by the earth’s rotation.

I wish good success to Mike for his effort.

John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 335 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Aug 24, 2001 (20:42) * 3 lines 
 
You are at the latitude of where I went to college. Now, I am far enough south 19° 43'N that though I cannot see aurora, I can see the southern cross and the Magellanic clouds at the right time of year.

I think Nature is not only foxy but also very wise in ways we try our whole lives to acertain. I am delighted to be nearer to you!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 336 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Aug 25, 2001 (14:39) * 11 lines 
 
Major Solar Flare on August 25, 2001

Space Weather News for August 25, 2001
http://www.spaceweather.com

MAJOR SOLAR FLARE: The most powerful solar flare since April erupted on
the Sun today. The X5-class explosion hurled a bright coronal mass
ejection into space and triggered a strong radio blackout on the sunlit
side of Earth. Visit spaceweather.com for more information, images and
updates.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 337 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Aug 25, 2001 (14:42) * 3 lines 
 
John, does this sort of thing affect the reception of signals for which you are searching? CMEs mess up satellite transmissions on occasion. Those of you in northern latitudes, please check for auroral activity.

Just think, John, from the ISS we could see both aurora borealis and australis! And each 90 minutes we could check both hemispheres!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 338 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Aug 25, 2001 (17:33) * 20 lines 
 
SFI:199 up from 174 | A:11 up from 5 | K:3 down from 4 at 2100 on 25 August.
SAF: moderate to high, GMF: quiet to active

A major flare occurred at 1645 UT on 25 August..
A proton event is expected .

Flare:
Class X5.3/3B/S17E34 BEG 25 Aug 2001 1623 MAX 25 Aug 2001 1645
END 25 Aug 2001 1704 UT

Comments: Flare occurred in region 9591.

Magnetic K-Index of 4 Warning valid from 25 Aug 2001 1720 to 26 Aug
2001 1800 UT

Magnetic A-Index >=30 Watch for 27 Aug 2001 UT
Magnetic A-Index &g=30 Watch for 28 Aug 2001 UT
Aurora Level: 7
Solar Wind: 429.5 km/s at 9.5 protons/cm3



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 339 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Aug 26, 2001 (00:50) * 12 lines 
 
You are talking about this...I can to say like navy signal.



This false-color movie captured by an extreme ultraviolet telescope aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory shows today's explosion above sunspot 9591.


I visit every day here:
http://www.sec.noaa.gov/SWN/

I found that it does not exist any connection with my signals.
John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 340 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Aug 26, 2001 (15:34) * 6 lines 
 
After so many years of a quiet sun and very poor propagation of radio signals, it is good to have an active sun, again! Thank you for posting the above link, John! Great links there, as well. Check them all. For aurorae, please check
http://sec.noaa.gov/pmap/ which shows both poles and the likelihood of seeing the aurora. It seems as though New Zealand might get the fringes!

That was certainly a spectacular CME yesterday. I imagine the part of the radio spectrum you monitor is far different than that used by the sun. This is only one of the reasons I can think of your not having solar interference.

Another place to check for solar images http://umbra.nascom.nasa.gov/images/latest.html


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 341 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug 27, 2001 (17:13) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 342 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug 27, 2001 (18:03) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 343 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug 27, 2001 (18:07) * 14 lines 
 
Sorry for the above errors.

Interplanetary Shock Wave Passes Earth

Space Weather News for August 27, 2001
http://www.spaceweather.com

An interplanetary shock wave triggered by a powerful solar explosion two
days ago buffeted Earth's magnetosphere between 19:30 and 20:00 UT on
Monday, August 27th. The impact will likely trigger auroras at
high-latitudes. Far-northern sky watchers across Europe and North America
should be alert for Northern Lights after nightfall, especially around
local midnight. Visit http://www.spaceweather.com for details and
updates.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 344 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug 27, 2001 (18:08) * 15 lines 
 
Note the aurora level is 9 - go check to see if you can see it!

SFI:192 up from 190 | A:15 up from 13 | K:4 up from 3 at 2100 on 27 August.
SAF: moderate, GMF: at active to minor storm levels

Magnetic K-Index of 4 Warning valid from 26 Aug 2001 2335 to 27 Aug
2001 1800 UT

Magnetic K-Index of 4 Warning valid from 27 Aug 2001 1935 to 28 Aug
2001 2100 UT

Aurora Level: 9
Solar Wind: 546.8 km/s at 12.4 protons/cm3




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 345 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Aug 27, 2001 (19:21) * 6 lines 
 
Dear Marcia,
I think that quiet sun means absence of electromagnetic noise and therefore, clean reception of radio signals. Current activity of the sun, has left the maximum level and is decreased. This means more good receptions.

For my pre-earthquake signals reception, simply, I receive frequencies where noise from sun is minimum but also I avoid big part from this noise that exists, with the manner of reception.
John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 346 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug 27, 2001 (21:39) * 3 lines 
 
Are things like "notch filters" usable in your frequency reception, John? They are most advantageous to use when listening to short wave radio or Ham bands. Perhaps you do not need such filters at the wave lengths of radio waves you use.

The sun is quiet for the time being. Ionization has made the prediction of aurora tonight possible. Of course, I will not see it, no matter how high I climbed in my big trees.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 347 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Aug 27, 2001 (22:10) * 17 lines 
 
Hi Y'all

Just a guess but I would suspect a low pass filter would be
optimum - one question I would have would be designing the
receiver with active or passive elements. Also, if passive
filters are used - how would the natural electromagnetic
fields affect the inductive elements - they are probably
very well shielded. Finally what type of pickup coil would
be used? Would this coil be an air core or ferromagnetic?
A ferromagnetic/ceramic hybrid? Questions, questions, questions!
After this most obnoxious week of work ends, I can do a bit
more research on these topics....

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 348 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Aug 27, 2001 (23:11) * 3 lines 
 
Finally some questions worthy of John's time and consideration! Thanks Mike.

I write for those who lurk and wish to know but never seem to log in and ask. I start with the premise that there is no such thing as a stupid question and go from there. I try to think what I would ask if I were not aware of this subject at all, but found it interesting. Please excuse my sounding ignorant, sometimes.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 349 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Aug 28, 2001 (02:40) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 350 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Aug 28, 2001 (02:47) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 351 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Aug 28, 2001 (02:52) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 352 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Aug 28, 2001 (02:54) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 353 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Aug 28, 2001 (02:58) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 354 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Aug 28, 2001 (03:05) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 355 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Aug 28, 2001 (03:12) * 3 lines 
 
I apology. I can’t delete resp. 350. Please Help
John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 356 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Aug 28, 2001 (03:15) * 13 lines 
 
Welcome back Mike and good question Marcia. My installation is like the image below. You can easy understand the why.
My first (if I can to say) filter is the system of the electrodes which are inside the ground water. About 2/3 of its length is inside ground water. My installation is like this:



The upper ground layer above the water, operates as faraday shield. It stops the most of human and nature electromagnetic signals that arrive from above. So, inside ground water, the signal (from ground) to noise ratio is enough well.
NS dipole consists of A and B electrodes and EW dipole consists of A and C dipoles.

Each channel has a low pass active filter at the input, with centre frequency at 0.25 Hz.

I use especially the signals with a period of 24 hours (band pass analogue active filter) and all longer periods. (a second low pass analogue active filter). It is impossible to use any other filter than actives in these ultra low frequencies.
John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 357 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Aug 28, 2001 (14:48) * 7 lines 
 
350 is deleted. This is one of three conferences on which I am host and can delete anyone's post. Otherwise I can only delete my own. I see I sent you the delete command just in time. We all need to use it on occasion. *HUGS* John! If I can ever be of assistance, you know your HPWS is ready and most willing to be of help.

Your Diagram will be most useful in understanding your work. Thank you for the filter information. I imagined that you had to be using something to make precise recordings, but did not think of the passive and active filters. I am not used to thinking of frequencies in these extremely low ranges.

You are extraordinarily gifted in making graphics! Thank you!




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 358 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Aug 28, 2001 (17:54) * 5 lines 
 


Perhaps this can express better my thanks and my feelings. I will be more careful in the future.
John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 359 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Aug 28, 2001 (18:32) * 1 lines 
 
Oh John!!! What a lovely rose! Thank you. Do not let this little programming difficulty you had bother you. We have all had them. Mine are buried in the early posts when I first created the conference. I cherish you all the more in your proving to be mortal, after all. *BIG HUGS*


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 360 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Aug 28, 2001 (20:59) * 5 lines 
 
Since John's rose seems to be having difficulties, let me repost it from my bit of hard drive on Spring for all perpetuity. *Hugs*... thank you!






 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 361 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Aug 28, 2001 (21:01) * 9 lines 
 
(I always press roses from special gentlemen on my hard drive!)







Note... this is the only one here!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 362 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Aug 29, 2001 (13:38) * 1 lines 
 
Still off-topic but relevant for any post is the fact that your image will only appear as long as it is still on the url from which you posted it. That is why for special images I ftp them to Spring's hard drive. It remains there as long as the server does not change or something cataclysmic does not happen to the entire Spring. Thus, John's lovely little rose has disappeared from his original url but it is forever on mine. I am very glad I saved it when I could still see it!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 363 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Aug 29, 2001 (15:56) * 24 lines 
 
AO-40 Gives Earthlings Another Scare

Sighs of relief were heard around the world as the 2.4-GHz S2 beacon
aboard the AO-40 satellite reappeared August 28 after an ominous
absence. The beacon failed to return on Orbit 381 at MA=44 (MA, mean
anomaly, an orbital position), when the RUDAK connections shut off
as programmed.

Gunter Wertich, DF4PV, who is equipped for moonbounce work, reported
hearing normal telemetry blocks very weakly, however, so ground
controllers were assured that the onboard computer had not crashed.
''It was suspected that the solid-state matrix IF connections had not
latched properly during the switch-over at MA=44,'' said ground
controller Stacey Mills, W4SM, who suspected DF4PV was hearing
middle beacon ''bleed through'' via the IF matrix.

When the satellite came into view at Mills' Virginia location, he
manually cycled the middle beacon-to-S2 transmitter connection off
and on, ''and the middle beacon popped back up,'' he said.

Although the RUDAK is temporarily turned off, Mills said the
schedule will remain in place. For now, there will be no middle
beacon and no RUDAK from MA=30 to 44. The middle beacon is off from
MA=220-250 because of eclipses.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 364 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Sep  9, 2001 (20:05) * 10 lines 
 
A major flare occurred at 2045 UT on 9 Sept..
Flare: Class M9.5/2N/S31E26 BEG 9 Sep 2001 2040 MAX 9 Sep 2001 2045 END
9 Sep 2001 2048 UT

Comments: None

Aurora Level: 3
Solar Wind: 284.2 km/s at 0.2 protons/cm3

http://hfradio.org/notice.html


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 365 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep 10, 2001 (16:23) * 13 lines 
 
SFI:245 up from 236 | A:5 down from 7 | K:1 down from 3 at 2100 on 10 September.
SAF: moderate to high, GMF: quiet to unsettled

Flare:
Class M9.5/2N/S31E26 BEG 9 Sep 2001 2040 MAX 9 Sep 2001 2045 END
9 Sep 2001 2048 UT

Comments: None

Aurora Level: 4
Solar Wind: 279.2 km/s at 3.5 protons/cm3

It hasn't gotten here yet...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 366 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep 10, 2001 (21:11) * 10 lines 
 
Check the aurora level now... get out and look at it, please!

SFI:226 | A:6 | K:1 down from 2 at 0600 on 8 September.
SAF: moderate to high, GMF: quiet to unsettled

Aurora Level: 7
Solar Wind: 339.1 km/s at 0.8 protons/cm3





 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 367 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 11, 2001 (17:39) * 9 lines 
 
SFI:250 up from 245 | A:13 up from 5 | K:3 down from 4 at 2100 on 11 September.
SAF: moderate to high, GMF: quiet to active

Magnetic K-Index of 4 Warning valid from 11 Sep 2001 1520 to 2359 UT

Aurora Level: 8
Solar Wind: 412.8 km/s at 2.7 protons/cm3

Even more change of Aurura tonight. Go out and look up!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 368 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 11, 2001 (19:14) * 37 lines 
 
A s t r o A l e r t
Sun-Earth Alert

Solar Terrestrial Dispatch
http://www.spacew.com

11 September 2001

POTENTIAL X-CLASS / WHITE-LIGHT SOLAR FLARE WARNING
POSSIBLE NAKED-EYE SUNSPOT GROUP



Active sunspot Region 9608 is crossing the central solar meridian and
is continuing to grow in size and magnetic complexity. The spot group will be
well positioned for possible viewing with the protected naked eye over the
next several days (do not attempt to view the Sun without adequate and proper
eye protection - serious and permanent eye damage could result).
This sunspot complex produced a brief, but x-ray bright class M9.5 major
solar flare on Sunday (9 September) at 20:45 UTC (4:45 pm EDT). The event was
otherwise not particularly impressive. But the continued growth and
development of additional magnetic complexity in this spot complex raises the
concern that more energetic flare activity may be possible. Energetic X-class
x-ray flares and possible concurrent white-light flare activity from this
spot complex appear to be possible. Observers interested in watching for
white-light components of major flare activity are encouraged to pay
particularly close attention to the penumbral regions of the large leader
spot of Region 9608. This region is the most poleward sunspot complex
presently visible. Identification of the sunspot is possible by visiting:
http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/data/synoptic/sunspots/mdi_sunspots.gif
We would be interested in receiving reports and/or imagery of any
suspected white-light flare activity from this region over the next week.
Reports may be submitted to: std@solar.spacew.com.
Real-time 24-hour per day imagery from a global solar monitoring network
of professional solar observatories is available at:
http://www.spacew.com/sunnow

** End of AstroAlert **


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 369 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep 17, 2001 (19:33) * 15 lines 
 
SFI:199 | A:12 up from 11 | K:3 at 0000 on 18 September.
SAF: moderate to high, GMF: quiet to unsettled

A major flare occurred at 1550 UTC on 17 September.
Flare:
Class M8.1/1N/S31W73 BEG 17 Sep 2001 1544 MAX 17 Sep 2001 1550
END 17 Sep 2001 1554 UT

Comments: None

The following Watch was CANCELLED at 1640 UT on 17 Sep 2001
Magnetic A-Index >20 Watch for 18 Sep 2001 UT

Aurora Level: 6
Solar Wind: 425.4 km/s at 2.8 protons/cm3


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 370 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Sep 17, 2001 (20:41) * 10 lines 
 
Hi yall

Well, Im back home again after being stranded in Las Vegas all
last week - drove to Denver to catch a plane back to Chicago.
Saw lots of neat canyons, formations, rocks, etc - hope to post
a longer note when Im not soooo pooped.

73 de AA9IL
Mike



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 371 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Sep 17, 2001 (21:05) * 5 lines 
 
Oh yes, I've done that drive - out of this world!!! My son is taking that route for his honeymoon next month. I know he will be stunned and delighted if he can take his eyes off his Bride...!

Delighted you are safe and back where you belong. I'm not even thrilled about flying next month! Oh well, only ocean between me and oblivion until I get to the west coast!

*Hugs* and welcome home, Mike!!!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 372 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Sep 19, 2001 (16:48) * 49 lines 
 
Mike, Fire up the Rig!!! They need you. Terry, too...

Amateur Radio volunteer information is on line

Amateur Radio volunteers continue to be needed to assist with
disaster relief communication in New York City and in Washington,
DC.

Operators willing able to volunteer for communications duty to
support the Amateur Radio Emergency Service relief and recovery
effort at the Word Trade Center in New York City may register at the
World Trade Center Disaster Relief Communications Web site,
http://wtc.ab2m.net.

When logging onto the site, Amateur Radio operators first will be
quizzed against a checklist, then asked to complete and submit an
on-line form.

New York City Amateur Radio volunteers must have a VHF (2-meter) or,
preferably, a VHF/UHF (2-meter/70-cm) mobile radio, power supply and
cables, and mobile/portable mag-mounted gain antenna. This duty
requires a serious commitment and could involve working in a
possibly hazardous area in war zone-like conditions. Volunteers will
need to supply some items of protective clothing.

Amateurs from outside the Greater New York City area who are asked
to report for duty are requested to alert their section managers. A
list of SMs is available on the ARRL Web site,
http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/org/smlist.html.

Amateur Radio operators within 50 miles of Washington, DC, are being
sought to assist the ARES relief and recovery effort for the
Pentagon attack site. Those available to help should first visit the
Virginia ARES Web site, http://www.aresva.org/help.htm. Those
willing and able to assist should then contact Virginia Section
Emergency Coordinator Tom Gregory, N4NW, n4nw@arrl.net. The
subject line of your e-mail should read ''Salvation Army Support''.

Volunteers need a 2-meter hand-held or portable with CTCSS
capability plus at least two batteries and a charger. Current shifts
are 4 AM to noon, noon to 8 PM and 8 PM to 4 AM, Gregory said. ARES
volunteers are staffing three sites in Washington, DC, primarily
supporting the Salvation Army relief and recovery efforts. The need
is for three operators per shift.

Amateurs from sections other than Virginia or Maryland who are asked
to report for duty are requested to alert their section managers. A
list of SMs is available on the ARRL Web site,
http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/org/smlist.html.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 373 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Sep 24, 2001 (23:11) * 20 lines 
 
Hey Kids

I have been keeping up with the events via Wisconsin public radio
but no HF activity lately due to travel and grad school. I did
make it to a ham fest this last weekend and picked up a spectrum
display for my surveillance radio, a tracking transmitter, and
a military radio that I have come to call my 'white elephant'.
Its this absurdly complicated computer controlled setup with
no redeeming purpose or practical value - I plan to use it on
PSK31 on 20 meters once I figure out how to load a frequency in
the #&%@! thing. Microwave Update 2001 is this weekend and Im
off to San Jose to geek out with other radio nerds. One of the
activities is a visit to the 150ft dish at Stanford for some
earth moon earth experiments. Cool! I would be more excited
if I were not so exhausted. Details to follow....

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 374 of 605: Moon Dreams  (Moon) * Tue, Sep 25, 2001 (07:14) * 1 lines 
 
What is a Solar thrust? It's supposed to be happening this week, maybe even today.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 375 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 25, 2001 (13:12) * 1 lines 
 
Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is what it is ususally called, and it is where the sun erupts vast amounts of it outer shell. It is so highly ionized that it at best causes beautiful Auroras to be see in both hemispheres, and at the worst, it can knock out satellite transmissions for the several day duration - including those warning us of iminent attacks from "over there." The current on is due. In the area in which you live you are too far south to see them, as am I. Even your Alma Mater is too far south, though they were visible earlier this year in Bakersfield, California.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 376 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 25, 2001 (13:16) * 13 lines 
 
Space Weather News for Sept. 24, 2001 http://www.spaceweather.com

SOLAR FLARE: A powerful X-class solar flare erupted Monday morning, Sept.
24th. The explosion hurled a spectacular coronal mass ejection (CME) into
space -- and it appears to be heading our way. The CME will likely sweep
past Earth late Tuesday or (more likely) Wednesday and trigger geomagnetic
storms. Sky watchers should prepare for Northern Lights during the nights
ahead.

WEEKEND AURORAS: An interplanetary shock wave buffeted Earth's
magnetosphere on Sept. 23rd, sparking a day-long geomagnetic storm at high
latitudes. Visit spaceweather.com to view pictures of the display.




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 377 of 605: Moon Dreams  (Moon) * Tue, Sep 25, 2001 (16:26) * 3 lines 
 
Thank you, Marcia! One of these days I am going to have to see the Aurora Borealis. Definitely a must do.

I have friends that were able to see the last comet and the AB at the same time.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 378 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 25, 2001 (20:49) * 24 lines 
 
SFI:275 | A:16 up from 12 | K:6 up from 4 at 0000 on 26 September.
SAF: moderate to high, GMF: at major storm levels

A major flare occurred at 0432 UTC on 25 September. A satellite proton event began at 1215 UTC on 24 September. A polar cap absorption event is in progress.
A proton event is expected to continue.

Flare:
Class M7.6 BEG 25 Sep 2001 0424 MAX 25 Sep 2001 0440 END 25 Sep
2001 0452 UT

Comments: None

Magnetic K-Index of 4 Warning valid from 25 Sep 2001 2051 to 26 Sep
2001 1500 UT

Magnetic K-Index > 6 Warning valid from 25 Sep 2001 2115 to 26 Sep
2001 2100 UT

Aurora Level: 10
Solar Wind: 279.5 km/s at 12.3 protons/cm3


Go out side and see what is up there!!!



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 379 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Sep 25, 2001 (20:52) * 1 lines 
 
Oh Moon, How delicious to see a comet and an aurora at the same time!!! I have seen many things including lunar eclipses while watching a volcano erupt. It is like watching another universe unfold.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 380 of 605: Moon Dreams  (Moon) * Wed, Sep 26, 2001 (07:58) * 4 lines 
 
I have seen many things including lunar eclipses while watching a volcano erupt. It is like watching another universe unfold.
How true! That's the attraction.

In our current state of affairs, we fear more what is to come of our planet.:-(


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 381 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Sep 26, 2001 (18:13) * 1 lines 
 
Yes, alas...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 382 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Sep 30, 2001 (22:38) * 13 lines 
 
Howdy Howdy

Back from San Francisco (Microwave Update 2001). I'll do a detailed
posting - but for right now, was tons o' fun. Bought plenty of
microwave goodies for projects, saw different presentations, and even
got to go into the control room of the Stanford radio telescope for
a demonstration of moon bounce at 1.2ghz. Standing in front of that
dish was awe inspiring.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 383 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Oct  1, 2001 (16:57) * 25 lines 
 
Oooh Mike! I'd envy you if you were not so special. I am delighted you got to see Stanford's goodies up close and personal. Any hair-raising events? I stood in front of the big dish at Greenbank, W Va, and I know the indescribable feeling of awe and wonder it causes. I am sitting here with chills remembering it. We also got the inside tour but I cannot remember much of that. I wish I could do it again! Whoopee, we get more from Mike! You do find the most fascinating things to do and experience. *Hugs* and welcome home.

A major flare occurred at 0515 utc on 1 Oct. A satellite proton event began at 0255 utc on 1 Oct. A proton event is expected to continue.

Magnetic K-Index of 5 Warning valid from 1 Oct 2001 0100 to 1500 UT

Flare:
Class M9.1 BEG 1 Oct 2001 0441 MAX 1 Oct 2001 0515 END 1 Oct 2001
0523 UT

Comments: None

Magnetic A-Index >30 Warning valid from 1 Oct 2001 0940 to 1200 UT

The following Warning was EXTENDED at 1456 UT and is now valid through
1500 UT on 2 Oct 2001
Magnetic K-Index of 4 Warning valid from 29 Sep 2001 1735 to 30 Sep
2001 1500 UT
Magnetic A-Index > 30 Warning valid from 1 Oct 2001 1551 to 2 Oct 2001
1500 UT
Aurora Level: 6
Solar Wind: 494.1 km/s at 1.7 protons/cm3





 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 384 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Oct  2, 2001 (21:42) * 43 lines 
 
Hi Marci and Geoites

Some good pictures of the dish are available on the SRI web page
I just did a google search on SRI and the URL popped up - dont
know it off hand. There should be some pictures from microwave
update available as well in the near future (see microwaveupdate.org)
One of the most interesting things about visiting the dish was the
types of antennas used - everything from 21mhz antennas for monitoring
Jupiter up through microwave. Im not sure what the upper frequency
limit on the dish is but suspect 5-7ghz? It didnt strike me to be
used above that range. Guess I should stop by the SRI web site
and read the tech details.
Up until last week, I only saw the dish from Hwy 280 going to
San Francisco - up close, it was bigger than I could even imagine.
The feed was lowered to the ground to allow installation of the
1.2ghz components then pulled back into place with a big cable.
The dish rotated around on its own railroad track. Inside the
control hut mounted on the dish base itself was one room that
held the biggest klystron I have ever seen along with its power
supply. (Several huge cabinets worth...) Also in the hut
was a work bench - the control room contained several racks of
HP test equipment including precision frequency standards - the
center desk contained a PC monitor to display pointing information
and an AZ-EL readout. There were additional PC's and test equipment
scattered around the room. The EME test involved pointing the
dish at the moon and transmiting/receiving morse code on 1.296.100
Ghz. Even at the power levels, I was amazed at the signal to noise
ratio. There were even 'pile ups' - several stations calling the
dish at the same time. The whole event lasted several hours and
was most thought provoking. While standing in the control room
and also walking around outside the dish, I thought how incredibly
cool it would be to participate in research like that. So, anyway,
I left the place with many thoughts racing through my head of projects
to be completed and research to be pursued. I made it through the
airport with a transit case and a suitcase filled with microwave
crap back home and am now getting back into building and experimenting.
I am still extremely exhausted but plan to carry on. THIS is where
passion of science, knowledge, and understanding overcome all and
provides the fire and drive to keep going.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 385 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct  2, 2001 (22:06) * 3 lines 
 
Never thought about pileups for an EME contact. Usually they schedule the pairing very carefully. Thanks for the good news about getting through security. My laptop is going with me!! Take a long nap, Mike! Burning the midnight oil and candles at both ends and you will end up soldering your fingers together. Making holes in your cothes and assorted other goofs of the weary. Too bad real life has to intrude on fun!! I am off to search for your BIG dish and admire yet another one. Happy me!!!

My son lives near that area. I want to look at it too, but will not even attempt a grand tour of the sort you had. Fantastic, Mike! Thanks for sharing. Will post a picture of said dish if I find one I can "borrow."


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 386 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Thu, Oct  4, 2001 (05:03) * 6 lines 
 
Hi Mike,
Too much interest that giant dish-antenna Mike. You are lucky man. But, I think that it will be interest to explain here how this radiation, in 21 Mhz band, is produced in Jupiter, and what we can expect to find, observing him in this band. I think that it is easy to begin the observation of Jupiter, with more simple installations.

I have certain explanations for it and you be sure that I will present them here. However, I wanted to hear your opinions first. Mike and I, we are fascinated from the inquire and we like to walk in unsearchable paths. Perhaps we can to impart this illness in different persons and especialy in young persons. I think that this is good. Correct Mike?
John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 387 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Oct  9, 2001 (23:06) * 34 lines 
 
Hi John

Sorry for not responding sooner - been overly busy with many
distractions. I have some information on Jovian emissions
in a radio astronomy text book so that should provide good
insight on the 21mhz signal sources. Yes, inquiry and the
pursuit of knowledge are what keeps me going. When I was
young, I would sit fascinated watching the Apollo missions
on TV. I wanted to build my own rockets from that point
which led to my interest in model rocketry. I have always
been fascinated in aerospace, radio, computers, and astronomy
and that fueled my passion to follow a scholastic path in
science/engineering/technology. One could only hope that
kids today would divert their already short attention from
TV foolishness and follow science. There are no moon shots
televised today and space shuttle launches are kinda ho-hum
where as the apollo missions would interrupt regular broadcasting
for days from launch to landing on the moon to splashdown.
Neat stuph. I read about the technology glory days after WWII
and the boom in amateur radio, solid state, the international
geophysical year, computers, etc and sometimes wish I was born
twenty years earlier so that I could have rode the wave but I
am where I am supposed to be right here and now so I will pursue
my passion in the present.

73 de Mike
AA9IL
radio cosmo international

p.s. Pictures from Microwave Update are on the G4DDK web page so
do a google search and you can see some pictures from the Stanford
Dish visit. There are also pictures from Microwave Update 2000
from last year as well.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 388 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct 10, 2001 (00:21) * 3 lines 
 
Thanks for your response, Mike. I was born 20 years earlier. My dad was a Ham and an all around scientist though a physical chemist by profession. he built our first television by hand from "scratch" in 1937. I learned when I was deemed old enough to adjust the 13 knobs to fine tune it. My son inherited the same curiousity genes. He and I woould watch everything television carried about space. I had dinner with the astronauts who went to the moon. Now he is a geologist who gave his wife to be a Meade 7 teleceope for a wedding present. He is busy programming it so mom can look, too! Not all kids are glued to the wrong televisions. Mine wasn't. He has me looking for Iridium flares and subscribing to SeeSat. Now, get thee hither and report back. You are due for a great aurora show this week. I am off now to go look for an iridium flare in my overcast skies.

Good seeing and hearing! I'm glad you're back!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 389 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Wed, Oct 10, 2001 (14:45) * 13 lines 
 
Hi Mike
The inquiry and the pursuit of knowledge are very fascinating. This web place is unique. Marcia brings off deservedly to inform us for the limits of human knowledge and the new conquests of human intelligence in all the spectrum of science. Also, it provides daily information, useful to the simple persons and to the children. Marcia carries out astonishing work, which is not any easy. She deserves congratulations.

We have about the same interests and we had about the same thoughts in the past. But, we cannot change the past neither our age nor history. Some times I feel as prisoner in my research. I absolutely understand you.
Your description for that big dish - antenna fascinates. His aim for the observation of Jupiter radio emissions is gave me the idea that it is useful to be explained the natural phenomena that they cause these electromagnetic radiations. Beyond the astonishing receiving systems and the total of the electronic devices that so much perfectly you are described, exists the analysis and process of radio signals that is received.

Unfortunately, our time is enough limited but I am thinking that it deserves the labour to we give an explanation of what exactly happen in Jupiter- Io system. There is the unique extraterrestrial source that has decametric radio emission. Is really fascinating that which produces this so strong electromagnetic radiation. Even if my own inquire runs under the surface of ground, nevertheless it impress me the natural processes in the wide area of Jupiter.

I will try to present the Jupiter – Io interaction in GEO. But I don’t know where is better. Here, if you agree or in GEO 34?

Regards
John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 390 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct 10, 2001 (16:20) * 15 lines 
 
John, my heart is full of thanks for your comments.

Possibilities for discussions include

Geo 24 Astronomy (beyond planet earth)

Geo 35 Mike's Gaia Magnetosphere topic

Geo ?? John's name of choice for his very own extraterrestrial topic.

I think you need your own topic - or several. I hope you also think it is a good idea, and either create it as a suprise, or allow me to help you with the wording of the title. I am sure you already have discovered the way to do the creation part. If you have any questions, I am ever ready to assist you.

*blush* Thank you for your most kind words about my work here. Geo's real creator had infinite trust in my abilities. He created it and turned me loose here. It has been an absolutley magical experience. Your thinking it is good and worthwhile means more to me than I can possibly tell you in words. Suffice it to say, I am delighted that you, Mike and Rob and others who regularly prod me with questions and comments are much appreciated. Those who contriubute have a special place in my heart. I love to share this curiosity and knowledge.

*Hugs* to you all for sharing my heart and mind and fascination of the natural world. I could not have done it without you.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 391 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct 10, 2001 (23:41) * 4 lines 
 
Jupiter's radio emissions:
http://www.windows.ucar.edu/cgi-bin/tour.cgi?link=/jupiter/magnetosphere/J_radio_emissions.html&cd=false&frp=/windows3.html&cdp=/windows3.html&sw=false&fr=f&edu=high&art=ok

I do wish I knew more about it. I think I need to go study. Then I will put it on Geo elsewhere when I can finally figure it out. Meanwhile I await John's decision of where he wishes to discuss his findings for planetary magnetism. I think you need a new topic just for that! Perhaps Geo 56 - John's elightenments (the new Pythic oracle?!) or whatever you wish. When you have time. If you wish to do it. Otherwise I will just talk to myself and see if I stir up any other thoughts.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 392 of 605: Mike Kana  (aa9il) * Thu, Oct 11, 2001 (11:15) * 17 lines 
 
Greetings all

Here is a very good web page for monitoring Jupiter emissions:
radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov/
I took a quick look at the circuit diagram - its a basic direct
conversion receiver that covers the 20 Mhz band. An amateur
or shortwave radio should cover this as well. The audio output
is fine for listening but really the next step would be to log
the signal level (tap off the detector) - then collect the data
using strip chart recorders or A/D data loggers on a pc. Another
neat thing to try would be to do a Fast Fourier analysis on the
audio portion of the emission. Anyway, food for thought.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 393 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct 11, 2001 (12:43) * 3 lines 
 
Thanks, Mike. My receiver beside me gets the 20 Mhz band and I suspect that two conditions must be right to hear Jupiter. One is that there is not too much background noise on the 20 Mhz end (time of day makes a difference as does porpagation) AND that Jupiter be above your horizon. Is this correct? I'm off to check your URL and need to study up on Fourier and his analysis. Sounds like more math...*sigh*

BFO on or off for these signals?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 394 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Oct 11, 2001 (13:14) * 21 lines 
 
Howdy Howdy

This would be done with the BFO off and Jupiter should be visible (I suspect)
RE FFT, actually if you use the AF9Y EME monitoring program, this will do
an FFT on the audio signal and break it down to its sub components.
And, regarding DSP....
Somewhere in the postal system, I have a DSP radio kit on the way. Also
have a DSP evaluation kit coming in as well. This is going to be one
of those 'ship in a bottle' complexity kits (well, I just have to be able
to do lots of surface mount soldering....) But, anyway, once complete, I
will have a radio set that does the demodulating and signal processing
portion using DSP hardware and software. This will no doubt displace several
other projects in queue but Im not planning on doing microwave in the winter
anyway. The other parallel path project that will be of use to the DSP
radio is a GPS disciplined 10Mhz reference oscillator. Much cheaper than
a rubidium standard but then again, the amount of money I blow on parts would
have bought me a couple of rubidium standards. Ah, its only a hobby....

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 395 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct 11, 2001 (17:42) * 1 lines 
 
I rather suspected line of sight for Jupiter and BFO off. NOw, to get the trap dipole to catch the signals. Please report your progress as it happens. Hobbies are important, and out of them often comes great original thinking and discovery. Do not belittle your attempts - I am all eager anticipation for your success. Good luck on the ship-in-the-bottle soldering. I suggest a set of vision magnifiers like crafters and jewelers and destists use. It makes things so much easier!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 396 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct 11, 2001 (17:43) * 1 lines 
 
My trap dipole, that is... what are you using? Not a 5-element beam...?!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 397 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Oct 11, 2001 (21:35) * 28 lines 
 
Howdy Howdy

Not quite sure on the antenna yet - I would suspect a dipole
cut for 40 meters or 15 meters would work fine (1/4 wavelength
and 3/4 wavelength) My only antenna is a v shaped wire streched
out over the back yard. No beams as of yet plus amateur beams
point towards the horizion and rotation is strictly AZ, not AZ EL.
There have been light weight beams that can be built that are
much less cumbersome to point at Jupiter. I have all the tower
sections to put up a beam - I have heard more than once to quick
talking about it and put the %&@#! thing up (i.e. its easier
to beg forgiveness than ask permission). Anyway, If I was to
put up an antenna, I would go with a simple dipole which would
pull double duty on the ham bands (albiet HF but occasionaly I
do wander down to the 'audio frequencies') Since most of my interest
is in signals around the hydrogen line, most of my focus is on
the dish. Anyway, regarding hobby and hobby expense, I think
I have built up a big enuf queue of projects that I should keep
myself amused/exhasperated/disgusted/depressed/elated for weeks
and months to come. (sometimes all the above feelings in one
evening....)

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international

p.s. my single board computer(s) arrived tonite so now I have
a computing platform to power all this foolishness.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 398 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct 12, 2001 (10:20) * 9 lines 
 
Ooh good! I love it when things start to arrive for you because that means you will be sharing more things with us when it is all done.

My 60'foot wire was replaced by the slightly more sophisticated lash-up on the house roof. I get far better line of sight for aircraft with it, and teh Ham bands are much better. I think I need to ou the "boat-anchor" Hammerlund receiver in here to listen to more things better. I need work space!! My scanner for the computer has not yet been set up due to lack of space!!

Mike, you are forgiven ahead of time. *^$%@%^ all you want.

I have similar stuff to do around here. I just wish you would photo some of your goodies and share them with us! And I will reciprocate .

*Hugs* You sound like you could use one about now!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 399 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct 12, 2001 (20:46) * 16 lines 
 
Diamond insulators? This is something to make a lady geologist sit up and take notice!

* Diamond comes under the microscope:

Insulators play a key role in many electronic devices,
but their very lack of conductivity makes it difficult to
establish their electrical properties on the atomic
scale. Now Kirill Bobrov and colleagues at the Universite
Paris-Sud have successfully used scanning tunnelling
microscopy - which usually only works for conductors - to
image the atoms on the surface of a diamond. The
researchers believe that the technique could be extended
to other insulating materials in the quest for
ever-smaller electronic gadgets (K Bobrov et al
2001 Nature 413 616).
[ http://PhysicsWeb.org/article/news/5/10/8 ]


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 400 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Oct 15, 2001 (20:47) * 31 lines 
 
Happy 400th posting to Gaia M.
If there was ever a place where I could reside with
good intellectual banter (and goofy banter as well)
then Geo is it. Thanks for letting me park my rants
here, Marica!
And, speaking of rants....
At 4:40am this morning, the night sky was incredibly
clear. It was almost like looking at vvs, colorless, round
cut diamonds against a black velvet background.
Why would I be up at this hour when I should be bagging it?
Well, had to go to Detroit today and I had to be at the air
port two hours early prior to my flight. I DID do an intellectual
battle of the lesser of two evils - drive or fly but figured Id
take my chances in the air rather than tempt IL, IN, and MI drivers.
Plus, I just wasnt going to be spooked and intimidated into not
flying so I flew. Anyway, the airports still have a way to go
to match a 'nice day' security level at Heathrow but it is getting
there.
So, what does this have to do with this topic.... Well, it is
fall and the summer thunderstorm season is fading into the distance.
And that means optimum whistler monitoring time! I have not listened
to any whistlers as of yet but plenty of radio to the left of
90Mhz on the FM dial and have had my faith renewed that original
non professional programming still exists in the midst of corporate
radio clones.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international

"We put the Da in DaDa!"


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 401 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Oct 15, 2001 (20:56) * 7 lines 
 
Oh good, Mike! I polished up the stars just for your first good "seeing" night abeit it was a predawn expereince. It sounds like it was spectacular. Elfs and Sprites await you discerning ears. Perhaps we should post the url for that website with the sound files for those of us without the proper equipment. *Sigh* I just have to find it amongst my jillion bookmarks in Netscape...

You are the one who deserves my thanks. I am delighted you are so comfortable crashing here. If we kept it purely informative we'd die of boredom, and I would have all of these hostly *HUGS* piling up unused.

Flake out, tune in and fly right. I'm joining you in the air this week and will let you know how much Aloha I get at the Kona airport. Heathrow is uncommonly kind. Terribly civilized. I miss it!

*Hugs!* (See? There's another one!)


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 402 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Oct 15, 2001 (20:58) * 2 lines 
 
Wow!!! 400 posts and counting. Congratulations and thanks from this lady who could only imagine one topic when I started this whole thing.
Let's hear it for Radio Free Cosmic International and Outer Space


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 403 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Oct 16, 2001 (21:17) * 23 lines 
 
Howdy Howdy

Well, as winter approaches, then I can start thinking
about the whistler radio - have a couple of other things
to finish first (as always). Regarding dadaism, I thought
about that while digging around thru some papers/books and
found my copy of RadioText(e) which included a chapter
on the radio dada manifesto. I have not heard anything
remotely surrealistic on FM radio for ages and only slightly
so on shortwave. I suppose I should listen more to the
college radio stations since that seems to be something
that would show up there. Problem is that the college
stations are low power and I can only hear them while
driving in Chicago, not out here in the burbs. I can
only imagine what the reaction would be if surrealistic
content radio snuck onto the commercial stations and
went at it full on raving for a couple of hours.
People would be screaming and I dont mean for joy or ice cream.
Well, another programming idea for the pirate station.

73 de Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 404 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct 17, 2001 (00:00) * 9 lines 
 
Unhppily the golden age of Pirate Radio seems to be over. They were Radio DaDa*, for certain. My humble receivers are not inhabited by distressed and lost spirits of the remote past of space. Perhaps it is also that we are so far from anything. Dx-ing has become a real chore.

*DaDa = Dada (French: "hobby-horse"), nihilistic movement in the arts that flourished primarily in Zürich, New York City, Berlin, Cologne, Paris, and Hannover, Ger. in the early 20th century. Several explanations have been given by various members of the movement as to how it received its name. According to the most widely accepted account, the name was adopted at Hugo Ball's Cabaret (Café) Voltaire, in Zürich, during one of the meetings held in1916 by a group of young artists and war resisters that included Jean Arp, Richard Hülsenbeck, Tristan Tzara, Marcel Janco, and Emmy Hennings; when a paper knife inserted
into a French-German dictionary pointed to the word dada, this word was seized upon by the group as appropriate for their anti-aesthetic creations and protest activities, which were engendered by disgust for bourgeois values and despair over World War I. A precursor of what was to be called the Dada movement, and ultimately its leading member, was Marcel Duchamp, who in 1913 created his first ready-made (now lost), the "Bicycle Wheel," consisting of a wheel mounted on the seat of a stool.
http://www.oir.ucf.edu/wm/paint/glo/dada/

http://www.smalltime.com/dada.html for a really far-out experience.

Mike! What on earth is this all about? Other-worldly hardly says it. You'd better exhale whatever you are smoking... it doing really strange things to your hearing!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 405 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Oct 17, 2001 (19:41) * 34 lines 
 
And when does an ardvark, psych!
Consider this because green only goes through open doors.
I think this is a quarter of 10% back or your satisfaction, guaranteed!
fnord

Anyway, no smoke involved. I have been pondering the state
of radio after doing quite a bit of travel and consequently
listening to radio from different areas. Since most of the
radio stations are owned by three major media holding, you
will notice quite a bit of similarity (and vanilla mediocrity)
on the airwaves which is kinda sad since radio is a wonderful
old style medium for communicating. So far, college radio
and listener supported community radio (NOT public radio) is
the most diverse and enjoyable of the radio stations to listen
to. Sure, some of the real wierd artsy fartsy experimental
stuff gets a little tedious but thats why I carry a large
number of CD's for backup. With low power fm getting nuked
by the NAB and corporate big money, hopefuly pirate radio
will flourish again. Its a shame that it has to be grey
area since pirate radio is so durn fun.
I have been working on some broadcast concepts to try out.
One of which is Radio Loco Motion which is a LPFM transmitter
broadcasting on a train - there are quite a few folks who
listen to the radio in transit so possibly this will provide
a good audience (or lynch mob...) Broadcasting will comprise
of different musical varieties from thrash polka to techno to
heavily distorted guitar power pop noize. Anyway, just some
thoughts.
Anyway, enuf of the radio rant and back to atmospheric broadcasting
au natural.

73 de Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 406 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Oct 17, 2001 (19:52) * 5 lines 
 
I'll put up a very long wire and listen to it when you get on the air. Surely you are going to be on the AM band....? What a concept!
Community radio here is for the mutinous or the terminally foolish. I try to avoid it, but I have fond memories from college days and late night listening.
And especially from visits to the UK in the 70's and 80's. It was happening big time then! Creativity had not become dirty word... *sigh* Let us know of your progress, as always. And..... you have a whole huge lake for bounce frequencies. I'll trade you an ocean for your lake!

Kick off your shoes and make yourself comfy. Big chair by the fire for cold nights!!! I think you fit just fine. Bring your books...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 407 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Oct 19, 2001 (21:11) * 25 lines 
 
SFI:248 | A:8 | K:3 up from 2 at 0000 on 20 October.
SAF: moderate to high, GMF: quiet to unsettled

A major flare occurred at 1630 UTC on 19 October. A satellite proton event began at 2225 UT on 19 October..A proton event is expected to continue.

Flare:
Class X1.6/2b/N16W18 BEG 19 Oct 2001 0047 MAX 19 Oct 2001 0105
END 19 Oct 2001 0113 UT
Comments: None

Flare:
Class M5.7/1B/S14W47 BEG 19 Oct 2001 0935 MAX 19 Oct 2001 0943
END 19 Oct 2001 0955 UT
Comments: None

Flare:
Class X1.6/2b/n15w29 BEG 19 Oct 2001 1613 MAX 19 Oct 2001 1630
END 19 Oct 2001 1643 UT
Comments: None

Magnetic A-Index >20 Watch for 21 Oct 2001 UT
Magnetic A-Index >30 Watch for 22 Oct 2001 UT
Aurora Level: 8
Solar Wind: 342.1 km/s at 5.5 protons/cm3



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 408 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct 21, 2001 (14:42) * 24 lines 
 
Go out and look up!! Mike, you should be able to hear a few Orionids...

Geomagnetic Activity Alert

Space Weather News for October 21, 2001
http://www.spaceweather.com

AURORAS: An interplanetary shock wave, spawned by a solar explosion last
Friday, swept past Earth on October 21st at approximately 1645 UT. A
geomagnetic storm is underway, and sky watchers (especially those living
at high latitudes) should remain alert for auroras. Usually the best time
to spot Northern (or Southern) Lights is around local midnight.

The solar wind shock wave that buffeted Earth's magnetosphere today could
be just the first of two heading for our planet. If so, the ongoing storm
could intensify when the second arrives later today (Oct. 21) or tomorrow
(Oct 22).

METEORS: North American observers spotted 10 to 20 Orionid meteors per
hour before dawn on Sunday, Oct. 21st -- a typical Orionid maximum. The
shower is not finished, though. Early risers who venture outdoors under
dark, clear skies between 3 a.m. and sunrise on Monday, Oct 22nd, will
likely count another 5-to-15 shooting stars per hour.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 409 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Oct 21, 2001 (15:08) * 9 lines 
 
The shock wave from the first of two X-1 solar flares (which erupted late
on Thursday night) finally impacted the Earth's magnetosphere at 11:50 a.m.
EDT Sunday, October 21. The velocity of the solar wind jumped from 350 to
over 700 km./sec. soon after the shock wave hit. The interplanetary magnetic
field turned sharply south when the disturbance arrived, setting the stage
for a possible display of Northern Lights. Those US observers especially who
live north of a line from southern Oregon eastward to Salt Lake City, central
Kansas, central Kentucky on to the Delmarva Peninsula should frequently check
the northern sky beginning soon after darkness falls this evening (10/21).


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 410 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Oct 29, 2001 (16:38) * 10 lines 
 
Happy Halloween and Happy New Year to all geoites.
Nuthin new or exciting at the moment which is sometimes good in
a way. The freaks were out early this weekend in Chicago for
pre-All Hallows Eve partying and general mayhem. Got to hear
some funky tunes in oh-so-hip Wicker Park so that was a good
thing but Im paying for it now....

73 de Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 411 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Oct 29, 2001 (17:14) * 7 lines 
 
Wicker Park, Mike?! How positively Drudic of them to celebrate there. Any effigies burnt? Samhaim will porbably be tame in the island, unfortunately. Too far from the source, probably, and the sugar copmpanies went broke years ago. *Sigh* I remember when I was a kid...!

Hey, do they serve shots of bootleg whiskey door-to-door in Chicago? Just curious. I wonder what they do in Greece for the holiday... John, where are you? (Yes, I know you are busy!)

Keep the faith, don't get stoned (literally or figuratively) and have a safe and happy Hallowe'en.




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 412 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Oct 29, 2001 (22:04) * 21 lines 
 
Howdy howdy

I dont think I have to worry about either one of those happening
and 10-31 should be pretty boring in sub-urb-ia. As far as free
booze - didnt see any of that - sounds more like New Orleans -
although that does remind me of the typical trash can punch party
from days of yore.
Saw a posting on the local VHF reflector that 50Mhz F propagation
seems to be starting up so there should be good DX on 6 meters.
The HF band was lively with lots of strange signals in the
utility bands. Tuned to 8.7Mhz USB which supposedly is a working
military psyops frequency - only a loud digital carrier but in
one place I did hear an english speaking voice speak 'Standing
by for traffic...' but then nothing else.... 75 meters sounded
good and relatively quiet with some nice sounding AM stations on.
Looks like the winter DXing and SWLing season is off to a nice
start.

73 de AA9IL
mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 413 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 30, 2001 (13:43) * 4 lines 
 
Have you noticed an increase in "number" stations? Since they are supposedly encryptions and of a national Security nature, I thought there might be significanly more broadcasts than usual. I'll have to dx one of these nights which does not involve tropical deluges during the time I can dx well. Winter is always good for listening. I'm looking forward to it, acutally1 Time to clean the corrosion off my connectors!

This might be of interest for those wishing to DX meteors:
http://radio.meteor.free.fr/


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 414 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 30, 2001 (13:46) * 3 lines 
 
Hallowe'en is scheduled to be a non-event in Hawaii. Malls were generally used to keep the little ones off the streets. Now Malls have become targets. The little ones will stay home where real scary things are happening!

Be safe!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 415 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Oct 30, 2001 (18:19) * 1 lines 
 
Does anyone want me to post the Keplerian data I keep getting weekly from ARRL? Where would you like it put? Radio 32? It is rather lengthy and a bit boring to put here, I think. Opinions are welcome!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 416 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Oct 30, 2001 (19:08) * 12 lines 
 
Howdy howdy

Regarding keps, dont really see a place for them here since they
are dynamic and constantly changing - I think more useful would
be to post the URL to the keps pages. Actually, they are available
on www.amsat.org and can be downloaded for tracking programs.

anyway, my $.02
Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 417 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Oct 30, 2001 (19:22) * 30 lines 
 
Halloween is pretty tame around here - mostly kids coming up
with watchful parents at the sidewalk. Some of the high school
kids will probably TP some houses or lob some eggs. Thats about
it. After reading the post(s) here from yesterday, I went to a
couple of historical Halloween pages - aint nuthin like what it
used to be thats for sure. I think one of the traditional events
closest to 'true' would be the Day of the Dead celebrations.
Im most likely going to hang around the house and listen to short
wave since 10-31 is a very popular pirate radio activity day. I
think the frequency is around 6.915 Mhz from dusk til midnite or
so. Anyway, did my partying on the weekend.
Today was one of those somber fall days with grey skies and drizzle.
All the news on the radio was the same old stuff so I put in a
new Tom Waits CD and used that for my drive time soundtrack. Very
raw and touching nerves and stuff deep under the skin. Perfect
for a pre all hallows eve nite. In fact, more creepy in a real
world way than some of my spooky electronic compositions. Anyway,
it fit real well. I drove to one of the local mega malls and that
place was almost deserted in an 'Omega Man' kind of way. So, that
was my scary nite for me one day ahead of the rush. After tomorrow,
the Christmas decorations will no doubt go up....

I think tomorrow when I have to work in our test lab, Im going to
bring my Pink Floyd Ummagumma cd to annoy the rest of the work
denizens.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 418 of 605: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Oct 30, 2001 (20:19) * 10 lines 
 
We're partied out here.

We had a big Halloween party a couple of days ago and had a firepit with a fire going most of the night (chance to clean up a lot of brush in the back yard). Bob came and sat in with the Band who was here compliments of Scott Swain, who is renting the cottage with Hulan.

A lot of Nia folks showed up, including Holly, the Grande Nia.

I took a quick dip in the pool, I'm afraid the swim season is repaidly drawing to a close. Sigh! Wait five months now for the new season.

We're doing a major webserver upgrade at work in a few days, going from Netscape 3.6.3 to iPlanet 4.1, Solaris 2.7 to 2.8 or "eight" as it's called, and upgrading Verity Search engine and Frontpage 2000 Server extensions.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 419 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Nov  1, 2001 (11:23) * 10 lines 
 
Howdy

Logged two pirate stations on shortwave...
Betty Boo Radio
United Patriot Bingo Radio

My faith in creative broadcasting has been restored....

Mike
-rci-


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 420 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Nov  1, 2001 (13:50) * 3 lines 
 
Yes!!! Mike, good for you. Have frequencies you might like to share? Are they local? Most I have heard were in the Caribbean or Atlantic and only audible from the east coast. No one seems to be active out in the Pacific. Suggestions?

I get the Keps from ARRL via email. I'll post a url for it as soon as I dig out the bookmark for it. Good suggestion!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 421 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Nov  1, 2001 (22:48) * 27 lines 
 
Howdy howdy

Most pirates tend to gather around 6.925Mhz or thereabouts.
The times to look would be Fridays/Saturdays after 0000GMT
The mode will most likely be AM but sideband is also a
possibility. Apparently the patriot militia bingo station
was sideband but their carrier must have beat with a digital
mode station that allowed me to receive them in the AM position.
Also, note that Radio for Peace International also broadcasts
down there in sideband so it would be easy to confuse them
at first. A good place to get updates on pirate activity
is the Free Radio Network webpage.
A side note - I was reading about 'Steal this Radio' out
of NYC where the author brought up the point that the preferred
name would be 'micro power' instead of pirate but I think
there is a difference in attitude between the stations that
are trying to put forth a community radio station (unlicensed)
with a near constant schedule vs the hit and run pirate stations.
I like the term pirate myself. There is some good writeups
on pirate nations put out by Autonomedia press - I read some
in the TAZ book (Temporary Autonomous Zone) by Hakim Bey that
describes these pirate nations from ye olden days and their
links to cyber punk ideals of the data nation state existing
on the web.
(-A-)
de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 422 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov  2, 2001 (00:14) * 1 lines 
 
Mike! I have an old White's Radio Log which lists pirate radio stations... ah for the good old days. More in the morning. I am beginning to see double!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 423 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Nov  2, 2001 (18:34) * 8 lines 
 
Ok, looking forward to part II.

Currently listening to WBCQ on 7.415Mhz - 'The Lost Disk
Radio Show' - surf rock, pop bop, and other kewl tunez
that would never see the light of day on commercial radio.

3' de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 424 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov  2, 2001 (19:30) * 10 lines 
 
The upside of living in Hawaii, is that 0000 GMT os 2 PM for us. The downside is that by the time we can hear in darkness, it is morning everywhere else. Or, worse, another day entirely. Hawaii is like living in a time warp.

Oooh, yes, "The Lost Disk Radio Show" sounds a bit like recapturing youth through your ears. I'll try to get them, but lots of stuff is on 7.415Mhz. World Harvest evangelizes thoughout the Pacific on that frequency, and remote stations for struggling countries are also beaming their news to the world from remote Pacific Islands.

My White's Radio Log dates to 1972 spring /summer issue of Communications World. Mine is yellowing and has my son's notes in the margins as I taught him the fine art of DX-ing. I will suprise him with it when I can bear to part with it! It is long out of business, but http://www.fcc.gov/mmb/asd/amq.html and
http://www.nrcdxas.org/ seem to be trying to fill in the void left by it. Not even close!

more to come...

Might I recommend http://hfradio.org/propagation.html I consider it worthwhile enough that I contributed to its upkeep.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 425 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Nov  5, 2001 (19:49) * 19 lines 
 
Thanks to Tomas and his dedicated work for the following:

SFI:235 | A:13 down from 15 | K:3 down from 4 at 0000 on 6 November.
SAF: moderate to high, GMF: at unsettled to major storm levels

A satellite proton event began at 1705UTC on 04 Nov.. A polar cap absorption event is in progress..
A proton event is expected to continue.

Magnetic K-Index of 5 Warning valid from 5 Nov 2001 2010 to 2359 UT

Magnetic A-Index >30 Watch for 7 Nov 2001 UT
Comments: This supercedes the previous Watch issued for this date.

Aurora Level: 8
Solar Wind: 281.2 km/s at 77.6 protons/cm3

Support: http://hfradio.org/notice.html
More Info / Subscribe: http://hfradio.org/propagation.html



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 426 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Nov  5, 2001 (19:52) * 1 lines 
 
Check http://www.spacew.com/astroalert.html The images are spectacular! They also captured a sigmoidal filament. Beautiful!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 427 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Nov  6, 2001 (19:46) * 14 lines 
 
Howdy all

Well, there were reports that the aurora was visible in N. IL
last nite - problem was that I was in Ann Arbor MI at the time.
I was goofing off around the university campus in the evening but
was back at the hotel when the peak activity occurred. Oh well...
(however, the pub pizza was very good and the white chocolate
mocha coffee for desert was excellent so the evening was not a
total loss)

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 428 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov  6, 2001 (20:07) * 3 lines 
 
Oh Mike!!! How could you (easy, I know!) What? No draft Michelob to go with that pizza? It was the only beer I could ever manage to drink. Now, I am hungry and absolutely understand. There will be more geomagnetic activity...

If all of the times I was kicked off my ISP last night was due to the solar activity (plus the static on Monday Night Football) it must have messed up satellite transmissions Big Time! Guess you did not DX it, either. Oh, btw, listen or look at the Leonid Meteor shower on the night of the 17th and 18th November! We're expecting the usual rain...*sigh*


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 429 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Nov  6, 2001 (20:17) * 9 lines 
 
howdy howdy

Ooops, forgot to mention the two pints of Bass ale...
Anyway, I figure more is to come so I am occasionaly
looking out the north window tonite...

73 de Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 430 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov  6, 2001 (21:10) * 5 lines 
 
=) good to know you are keeping the traditions of college life!

If you have the patience to download it, this is most valuable to consult. According to the map you should still be able to see something in the Great Lakes area of the USA. Keep looking - they are always best after midnight when we face out into space. Good luck! You might even catch early Leonids!

http://solar.spacew.com/solar/realtime.html


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 431 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov  6, 2001 (21:18) * 1 lines 
 
There is the nicest auroral halo on the earth tonight. It is pretty enough that I saved it.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 432 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov  6, 2001 (21:18) * 1 lines 
 
http://solar.spacew.com/solar/aurora.html


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 433 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Nov  6, 2001 (21:20) * 21 lines 
 
SFI:237 | A:74 | K:4 up from 3 at 0300 on 7 November.
SAF: moderate to high, GMF: at unsettled to minor storm levels

A severe geomagnetic storm began at 0300 UTC on 06 Nov. A satellite proton event began at 1705UTC on 04 Nov.. A polar cap absorption event is in progress..
A proton event is expected to continue.

Magnetic A-Index >50 Warning valid from 6 Nov 2001 0500 to 1800 UT

The following Warning was EXTENDED at 1432 UT and is now valid through
2359 UT on 6 Nov 2001
Magnetic K-Index >6 Warning valid from 6 Nov 2001 0215 to 1500 UT

The following Warning was EXTENDED. Now valid through 0600UT on 07 Nov
2001.
Magnetic A-Index >50 Warning valid from 6 Nov 2001 0500 to 1800 UT
Magnetic K-Index of 4 Warning valid from 7 Nov 2001 0050 to 1800 UT
Magnetic A-Index >30 Warning valid from 7 Nov 2001 0055 to 1800 UT
Aurora Level: 8
Solar Wind: 703.7 km/s at 0.7 protons/cm3

Support: http://hfradio.org/notice.html


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 434 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Nov 10, 2001 (19:57) * 47 lines 
 
Thanks to Mark

Best way I've found is with a 6m all mode tuned to VIDEO carrier frequency
of whichever low band (VHF) TV channel is NOT occupied in your local area.
Channel 2, 3 or 4.

The video carrier is AM. Put the radio in CW mode. A decent 6m (or even TV
antenna) outside will be very helpful. This method is far superior to
"vacant channel" FM broadcast listening. On the FM broadcast band your
likely to hear only the loudest "pings". With the TV video carrier method
you'll hear a variety of pings from all directions both weak and strong
(different frequency equals different transmitter) and, since the video
carrier is AM (continuous carrier) you'll hear doppler shift as the
"pebbles" move toward or away from you.

These days I set up a MD (minidisc) recorder (you can use cassette tape or
whatever). With the MD I can record for 2 hours and 45 minutes uninteruppted
and go back outside and observe. I either make careful note of the time of
the beginning of the recording...or, if I'm really feeling ambitious, I set
up a second (HF) receiver tuned to the WWV time service and mix that audio
with my "ping" audio and, viola!, I have a time stamped recording of the
meteor activity.

With the video carrier method the pings are heard as a sweet little "tweet"
as the burst generates an ionized trail.

If you need the video carrier frequencies send a direct reply and I'll be
glad to provide them.

Regards,

Mark

Mark S. Williams
k9gx@n4gn.com
Trustee: KY9IN
Kentuckiana Radiosport Association
Elizabeth, In

The archive and Web site for our list is at http://www.meteorobs.org
If you are interested in complete links on the upcoming LEONIDS, see:
http://www.meteorobs.org/storms.html
To stop getting email from the 'meteorobs' list, use the Web form at:
http://www.meteorobs.org/subscribe.html

EM78ad



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 435 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Nov 10, 2001 (19:58) * 1 lines 
 
The above is in regards to *listening* to the Leonids. I think I should lie down before I have to delete any more of my posts for errors or incorrect placement.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 436 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Nov 11, 2001 (19:41) * 2 lines 
 
Tree radio meteor station around the world publish their data in Live !
see : http://radio.data.free.fr


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 437 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Nov 15, 2001 (19:14) * 11 lines 
 
74sites in 12countries participate in this project !!
The live and flash are updated !!

The live is updated every 10minutes.
And the flash is updated every few hours.

Flash Leonids by Radio
http://homepage2.nifty.com/~baron/leo01.htm
Live Leonids by Radio
http://homepage2.nifty.com/~baron/leolive01.htm



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 438 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Nov 23, 2001 (13:47) * 20 lines 
 
SFI:190 | A:10 | K:3 down from 4 at 1800 on 23 November.
SAF: low to moderate, GMF: unsettled to active

A major flare occurred at 2330UTC on 22 November.. A satellite proton event began at 2320UTC on 22 November.. A polar cap absorption event is in progress..
A proton event is expected to continue.

Magnetic A-Index >20 Watch for 25 Nov 2001 UT

Flare:
Class M9.9/2N/S15W34 BEG 22 Nov 2001 2232 MAX 22 Nov 2001 2330
END 23 Nov 2001 0006 UT

Comments: None

Aurora Level: 7
Solar Wind: 278.6 km/s at 7.9 protons/cm3


More Info... http://hfradio.org/propagation.html



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 439 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Nov 26, 2001 (14:14) * 12 lines 
 
Listening to Leonids'

NASA Science News for November 26, 2001

For centuries scientists have regarded reports of sounds from meteors with
skepticism. Edmund Halley himself in the 18th century said they were
little more than "pure fantasy." Yet earlier this month plenty of sky
watchers heard strange hissing and sizzling noises during the Leonid
meteor storm. Was it a hallucination? Read this story and find out!

FULL STORY at
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2001/ast26nov_1.htm?list89800


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 440 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Nov 26, 2001 (19:28) * 22 lines 
 
howdy howdy
First off, nice new welcome page!
Just was reading my recent copy of the Longwave Club
of America newsletter in the Natural Radio section.
Seems to have been quite a bit of activity with the
recent CMEs. One thing that I found interesting was
a reference to ELF hiss - now what would cause that?
Interesting question.... Whenever there is a corona
discharge due to very high voltages such as those
around an orb attached to a VanDeGraff generator,
the air basically ionizes and bleeds off. I was wondering
if it is possible for the overall magnetosphere to become
so charged that a bleeding off into space would occur which
would cause interesting ELF/SLF signals? Obviously, in order
to get this extra charge would be from a CME hitting full on.
Just random musing here....

Anyway, free time allows more visits!
73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 441 of 605: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Nov 26, 2001 (20:16) * 2 lines 
 
Hey, it's an attack of the acronyms! Let us know when the CME attack
happens! Risky business.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 442 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Sun, Dec  2, 2001 (08:19) * 6 lines 
 
Howdy howdy Mike and all
Interesting questions Mike. I think that nature has its solution. Thunderstorms! They discharge the supernumerary charge by lightnings. Maybe the number of lightning’s per hour on Earth it depends on this extra charge.

Additionally, I think that the motion of charged particles (mainly electrons, which are part of the solar wind), inside our magnetosphere produces ELV-VLF radio emissions. Certainly, they are more effective when we have powerful CME’s on the Sun.
John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 443 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec  2, 2001 (15:58) * 3 lines 
 
Thank you, John. I was hoping you would post an answer.

Another CME is currently underway. The Christmas ELFs should be in the finest of good cheer for Mike's listeing pleasure.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 444 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Dec  9, 2001 (19:10) * 22 lines 
 
Mike, if you missed it, John also responded to your comments in Geo 27.
I also found the following - which you prebably know about. IN case not,

http://www.elfrad.com/infof.htm

ELFRAD

©1986

Extremely Low Frequency Research And Development

The Elfrad Group was founded in 1986 and is a self funded , non-political
organization, consisting of individuals interested in the research of Extremely
Low Frequency signals which propagate the interior of the Earth. This is a
pioneering field with unknown possibilities and all information concerning this
study will be made available to the public.

Membership is open to everyone, professional or amateur, who expresses a desire
of knowledge, in this particular study. Acoustic, seismic, and electromagnetic
signals, both natural and artificial, surround us and are a part of our
environment. The source of these signals, both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial,
and their content is of extreme interest to our research.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 445 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Dec 12, 2001 (19:08) * 14 lines 
 
Hi Marci
Thanks for that link - Im not familiar with that group but
it will be very much worth looking into. The 'quiet season'
is now here for low frequency monitoring although right now
Im working on finishing up some more microwave stuff. Been
running myself ragged as of late but have some time freed up.
Side note - had to make a trip to El Paso last week (see short
rant in technomads in the radio section) - I wish I could have
went to Marfa to try to see the lights but not enuf time to drive
and lots of misc stuff to do. sigh...

73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 446 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Dec 12, 2001 (22:17) * 3 lines 
 
John responded to your questions earlier on another topic. I'll paste it from Geo 27 if you dread treading outside of your topic.

Thought this was the season to warm yourself over the vacuunm tubes of your boat anchor radios! I'm off to technomads to read of your adventures. Welcome home for the holidays! *Hugs* It's snowing in Hawaii even as I write this! I'm delighted you are back.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 447 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Dec 14, 2001 (11:30) * 14 lines 
 
Howdy Howdy

It snowed here today so I guess it is winter time afterall - temp was in the
40's which was a bit warm for this time of the year. Yep, dont mind wandering
around to other topics to read up as well and learn new things. I was going
through some of the early nomadic research lab posts and there was talk about
IOTA operating which would seem like the perfect cure for the winter doldrums.
Nothing like working the world from under a palm tree and enjoying the ocean
blue.

73 de aa9il
Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 448 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Dec 14, 2001 (12:41) * 3 lines 
 
From under my palm tree I can also see winter snow. It's falling on Mauna Kea and on Mauna Loa even as I type this. I'll have seomthing long and cool to remember you as I think of you snowbound and cozy by the fire. Please wait till the lake freezes over (never!) before getting out your ice skates!

Happy DX-ing. It just might be a really good winter for grabbing a few obscure QSL cards.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 449 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Dec 14, 2001 (16:20) * 7 lines 
 
I found this fascinating and unknown to be before reading this article. Has anyone heard the Black Aurora? I suspect that it is invisible...

CLUSTER QUARTET PROBES THE SECRETS OF THE BLACK AURORA
------------------------------------------------------
Anyone living near the Arctic Circle will be familiar with aurorae, the legendary red and green curtains that illuminate the long winter nights. Much less familiar is the mysterious 'black aurora', a strange electrical phenomenon that produces dark, empty regions within the visible Northern and Southern Lights.
http://spaceflightnow.com/news/n0112/12blackaurora/



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 450 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec 27, 2001 (16:39) * 74 lines 
 
/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\

POTENTIAL GEOMAGNETIC STORM WARNING

ISSUED: 17:30 UTC, 27 DECEMBER 2001

/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\

(See Appended Comments for Synoptic Information)

VALID BEGINNING AT: 00:00 UTC 28 DEC
VALID UNTIL: 19:00 UTC 29 DEC

HIGH RISK PERIOD: 28 DEC (UTC days)
MODERATE RISK PERIOD: 28 - 29 DEC

POTENTIAL LOW-MIDDLE LATITUDE STORM INTENSITY: MINOR
POTENTIAL HIGH LATITUDE STORM INTENSITY: MINOR - MAJOR

POTENTIAL DURATION OF GEOMAGNETIC STORM: APPROX 24 HOURS
DURATION OF MAIN BELT OF ACTIVITY: 18 TO 24 HOURS

POTENTIAL PEAK LOW-MIDDLE LATITUDE K-INDEX VALUES: 6
POTENTIAL PEAK HIGH LATITUDE K-INDEX VALUES: 7

EXPECTED DOMINATING LOW-MIDDLE LATITUDE K-INDEX: 4-5
EXPECTED DOMINATING HIGH LATITUDE K-INDEX: 5

POTENTIAL FOR LOW LATITUDE HF DEGRADATION: LOW
POTENTIAL SEVERITY OF HF DEGRADATION: MINOR
EXPECTED HF PROPAGATION CONDITIONS: GOOD

POTENTIAL FOR MIDDLE LATITUDE HF DEGRADATION: MODERATE
POTENTIAL SEVERITY OF HF DEGRADATION: MINOR - MAJOR
EXPECTED HF PROPAGATION CONDITIONS: GOOD TO FAIR

POTENTIAL FOR HIGH LATITUDE HF DEGRADATION: HIGH
POTENTIAL SEVERITY OF HF DEGRADATION: SEVERE
EXPECTED HF PROPAGATION CONDITIONS: RADIO BLACKOUT TO POOR
DUE TO ON-GOING PCA ACTIVITY

POTENTIAL RISK FOR GEOSYNCHRONOUS MAGNETOPAUSE CROSSINGS: 50%


--------------------------------- ---------------------------------
EST. POTENTIAL GEOMAGNETIC IMPACT EST. POTENTIAL IONOSPHERIC IMPACT
--------------------------------- ---------------------------------
SEVERE STORM : 10 % LOW LATITUDES : MINOR
MAJOR STORM : 30 % MIDDLE LATITUDES : MINOR
MINOR STORM : 40 % HIGH LATITUDES : MAJOR
ACTIVE OR LESS : 20 % POLAR LATITUDES : MAJOR
--------------------------------- ---------------------------------
PROBABLE SI ASSOCIATION : 75% ESTIMATED GLOBAL IMPACT: MINOR - MAJOR

ESTIMATED FORECAST PEAK PLANETARY 24-HOUR A-INDEX DURING STORM: 30
---- ---------------

COMMENTS:

Source of anticipated activity was a partially Earthward-directed CME
having a respectable velocity but directed mostly west of the Earth. It was
associated with a major class M7.1/1B solar flare on 26 December. Initial
southward turning of the IMF is possible. The orientation of the IMF
immediately after shock passage may assume a stronger eastward direction than
a southward direction. Nevertheless, there may be a sufficient southward
turning to trigger the onset of geomagnetic storm conditions. Overall, this
is not expected to be a particularly signifiant event. However, periods of
minor to major geomagnetic storm activity may (at times) be observed over
high and middle latitude stations.

Best-estimate on impact of the shock is for a time centered near 08:00
UTC on 28 December (give or take several hours).

** End of Warning **


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 451 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Jan 13, 2002 (21:38) * 11 lines 
 
Hi Kids and happy holidays

Still around but have been overly busy with work and grad skool. The
January VHF contest is this weekend and I will be running 6m, 2m, 220, and
432mhz mobile - especially if the snow is kept at bay. We will see what
conditions are like working across the lake. New Years was fun in Austin
with the Social Scenesters but like the song by U2, nothing changes on
NewYears day. Anyway, looking forward to another snow free week in January.
73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 452 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Jan 13, 2002 (23:34) * 7 lines 
 
Happy New Year, Mike! Did you get to see Terry while you were in Austin? Sounds like it was terrific. I'll be checking SW this weekend to see if anything from your area is getting through. I usually get west of the rockies, in teh Caribbean and Europe going west to east. I get drown by Japan at later. Aussies and NZ and the guys from Pitcairn Island are good for most times of the 2400 around. Good luck!

Sharpen up the crayons and keep up the good fight. We'll celebrate your accomplishments and fresh college degree. I need another reason to decorate!

Thanks for checking in. John, our Geoite from Greece, who understands all the stuff you are talking about, has broken his ankle rather badly and is still getting over the initial shock and pain. He'll be back. You be back, too, as time allows!




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 453 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jan 15, 2002 (16:48) * 38 lines 
 
Mike, this can be your next project?!

New Amateur Radio antenna installed in space.

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station got a new antenna
January 14, thanks to a spacewalk by Expedition 4 crew members Yuri
Onufrienko, RK3DUO, and Carl Walz, KC5TIE. Another of new ARISS ham
antenna--there are four in all--could be installed January 25.

''It was beautiful to watch,'' ARISS Board Chairman Frank Bauer,
KA3HDO, said. ''It went like clockwork, everything deploying just as
it was supposed to.''
While crewmate Dan Bursch, KD5PNU, operated the robotic arm and
monitored and videotaped the spacewalk--or EVA--from inside the ISS,
Onufrienko and Walz first relocated a Russian Strela cargo crane
used to maneuver equipment and spacewalkers. Then, they installed
the flexible-tape VHF-UHF Amateur Radio antenna on a handrail at the
end of the Zvezda Service Module--the crew's living quarters. The
new VHF-UHF antenna is the first one designed for and dedicated
specifically to support ARISS operations.

Installation of the new antenna on Zvezda paves the way for two
separate ham stations aboard Space Station Alpha. The ARISS initial
ham station gear--single-band hand-held transceivers for 2 meters
and 70 cm--now is installed in the Zarya Functional Cargo Block.
Tentative plans call for a 2-meter station to remain in Zarya, while
a second 70-cm station will be set up in Zvezda using the newly
installed antenna.
ARISS ARRL representative Rosalie White, K1STO, said she, too, was
pleased to see this phase of the project coming together. ''We
started all this in 1998--and now we have a permanent antenna on the
outside of the station,'' she said. ''Pretty cool.''

Bauer congratulated the ARISS international team for their
assistance in the antenna project. ''We have taken our ideas,
concepts and vision and transformed them into reality,'' he said.
ARISS is a collaboration of ARRL, AMSAT and NASA. For more
information, visit the ARISS Web site, http://ariss.gsfc.nasa.gov.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 454 of 605: Shawn  (VLFKorgan) * Sat, Feb 16, 2002 (21:23) * 10 lines 
 
Subject: Natural radio VLF e-mail discussion group!

Attention all "natural radio" VLF listeners,

To join the VLF discussion group simply send a blank e-mail to VLF_Group-subscribe@yahoogroups.com. Once subscribed, all messages sent to VLF_Group@yahoogroups.com will be sent to all members who are part of the VLF discussion group. The VLF group is an e-mail reflector and is a recent endeavor to try to tie VLF listeners together by e-mail for discussion and alert purposes. This group contains members from all walks of life who are interested in discussing "natural radio" and related topics to natural VLF radio monitoring. Feel free to subscribe or unsubscribe from this group at any time. You will be sent a confirmation e-mail upon successfully subscribing to the list.

Shawn Korgan
List Owner
INSPIRE Team I-01
Colorado


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 455 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Feb 16, 2002 (21:33) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks, Shawn! Welcome. I'll certainly drop in on your Yahoo group.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 456 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Feb 16, 2002 (21:35) * 1 lines 
 
May I use what is posted there, here? If I give proper source URL?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 457 of 605: Shawn  (VLFKorgan) * Sat, Feb 16, 2002 (21:46) * 1 lines 
 
Sure Marcia! The actual web site is http://groups.yahoo.com/group/VLF_Group/ There are examples of activity I just heard here in Colorado a few days ago and last week. The whistlers were really flying here in Colorado last week!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 458 of 605: Shawn  (VLFKorgan) * Sat, Feb 16, 2002 (23:30) * 10 lines 
 
I've noticed recently (in the past several weeks) that a strange meandering line has been appearing on the X-component of the ULF Kiruna Magnetogram (http://www.irf.se/mag/puls.html) during recent waves of solar activity. The stronger this mysterious line gets the better the VLF activity becomes (whistlers especially) and the weaker this signal is the weaker VLF tends to be as well. Does anyone know what causes a meandering frequency between 0-2 Hz when waves of activity arrive from the sun? In my past time I've studying ULF pulsations and they appear in large part to be what fires up VLF sounds by upsetting the whistler generation region of the ionosphere.

Hi all! I'll check in at least once a week for new posts.

Shawn Korgan
INSPIRE Team I-01
KB0LSW
Colorado

Located at 50 degrees north geomagnetic latitude at what many believe is whistler heaven for the northern hemisphere:)


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 459 of 605: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Sun, Feb 17, 2002 (11:53) * 1 lines 
 
hi shawn! (unfortunately, i don't have a clue what you're talking about *smile*)


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 460 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 17, 2002 (13:44) * 3 lines 
 
When Mike comes back from midterms, what a happy susrprise Shawn will be for him. I have a clue, I also have a boat anchor radio and small one to receiver singals (and a rooftop trap dipole) However, I am in my infancy in this search for exotic signals. I am still outside looking up and recording satellite passes. John, when he has time will also be far more expert at sharing experiences than I can ever be.

I already subscribe to SeeSat. VLF will be an added pleasure. Thanks for posting the live link.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 461 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Feb 18, 2002 (09:11) * 15 lines 
 
Welcome Shawn,
I live in Greece and I have a small experience with VLF sounds. They are really fascinating and very interesting. Unfortunately my latitude is not good for that. I received some sounds here before more than 15 years by chance.

But my interest was on pre-earthquake electrical signals and I made everything possible to reduce these sounds. They were completely unknown to me. I am focused on ULF signals from the ground where I found what I was searching finally. (See topic 67 if you have time).

I would want to ask you something. Are you sure that all the sounds that you record emanate from the ionosphere? Personally I believe that between these sounds exist certain tones or pulses that emanate from the interior of the earth. I know how difficult is to separate them and find the source. Especially when you use stations near aurora latitudes.

Making my research on pre-earthquake electrical signals I found that I receive some special “pulses” before very strong EQ’s on the entire earth. Searching how these signals can arrive here (from every where of the Earth) I found only one possible way. It is the electromagnetic resonance of the space between ionosphere and ground. But this is something different.

In any case your work is very interesting and your attempt useful. Your presence here is a happy surprise to me. I hope that you can write for us and explain more on VLF sounds when you have time.

Regards

John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 462 of 605: Shawn  (VLFKorgan) * Mon, Feb 18, 2002 (19:51) * 21 lines 
 
Hi John!

I'll take a look at topic 67. There is a group on the web called ELFRAD. You are probably already aware of them. I was a member of their e-mail list for a while last year into this year. They have a great web site (www.elfrad.net) on ULF/ELF waves and often discuss in their e-mails the ULF/ELF signals they receive prior to earthquakes!

Not all VLF sounds come from the ionosphere. In reality there are tweeks that originate from lightning bouncing between the ionosphere and the earth. Tweeks change in sound on a minute by minute basis at times and reflect some sort of change in the ionosphere.

One year when INSPIRE was conducting a VLF coordinated listening session several listeners in Italy recorded a sound similiar to the crumpling of cellophane paper right before a big earthquake struck. I've heard something similiar to this on several occassions in Colorado but am unsure as to whether it originated from the power lines or from elsewhere.

I occassionally record on Trail Ridge Road in Colorado during the summer months. This is a paved road at an elevation of over 12,000 feet and many miles from any power lines. I have captured on no less than three different occassions what I refer to as pavement sounds. These are bouncy sounding VLF emissions between 400 hz and 1 KHz that emanate from the pavement as vehicles drive over low spots in the road. Fascinating to say the least!

There are also man made signals as you mention throughout the VLF spectrum. Every time I listen to VLF I normally hear a station from Australia at 13 KHz and several stations refered to as ALPHA out of Russia.

I have a couple strange signals that I've recorded on my VLF receiver. They appear to be manmade although they were recorded in the open prairie in the middle of the night where houses are few and far between!

From what I understand ULF signals can travel through the earth itself as well.

There is a strong relationship between the ionosphere and the currents which build up above the surface of the ground although I do not know much down this line.

Nice chatting!

Shawn


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 463 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Feb 19, 2002 (01:21) * 19 lines 
 
Hi Shawn!
Thank you for the explanations. I know ELFRAD group. I saw their web site. They are receiving signals similar with mine. But my installation has some very important differences. Also, Is needed some special process on raw data. High selectivity of my installation was an agreeable surprise. Additionally, we have made a special program that can process big number of data very fast. Finally, our results are excellent with good accuracy.

VLF sounds are very interesting. But man-made signals are a problem. I made a scanning of the electromagnetic spectrum below 30Khz during eighties. I found all of that you already know. I was using a long “ground dipole” as antenna. I mean two electrodes in long distance on the ground. But this is difficult because the entire installation is not portable.

Fast deformation on earth's crust can cause high piezoelectric voltages on the rocks at the epicenter area, just like the piezoelectric ignition system in some common lighters. They are observed lighting sparks just before or during big EQ's. Last example is the EQ of Ismit, Turkey on 17th of August 1999. (M=7.5R). These sparks can produce electromagnetic waves that contain frequencies from Quasi DC to VHF band and higher. So, this is a possible explanation for these like the crumpling of cellophane paper sounds.

My experience in the area between 400 Hz and 1 KHz is that there exist many different strong electromagnetic signals. I suppose that most of them are man made as result of electric power using in several appliances. But, I have not studying on them.

I understand your feeling when you observe strange signals. It is like a walk in an unsearchable forest. It is fascinating.

I really don't know if the ULF signals can travel through the earth. It appears to me as not true. Surely they travel straight in long distances but not illimitably. This is one reason of our success on the definition of the epicentre in EQ prediction.

Induction of low ionospheric currents on earth's surface is a real fact. Second reason of our success on EQ prediction is that I reduced enough the ionospheric effect by my installation designing.

Regards

John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 464 of 605: Mike Kana  (aa9il) * Thu, Feb 21, 2002 (14:52) * 17 lines 
 
Greetings Marcia, Shawn, John, Wolfie, et. al.

It is nice to be back amongst the living - anyway, looks like some interesting
new posts - Shawn - no doubt you are active with the LWCA? I am a member
although have not done much in terms of copying LOWFER beacons for a while.
I am interested in communications on the band but the area I am really interested in is life below 10 KHz. My beacon receiver is a Watkins Johnson
340A which is a late 70's/early 80's era surviellance radio / demodulator.
I live in a relatively heavily populated area in northern Illinois (as far
as light dimmers and other noise is concerned) but it is no problem to jump
in the truck and drive to the boonies to listen for spherics. I plan to check
out the ELFRAD site and see what they have going - my one goal is to build up
a 1 Hz to 1KHz receiver to do long term integration on ULF and ELF signals. Looking forward to seeing your posts here. As of late, most of my activity is up around 10 and 24 GHz but I do jump to the other end of the spectrum as well.

73 de AA9IL
Mike Kana
r-c-i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 465 of 605: Shawn  (VLFKorgan) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (08:14) * 7 lines 
 
Hi Mike!

I am a member of the Longwave Club of America. I'm more interested in the natural VLF section of this magazine than anything else. I listened to NDBs years ago and it was not quite what I was looking for. It turns out that Natural Radio listening fits me to a "T". I love listening to the naturally occurring sounds of nature!

A 1 Hz to 1 KHz receiver sounds fantastic! Sometimes I think it would be nice to live in the boonies away from all RF interference! Someday maybe...

Shawn


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 466 of 605: Mike Kana  (aa9il) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (08:59) * 34 lines 
 
Hi Shawn

Yep, hearing a whistler is unworldly - I have never heard one via radio
but have listened to recordings off the net plus some a friend of mine
in Ft Worth had made. He also did some experiments with photo sensors
monitoring noises the sun made. Most of my reception on VLF has been plenty
of tweeks/clicks and plenty of light dimmer hum and other misc man made noise.
There are areas up here that are very unpopulated - one spot that I would
like to take a receiver to is the far north of Wisconsin where I think
the reception should be excellent.
I know there are places around here - the guy that writes the natural radio
column lives to the southwest of me in a relatively populated area but
less populated going west - lots of corn fields tho...
I look forward to discussing experiments further here on this page or the
seismic page. Marcia is a wonderful hostess as you have already have
seen.
I have been a bit infrequent posting here due to a bunch of silly distractions
but after reading some of the previous postings from you and John have
reignited my interest in building some of this stuff. I visited the
ELFRAD site and got some good ideas on very small/high capacity inductive
pickups. At first I was going to go with a 50000 turn coil for the ELF
receiver but then saw the designs for the 100000 turn pickups - the one
experiment I would like to try would be to use ferrite rods as the core
instead of iron. My other item I need to pickup is some physically
small yet high value capacitors - I know of an engineer in Milwaukee
who has a basement full of parts - I wonder if he has any 1 farad caps?
The rest of the componets can come from digi key - for the data analysis,
I plan to use one of the generic DSP spectrogram programs for the PC.
Look forward to discussing this further.

73 de AA9IL
Mike Kana
r-c-i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 467 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (12:32) * 20 lines 
 
From Shawn posted at his VLF group at Yahoo
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/VLF_Group/

I was doing a little research on the internet and bumped into a very
interesting article entitled, "Lightning and Whistler Ghosts." This is a
scientific article put out by the Space Physics Research Institute,
Physics Dept., University of Natal, Durban, South Africa.
In short, the article makes reference to whistler ghosts (identical
whistlers which occur 600 ms or so after the original whistler) and how
some scientists are now starting to believe that whistlers create new
lightning strikes! Lightning creates whistlers and whistlers in turn can
create more lightning! Also discussed in this article are whistler paths
and whistler echoes as well.
The location for the article can be found at:
http://da.saao.ac.za/~wgssa/as3/hughes.html

On a different note, it appears the best of the activity will arrive
on Saturday. Whether we will hear whistlers out of the activity or not
remains to be seen or should I say heard!



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 468 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Feb 22, 2002 (12:38) * 1 lines 
 
Hawaii may be Paradise to some, but any radioman will tell you, the tropics is NOT the optimal place to listen for VLF. Auroras are unknown here. I wonder if being atop Mauna Kea makes a difference?! It is the equivalent to the polar region there climatically, but I also think if it is line-of-sight, there is no way we're going to hear anything.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 469 of 605: Shawn  (VLFKorgan) * Sun, Feb 24, 2002 (08:38) * 9 lines 
 
Hi Marcia and group,

Hawaii is a prety good trade off for not hearing whistlers! I'll trade you for a year!

The reception of whistlers would be slightly better on top of the mountain but nothing can compare to being closer to the north or south pole.

"HI" to Hawaii!

Shawn


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 470 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 24, 2002 (13:17) * 3 lines 
 
Aloha Shawn, How do you feel about watching volcano eruptions? Seeing new black sand beaches forming, swimming on a beach made from green jewels? Ski at the summit after surfing in the morning in our 75° seas (year round) then apres ski, hang around the world's most impressive collection of telescopes in one place on Mauna Kea? The astronomy from up there is incredible.

Sounds like a deal. Akron did you say? Does it smell any better than the last time I went through on the way to Circleville to visit my sister? *Cough* Rubber tire fragrance permiated the town rather impressivly! Listening to Cricket matches from New Zealand is as exotic as my listening gets these days.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 471 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Feb 24, 2002 (13:19) * 1 lines 
 
Japan comes in Loud and Clear during DX contests but have heard Scotland, Germany and Italy on a good clear night.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 472 of 605: Shawn  (VLFKorgan) * Mon, Feb 25, 2002 (07:56) * 4 lines 
 
Colorado is very beautiful. *Smile* We have tall beautiful snow covered mountains to our west about forty miles. We have four seasons each year that have been rather mild in the past four to five years. It does not get too hot or too cold "normally" at any point in the year. Someday, I'll have to take a trip to Hawaii. I've heard there are special types of nose whistlers that can be heard toward the equator that are nearly impossible to hear elsewhere. You must be a ham operator as well!

Shawn
KB0LSW


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 473 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Feb 25, 2002 (11:32) * 7 lines 
 
Ah yes, You are in the stunning Rocky Mountains. Little wonder you spend so little of your night sleeping. My dad was a Ham. I was the youngest of three daughters, so I got to climb trees to string antennas for him. I was his go-fer and all round assistant. I learned everything he could teach me except for Morse Code. He kept up his schedule of contacts to keep his skills honed and disagreed with the idea that one could get a ticket without being able to send and receive. Thus, with my terrible fist and QLF (sorry guys, but this is Ham talk) I never did get on the air. I do actively support the local Ham community and log contests regularly to keep my gear in good shape. If you don't use it here, it tends to get really nasty inside and you short out quickly. The fragrance of burning circuit boards is NOT my favorite aroma. Mike and Terry
(the founder of The Spring where we have this space) are both active Hams.

Give my regards to the Continental Divide. It still amazes me to see the trickle of water which ends up being a great river before it enters the sea.

Marcia
Daughter of W2CWR


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 474 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Feb 27, 2002 (15:14) * 10 lines 
 
Hi yall

Now, Marcia, it would be most wonderful if you could grace the
ham bands someday. You could always try hi fi AM or try the
digital modes such as PSK. Anyway, with only a few weeks of school
left, I am getting the urge to build some more stuff.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 475 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Feb 27, 2002 (16:43) * 3 lines 
 
I'm actually considering the options. I have a very supportive Ham community in Hilo, so when I decide, they will surround me with encouragement and information. I think I cannot fail.

Building stuff? Are you any further along on your radio telescope?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 476 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Mar  5, 2002 (11:34) * 13 lines 
 
Hi Marcia and Geoites

Well, I was building stuff but have been overly preoccupied with moving
so all my junk has been going into numerous boxes. Didnt realize just
how much stuff Ive accumulated over the years. I have been working on
some small projects for the microwave projects and have been visiting
the ULF/ELF receiver design pages from the ELFRAD postings. Also been
playing with the new toy - an Icom 706MKIIG transceiver - a result of
getting a little bit older but not necessarily wiser ;)

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 477 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar  5, 2002 (17:15) * 1 lines 
 
OOOH, ICOM!!! you do go for the Jugular, don't you? Nice choice - and what is money for, if not to keep the economy going! Older isn't all bad, it is merely a statistic by which we tell when our kids are catching up with us. *hugs* and good luck. It really is good to see you here!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 478 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Mar  5, 2002 (17:55) * 17 lines 
 
Howdy Howdy

Its good to be back - the Icom was primarily for use in
VHF/UHF contesting but it includes HF as an added bonus.
Anyway, I looked at quite a few of the ELFRAD sites and
pulled a couple of schematics for ULF type radios - the
first priority will be to build a suitable antenna. I
do have a design off the web but would like to investigate
using ferrite rods in the core instead of the iron strips
iron vs ferrite? Might not make a difference and I will
learn something as a result of investigation. Also pulled
a good DSP spectrum display program off the web to look
at the signals. More to come as this stuff gets built.
Have a groovy day!
73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 479 of 605: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Mar  5, 2002 (18:35) * 1 lines 
 
hi cosmo, moving is always fun, huh? *laugh*


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 480 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Mar  5, 2002 (20:05) * 14 lines 
 
Hi Wolfie

I did not realize the amount of crap I have accumulated! Some stuff
will stay and things that I thought I would never let go of I am now
considering selling since I will not have the space. Right now, I
am looking at 'battleship row' - a National HRO50 receiver, two Collins
receivers, and a B29 transmitter/receiver combo (about 300+ pounds
of radio gear) - wondering where the heck Im going to put this stuff or
should I sell it??? These are not even my 'main' station radios either....
Hard core feng shui time!

73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 481 of 605: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Mar  5, 2002 (21:44) * 3 lines 
 
when we moved here, we had a huge garage sale, moved a ton of stuff to goodwill, and still wound up having to rent a storage spot for stuff that couldn't go with us but we weren't going to get rid of either! 15 years of stuff in one house!!

are they bulky items? you could display them on a shelf system if you don't have the heart to part with them.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 482 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar  5, 2002 (21:55) * 3 lines 
 
DON'T get rid of that HRO!!! If it is like the one I inherited from my dad it has "drawers" for different bands and a knurled knob of exquisite tuning capabilities! I passed mine to a very worthy local Ham who gave me the Hammerlund boat anchor.

Don't toss out that "stuff" or you will need it immediately after you do the deed. Ask me!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 483 of 605: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Mar  6, 2002 (17:02) * 1 lines 
 
indeed!!!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 484 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Mar  6, 2002 (18:27) * 1 lines 
 
Wolfie knows! She just did it. Anyone want 30 years worth of accumulated junk NOT mine? You can even have the guy who collected it!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 485 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Mar  8, 2002 (10:27) * 9 lines 
 
Ok, yall convinced me - I had a weak moment there when I was looking
at all the piles of stuff to move. Most of the stuff that will get
sold are parts/assemblies and misc. Then I will have some extra change
to by more new Junque. I just cant part with those boatanchors tho....
BTW, if you want to see microwave geeks in action, go to www.microwaveupdate.org
and check out MUD2000 and MUD2001 links, stores, and pictures.

73 de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 486 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar  8, 2002 (20:07) * 6 lines 
 
Fantastique, Mike! Except I got the dreaded 404 message when I tried the MUS2000 link. Maybe I need to dump RAM...

Boat anchors are a necessity of life! Gadzooks,how could you have even pondered such a thought? Next time you get practical, come back and we'll hold your hand until the sensation goes away! *Laughing* been there and done that! Why do you think my father gave me the HRO and an even more primitive receiver yanked from a bomber sans box - he created the case for it out of pebbled black aluminum (you know the kind) and you changed bands by pulling or pushing a long square bar in and out. I got campused (confined to my room) for a whole weekend for having hung an "invisible" antenna out of my dorm room.

Keep the faith!
88s !


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 487 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Mar  8, 2002 (22:00) * 15 lines 
 
Howdy howdy

I had the same thoughts when I was living in a high rise dorm about running
a super long wire out the 'sealed' windows to the park below. Could have
got in big trouble for that. I had to content myself with running 2m FM
from the dorm room but I did irritate the neighbors when I came in over
the stereo!
At the microwave update site, the pictures of the 2000 and 2001 updates
are at the G4DDK and G3PHO links. The MUS2000 is a dead link.
Anyway, I do have irrational thougths when sorting all the junque but the
boatanchors are safe now.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 488 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Mar 11, 2002 (19:23) * 16 lines 
 
Howdy all

Interesting thread on the ELFRAD reflector regarding the generation
of 10 Hz signals and the physiological effect on humans - including
some of the Soviet behavioral modification experiments.
While rooting around in the basement, I found a plexiglass tube I didnt
know I had - it was for a Tesla coil I was going to build so I guess
I got another project in the wings now.
Finally, got to do some topographic observations of potential microwave
test locations for the upcoming summer. Woo Hoo!

living amongst the boxes
73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 489 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 11, 2002 (22:28) * 3 lines 
 
See? If you had tossed out that tube you would be looking to get another one about now. Whose behaviour are you looking to modify? An unsuspecting Co-ed?

Oooh, summer is gonna be fun and games for Mike. Take us with you! As to living amongst the boxes, my newly-moved son and my newly acquired daughter-in-law are also doing the same. When he was in college, he rescued a legless table top from the rubbish and made a table using the boxes as pedestals. Others were his bureau and so forth. There's nothing like the inventiveness of college kids - no matter their age! I suspect this first home of their own will not be furnished in the same manner.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 490 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Mar 11, 2002 (22:29) * 1 lines 
 
Mike, Listen to enough of Art Bell on late night radio and you will find all sorts of evils our governement is doing with radio waves - including weather modification and causing rashes.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 491 of 605: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (09:52) * 1 lines 
 
*YIKES*


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 492 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (13:24) * 3 lines 
 
Wolfie, guess it is on a "need to know" basis. Most of us simply do not need to know so we rely on the amazingly clever spies who call in to Art Bell's program to keep us informed. Yeah, sure... uh huh! They are also into cattle mutilations and alien abductions which may or may not also be part of a comsic conspiracy. One could become truly paranoid listening to this guy all night long on a long lonely trucking run.

One regular lives in the forests on this island. I hope we never meet.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 493 of 605: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (17:50) * 1 lines 
 
sounds sooo spooky!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 494 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (18:20) * 29 lines 
 
Hi all

Marci - no need to worry about me sending out 10hz waves to mess with
folks. As far as ol' Art goes, he is on a bit too late for me - I usually
bag it before the black helicopter crowd comes out although there are
quite a few para(noid) para(normal) shows on shortwave during the more
civil hours of the evening that I like to listen to. As far as ein klein
nacht radio goes, I have my stack of cd's ranging from ambient house/trance
to garage punk to listen to although there are some good talk shows out
of Chicago. I will also listen to NPR at nite to see if the dj ever
cuts loose when they think the establishment is not listening and sneek
in some Iron Maiden or Bauhaus in between selections of Duke Elington
and Thelonius Monk. So far, that has not happened yet.... I do wish
that Pacifica was carried around here but even that network is suffering
with its inside (mis)management trying to make them more mainstream...
Wow, a rant, this is kind of fun!
Anyway, the view from suburbia is one of self fulfilling banality and
conformist mediocrity. Even the edgy types are following the Madison
Avenue pre ordained path. Of course, radio free cosmo is pursuing
the avant in a pure underground sense with the single goal of establishing
a non establishment, anti autocratic, pseudo dadaist media space with
moot and plushness for all.
Anyway, keep watching the sky and spinning those cd's backwards to hear
the secret coded messages.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio cosmo international



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 495 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (19:16) * 10 lines 
 
Praise be - I find my kicks on radio internet international. Any language and any music - Greek lately. If they have some hidden propaganda, it is lost on me
I can't understand much of anything but English!

7.415 used to be a good source for off-beat pirate and small movment radio clandestine - of course. But lately they are taken over by religious WHRI which is fine, but not my "thing."

Ranting is good for the soul. Have at it, Cosmic Mike! It's YOUR topic!!!

*Hugs*

You sound like a great guy for an interesting evening's company!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 496 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (19:30) * 29 lines 
 
howdy howdy howdy

Ok, feel much better after a rant - especially after a day of putting stuff
in boxes. Anyway, I will be glad once this foolishness is over and I can
get back to more important stuff like building the ELF/ULF receiver and
working on the microwave stuff. Anyway, we are close enuf to the east coast
that I pick up WBCQ (The Planet) pretty well - especially during the winter.
7415 used to be a big pirate frequency but now they are around the 6.9Mhz
range. BTW, here is a summary of some of the projects (not) going on at the
r-c-i laboratories...
* Build up the ELF/ULF receiver including interface to pc for logging - any
interesting observations will probably be posted on John's topic.

*Work on the VLF observations which will appear here on this topic page.

*Test out the 24ghz transverter later this spring with the goal of an
across the lake contact. Plus any interesting propagation studies
for the across the lake contacts will also appear here.

*Get started again on the Radio Astronomy projects which kind of got side tracked.

The basic disclaimer is that all this will resume after the move of course...
Whew, enuf for now.

73's de Mike
AA9IL
Marcia - thanks again for letting me ramble on here on this most interesting
and cool topic page!



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 497 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Mar 12, 2002 (23:02) * 3 lines 
 
It's my pleasure to have you here, Mike! It is always a delight to hear of your frenetic life and the "projects" list. All electro-wizards must have them. My son, you, and I suspect John has them, as did my father. My job as go-fer and chief cheer-leader. That way I don't solder my fingers together! Le me peek over your shoulder on occasion - I am easy to please!

Get that stuff out of those boxes - they are debilitating and you soon forget which one has what inside!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 498 of 605: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Mar 13, 2002 (16:58) * 1 lines 
 
should i add "conspiracy theories" to our para(normal) spring conference? *laugh*


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 499 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar 14, 2002 (14:48) * 1 lines 
 
Why not! Most - if not all - of them fall into that category!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 500 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sun, Mar 17, 2002 (18:14) * 7 lines 
 
Sprite-Related News
Last week Nature magazine published an account of a giant blue jet. That and three other new links are added to the Sprites and More list. What are sprites and blue jets, you ask? Go see--you're in for a treat.
http://geology.about.com/cs/sprites_and_more/

Perhaps this is easier to understand. It is written for the technology-handicapped, like me =)




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 501 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar 21, 2002 (19:43) * 12 lines 
 
A New Form of Matter

NASA Science News for March 20, 2002 3:00:00 PM

Scientists have created a new kind of matter: It comes in waves and
bridges the gap between the everyday world of humans and the micro-domain
of quantum physics.

FULL STORY at
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2002/20mar_newmatter.htm?list89800




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 502 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Apr  1, 2002 (11:56) * 15 lines 
 
Hi Marci and Geo-ites

Back amongst the living again and its nice. Still removing stuff from
boxes but the work bench is sort of set up to do some building (again, finally!)
The weather is getting a bit warmer which is nice especially since my new
workshop is relegated to the garage - although just last week I had a chance
to experience oh-so-fun 50+ mph snow blowing off Lake Erie while in Cleveland.
Nothing else to report until the soldering iron gets unpacked and re-assembled.
More migratory birds in the area tho so Spring is very near - plus had a
couple of loons on the lake and I dont mean the human variety.

73 de AA9IL
Mike
RCI



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 503 of 605: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Apr  1, 2002 (12:52) * 1 lines 
 
you've not unpacked YET??? (don't worry, i've got boxes still lying around)


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 504 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr  2, 2002 (14:43) * 3 lines 
 
Loons!! I love Loons! They sound so spooky on a still foggy evening!

I think my son hand carried his soldering iron from old condo to new home. His house now has both antennas and weather station instruments atop the crest. That windchill must have been wretched. I'll send you some of our heat to hasten Spring!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 505 of 605: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Tue, Apr  2, 2002 (15:30) * 1 lines 
 
do loons live in S. Cal?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 506 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr  2, 2002 (19:55) * 0 lines 
 


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 507 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr  2, 2002 (19:57) * 6 lines 
 
They are a northern species of pine-trees-down-to-the-water-lakes. Maine has them and Canada. Common Loon hass a handsome
black and white checkerbroad back and looks formally elegant. They winter in the Mediterranean and Mexico, so it is possible for you
to see one. I did on the migration while they paused in Pennsylvania.

If you have ever heard their call, you would know immediately why the saying "crazy as a Loon" is so appropriate. It is described as a
loud maniacal laughing call. It can be very distressing!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 508 of 605: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Wed, Apr  3, 2002 (18:13) * 1 lines 
 
The maniacal call is appropriate to those red eyes they have. They are handsome birds, as Marcia stated. They are also a very ancient species, I understand.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 509 of 605: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Apr  3, 2002 (19:39) * 3 lines 
 
"The maniacal call is appropriate to those red eyes they have."

I'm still mulling that sentence over.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 510 of 605: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Apr  3, 2002 (19:41) * 1 lines 
 
i suppose i've never heard that call...i remember hearing another one made by loons (or maybe they weren't, but it was on tv not IRL). it was closer to a hooting owl.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 511 of 605: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Apr  3, 2002 (20:07) * 1 lines 
 
I'm glad you got it, wolfie.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 512 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr  3, 2002 (22:38) * 1 lines 
 
It is fairly high-pitched call of the loons. Red eyes, yes! I saw mine before they knew hemp was good for anything beside making rope! The Great Stoned Loon - it reminds me of the Great Horned Spoon, but that is for another topic in a world far FAR away!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 513 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Apr  5, 2002 (08:46) * 19 lines 
 
Hi yall

Ive heard several types of loon calls...

A single lone cry that rises in pitch

The single lone cry followed by 'screeing' (if thats a word) that sort of
sounds like a sea gull.

A short kind of chuckle or warble

Yep, the loons have red eyes that fits the crazy call. I think the two in
the lake are migrating but they have been there for a week so far - plus the
usual mallards and Canada geese but yesterday I was suprised by a treat -
a large group of wood ducks wandering around in the yard feeding before
taking off to the lake. They are cute.

73 de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 514 of 605: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Apr  5, 2002 (09:26) * 1 lines 
 
i've heard the word screeing when describing bird calls before...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 515 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr  5, 2002 (15:23) * 3 lines 
 
In the endless pursuit of trivia which seems to afflict me, I looked up "screeing" on Google. Of course, they assumed I meant "screening" and gave me a bunch of links which were useless to me. However, when I limited it to bird calls I got was a dead link (only one) alluding to it. I looked in my unabridged dictionary and found that one definition of screed is a tirade. So screeing would be the act of speaking (or calling) - a long vehement speech.
I think that fits the way Loons call. I only know that one early morning as the fog was still on the swamps, HM and his buddies were huddled in a boat waiting to do some duck hunting. Quietly, from behind, a loon swam silently toward them.... then loosed a volley of hysterical piercing calls scaring them clear out of their skins. A volley of birdshot followed, alas. I thought it was funny.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 516 of 605: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Fri, Apr  5, 2002 (15:32) * 1 lines 
 
screeing is also used to describe the call of hawks and other birds of prey.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 517 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr  5, 2002 (15:46) * 1 lines 
 
Yes!!! High piercing scream-like sound. Eagles do it, too.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 518 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Apr 10, 2002 (14:45) * 11 lines 
 
Hi yall

FYI
This friday, April 12th is the anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's space flight
- there is a web page detailing all the locations for parties and events.
Checkout www.yurisnight.net and see if there are any space parties going
on in your neighborhood. If not, throw one!

73 de AA9IL
Mike
radio-cosmo-international


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 519 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Apr 10, 2002 (14:55) * 3 lines 
 
I hear you! Thanks, Mike! http://www.yurisnight.net is a pretty cool place. I haven't been there lately, but they used to have ecards and great photos of space things, too.

Party time! If we needed an excuse, this works and you can watch for the Shuttle/ISS going overhead plus most of the naked-eye planets across the ecliptic. Don't forget to count the one under your feet when you number how many are visible. On the 20th of this month, all of them will be strung across the celestial sphere like brilliant jewels. Don't miss it. It will not happen again in our lifetime!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 520 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Apr 11, 2002 (15:14) * 15 lines 
 
Hi there

Yep, party time indeed - most likely I will be working on a Mode S (2.4 GHz)
down converter. I have the actual converter already and the dish -just need
to build up a feed antenna - either a spiral helix or patch. Then I can
listen to the AO 40 downlink.

April 20th kind of sounds like the harmonic convergence from back in the
late 80's (wow, was it that long ago...?) Went on a loooong drive from
Houston to San Diego on one of those goofy college road trips. Learned a few things on that trip which made my life a bit more easier (?!)

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 521 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Apr 11, 2002 (17:07) * 3 lines 
 
The 80's were just yesterday, weren't they? Seems like it...*sigh* We can go outside and make harmonics or whatever one does when one converges with the cosmos. It sounds like flowers in the hair time, again. Shall you grow it long and wild to entangle the great vibes we create? Amazing thoughts and visions come to mind. In any case, I am planning on a clear night. I wonder who has a fish-eye lens for their camera...

In what form do the AO downloads appear? I imagine there is a program for that too, and if not, you certainly can write one! What is the status of the radio telescope? Bird bath?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 522 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Apr 11, 2002 (20:49) * 9 lines 
 
The 80's are long gone - thank goodness.
Anyway, AO40 transmits SSB and CW as well as digital modes - its just
the transmit frequency is in the microwave bands.
Anyway, the radio telescope is still on hold but as usual, waiting
in the wings (or project queue) as the case may be. Still got to unbox
all the microwave junk still.

73 de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 523 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Apr 11, 2002 (21:01) * 5 lines 
 
We'll be patient. I remember packing and moving. *shudder*

What? you don't have any old stuff in your closet that came from then? I guess since you moved, that has all gone the way of the Dodo - and a good thing it did. I was not fond of the 80's particularly.

I guess I have only heard the binary code signals from satellites, but it stands to reason they now come in several forms.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 524 of 605: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, Apr 12, 2002 (05:50) * 1 lines 
 
Mike, did you know we're on ilink (see our ilink topic in radio)? It's a way tyou can talk to me in the mobile from your computer.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 525 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Apr 12, 2002 (09:36) * 17 lines 
 
Happy Yuri Day to All

Actually, there is some cool telemetry that can be decoded from AO40 that
gives the satellite stats - once I get my mode S up and running, I can
take a shot at receiving and decoding. I tested the down converter last
night and it works so thats good.

I ditched all my old clothes from back then - wouldnt fit anyway. I think
I saved an old concert T Shirt from when Pink Floyd played in the Astrodome
in Houston (87 or 88....)

Hi Terry - I saw your postings on ilink in the radio section - once I get
settled, I want to give that a try.

73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 526 of 605: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, Apr 12, 2002 (11:14) * 1 lines 
 
It's definitely taking our local repeater, 442.15, by storm.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 527 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Apr 12, 2002 (19:15) * 1 lines 
 
alas, line of sight is out of the question to Austin. Even for skip. How IS skip lately? I've gotten the west coast when conditions were right but that was about 20 years ago!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 528 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Apr 18, 2002 (07:35) * 13 lines 
 
Hi Marcia and geoites

Well, no skip to talk on the 442.150 machine since all the hocus pocus
takes place on the net. HF conditions have been pretty good - I have been
listening to shortwave with a 4 ft piece of wire stuck in the antenna terminal
of the R390A - stations boom in. Not bad for a 50 year old tube radio.
Im thinking about trying some over the water contacts - maybe even this weekend
on 10ghz - Its been very warm here and Lake Michigan is still cold so there is
the possiblity of tropo ducting.

73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 529 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 30, 2002 (23:41) * 13 lines 
 
Mike, if your homebrew radios are anything like my son's you have a genuine fondness for LEDs:

Long polymers light up LEDs
http://physicsweb.org/article/news/6/4/22
LEDs made from long-chain polymers should emit more light than those
based on short molecules, according to physicists in the US and the
Netherlands. Valy Vardeny of the University of Utah and colleagues say
they were amazed to find that the production of light-emitting `excitons'
in these materials depends on the length of the polymer chain. The
discovery could lead to the development of ultra-efficient polymer LEDs
(M Wohlgenannt et al 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 197401).




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 530 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, May 20, 2002 (19:24) * 11 lines 
 
Hi there - most of my homebrew radios usually have one led hidden
in the rats nest to indicate power 'ON'. Sorry for being away for
a while - busy with travel and projects. I did finish a prototype
10ghz beacon for testing propagation so I will have details on
that as it nears completion. The June contest for VHF and up is
rapidly approaching so I have to get all my misc/sundry microwave
equipment operational - preferably at the same time!

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 531 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 20, 2002 (20:56) * 1 lines 
 
Fingers crossed for great propagation this summer for you - starting NOW. I'd also appreciate it just from the standpoint of DXing. Take your time with the household stuff and get the gear up and running. First things first!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 532 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Fri, Jun 28, 2002 (00:21) * 1 lines 
 
TEST, test


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 533 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Tue, Jul  2, 2002 (23:40) * 13 lines 
 
We had STRONG Space Weather Radio Blackout the in the past 24 hours.

Radio Blackouts are disturbances of the ionosphere caused by X-ray emissions from the Sun.

According to NOAA scales, STRONG Radio Blackout has the following characteristics:
HF Radio: Wide area blackout of HF radio communication, loss of radio contact for about an hour on sunlit side of Earth.

Navigation: Low-frequency navigation signals degraded for about an hour.

See NOAA: SPACE WEATHER NOW

John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 534 of 605: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Wed, Jul  3, 2002 (15:11) * 1 lines 
 
didn't the sun have a massive explosion on the 1st?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 535 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Jul  7, 2002 (21:45) * 9 lines 
 
Hi all

Quite a blow out from what I understand - also, yea! My goofy browser
can display all the Geo entries again!

73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 536 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Jul  8, 2002 (03:19) * 4 lines 
 
Hi Mike,
Terry is a perfect doctor for Geo. Thank you very much Terry.

John


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 537 of 605: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Jul  8, 2002 (09:40) * 1 lines 
 
Did I do something?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 538 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jul  8, 2002 (18:36) * 1 lines 
 
Think Mike's browser healed itself. Terry, you have done much. Now, all I need is you to enable me to get into marci's ftp files on spring.net. This problem is some months old but I reserved its cure until I needed it - and as soon as I get my laptop back it will be needed. Currently I am using a created folder in /geo for general purposes.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 539 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jul  8, 2002 (18:37) * 1 lines 
 
I will email you when I am enabled to ftp again If you do not have it cured by then!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 540 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Jul  8, 2002 (20:29) * 8 lines 
 
Hi Marci

I think the last posting was towards me - it was really goofy - I could
only display Geo up to topic 32. Today, everything displayed as normal
so I guess life is good. Anyway, hope your laptop is all ok.

73 de Mike



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 541 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul  9, 2002 (14:03) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks Mike, me too! Oddly enough, when my host Don signed on last night only some of the topics showed up. Never had I seen this happen. And, I think never to me. In any case I told him the topic mumber he wanted and it was not there on his list. Of course it was archaeology and he was gracious enough to post his introduction there when I fudged the url and made it appear. I have NO ideal why this happens or how to cure it.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 542 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Jul  9, 2002 (14:51) * 10 lines 
 
Hi again

Ok, well everything is working fine now - anyway, sounds like you are having
quite a fun time down in rock/cave country. Plus seeing some interesting
new topics appearing on the Geo list! This is one of my favorite places
to visit!

73 de Mike
AA9IL
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 543 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul  9, 2002 (15:09) * 5 lines 
 
You are good company, Mike. We enjoy having you. I am hoping Don will feel the same though he has scarcely the time for it. As long as I can I will keep him interested and take some of his load off by doing proof reading and such ordinary tasks. Unhappily, he finds stuff I miss.

Take off your shoes and join us. The waters' fine and the company is good.

I wonder what do to with these geodes I have and other goodies... Probably post them in one of the rock topics. Now all I need is my laptop, David!!!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 544 of 605: John Tsatsaragos  (tsatsvol) * Mon, Jul 15, 2002 (23:07) * 9 lines 
 
3-day Solar-Geophysical Forecast issued Jul 15 at 22:00 UTC

Solar Activity Forecast: Solar activity is expected to be moderate. Region 30 is likely to produce isolated M-class flares. Region 30 could also produce another major flare during the period.
Geophysical Activity Forecast: Geomagnetic field activity is expected to increase to quiet to active levels on 16 July due to recurrent coronal hole effects. Activity may increase to active to minor storm levels on 17 July following today's X-flare. A greater than 10 MeV proton event is expected to begin early on 16 July, also due to today's X-flare.

http://www.sec.noaa.gov/today.html

John



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 545 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 17, 2002 (15:59) * 1 lines 
 
This one just might be the current largest CME in recent months. I posted a bit about it in Geo Space news (is that Geo 34?!) Those of you who live in the north, look for aurora!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 546 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Jul 17, 2002 (16:29) * 2 lines 
 
Must be time for aurora - its cloudy up here....



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 547 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 17, 2002 (18:18) * 1 lines 
 
That always seems to be the norm. Good stuff going on astronomically assures clouds. It is empirical, I guess. Pity!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 548 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Jul 20, 2002 (20:43) * 15 lines 
 
METEOR SCATTER - MAKE MORE MILES ON VHF
http://www.meteorscatter.net/

VIA Sheldon Harvey, Greenfield Park, Quebec

These pages contain lists of hotlinks for VHF radio
amateurs hunting dx via Es, tropo-, aurora- & meteor
scatter; give quick views over solar, geophysical,
atmospheric & meteor stream events; link to pages with
in-depth information about amateur radio meteor
scatter; provide up-to-date listings of e-mail
addresses of radio amateurs QRV in meteor scatter mode
in Europe & North America. The site is maintained by
Bernie Gapinski, DK3XT/AB7YI.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 549 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Jul 23, 2002 (13:38) * 17 lines 
 
METEOR SCATTER - MAKE MORE MILES ON VHFb
http://www.meteorscatter.net/

Bernie's is one of the very best Web sites for all types of VHF
propagation, as well as MS.
He does not try to cover everything, but has links to most of the other Web
sites that have extensive coverage of various types. Meteor scatter, of
course, is one of these.
If you do any MS work, you need to become familiar with this page, and with
the many MS links. There is a huge amount of material available, and
almost none of it is linked from any of the visual pages.
Shelby Ennis, W8WN - EM77bq - KY
w8wn@arrl.net
w8wn@amsat.org
Web: http://www.qsl.net/w8wn/

Borrowed from http://www.meteorobs.org


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 550 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Jul 24, 2002 (10:54) * 8 lines 
 
Hi all

Re VHF - I will be presenting a paper at the Central States VHF Society conference this weekend on the fine art of microwave component acquistion
(i.e. collecting junk and building stuff with it...)

73 de AA9IL
Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 551 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Wed, Jul 24, 2002 (20:27) * 1 lines 
 
Ah, the fine art of foraging and what you can do with what you find. Good luck, Mike. I'd love to be there when you deliver your message. I can bet iut will be entertaining AND informative!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 552 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jul 26, 2002 (19:11) * 8 lines 
 
M8 Flare at 2112 26 JUL
Moderate Radio Blackout
Recovery within next hour.
d-layer absorption up to
23 MHz on sunlit side of
earth. More info:
http://prop.hfradio.org/



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 553 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 31, 2003 (19:16) * 70 lines 
 
Mike, get out that boat anchor and do some DXing this weekend:

DX Bulletin 31 ARLD031
From ARRL Headquarters
Newington CT July 31, 2003
To all radio amateurs
SB DX ARL ARLD031
ARLD031 DX news

This week's bulletin was made possible with information provided by
K8FFO, the OPDX Bulletin, The Daily DX, QRZ DX, 425DXnews, DXNL,
WA7BNM and Contest Corral from QST. Thanks to all.

RODRIGUEZ ISLAND, 3B9. Guy, 3B9ZL has been QRV on 15 meters using
CW and SSB around 0730 and 1430z. QSL via FR5ZL.

CROATIA, 9A. Aco, DJ0LZ is QRV as 9A/DJ0LZ/p from Pag Island, IOTA
EU-170, until August 9. QSL to home call.

MOROCCO, CN. Mohamed, CN8KD has been QRV on 6 meters around 2200 to
2300z.

PHILIPPINES, DU. Peter, DU9/DK2PR/p and Bert, DU9/DK2BR/p are QRV
from Samal Island, IOTA OC-235, until August 4. They are active on
20 and 15 meters on the usual IOTA frequencies. QSL to home calls.

ST. PIERRE AND MIQUELON, FP. Paul, FP/K9OT and Peg, FP/KB9LIE are
QRV from Miquelon, IOTA NA-032, until August 5. Activity is on 160
to 6 meters, including the newer bands, using CW and SSB. FP/K9OT
will also participate in the North American CW QSO Party. QSL to
home calls.

SARDINIA, IS0. IS0/IK5XCT is QRV from Sardinia, IOTA EU-024, until
August 7 and IM0/IZ0EJQ is QRV from San Pietro, IOTA EU-165, until
August 20. QSL to home calls.

WAKE ISLAND, KH9. Jake, N6XIV/KH9 is QRV for about four weeks. He
is here on a work assignment, so his operating time is limited. He
is using only SSB. QSL via K2FF.

NETHERLAND ANTILLES, PJ. Peter, PJ4/PA2VST is QRV from Bonaire,
IOTA SA-006, until August 11 and is active mainly on 6 meters. QSL
to home call.

UZBEKISTAN, UK. Mikhail, UK8OM is licensed for 6 meters and
operates daily on 50115 kHz using CW. QSL direct.

CAMBODIA, XU. Hugo, LA5YJ is QRV as XU7ACW and is here until
September 9. He is active on 40, 30, 20 and 17 meters using CW.
QSL to home call.

CAYMAN ISLANDS, ZF. Steve, K8FFO will be QRV as ZF2FF from Grand
Cayman from August 5 to 11. Activity will be on 20 and 17 meters
using CW and SSB in the morning and afternoon each day. QSL to home call.

DXCC Operations Approved. The following stations, along with their
effective dates, are approved for DXCC credit. 3XD02, March 19 to
April 31, 2003, 3XY1L, January 1 to December 31, 2003, 5X2A, June 24
to July 1, 2003, D2CR, January 1 to December 31, 2003, J5UCW, March
8 to April 6, 2003, ST2CF, March 17 to April 2, 2003 and YA/N4SIX, ongoing.

THIS WEEKEND ON THE RADIO. The ARRL UHF Contest, The North American
CW QSO Party, European HF Championship, SARL HF DX SSB Contest,
Ten-Ten International Summer Phone QSO Party, TARA "Grid Dip"
Contest and the PanAmerican Lighthouse-Lightship Weekend will
certainly keep contesters busy this weekend. Please see August QST,
page 91, and the ARRL and WA7BNM contest websites for details.
NNNN
/EX



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 554 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Sep 12, 2003 (19:16) * 10 lines 
 
Solar Flares on Steroids

Solar flares that scorch Earth's atmosphere are commonplace. But
scientists have discovered a few each year that are not like the others:
they come from stars thousands of light years away.

FULL STORY at
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2003/12sep_magnetars.htm?list89800




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 555 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sat, Nov 29, 2003 (17:51) * 19 lines 
 
Hi all

Conditions on shortwave to VHF have been whacky with all the sun
spot activity (typical conditions are in milli-whacks but the recent
CME's have been in terms of mega-whacks and giga-whacks) - a new
metric measurement....
Anyway, during the big CME, aura visibility was nil due to crappy
weather but 6 meters (50mhz)was jumping with activity. You could
tell all the auroral propagation from the raspy 'buzz saw' cw signals.
On the HF bands, shortwave listening was fluctuating wildly as the
ionosphere was pounded. During the winter months, life above 10mhz
ends at dusk but even shortwave stations on 7 mhz to 5mhz was spotty.
The BBC was booming in however on 5975. Winter brings activity time to
75 and 160 meters so listen down there - including the tropical bands
in the 4-5mhz bands.

73 de AA9IL
mike
radio cosmo international


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 556 of 605: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sun, Nov 30, 2003 (20:13) * 6 lines 
 
What's your view on the coming "magnetic storm" Mike? Are you fully aware
of this or do I need to brief you?

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/magnetic/




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 557 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Dec  4, 2003 (13:56) * 1 lines 
 
Whole bands dropped out on me when the last CME hit. I am sorry I am not presently equipped to receive 6 meters. And, it takes a rare storm to knock out 5975 and the BBC. It is my benchmark station for which I check the entire band for reception.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 558 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Thu, Dec  4, 2003 (16:30) * 19 lines 
 
Hi Marci

The BBC is coming in fantastically on 5975 - even though that is
not a North American service. By far my most favorite station
to listen to. Also, Radio Canada International.
Since you are in the 'lower 48' you can probably pick up WBCQ
on 7415. Go to their web site for a schedule. Any shows that
have Timtron or Complex Variable Studios (Tasha) are on my list as well
as Radio NewYork International. Be forwarned though as you will
also hear all forms of broadcasts from the hard core right to the
left. I listen to those sometimes for giggles and take things
with a grain of salt (or a block of salt in some cases...). I am
thinking about buying some time to do a show once I get all my
finances in order and can afford to blow some cash on that.
BTW, what are you using for your SWL radio? Still using the
boatanchor twins - the Hammarlund SP600 and the Collins R390A
Heavy Metal Rules!
73 de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 559 of 605: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Dec  4, 2003 (18:05) * 2 lines 
 
Is there a way for Marci to listen on Echolink without having a license,
Mike?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 560 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, Dec  5, 2003 (14:49) * 7 lines 
 
Howdy Terry

I think Echolink requires a verification that the requester is
licensed - that is what I had to go through.

Mike



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 561 of 605: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Dec 15, 2003 (13:11) * 3 lines 
 
Isn't there a listen only gateway called IRL or something. I'm vaguely
remembering that we talked about this.



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 562 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 22, 2003 (17:25) * 3 lines 
 
*SIGH* Thanks for asking, Mike ! I'll await further developments. If I end up too far in the "Boonies" I may have to get my own license. I just heard my father rolling over...

Yup, Hammerlund is in exellent fettle. It likes the lower humidity of a solid temperate zone house better than a tropical rainforest. Fewer static crashes and arcing incidents. No Collins here, alas. How is your British rig working for you?


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 563 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 22, 2003 (17:48) * 1 lines 
 
That is an awesomne site you suggested. I can't wait till you add to it. and to us(I copy and give credit if you won'r....)


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 564 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 22, 2003 (20:28) * 1 lines 
 



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 565 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Dec 22, 2003 (20:28) * 2 lines 
 
YES!!! the above graphics from
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2003/05dec_dixieland.htm?list89800


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 566 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jan 23, 2004 (20:14) * 123 lines 
 
A s t r o A l e r t
Sun-Earth Alert


Solar Terrestrial Dispatch
http://www.spacew.com


21 January 2004


COMPLEX SERIES OF SOLAR EVENTS MAY PRODUCE AURORAL DISPLAYS


A complex series of solar events on 19 and 20 January has resulted in a
well-defined Earthward-directed coronal mass ejection (CME). The events
involved filament eruptions as well as a major solar flare (a fairly minimal
major x-ray class M6.1 flare) in sunspot complex 10540 on 20 January.


Confidence is high that this coronal mass ejection will impact the
Earth. Low and moderately energetic protons at greater than 5 MeV have
already increased in response to the effects of the associated leading shock
front from the CME. Impact is expected to occur during the early portion of
the UTC day of 22 January (evening/night hours over North America).


A middle latitude aurora watch has been issued for 22 and 23 January. If
the disturbance arrives as predicted, North America should be best positioned
to observe much of the activity. The watch statement has been appended below.


/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\


MIDDLE LATITUDE AURORAL ACTIVITY WATCH


WATCH ISSUED: 09:30 UTC, 21 JANUARY 2004


/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\


VALID BEGINNING AT: 21:00 UTC (4 pm EST) ON 21 JANUARY
VALID UNTIL: 23:00 UTC (7 pm EDT) ON 23 JANUARY


PREDICTED IMPACT TIME OF DISTURBANCE: 03:00 UTC ON 22 JAN, +/- SEVERAL HOURS


HIGH RISK PERIOD: LATE 21 - 22 JANUARY (UTC DAYS)
MODERATE RISK PERIOD: 22 - 23 JANUARY


PREDICTED ACTIVITY INDICES: 15, 35, 20, 15 (21 JANUARY - 24 JANUARY)


POTENTIAL MAGNITUDE OF MIDDLE LATITUDE AURORAL ACTIVITY: MODERATE


POTENTIAL DURATION OF THIS ACTIVITY: MAIN BELT = 12 TO 18 HOURS
MINOR BELT = 18 TO 36 HOURS


ESTIMATED OPTIMUM OBSERVING CONDITIONS: NEAR LOCAL MIDNIGHT


EXPECTED LUNAR INTERFERENCE: NONE


OVERALL OPPORTUNITY FOR OBSERVATIONS FROM MIDDLE LATITUDES: FAIR TO GOOD


AURORAL ACTIVITY *MAY* BE OBSERVED APPROXIMATELY NORTH OF A LINE FROM...


SOUTHERN WASHINGTON STATE TO SOUTHERN MONTANA TO SOUTH DAKOTA TO NORTHERN
IOWA TO NORTHERN ILLINOIS TO NORTHERN INDIANA TO OHIO TO PENNSYLVANIA TO
NEW JERSEY.


ACTIVITY *MAY* ALSO BE OBSERVED APPROXIMATELY NORTH OF A LINE FROM...


IRELAND TO ENGLAND TO NORTHERN BELGIUM TO NORTHERN GERMANY TO NORTHERN
POLAND TO LITHUANIA TO SOUTHERN LATVIA TO NORTH-CENTRAL RUSSIA.


ACTIVITY *MAY* ALSO BE OBSERVED APPROXIMATELY SOUTH OF A LINE FROM...


SOUTHERN NEW ZEALAND TO EXTREME SOUTHEASTERN AUSTRALIA.



SYNOPSIS...


A well-defined Earthward-directed coronal mass ejection is enroute to
the Earth. Impact of this disturbance is expected to occur during the early
UTC hours of 22 January (our target time is estimated near 03:00 UTC, give or
take several hours). NOTE that this correponds (for North American observers)
to the evening hours of 21 January (Wednesday night). Auroral activity could
intensify to moderately strong levels following the arrival of the
disturbance and may provide sporadic opportunities to observe auroral
activity over fairly wide-spread middle latitude regions. The near-new phase
of the moon will help ensure optimally dark skies for all regions.


This watch will remain valid through 23:00 UTC (7 pm EDT) on
23 January. It will then be updated or allowed to expire. For updated
information, visit: http://www.spacew.com/aurora/forum.html. For real-time
plots of current activity, visit: http://www.spacew.com/plots.html or
www.sec.noaa.gov.


PLEASE REPORT OBSERVATIONS OF AURORAL ACTIVITY TO:
http://www.spacew.com/submitsighting.html

Please also report themm here. Of course I am clouded in with ice storms on the way...




 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 567 of 605: Lucie  (alyeska) * Fri, Jan 23, 2004 (22:40) * 1 lines 
 
I'm glad to see this. Welcome back


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 568 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 10, 2004 (19:59) * 3 lines 
 
Did anyone see the aurora? The only way I could tell the CME had taken place was by how bad the short wave propagation was.

This week it has been excellent considering I am working with an almost defunct radio. I NEED a new one!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 569 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Feb 10, 2004 (20:01) * 3 lines 
 
Thanks, Lucie! I was missing talking here I was making a nuisance of myself in real life.

Thanks for missing me!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 570 of 605: Cheryl  (CherylB) * Fri, Apr 16, 2004 (12:56) * 16 lines 
 
How sunset helps birds to navigate

Tim Radford, science editor
The Guardian

Migrating songbirds check their direction each night before take-off - by taking a bearing on the setting sun.
Many migrating creatures - honeybees, certain fish, many birds, and even monarch butterflies - possess built-in compasses to follow the lines of the Earth's magnetic field, and today in the journal Science ornithologists report on how they tried to mislead thrushes by exposing them to magnetic fields distorted towards the east.

It seemed to work. Released after dark, the birds flew west instead of north to their summer breeding grounds. They were fitted with radio transmitters, and the German and American ornithologists followed them by car for up to 1,100km (680 miles).

However, once free to decide where they were, the birds noted the direction of twilight and corrected their flight northward. The conclusion: thrushes steer by compasses at night, and update them from the setting sun every 24 hours.

Migration has been a mystery. Some birds return to nesting sites every year, flying up to 25,000km. Monarch but terflies breed in the eastern United States and Canada and every autumn their offspring fly 2,500km to the same roosting areas in Mexico. Salmon and sea turtles, and even a species of mole rat, make epic journeys using very precise navigation.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,3604,1193102,00.html



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 571 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Apr 18, 2004 (21:40) * 13 lines 
 
Hi all

There was a major amount of migratory waterfowl in the nearby lakes
not quite indegenous to this area - a loon, Mergansers, wood ducks,
buffleheads - all on their way up to the upper pennensula, Minnesota,
Canada, etc. It was nice to see them - now all the ducks are the
standard mallards and Canada Geese - plus plenty of nut-thatch,
flickers, common woodpeckers, etc. Spring is definately here ass
all the tulips are up as well as the trees being in bloom - this
is the perfect season.

73 de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 572 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Sun, Apr 18, 2004 (21:42) * 8 lines 
 
Have a new CD on order - 'Spectral' by Joyce Hinterding
Saw the reviews in some experimental music zines and this
has quite a bit of natural radio recordings in it - will
provide a good radio hacker review after the first listen.

de Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 573 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Apr 20, 2004 (12:29) * 4 lines 
 
Oooh, a loon! I don't have one on my lifelist. I've been relearning the birds in this part of the world and what fun it is. I have little swifts hatching in a porch eave, and that is exciting. I am just boggled at the thought that all the warblers will arrive and I don't rememeber one song from the other. I guess it is time to get out the binoculars and Peterson.

Mike, are her natural recordings of whales or or elfs and sprites. I like the other-worldly nature of the latter, though not sure how it fits with music.
Propagation is fair to middling - I think I need a much better antenna for starters...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 574 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Apr 20, 2004 (21:57) * 10 lines 
 
I heard a sample track and it is what I would call
ambient sound montage - its avant garde by all means
you would never hear this on a commercial radio station
but rather on one of the more progressive college/community
radio stations. The sounds I recognized was radio teletype,
static hiss, and dawn chorus bleeps and chirps - I am
sure there are whistlers as well.

73 de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 575 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Apr 22, 2004 (08:04) * 3 lines 
 
Do you recommend it? put a descrete speaker ourdoors somewhere secluded and have at it during this season of flowering trees and warm breezes. I love the Dawn Chorus. It was also my dad's favorite sound (with ocean waves a close second.)

Meteor shower coming up. More in astronomy topic.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 576 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, May  7, 2004 (13:03) * 15 lines 
 
Hi kids

Ok, a music review on 'Spectral' - it is very ambient and very
avant - primarily what I described earlier as little pings, chirps,
and static blips super imposed with some weather sat stansmissions.
Some drone hum (50hz60hz/120hz?) and some band cruising - in AM
as there were some SSB stations. Also, during the atmospheric
stuff, I think I heard some of the VLF Omega signals. Not really
music but more sound montage. Also alot like what I hear every night
when I tune the shortwave bands. All in all, pretty cool to listen
to - this would be sooo cool to play on one of the corporate FM
stations - clueless listeners would be calling in to ask whats da deal...

73 de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 577 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Fri, May  7, 2004 (13:05) * 5 lines 
 
btw....
A good web site with lots of whistler recordings is:
www.pw.physics.uiowa.edu/mcgreevy/
and
www.auroralchorus.com/natradio.htm


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 578 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Wed, Jun 16, 2004 (18:11) * 5 lines 
 
Just picked up a new surplus toy - a geophone sensor
details of the vibrations around the lake to follow...

73 de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 579 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Jun 25, 2004 (20:20) * 1 lines 
 
Oh Mike! How great! Let us know what you hear. That lake has monsters in it? Perhaps you might solve some great mystery... or find whales?!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 580 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Jun 28, 2004 (14:10) * 7 lines 
 
Speaking of vibrations, we had a magnitude 4.5 quake hit this
morning (1am) - the epicenter was 70 miles west of Chicago.
Of course, I slept through the whole thing....

73 de Mike
r-c-i



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 581 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 22, 2004 (22:44) * 2 lines 
 
Earthquake!!! I wonder if the New Madrid fault is stirring again...?! That also means where I am is also supject to possible earth movement. I though it was bad enough to catch every strong storm of the century the past two months...



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 582 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jul 22, 2004 (22:45) * 1 lines 
 
...and, of course you slept through the earthquake. Everybody does who wants to feel one. *sigh*


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 583 of 605: Mike Kana  (aa9il) * Thu, Jul 29, 2004 (16:11) * 16 lines 
 
Hi Marci and Geoites

I did some research and this was not the New Madrid fault - one theory
was that this quake came from an ancient fault in the N. IL area and
could have been related to pressure due to glacial activity from the
ice age. Yea, I know, this would have been cool to experience in an
awake state but ZZZzzzz.....
I have been thinking about building a simple sensor in a 5 gallon
bucket - pretty straight forward - massive coil of wire with a
spring suppported magnet in the middle - feed to a high gain amp
or analogue to digital converter on the PC.
Been busy with the RF end of the spectrum but this is in queue as
a project which means I might get to it by the end of 2005....

73 de Mike
r-c-i


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 584 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Tue, Aug 10, 2004 (11:02) * 1 lines 
 
I ran your plan past my-son-the-geologist and he says he found instructions on the internet for such a detector. He is seriously thinking of building one, too. He also says to be of good cheer. There will be more earthquakes!!! (Is that good news or bad?!)


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 585 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Oct 14, 2004 (00:19) * 9 lines 
 
Total lunar eclipse

On Wednesday night, Oct. 27th, North Americans can see a total eclipse of
the moon.

FULL STORY at

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2004/13oct_lunareclipse.htm?list89800



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 586 of 605: earth's magnetosphere  (cfadm) * Sun, Mar  6, 2005 (10:19) * 13 lines 
 
http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/cowley.html

is a guide to the earth's magnetosphere.

The magnetosphere is the region of space to which the Earth's magnetic field is confined by the solar wind plasma blowing outward from the Sun, extending to distances in excess of 60,000 kilometers from Earth. Much has been learned about this dynamic plasma region over the past 40 years, since the first direct measurements were made by the early Sputnik and Explorer spacecraft.

by Stanley W. H. Cowley, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom

The Earth's magnetosphere is formed from two essential ingredients. The first is the Earth's magnetic field, generated by currents flowing in the Earth's core. Outside the Earth this field has the same form as that of a bar magnet, a dipole field, aligned approximately with the Earth's spin axis. The second ingredient is the solar wind, a fully ionized hydrogen/helium plasma that streams continuously outward from the Sun into the solar system at speeds of about 300–800 kilometers per second. This wind is therefore composed of protons and alpha particles, together with sufficient electrons that it is electrically neutral overall. The solar wind is also pervaded by a large-scale interplanetary magnetic field, the solar magnetic field transported outward into the solar system by the solar wind plasma. There is a third ingredient that also plays an important role: the Earth's ionosphere. The upper atmosphere is partially ionized by far-ultraviolet and X rays from the Sun above altitudes of about 100 km. The res
lting ionosphere forms a second source of plasma for the magnetosphere, mainly of protons, singly charged helium and oxygen, and the requisite number of electrons for electric charge neutrality.


and there's lots more.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 587 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Mar 10, 2005 (22:33) * 1 lines 
 
If it weren't for the Magnetosphere, we'd have fried long ago from cosmic rays and radiation from the sun. Thanks for a most useful site.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 588 of 605: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, Mar 11, 2005 (09:00) * 7 lines 
 


The site which carried this picture

is http://www-istp.gsfc.nasa.gov/Education/Intro.html

and has several good links.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 589 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Fri, Mar 11, 2005 (21:53) * 3 lines 
 
OOOH that IS a great illustration. Take time to really look at that graphic. See that little blue marble in the middle of that force field?

That is EARTH!!!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 590 of 605: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Sat, Mar 12, 2005 (06:39) * 1 lines 
 
Isn't that wild. Wild stuff.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 591 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 12, 2005 (15:08) * 1 lines 
 
Thanks to those blue loops around us, we have radio and all that has come since.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 592 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Sat, Mar 12, 2005 (15:08) * 1 lines 
 
well, sort of...


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 593 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Mon, Apr 11, 2005 (17:11) * 3 lines 
 
Has anyone seen the recent articles about a magnetic pole flip?

Inquiring minds wanna know!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 594 of 605: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Mon, Apr 11, 2005 (18:21) * 3 lines 
 
We've been talking about that, did you see the Nova or National Geographic program about this?

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/magnetic/


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 595 of 605: Curious Wolfie  (wolf) * Mon, Apr 11, 2005 (19:07) * 1 lines 
 
nope, this is the first i've heard of it.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 596 of 605: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Tue, Apr 12, 2005 (07:11) * 3 lines 
 
It's a great show if you can catch it in reruns. I need to tivo it next time around and burn it to a dvd. I love my new tivo dvd burner all in one unit. Today I'm going to dump Battlestar Galactica and Matthew McCounaughey's road trip to dvd for archival storage.

In our lifetimes there will be the beginnings a major magnetic chaotic event which will cause compasses to gyrate wildly and there will be cancer causing disruptions of the earth's protective atmospheric layer. Not earth ending, but very disruptive. If social security upheaval and soaring gas prices weren't enough!


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 597 of 605: _cosmo_  (aa9il) * Tue, Apr 12, 2005 (16:13) * 12 lines 
 
Hi all

Yea and I heard also massive flooding, cootie infestation, etc. If
I was to go along with all the doomsayers, I would have crawled into
a cave long ago. I did see a magazine while going through the airport
- not sure if it was Scientific American or Popular Science but it
was this month. Anyway, next time at the book store, will see what
the article was about. Most likely a good web search will also turn
up the same info.

73 de Mike



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 598 of 605: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Wed, Apr 13, 2005 (10:10) * 1 lines 
 
Don't invest heavily in compasses! They may become obsolete in your waning years, Mike.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 599 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, May 30, 2005 (19:34) * 3 lines 
 
I have also been watching geologists working on the pole shift possibility. What it means for us is open to conjecture. Life had survived many such flips, but I wonder if that will be our ultimate demise this time around? How fitting. And we were so ego-centric that we thought WE would be the ones to kill us off. I think we are very small intellects. Next time evolution may prove a bit more clever. Too bad nothing survives from one time to the next.

No, I'm really not that cynical, but the problem, if we think of it as such, will not go away and we sure as heck can't guess how to prevent its happening !! What kind of shelters shall we build in the back yard for this eventuality? It had better be very well stocked. It will take a while to ward off the solar radiation by new magnetic fields.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 600 of 605: radio_cosmo  (aa9il) * Sun, Dec  9, 2007 (19:06) * 6 lines 
 
Oy veh! Its been 2005 since the last posting! Anyway, wanted to drop by and say 'Howdy!' and happy Solstice! No, I havent moved off to some temple in Tibet - Im wrapping up graduate school and need to be focusing on that - so nothing exciting to report. Just wanted to jump in and make a post - will be back in the swing of things around the time of the Summer solstice!

73 de Mike
r-c-i
ps Hi Marci!



 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 601 of 605: geomancer (cfadm) * Sat, Dec 29, 2007 (04:48) * 1 lines 
 
Sounds great Mike, happy New Years.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 602 of 605: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Mon, Jun 30, 2008 (19:50) * 1 lines 
 
Hey Mike I have a problem and you might have some suggestions for its solution. I live in a large three storey house built in the 1920s. It is just about dead to AM radio and not much better for FM. MY scanners do just fine. There is no doubt that an external antenna would be ideal but the roof is just about impossible to get to. Suggestions for other kinds of antennas? I lived in a brick dormitory my first year of college and to get any radio signals at all I have to sneak a wire dangling from my window and it worked great. They found it and that was the end of that.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 603 of 605: geomancer (cfadm) * Mon, Jul 21, 2008 (19:23) * 1 lines 
 
A long wire. Tie a rock to the end of it and toss it up over the peak of throof. I'll let Mike add to this.


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 604 of 605: radio_cosmo  (aa9il) * Tue, Jul 22, 2008 (20:41) * 14 lines 
 
Hi all

Wow, I had this thought that I needed to log in so I did and sure nuf
there is a question....
Yes, a long wire will help for AM - for FM you could get by with
a simple dipole or active fm antenna - you can find those at rat shack.
For AM, your radio should have a good ferrite loop antenna but if you have
a long piece of wire, you will get signals BUT you will get noise too.
A loop antenna will have better immunity to noise and some degree of
direction - do a search for LWCA - long wave club of America and search
for MW and LF loops - you will find some good examples there.

73 de Mike
rci


 Topic 35 of 99 [Geo]: Gaia Magnetosphere
 Response 605 of 605: geomancer (cfadm) * Sat, Aug 16, 2008 (18:40) * 5 lines 
 
Good answer. I've been putting off for years getting the GE Superradio.

is that still the state of the art in radio reception?

I look at it longingly every time I go to Frys.

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