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Topic 73 of 109: Digital Video projects

Thu, Sep 6, 2001 (16:04) | Paul Terry Walhus (terry)
Making movies for the web. Technical discussion.

15 responses total.

 Topic 73 of 109 [web]: Digital Video projects
 Response 1 of 15: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Sep  6, 2001 (16:04) * 35 lines 
 
IEEE 1394 Installation Troubleshooting Guide

This document applies to all configurations that use OHCI-compliant IEEE 1394 hardware, including IEEE 1394 add-in cards and IEEE 1394 ports built into the motherboard (for example, FireWire or i.LINK). Use this document to check the configuration and determine if the DV device you use is compatible with built-in DV support in Adobe Premiere 6.0 for Windows. You can also use this document if the IEEE 1394 capture system you use doesn't include its own project settings in the Project Settings dialog box.

The built-in DV support in Premiere 6.0 requires the Microsoft DV class driver (MSDV), which cannot coexist in Windows with any other DV class drivers. MSDV supports any OHCI-compliant IEEE 1394 interface in Windows 2000, Windows Me, or Windows 98 SE. IEEE 1394 interface manufacturers provide DV class drivers for Windows 98 (First Edition) and earlier.


To determine which DV device driver is installed, and to ensure compatibility with Premiere 6.0:
1. Exit from Windows.
2. Verify that the DV device is plugged into the wall socket and is connected to the computer's IEEE 1394 port with an IEEE 1394 cable. If you use a DV camera, do not use battery power as it causes some cameras to go into sleep mode.
3. Make sure that the DV device is on. If you use a DV camera, make sure it's in VTR mode, not in Camera mode.
4. Start Windows. (Windows Me may take several minutes to load the DV driver.)
5. Check to see which DV device driver is installed:
a. Right-click My Computer, and choose Properties.
b Click the Hardware tab, and then click Device Manager.
c. Click the plus sign (+) beside Imaging Device or Sound, Video and Game Controllers:


-- If the device is listed as "Microsoft DV Camera and VCR" or "[manufacturer] DV Camcorder" (Windows Me only), MSDV is installed, and Premiere should be able to capture with the DV device. If Premiere returns the error "Can't connect to the capture driver" when you try to capture video, uninstall and then reinstall Premiere, restart Windows, and then try to capture video again. If Premiere still can't connect to the capture driver, reinstall Windows, and then reinstall Premiere.


-- If the device is listed as "1394 DV Camcorder," the Texas Instruments DV class driver is installed. Disable the Texas Instruments DV class driver and enable MSDV instead. For instructions, see document 325937, "Unable to Capture Using Texas Instruments DV Device in Premiere 6.0 for Windows".


-- If the device is listed as "Sony DVCR," the Sony DV class driver is installed. Disable the Sony DV class driver and enable MSDV instead using the latest version of SonySwitcher, which you can download from Adobe's Web site at www.adobe.com/support/downloads/prwin.htm. (Only Sony DVGate software can capture from or play back to the device using the Sony DV class driver).


-- If a device isn't listed under either category, verify that the Device Manager lists a category for 1394 Bus Controller:


- If 1394 Bus Controller is listed, repeat steps 2-5, using a different IEEE 1394 cable to determine if the cable is faulty.


- If 1394 Bus Controller isn't listed or if the device isn't listed when you use a different IEEE 1394 cable, the drivers for the IEEE 1394 hardware didn't load at startup or weren't installed correctly. For assistance, see the documentation for the IEEE 1394 hardware or contact the IEEE 1394 hardware manufacturer.



 Topic 73 of 109 [web]: Digital Video projects
 Response 2 of 15: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Sep  6, 2001 (16:04) * 22 lines 
 
Unable to Capture Video in Premiere 6.0 on Sony VAIO Computer

Issue
When you try to capture video in Adobe Premiere 6.0 on a Sony VAIO computer in Windows 98SE or Windows Me, Premiere returns one of the following errors:
-- "Unable to connect to capture driver."
-- "No DV device available."


Detail
You cannot switch from the Sony DV class driver to the Microsoft DV class driver in the SonySwitcher.


Solution

Install SonySwitcher 3.0, which you can download from Adobe's Web site at www.adobe.com/support/downloads/prwin.htm.


Additional Information

Premiere 6.0 requires the Microsoft DV class driver to support DV capture devices in Windows 2000, Me, 98SE, and 98. SonySwitcher 3.0 allows you to switch between the Sony and Microsoft DV class drivers without problems, unlike earlier versions of SonySwitcher.




 Topic 73 of 109 [web]: Digital Video projects
 Response 3 of 15: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Sep  6, 2001 (16:05) * 71 lines 
 
Optimizing a Windows System for Video Editing with Premiere 6.0x

Optimizing the system can eliminate compatibility problems that can interfere with video editing. To optimize a Windows system for Adobe Premiere 6.0x, work through the tasks in this document. To further eliminate problems, simplify the system to include only those components necessary for editing video.

1. Make sure that the system meets the minimum requirements.
If you use Premiere for editing analog video or IEEE 1394, OHCI-compliant DV, make sure that the system meets the following requirements:
-- Intel Pentium III 500MHz or faster processor (Pentium III 700 MHz recommended)
-- Windows 98 Second Edition, Millennium Edition, or 2000
-- 128 MB or RAM (256 MB or more recommended)
-- Dedicated large capacity 7200RPM UDMA 66 IDE or SCSI hard disk or disk array
-- Microsoft certified OHCI IEEE 1394 interface
-- Microsoft DirectX compatible video display adapter


Additional requirements for third-party capture cards:
-- Adobe Premiere certified capture card (For a list of certified capture cards, visit Adobe's Web site at www.adobe.com/products/premiere/6cards.html.)


Note: Premiere does not support FireWire disk drives.


2. Install the latest version of Premiere.
The latest version of Premiere is 6.01, which may be more compatible with the operating system and hardware drivers. Before you install an update, make sure that the system meets the requirements.

The free Premiere 6.01 update is available from Adobe's Web site at www.adobe.com/support/downloads/main.html.


3. Check hard disk speed.
If you work with analog video, contact the manufacturer of the video capture card for hard disk speed requirements. If you work with DV video (IEEE 1394), Premiere requires hard disks that can sustain a minimum data rate of 5 MB/second for smooth playback.


In addition, disks should have a rotational speed of 7200 rpms or greater. As you save more content to the disk, access and transfer times to the disk increase to slow performance. If you work with disks at near-capacity, use a faster disk (for example, one with a speed of 10,000 rpms) to compensate for the decrease in performance.


If you use external drives, make sure that the cables can handle the drives' data rates and rotational speeds. Adobe recommends that you use large capacity UDMA 66 IDE or SCSI drives dedicated to video only. If you use an IDE disk drive for capturing video, see task 4, "Optimize IDE disks," in this document. Premiere doesn't support multiple devices on a FireWire chain or multiple devices on a FireWire card.


7. Optimize the video display.
Video display options and acceleration can conflict with capture card drivers, resulting in a system error, and screen savers can interrupt the flow of data when you capture video, causing dropped frames. In addition, display options use system resources, decreasing resources available to Premiere.


-- To disable video display acceleration:


Important: If you have a Sony VAIO with DVGate Motion, don't disable video display acceleration; doing so may affect the overlay capabilities of the video display adapter.


In Windows 2000:
1. Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel.
2. Double-click Display, click the Settings tab, and then click Advanced.
3. Click the Troubleshooting tab.
4. Move the Hardware acceleration slider to None.
5. Click OK to accept the new setting, and then click OK to close the Display Properties window.
6. Restart Windows.


In Windows Me or 98:
1. Right-click My Computer, and choose Properties.
2. Click the Performance tab, and then click Graphics.
3. Move the Hardware Acceleration slider to None or one notch above None, and then click OK.
4. Restart Windows.


-- To optimize display options:
1. Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel, and double-click Display.
2. Click the Background tab in the Display Properties dialog box.
3. Set the Wallpaper and Pattern options to None, and then click OK.
4. Click the Screen Saver tab, select None from the Screen Saver scroll box, and deselect the Energy Saving options.
5. Click the Settings tab, choose High Color (16 bit) or True Color (32 bit) from the Color Palette pop-up menu, and then click OK.
6. Click Yes to restart the computer.



 Topic 73 of 109 [web]: Digital Video projects
 Response 4 of 15: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Sep  6, 2001 (16:05) * 35 lines 
 
Unable to Capture Using Texas Instruments DV Device in Premiere 6.0 for Windows

Issue
When you try to capture from a Texas Instruments DV device (e.g., 1394 DV Camcorder) in Adobe Premiere 6.0 for Windows, Premiere does not display the device in the Capture dialog box.


Solutions

Do either of the following:


Solution 1
If you use Windows 2000 or Windows 98 Second Edition (SE), use the UnTI utility to automatically disable the Texas Instruments DV Class driver and enable the Microsoft DV Class driver. You can download the utility from the ADS Technologies Web site at www.adstech.com/downloads/pyro.html.


Solution 2
Manually disable the Texas Instruments DV Class driver, and enable the Microsoft DV Class driver:
1. Make sure that the camcorder is connected and turned on, and then choose Start > Programs > Windows Explorer (Windows 98 SE) or Start > Programs > Accessories > Windows Explorer (Windows 2000, Windows Millennium Edition [Me]).
2. Choose Tools > Folder Options, and then click the View tab.
3. Select Show Hidden Files and Folders, deselect Hide File Extensions for Known File Types, and then click OK.
4. Right-click My Computer, and choose Properties from the pop-up menu.
5. Click the Device Manager tab (Windows 98 SE, Windows Me) or click the Hardware tab, and then click Device Manager (Windows 2000).
6. Double-click Sound Video and Game Controllers, select 1394 DV Camcorder, and then click Delete (Windows 98 SE, Windows 2000) or Remove (Windows Me).
7. Turn off the camcorder.
8. Navigate to the [X]:\Windows\Inf folder, where [X] is the system drive, and then delete the following files:
- Dvcam.inf
- Dvcam.sys
- Dvcam.pnf
10. Turn on the camcorder.
11. If any Version Conflict dialog boxes appear, click Yes.

Additional Information
Premiere 6.0 is incompatible with the Texas Instruments DV Class driver, which was developed for versions of Windows prior to Windows 2000, Windows 98 SE, and Windows Me.




 Topic 73 of 109 [web]: Digital Video projects
 Response 5 of 15: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Sep  6, 2001 (16:06) * 19 lines 
 
Premiere 6.0 and Compatibility with Capture Cards and IEEE Interfaces

To capture video with Adobe Premiere 6.0, you need an Adobe-certified capture card or a compatible IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) 1394 interface.

Certified Capture Cards
You can use a certified capture card to support analog or digital video in Premiere. Capture cards that are certified for Premiere 6.0 are listed on Adobe's Web site at http://www.adobe.com/products/premiere/6cards.html.


Note: Capture cards that are certified for Premiere 5.x may not be ceritified for Premiere 6.0.


Compatible IEEE 1394 Interfaces
You can use a compatible IEEE 1394 interface (also called FireWire in Mac OS) to support digital video in Premiere. The interface can be built-in to the computer or purchased separately as an add-on card, and it must meet one of the following conditions:
-- Microsoft OHCI (Open Host Controller Interface)-certified (Windows)
-- Microsoft DirectX-compatible (Windows)
-- Apple QuickTime-compatible (Mac OS).


To view Microsoft compatibility testing results, go to the Microsoft Web site at http://www.microsoft.com/hcl/results.asp, and choose 1394 Controller from the "In the following types" pop-up menu.


 Topic 73 of 109 [web]: Digital Video projects
 Response 6 of 15: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Sep  6, 2001 (16:06) * 27 lines 
 
Adobe Premiere 6.0 Certified Third-Party Capture Cards
Capture Board Vendor Platform Driver Version
Igniter Aurora Mac OS 9.04 / 9.1 v3.1
EZ-DV Canopus Windows 98SE v1.11
DV Raptor Canopus Windows 98SE / 2000 v2.11
DV Raptor RT Canopus Windows 2000 v1.00
DV Storm Canopus Windows 2000 v1.01
DV Rex RT Canopus Windows 2000 v2.93A
DV Rex Pro Canopus Windows 2000 v2.93
Reality DPS Windows 2000 v1.5.0.141 or higher
* With Adobe Premiere 6.0 plugins (by DPS), v2.0 build 23
DV.Now FAST - Dazzle Windows 2000 v1.6
DV.Now AV FAST - Dazzle Windows 2000 v1.6
Digisuite LE Matrox Windows 2000 DigiUtils 5.0
Digisuite LX Matrox Windows 2000 DigiUtils 5.0
Digisuite Full Matrox Windows 2000 DigiUtils 5.0
Digisuite MAX Matrox Windows 2000 v6.0
* For the Matrox Digisuite LE, LX and DTV configurations.
Digisuite DTV Matrox Windows 2000 DigiUtils 5.0
RT2000 Matrox Windows ME / 2000 v3.0
RT2500 Matrox Windows ME / 2000 v3.0
DV500 Pinnacle Systems Windows 98SE / ME / NT / 2000 v2.0
DC1000 Pinnacle Systems Windows 98SE / NT v3.0
DC2000 Pinnacle Systems Windows 98SE / 2000 v3.0
Targa 3000 Pinnacle Systems Windows 2000 v1.5
Pro-ONE Pinnacle Systems Windows ME v1.0



 Topic 73 of 109 [web]: Digital Video projects
 Response 7 of 15: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Sep  6, 2001 (16:07) * 181 lines 
 
Adobe Premiere 6.0 Brochure

The essential tool for professional digital video editing

DV in, Web out. That vision is now a reality for Macintosh and Windows users alike. With Adobe Premiere 6.0 software, you can effortlessly capture digital video (DV), employ best-of-breed tools to craft your video productions, and then output to the leading Web streaming-video formats or to any type of medium. Whether you are a video professional or an aspiring producer, you'll enjoy the versatility, ease of use, and power of Adobe Premiere software.


Robust DV Support
Adobe Premiere 6.0 software provides built-in support for all types of DV devices, ranging from consumer to professional. Simply plug your DV camera into the IEEE-1394 (also known as FireWire and i.LINK) port on your Windows or Macintosh computer, select the camera model and manufacturer, and let the fun begin. With native DV support, getting started has never been easier.


One-step Web Output
Looking to output your video to the Web? Adobe Premiere 6.0 software provides a comprehensive set of video-to-Web tools that enable you to quickly produce streaming video in all the leading formats. Use the Save for Web feature for multiple Web output options, or use the customized Windows Media or RealMedia export options for more precise control over the streaming formats. Whatever your Web video needs, Adobe Premiere 6.0 software enables you to deliver content in the formats and at the speeds you and your viewers prefer.


Enhanced Professional Tools
New tools in Adobe Premiere 6.0 software, such as the professional-level Audio Mixer and the innovative Automate to Timeline feature, encourage creativity and experimentation. New storyboarding capabilities let you visualize the layout of your entire program before you begin editing. And you can take advantage of interface refinements, new palettes, and more visual feedback, which will help you produce projects faster and more efficiently.


Seamless Integration
Adobe Premiere 6.0 software shares a similar interface and tools with Adobe After Effects, Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe Illustrator applications. Adobe Premiere users will find it easy to work with these industry-standard Adobe software applications to achieve outstanding, professional results. The new Edit Original command lets you conveniently edit placed images and other content--such as Photoshop images--in their native software applications. And content created in Adobe Premiere and imported into Adobe GoLive software maintains its metadata, allowing you to further refine the content for the Web. Whatever your video production tasks, count on Adobe Premiere software to help you work productively as you explore your most creative ideas.

Robust DV Support
- Take advantage of cross-platform support for the latest DV-enabled hardware systems.
- Experience native support for the Open Host Controller Interface (OHCI), a specification that provides Windows with a standardized way of interacting with the DV/1394 bus.
- Ensure the integrity of your DV work with support for widescreen frame aspect ratio and the Anamorphic pixel aspect ratio.
- Choose settings for the compressor, frame size, pixel aspect ratio, frame rate, depth, audio, and field order using DV presets in the Load Project Settings dialog box.
- Experience more flexible and efficient DV capture with an enhanced Movie Capture window. Built-in device control provides maximum reliability, making the video capture process more precise.
- View and edit your video capture settings and change your capture location and device control preferences using the Movie Capture Settings panel.
- Quickly log video clips, set In and Out points, name clips and reels, effortlessly batch capture multiple logged video clips, and add comments about each clip using the Movie Capture Logging panel.


One-Step Web Output
- Choose from Premiere 6.0 software's multiple Web output options, including QuickTime Streaming, QuickTime Progressive Download, RealG2 Web Download, RealG2 Streaming, Windows Media (audio and video), AVI CD-ROM, MPEG-1, and MP3.
- Generate high-quality, high-bandwidth video for playback on Windows Media Player and other applications with advanced Windows Media Export (Windows only).
- Output video directly to the RealMedia streaming format with Advanced RealMedia Export from RealNetworks.
- Set Timeline markers that include links to HTML pages. Using these markers, you can develop streaming videos that automatically launch Web pages at precise points during playback.


Professional Tools


Monitor window
- Work efficiently with a traditional Source/Program editing metaphor.
- Open, play, and edit source clips in the Source view. Play back an edited program in the Program view.
- Split the video and audio In and Out points in the Source view to achieve more creative and dramatic effects.
- Use the Insert and Overlay buttons to precisely position source clips on the Timeline.
- Remove footage from the Timeline using the Lift or Extract button. The Lift button leaves a hole, while the Extract button causes any subsequent clips to ripple back.
- View customizable Title Safe and Action Safe margins for both the Source and Program views.
- Switch to Trim Mode to precisely edit two clips in relation to each other.


Timeline window
- Add up to 99 video and 99 audio tracks to the Timeline. New video tracks appear above existing ones, indicating how the final movie will be composited.
- Edit video directly in the Timeline using the Ripple, Rolling, and Rate Stretch editing tools.
- Use the Slip and Slide editing tools to preserve a clip's duration and the duration of the overall movie while changing the clip's In and Out points.
- Add transitions and effects by dragging and dropping them from palettes onto the Timeline.
- Assign descriptive names to tracks to make it easier to identify their roles. For example, name a track "Titles" or "Jazz Music."
- Add, delete, and move keyframes directly in the Timeline or from menus with the Effect Keyframe track. Using the Keyframe track in conjunction with the Effects Control palette delivers unlimited creative capabilities.


Project window
- Create multiple bins for related clips and nest them. See a hierarchical representation of the files in a project with the Bin view.
- Choose how the Project window displays clips: as thumbnails with text descriptions in Thumbnail view, as icons in Icon view, or as a file list in List view.
- Preview a video clip from within the Project window. The Preview area includes basic information about the clip.
- Change the poster frame, which visually identifies the clip in the Project and Timeline windows.


Storyboard window
- Use the Storyboard window to experiment with a production's layout, dragging and dropping clips to assemble a rough cut within minutes.
- Double-click a file in the Storyboard to change its In or Out points or to add markers.


Automate to Timeline
- Send a sequence of clips from the Storyboard or Project window to the Timeline using the innovative Automate to Timeline feature.
- Quick rough cuts: Take your storyboard--a collection of still images or video clips--straight to the Timeline, with a default transition and overlap included, using the Automate to Timeline command.
- Automatic music videos: Create a series of unnumbered markers on the Timeline set to the beat of your audio track. Choose Automate to Timeline, and your clips will be choreographed to the music, cutting in and out at the beats you marked.


Audio Mixer
- Blend multiple audio tracks and adjust gain and pan with instant feedback through dynamic VU meters on the sophisticated new Audio Mixer.
- Precisely control audio gain with the Volume fader control.
- Click the Mute and Solo buttons to turn off tracks temporarily.
- Pan a monophonic clip from left to right or balance a stereo clip with the Pan/Balance control.
- Read and write automation: Click the Automation Read icon to read an audio track's stored gain (volume) and Pan/Balance data. Click the Automation Write icon to write changes to the stored gain and Pan/Balance data.
- Group audio tracks to simultaneously apply changes to multiple tracks.


Titling controls
- Add text rolls and text crawls (titles that move on-screen vertically or horizontally, such as movie credits) with precise control.
- Set ease-in and ease-out points for the roll, crawl, or graphical title, or specify its duration in seconds or frames.
- Apply font, size, color, and other attribute changes to individual text characters, words, or rows of text within a text block (runs of style).
- Apply transparency and gradients to type, graphics, and shadows.


Adobe standard palettes
- Easily experiment with creative ideas in any Adobe Premiere window. With up to 99 undos, the History palette (also found in Photoshop) ensures you'll be able to return to the point where your experimentation began.
- Use the Effects Control palette, similar to the one in After Effects software, for convenient control over all aspects of a clip's effects parameters, and get real-time feedback in the Monitor window.
- Search for filters by name in the Video and Audio filters palettes, or streamline your workflow by creating a folder of your favorite and most often used effects.
- Organize transitions in folders and rename, reorganize, hide, or delete folders with the Transitions palette.


High-quality professional effects
- Apply built-in Adobe Photoshop plug-in filters for color balance, brightness, contrast control, blurring, distortions, morphing, and more.
- Explore creative possibilities with more than 25 built-in filters from After Effects software, including Channel Mixer, Directional Blur, Color Balance, Basic 3D, Drop Shadow, Broadcast Colors, Transform, and Reduce Interface Flicker.
- Apply multiple keyframes to video filters to modulate their effect over time.
- Work with motion control to make still or moving images fly along a path. Specify the twist, zoom, rotation, and distortion effects applied.
- Superimpose clips using professional keying tools for specifying chroma, luminance, and alpha channels, and for creating traveling mattes.


Customizable work space
- Configure the work space to best suit your needs during each step of your project.
- Take advantage of four preset work spaces - A/B Editing, Single- Track Editing, Effects, and Audio - placing the appropriate palettes and features within easy reach.
- Customize the four preset work spaces at any time or create your own and save them for later use.


Settings Viewer
- Potentially save hours of troubleshooting time by displaying all settings in the unique Settings Viewer.
- View all settings--including Capture, Clip, Project, and Export--in a single window, which allows you to compare settings and fix problems immediately.
- Easily identify Capture, Project, and Export settings that don't match--Adobe Premiere software displays them in red.


Seamless Integration
- Work with the award-winning Adobe standard interface, which makes it easy for you to move efficiently among Adobe programs.
- Conveniently edit placed images and other content--such as Photoshop images--in their native applications with the Edit Original command.
- Import Adobe Premiere content into GoLive software -- its metadata will remain intact, enabling a GoLive user to view and modify the links to HTML pages.
- Import individual Photoshop layers and rasterize Illustrator EPS files automatically upon import.
- Use Adobe Premiere, Photoshop, Illustrator, and After Effects software together for a complete suite of video production tools.


System Requirements


Macintosh
- PowerPC processor
- Mac OS software version 9.0.4
- QuickTime software version 4.1.2
- 32 MB of available RAM (128 MB recommended)
- 50 MB of available hard-disk space required for installation
- Large-capacity hard disk or disk array


Additional Requirements for DV
- PowerPC processor (300 MHz or faster)
- Apple FireWire 2.4
- QuickTime compatible FireWire (IEEE-1394) interface
- Large-capacity hard disk or disk array (capable of sustaining 5 MB/sec)


Additional Requirements for Third-Party Capture Cards
- Adobe Premiere certified capture card


Windows
- Pentium class processor (300 MHz or faster)
- Microsoft Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, Windows 2000, Windows Millennium, or Windows NT 4.0 with Service Pack 6
- 32 MB of RAM (128 MB recommended)
- 85 MB of available hard-disk space required for installation (40 MB for application)
- 256-color video display adapter
- Large-capacity hard disk or disk array


Additional Requirements for DV
- Microsoft DirectX compatible IEEE-1394 interface
- Microsoft DirectX compatible video display adapter
- Large-capacity hard disk or disk array (capable of sustaining 5 MB/sec)
- For built-in DV: Windows 2000, Windows 98 Second Edition, or Windows Millennium


Additional Requirements for Third-Party Capture Cards
- Adobe Premiere certified capture card


For More Information
For a comprehensive overview of Adobe Premiere 6.0 software, please visit www.adobe.com/premiere.



Adobe Systems Incorporated * 345 Park Avenue, San Jose, CA 95110-2704 USA * www.adobe.com
Adobe, the Adobe logo, Adobe Premiere, After Effects, Clearly Adobe Imaging, the Clearly Adobe Imaging logo, GoLive, Illustrator, and Photoshop are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries. Apple, Mac, Macintosh, and QuickTime are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the United States and other countries. QuickTime is a trademark used under license. PowerPC is a registered trademark of IBM Corporation in the United States. Pentium is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation. Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. 2000 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA. BC2607 11/00



 Topic 73 of 109 [web]: Digital Video projects
 Response 8 of 15: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Sep  6, 2001 (16:08) * 207 lines 
 
Optimizing Windows 95 and 98 for Working With Digital Video in Premiere 5.x

What's Covered
Optimizing Premiere
Optimizing Windows 95 or Windows 98


This document provides general instructions for optimizing performance and troubleshooting configuration problems in Adobe Premiere 5.x for Windows 95 and 98. For information on optimizing your system for using Premiere with a specific video capture card, review the documentation provided by the card's manufacturer and search their Web site for additional details. For current summaries of the most common Technical Support issues regarding Premiere, see document 343358, "Top Issues: Adobe Premiere 5.x for Windows."


Optimizing Premiere

Faster processors, more random-access memory (RAM), and faster and larger hard drives improve Premiere's performance. In addition, simplifying your system and hardware minimizes conflicts with other components. To optimize Premiere's performance when capturing, editing, or playing digital video, do all of the tasks outlined in this record.


Install the Latest Version of Premiere 5.x
Make sure that you are using the latest version of Premiere 5.x, and the latest supported version of the software for use with it by doing the following:


A. The latest version of Adobe Premiere for Windows is 5.1. The Premiere 5.1 update resolves various problems with Premiere 5.0, and is available to all registered owners of Premiere 5.0. You can download the update from the Adobe's Web site athttp://www.adobe.com/supportservice/custsupport/LIBRARY/prwin.htm, or you can request the update on CD-ROM by calling Adobe Customer Services at 888-724-4507.


Update Premiere and Drivers
Make sure that you are using the latest update for Premiere 5.x and the latest supported drivers for use with it:


A. The latest update for Premiere 5.x for Windows is 5.1c. The Premiere 5.1c update is available from Adobe's Web site at www.adobe.com/support/downloads/prwin.htm. (For information about upgrading to Premiere 6.0, visit Adobe's Web site at www.adobe.com/store/products/premiere.html.)


B. Use the current drivers for your video digitizing board and video display card, as well as the current drivers for your SCSI card or disk drive(s) or both.

Manufacturers regularly offer updated drivers, which are usually available on their Web sites, bulletin boards, and on-line services. Adobe Technical Support strongly recommends updating drivers as they become available, before installing any new hardware, and if you experience problems with your computer. For contact information, see document 143312, "Digital Video Resources General Information." For current driver version information, see document 343358, "Top Issues: Adobe Premiere 5.x for Windows."


For a list of capture cards supported in Premiere 6.0, visit Adobe's Web site at www.adobe.com/products/premiere/6cards.html.


Install and Test Hardware
It is important to check for hardware compatibility problems that could interfere with editing video. To determine whether compatibility problems exist, do the following:


A. Check for known compatibility issues before installing digital video hardware.


Digital video card manufacturers frequently document testing, compatibility, and configuration details, then post these details on their Web sites, bulletin boards, fax-back systems, and on-line services. Before installing your video digitizing card, Adobe strongly recommends that you review your video card's hardware requirements, recommended configurations, and compatibility guidelines. For contact information, see document 143312. "Digital Video Resources General Information."

B. Install and test new digital video components.


Install each digital video hardware and software component one at time, restart your computer after installing each component, then thoroughly test the components to ensure that they and your computer perform as expected. Adobe Technical Support recommends the following installation order:


1. Install Premiere, restart the computer, then test Premiere by following the Tour in Chapter 1 of the Adobe Premiere 5.0 User Guide.
2. Install your SCSI adapter and disk drive(s) using the instructions provided by the manufacturer, then perform tests suggested by the manufacturer. Restart the computer, then retest them.
3. Install your video digitizing card using the instructions provided by the manufacturer, then test the card by capturing video using either the capture utility included with it or the Captst32 capture utility in the Support folder on the Premiere 5.0 CD. For instructions, see document 343322, "Testing Capture and Playback Problems in Premiere 5.x for Windows Troubleshooting Guide."


NOTE: Never install two PCI plug-and-play cards at the same time. Before adding additional cards, make sure to restart and thoroughly test the card you just installed.


For additional configuration and troubleshooting information, see Related Records.


Optimizing Windows 95 or Windows 98

Digital video editing places unique demands on your computer system. Functions that compete for Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) bandwidth or interrupt the flow of data cause a decreased data rate, dropped frames, poor quality results, and in some cases, errors or crashing in video capture, editing, or playback software.


You can optimize Windows 95 or 98 for video editing by doing the following:


A. If your computer is not a dedicated video-editing station, create a special user profile for editing video.


Creating a special user profile enables you edit video in a system configuration that is optimized for video editing, and then switch to your standard configuration for doing other work.


In Windows 95 and 98, user profiles contain configuration preferences and options for each user. User profile settings include Control Panel settings and preferences for user interface, settings for network connections, information about recently used resources (including documents), and application settings. User profiles also include settings for accessories and applications installed with Windows 95 or 98, and menu and toolbar configurations. For example, if you install an application when user profiles are enabled, and then choose to include a shortcut to the application in the Programs menu, the shortcut will be available only in the Programs menu when you are using the user profile that was active during installation. When using a different user profile, your will have to create a shortcut to the application and manually add it to the Programs menu.


NOTE: Before creating a User Profile, review Chapter 15, User Profiles and System Policies, in the Microsoft Windows 95 Resource Kit, or Chapter 7, User Profiles, in the Microsoft Windows 98 Resource Kit, or consult your Network Administrator.


To create a user profile for editing video:
1. If your computer is connected to a network, shut down the computer, disconnect the network cable from the back of the CPU, then restart the computer.
2. Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel, then open the Passwords Control Panel.
3. In the Passwords Properties dialog box, click the User Profiles tab.
4. Select "Users can customize their preferences."
5. For the User Profile Settings, select "Include Desktop Icons" and "Include Start Menu and Program groups," then click OK.
6. Click Yes when prompted to restart your computer.
7. In the Welcome to Windows dialog box, type "video" for both User name and Password, then click OK.


NOTE: If you previously created a user profile and the name for that use profile appears in the Welcome to Windows dialog box dialog box, do not log in as that user. Type "video" over any existing text in the User name and Password text boxes.


8. When asked to confirm your password, type "video" and then click OK.
9. When the message, "You have not logged on to this computer before," appears, click Yes.


NOTE: Because capturing and playing video is occasionally interrupted by network communication, Adobe recommends that you disconnect from the network when working with digital video. It is necessary to disconnect from the network to initialize a user profile, but once you have logged in for the first time using your user profile for video editing, you can reconnect to the network if necessary. To log in to your user profile for video editing after reconnecting to the network, enter your usual User name and Password in the Enter Network Password dialog box, then type "video" in the User Name and Password text boxes in the Welcome to Windows dialog box.


To disable user profiles, open the Passwords Control Panel, click the User Profiles tab, then select "All users of this PC use the same preferences and desktop settings."

B. Set system properties to optimize digital video processing performance.


The following changes improve data rate performance and eliminate some functions that interfere with digital video processing.


NOTE: Make these changes only when you are using your user profile for video editing. This ensures the changes only affect your system configuration that is optimized for editing video.


To optimize digital video processing performance:
1. Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel, then open the System Control Panel.
2. In the System Properties dialog box, click the Performance tab, then verify that both File System and Virtual Memory report "32-bit."


NOTE: Windows 95 provides protected-mode drivers for most devices, including display, network, disk, etc. that ensure better performance and increased reliability over real-mode (MS-DOS) drivers. The presence of any real-mode components is reported as "MS-DOS compatibility" in System Properties dialog box. When real-mode drivers are loaded, the systems performance of the computer is slowed severely. For working with digital video, it's important to remove or disable all real-mode drivers.


If "MS-DOS compatibility" is reported for either File System or Virtual Memory, you must resolve the issues that prevent protected-mode drivers from loading before you proceed with these optimization settings. For optimizing or solving problems related to virtual memory, the file system, or graphics performance, See Chapter 19, Devices, in the Microsoft Windows 95 Resource Kit, or Chapter 24, Device Management, in the Microsoft Windows 98 Resource Kit.


3. Click File System.
4. In the File System Properties dialog box, click the Hard Disk tab.
5. Choose Desktop Computer from the Typical Role of this Machine pop-up menu. The Desktop Computer setting optimizes disk performance for a stand-alone computer that has more than the minimum required RAM and is running on power (rather than battery). This setting gives priority to foreground tasks of the active application (e.g., Premiere).
6. Move the Read-Ahead Optimization slider to None. Changing the Read-Ahead Optimization setting to None prevents block-size chunks of data, in the range of 1-2K, from being cached. Retrieving and reading this cached information interferes with high data rate playback.
7. Click the Troubleshooting tab, select "Disable write-behind caching for all drives," then click OK.


NOTE: Selecting this option causes the disk cache to flush continually, removing any performance benefits gained from disk caching. You should not select this option if you are performing risky operations and must ensure prevention of data loss.


8. In the System Properties dialog box, click Virtual Memory.
9. In the Virtual Memory dialog box, select "Let Windows manage my virtual memory settings," then click OK.
10. Click OK to close the System Properties dialog box. When prompted to restart your computer, click Yes.


C. If you have 24 MB or more of RAM, set up a 4 MB virtual memory cache.


Windows 95 repeatedly tries to page out the virtual memory swap file to the hard drive. This added CPU processing affects playback performance. A permanent 4 MB swap file in the main memory should eliminate this paging, and therefore improve performance in Premiere. Adobe does not recommend disabling virtual memory because it could result in an unstable environment and potential file corruption.


To setup a 4 MB virtual memory cache:
1. Make a backup copy of the System.ini file in the Windows folder.
2. Open the original System.ini file in a text editor that can save in text-only format (e.g., Notepad).
3. Under the [vcache] section, add the following lines:


MinFileCache=4096
MaxFileCache=4096


4. Save your changes in text-only format, exit from the text editor, then restart Windows.


D. Set VGA display options.


Certain VGA display options, like a screen saver engaging, can interrupt the flow of data on the system, causing a decrease in performance. Other options, such as the Wallpaper, require valuable system resources, decreasing the amount of resources available to Premiere or your capture card's drivers, also causing a decrease in performance.


To set VGA display options:
1. Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel, then open the Display Control Panel.
2. In the Display Properties dialog, click the Background tab, select None from both the Pattern scrollbox and the Wallpaper scroll box.
3. Click the Screen Saver tab, select None from the Screen Saver scroll box and deselect the Energy Saving options.
4. Click the Settings tab, choose High Color (16 bit) from the Color Palette pop-up menu, then click OK.
5. When prompted to restart your computer, click Yes.

E. Disable background applications and terminate-and-stay-resident (TSR) programs.

Settings that either compete for CPU resources or interrupt the flow of data, (e.g. screen savers, CD-ROM auto insert notification, Taskbar clock, etc.) should be disabled by doing the following:


1. Disable the Taskbar Clock by choosing Start > Settings > Taskbar, deselecting Show Clock, then clicking OK.
2. Disable the CD-ROM auto insert notification:
a. Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel, then open the System Control Panel.
b. Click the Device Manager tab, click the "+" (plus) next to CDROM to display your CD-ROM device, then double-click your CD-ROM device.
c. Click the Settings tab, deselect Auto Insert Notification (if available), then click OK.
3. Disable TSR programs.

To determine if TSR programs are running, exit from all applications, then display the Close Program dialog box by pressing Ctrl+Alt+Delete. The Close Program dialog box will list all currently-running applications. If programs other than Windows Explorer are is listed, make sure they are not starting automatically during Windows startup. When starting. Windows automatically starts programs in the Startup folder or whose paths are listed in the "load=" and "run=" lines of the Win.ini file.


To prevent TSR programs in the Startup folder from loading automatically during Windows startup:
1. Choose Start > Settings > Taskbar.
2. In the Taskbar Properties dialog box, click the Start Menu Programs tab, then click remove.
3. In the Remove Shortcuts/Folders dialog box, click the "+" (plus) sign next to StartUp to display TSR programs.
4. Select a TSR program in the Startup folder, then click Remove. Repeat this step for each TSR program listed.
5. Click Close to close the Remove Shortcuts/Folders dialog box, then click OK to close the Taskbar Properties dialog box.


To prevent TSR programs listed in the "load=" and "run=" lines of the Win.ini file from starting automatically during Windows startup:
1. Make a backup copy of the Win.ini file in the Windows folder.
2. Open the original Win.ini file in a text editor that can save in text-only format (e.g., Notepad).
3. Locate the "load=" and "run=" lines In the [Windows] section. If either the "load=" and "run=" lines list any applications, insert a semicolon at the beginning of the line as follows:

;load=
;run=


4. Save the Win.ini file in text-only format, then restart Windows.




 Topic 73 of 109 [web]: Digital Video projects
 Response 9 of 15: Karen Rosenberg  (KarenR) * Thu, Sep  6, 2001 (16:51) * 3 lines 
 
What do you know about Dazzle? Can't get it loaded on my computer. :-(

Also, I have a Windows Media file uploaded, but it can't be played from my site. I imagine that the proper software isn't installed on our server to enable it. Right?


 Topic 73 of 109 [web]: Digital Video projects
 Response 10 of 15: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Sep  6, 2001 (22:27) * 1 lines 
 
I don't think it requires a special server, but I could be wrong. I know very little about Dazzle because I haven't used it. Which Dazzle did you get? They have several versions. What is the software you can't load?


 Topic 73 of 109 [web]: Digital Video projects
 Response 11 of 15: Karen Rosenberg  (KarenR) * Fri, Sep  7, 2001 (08:18) * 5 lines 
 
This is the Windows Media file that won't play unless it is downloaded to your own PC, then it plays fine.

http://www.spring.net/karenr/vid/gqcolin.wmv

I have Dazzle Digital Photo & Video Maker. I couldn't even load the hardware device. My PC won't recognize it in the right hardware category.


 Topic 73 of 109 [web]: Digital Video projects
 Response 12 of 15: Denny Liford  (dliford) * Thu, Jan 17, 2002 (08:50) * 6 lines 
 
I need expert help with an issue concerning video editing with Premiere 5.1
The PC I have been assigned to edit on is a PIII 850 256 RAM with a 20g h.d.
All this seems well and good. However, I think the IEEE-1394 card that was installed is incompatible with Premiere 5.1
The card is a SIIG, and according to sources from their web site, it is compatible with 6.0, but nothing earlier. I need to know the best Firewire card to get that would be compatible with 5.1 and 6.0 in case we decide to upgrade Premiere.
The Premiere interface pulls up fine, but when I hook up the camera (Sony DCR-TVR720 NTSC), it cannot find a source in the configuration settings.
Can anyone help me out?


 Topic 73 of 109 [web]: Digital Video projects
 Response 13 of 15: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Thu, Jan 17, 2002 (22:06) * 11 lines 
 
I'd recommend Adaptec's new card, it has both firewire and usb version 2, the faster usb. Poke around on Adaptec's site and you'll find it.

Look for the DuoConnect Combo Firewire and USB 2.0 Card. It drops in to a pci slot and supports both specs. Three FireWire ports (one internal) and 4 usb ports. It is backward compatible with usb 1.1 so it will support your older usb devices. This "Kick Ass" product survived heavy traffice from simultaneously conneect burners and drives wiht all ports full in tests done by Maximum PC.

Comes with dv editing software which you probably won't need if you have Premiere.

My latest digital video project is on the Spring's main page.

http://www.spring.net/boomquest

Hope this helps Denny!


 Topic 73 of 109 [web]: Digital Video projects
 Response 14 of 15: Marcia  (MarciaH) * Thu, Jan 17, 2002 (22:38) * 1 lines 
 
Looks like your home, Terry. I'll look for the family portrait when this all loads. It takes a bit of time. Patience is the price we pay for being bandwidth impaired, I guess.


 Topic 73 of 109 [web]: Digital Video projects
 Response 15 of 15: Paul Terry Walhus (terry) * Fri, Jan 18, 2002 (06:08) * 1 lines 
 
It does take a a while to load if you're on 56k.

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